MKSAP: 58-year-old man with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 58-year-old man is evaluated in follow-up for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), which was diagnosed 2 years ago. He has cough and shortness of breath and now requires supplemental oxygen at rest. Previous evaluations have not identified any cause for his symptoms other than progressive IPF. He has participated in pulmonary rehabilitation and continues in a maintenance program. He is a lifelong nonsmoker. His medical history is otherwise unremarkable, and he takes no medications. On physical examinat...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Pulmonology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 11th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 10, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 4th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 3, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Can Present Stem Cell Therapies Improve Vaccine Response in the Elderly?
Mesenchymal stem cell therapies fairly reliably reduce chronic inflammation for some period of time following the transplantation of cells. The cells don't survive long in the patient, and this effect is mediated by the signals they produce while present. Chronic inflammation causes many issues, including a disruption of tissue maintenance and regeneration. It contributes directly to the progression of numerous age-related conditions, including the components of frailty syndrome, but it is an open question as to the degree to which it is required to maintain the current state of those conditions. If inflammation is suppres...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 28, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 28th 2018
This study indicates that frailty and other age-related diseases could be prevented and significantly reduced in older adults. Getting our heart risk factors under control could lead to much healthier old ages. Unfortunately, the current obesity epidemic is moving the older population in the wrong direction, however our study underlines how even small reductions in risk are worthwhile." The study analysed data from more than 421,000 people aged 60-69 in both GP medical records and in the UK Biobank research study. Participants were followed up over ten years. The researchers analysed six factors that could impa...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 27, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Choosing life with a VAD (ventricular assist device)
Rain splattered, blurring my view of the Massachusetts state highway. The rental car’s wipers squeaked as they dragged across the windshield. Though I was briefly tempted to turn back, I kept driving. The man with the battery-operated heart had invited me to his home, and I didn’t want to be late. I am a critical care doctor. Throughout the course of my training, I have learned how to manage a ventilator, how to treat sepsis, how to sort out the causes of renal failure. But what I didn’t learn is what comes after for those who do not die, whose lives are extended by days, months, or even years as a result...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Daniela J. Lamas, MD Tags: End of life Health Heart Health Managing your health care Source Type: blogs

The Roller Coaster Ride of Grief
I was talking with someone recently about grief when she said that it felt like being on a roller coaster ride. This person is facing the impending death of a loved one even as there is no definitive timeline per the treatment team. We spoke of the dynamic of anticipatory grief and the ways in which it impacts the process of letting go of this person as she plans her future in the face of his eventual absence. I have found both in my therapeutic practice and in my personal life, that anticipatory grief genuinely effects mourners, although a 2006 article published in the Counseling, Psychology, and Health Journal quest...
Source: World of Psychology - May 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Aging Family Grief and Loss Health-related Interview Peer Support Personal anticipatory grief Cancer grieving Mourning widow widower Source Type: blogs

Real World Evidence (RWE) vs Randomized Control Trials (RCT): The Battle For the Future of Medicine
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD Randomized control trials – RCTs – rose to prominence in the twentieth century as physicians and regulators sought to evaluate rigorously the performance of new medical therapies; by century’s end, RCTs had become, as medical historian Laura Bothwell has noted, “the gold standard of medical knowledge,” occupying the top position of the “methodologic heirarch[y].” The value of RCTs lies in the random, generally blinded, allocation of patients to treatment or control group, an approach that when properly executed minimizes confounders (based on the presumption t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The Case For Real World Evidence (RWE)
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD Randomized control trials – RCTs – rose to prominence in the twentieth century as physicians and regulators sought to evaluate rigorously the performance of new medical therapies; by century’s end, RCTs had become, as medical historian Laura Bothwell has noted, “the gold standard of medical knowledge,” occupying the top position of the “methodologic heirarch[y].” The value of RCTs lies in the random, generally blinded, allocation of patients to treatment or control group, an approach that when properly executed minimizes confounders (based on the presumption t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 14th 2018
This study found that professional chess players had shorter lifespans than those players who had careers outside of chess and argued that this might be due to the mental strain of international chess competition. In the present study, we focused on survival of International Chess Grandmasters (GMs) which represent players, of whom most are professional, at the highest level. In 2010, the overall life expectancy of GMs at the age of 30 years was 53.6 years, which is significantly greater than the overall weighted mean life expectancy of 45.9 years for the general population. In all three regions examined, mean life...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 13, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 35-year-old woman is evaluated for intermittent fever
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 35-year-old woman is evaluated for intermittent fever, sweats, fatigue, and dull midchest pain of 2 weeks’ duration. Medical history is significant for liver transplantation 6 months ago for primary biliary cirrhosis; she was seronegative for cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus, and her donor was positive for both. Results of pretransplant testing for tuberculosis were negative. She received valganciclovir prophylaxis for 3 months after transplantation. Medications are tacrolimus, prednisone, ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Allergies & Immunology Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Exclusive: BeCare Link ’s Innovative App for Multiple Sclerosis Patients
BeCare Link  has created a mobile application (“BeCare MS Link” in the Google Play app store) that connects patients to physicians and researchers to provide unprecedented levels of insight into multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurodegenerative diseases. As paraphrased from a MS patient: “Much of MS is what is happening in your head, and you need the objective evidence that maybe things are not going as badly as you think.” A typical physician’s visit can only provide a snapshot in time of a patient’s overall well-being and functional status, with a patient’s self-recorded l...
Source: Medgadget - May 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Alice Ferng Tags: Exclusive Medicine Neurology Rehab Source Type: blogs

Everything ECMO!
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog In specialist centres, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a now a mainstay of the management of cardio/respiratory failure refractory to other measures. However, much of the clinical information required to care for ECMO patients at the bedside remains inaccessible to learners. To address this, the creation of a free-to-access educational ECMO blog post is now a requirement for completion of the Alfred ICU ECMO Accreditation Certificate. These &ld...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 29, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Education Everything ECMO extracorporeal life support Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation INTENSIVE Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 23rd 2018
In conclusion, a debate exists on whether aging is a disease in itself. Some authors suggest that physiological aging (or senescence) is not really distinguishable from pathology, while others argue that aging is different from age-related diseases and other pathologies. It is interesting to stress that the answer to this question has important theoretical and practical consequences, taking into account that various strategies capable of setting back the aging clock are emerging. The most relevant consequence is that, if we agree that aging is equal to disease, all human beings have to be considered as patients to be treat...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 22, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 16th 2018
This study demonstrates that small peptide domains derived from native protein amelogenin can be utilized to construct a mineral layer on damaged human enamel in vitro. Six groups were prepared to carry out remineralization on artificially created lesions on enamel: (1) no treatment, (2) Ca2+ and PO43- only, (3) 1100 ppm fluoride (F), (4) 20 000 ppm F, (5) 1100 ppm F and peptide, and (6) peptide alone. While the 1100 ppm F sample (indicative of common F content of toothpaste for homecare) did not deliver F to the thinly deposited mineral layer, high F test sample (indicative of clinical varnish treatment) formed mainly C...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 15, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

TransMedics ’ Lung Preservation System Approved in U.S. for Double Transplants
TransMedica, based in Andover, Massachusetts, won FDA approval to introduce its Organ Care System (OCS) LUNG for use in standard double lung transplant procedures. The approval was based on the INSPIRE Trial, which the company touts as being the largest lung preservation for transplantation trial ever. Twenty one institutions around the world were involved comparing the OCS LUNG to existing cold storage systems, and the results showed that the new system is both safe and effective for preserving donor lungs within defined criteria. OCS LUNG is a portable system that perfuses, ventilates, and monitors the lungs as they...
Source: Medgadget - April 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Thoracic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Journalistic Views of Aging and Longevity Have Yet to Reach Maturity
While journalistic treatment of serious rejuvenation research has improved greatly over the past decade, the mainstream media remains decidedly childish at times. Much of the profession of journalism works hard at producing the appearance of educated folk paid to play the fool, writing for an imagined audience of inattentive, ignorant peers, while ensuring that their education slips through the mask just enough to be seen. It degrades the author and insults the world at large. Everyone in this picture is better than they are portrayed, capable of introspection and self-determination. I noted the article here because it vee...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 12, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Three Recent Papers on the Use of Senolytic Therapies to Address Age-Related Disease
We present concepts of the immune response to tissue trauma as well as the interactions with SnCs and the local tissue environment. Finally, we discuss therapeutic implications of targeting SnCs in treating osteoarthritis. (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - April 11, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Making Electronic Health Records Great Again
By ROBERT WACHTER and JEFF GOLDSMITH After a blizzard of hype surrounding the electronic health record (EHR), health professionals are now in full backlash mode against this complex new tool. They are rightly seen as a major cause of professional burnout among physicians and nurses: Clinicians are spending almost half their professional time typing, clicking, and checking boxes on electronic records. They can and must be made into useful, easy-to-use tools that liberate, rather than oppress, clinicians. Performing several tasks, badly. The EHR is a lot more than merely an electronic version of the patient&rs...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Fix the EHR!
By ROBERT WACHTER and JEFF GOLDSMITH After a blizzard of hype surrounding the electronic health record (EHR), health professionals are now in full backlash mode against this complex new tool. They are rightly seen as a major cause of professional burnout among physicians and nurses: Clinicians are spending almost half their professional time typing, clicking, and checking boxes on electronic records. They can and must be made into useful, easy-to-use tools that liberate, rather than oppress, clinicians. Performing several tasks, badly. The EHR is a lot more than merely an electronic version of the patient&rs...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Arterys Receives FDA Clearance for Lesion and Tumor Detection Program
Arterys, the San Francisco-based medical imaging company, has just been granted Food and Drug Administration 510(k) clearance for their new Oncology AI suite that detects and tracks lesions and tumors in the liver and lungs using artificial intelligence (AI). The clearance marks the latest accomplishment forArterys. At this year ’s annual Radiological Society of North America conference, they introducedMICA, a system that uses scalable GPU architecture to improve workloads. The AI Suite analyzes specific nodules and lesions as a radiologist would by automating segmentation with impeccable accuracy. Clinicians are abl...
Source: radRounds - April 7, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 26th 2018
In conclusion, senescence of vascular cells promotes the development of age-related disorders, including heart failure, diabetes, and atherosclerotic diseases, while suppression of vascular cell senescence ameliorates phenotypic features of aging in various models. Recent findings have indicated that specific depletion of senescent cells reverses age-related changes. Although the biological networks contributing to maintenance of homeostasis are extremely complex, it seems reasonable to explore senolytic agents that can act on specific cellular components or tissues. Several clinical trials of senolytic agents are currentl...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 25, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Cellular Senescence in the Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases of Aging
In conclusion, senescence of vascular cells promotes the development of age-related disorders, including heart failure, diabetes, and atherosclerotic diseases, while suppression of vascular cell senescence ameliorates phenotypic features of aging in various models. Recent findings have indicated that specific depletion of senescent cells reverses age-related changes. Although the biological networks contributing to maintenance of homeostasis are extremely complex, it seems reasonable to explore senolytic agents that can act on specific cellular components or tissues. Several clinical trials of senolytic agents are currentl...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 23, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 19th 2018
In this study, we did not observe significant age-dependent upregulation of the prominent SASP cytokine Il6 in any tissue, although an upward trend was observed that was consistent in magnitude with previous observations in the heart and kidney. This modest age-related upward trend could be explained by a previous report which demonstrated that senescent cell-secreted IL-6 acts in an autocrine manner, reinforcing the senescent state, rather than inducing senescence or promoting dysfunction in neighboring cells. The decreased expression of Il6 with age we observed in the hypothalamus could be indicative of a lack or ...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 18, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Oregon Health & Science University ’s Artificial Heart Ready for Animal Trials
Researchers at the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) are developing an artificial heart that may one day serve as a long-term replacement for failing natural hearts. This would be a major development, as the only FDA approved artificial heart, the SynCardia temporary Total Artificial Heart , is only meant as a “bridge” to a transplant. OHSU’s device is intended to be applicable to patients as young as 10 years old and should also fit most adults. Unlike many previously designed artificial hearts, the new device has few parts that are subject to failure. A rod made of a titanium ...
Source: Medgadget - March 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Source Type: blogs

When you learn about a person ’s story, you can’t ignore it
I had the honor and privilege of rotating for three weeks on the transplant service where I experienced a lot of great medicine, surgery and the ethics that intertwines them.  One late night on service I had the opportunity to travel to a different hospital and help the team harvest a liver and kidneys from a donor.  Never had I seen anything more amazing than what I witnessed that night in my 24 years of life.  When I first met the patient, she was already draped and prepped for surgery, supported by ventilators, and declared brain dead.  I never saw her face.  I said a small, quiet prayer over he...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 4, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/julia-cartledge" rel="tag" > Julia Cartledge < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Surgery Source Type: blogs

Digital Health Best Practices For Policy Makers: A Free Report
Where should the line be drawn when deciding whether or not to adopt disruptive technologies? As digital health brings up plenty of ethical questions, legal issues, and safety concerns, The Medical Futurist Institute decided to collect the best examples of how governments worldwide tried to adopt digital health. We hope it inspires other policy-makers to take the first steps in shaping their healthcare regulations. Our common goal is to arrive at a better future of healthcare Disruptive technologies spread around like wildfire, but healthcare systems are crumbling under the pressure of problems and changes. So, The Medical...
Source: The Medical Futurist - March 1, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Digital Health Research Healthcare Policy digital health strategy digital innovation future health policy Medicine technology Source Type: blogs

Arterys FDA Clearance for Liver AI and Lung AI Lesion Spotting Software
Arterys, a San Francisco, California firm, won FDA clearance for its Arterys Oncology AI suite. The cleared software aids in finding lesions within CT images of the lungs (Lung AI) and in both CT and MRI when assessing the liver (Liver AI). It uses artificial intelligence methods to segment lesions and nodules, and in evaluations versus certified radiologists it performed as well as them. The online software, accessible using a browser, allows a radiologist to measure and track the progress of tumors and suspected tumors. Because it doesn’t require any on-site infrastructure, it is inherently easy to setup and begin ...
Source: Medgadget - February 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Radiology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 19th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 18, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Stem-cell transplant: A possible high-risk/high-reward treatment for scleroderma
In this study, 36 people with severe scleroderma received stem-cell transplantation and were compared with 39 otherwise similar people who received a year of standard immune-suppressing medication. After 4.5 years, those assigned to receive stem-cell transplantation had improved overall survival compared with standard treatment (79% vs. 50%) less need for immune-suppressing medication (9% vs. 44%) fewer deaths related to worsening scleroderma (11% vs. 28%) more deaths related to treatment — (3% vs. 0%). These findings suggest that stem-cell transplantation may be much better than standard treatment for people with ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Autoimmune diseases Health Skin and Hair Care Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 12th 2018
In conclusion, most experimental data on immune changes with aging show a decline in many immune parameters when compared to young healthy subjects. The bulk of these changes is termed immunosenescence. Immunosenescence has been considered for some time as detrimental because it often leads to subclinical accumulation of pro-inflammatory factors and inflammaging. Together, immunosenescence and inflammaging are suggested to stand at the origin of most of the diseases of the elderly, such as infections, cancer, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory diseases. However, an increasing number of gerontologists have chall...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 11, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Few Recent Advances in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine
The tissue engineering and regenerative medicine communities are too large and energetic to do more than sample their output, or note the most interesting advances that stand out from the pack. The publicity materials I'll point out here are a recent selection of items that caught my eye as they went past. Dozens more, each of which would have merited worldwide attention ten or fifteen years ago, drift by with little comment every year. The state of the art is progressing rapidly towards both the ability to build complex tissues from a cell sample, such as patient-matched organs for transplantation, and the ability to cont...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 10, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

The Digital Health Manifesto
Conclusion No manifesto will by itself change a two-thousand-year-old system, any more than Martin Luther’s 95 theses did. Establishments die hard: 100 years ago, in 1918, Max Planck was awarded the Nobel Prize in physics, and in his Scientific Autobiography he talked about the adoption of change by any establishment: A new scientific truth does not win adoption by convincing its opponents and making them see the light, but because its opponents eventually die. A manifesto can, though, kindle new thinking among those who do see the light. Planck continued: … and a new generation comes up that is familiar wi...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 6, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Empowered Patients Healthcare Design Healthcare Policy digital digital health doctor empowerment future Health 2.0 Innovation manifesto patient empowerment Personalized medicine philosophy technology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 5th 2018
In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Gbp1 plays a role in regulating immunometabolism and senescence of macrophages. We found that Gbp1 was mainly expressed in macrophages, but not adipocytes in response to IFNγ/LPS stimulation; Gbp1 expression was significantly decreased in inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT) of high-fat diet (HFD)-fed and aged mice. We also observed that downregulation of Gbp1 in macrophages resulted in M1 polarization and impairment of mitochondrial respiratory function possibly via disrupting mitophagy activity. Moreover, macrophages with downregulated Gbp1 displayed dampened glycolysis ...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 4, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 75-year-old man with very severe COPD
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 75-year-old man is seen for routine follow-up for very severe COPD. He has constant dyspnea and air hunger and spends most of the day in a chair. He has had no change in baseline cough and sputum production. He has had multiple COPD exacerbations that required ICU admission and intubation. He has not benefited from pulmonary rehabilitation in the past. He quit smoking 3 years ago. His medical history is also notable for hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and a myocardial infarction 3 years ago. Hi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Palliative Care Pulmonology Source Type: blogs

Precision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease (Book Index)
In January, 2018, Academic Press published my bookPrecision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease. This book has an excellent " look inside " at itsGoogle book site, which includes the Table of Contents. In addition, I thought it might be helpful to see the topics listed in the Book's index. Note that page numbers followed by f indicate figures, t indicate tables, and ge indicate glossary terms.AAbandonware, 270, 310geAb initio, 34, 48ge, 108geABL (abelson leukemia) gene, 28, 58ge, 95 –97Absidia corymbifera, 218Acanthameoba, 213Acanthosis nigricans, 144geAchondroplasia, 74, 143ge, 354geAcne, 54ge, 1...
Source: Specified Life - January 23, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: index jules berman jules j berman precision medicine Source Type: blogs

Deceased Organ Donors Exceed 10,000 for First Time
During 2017, the number of deceased organ donors in the United States topped 10,000 for the first time, according to preliminary data from United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), which serves as the national Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) under federal contract.  For the year, organs were recovered from 10,281 donors, representing a 3.1 percent increase over 2016 and an increase of 27 percent since 2007. A total of 34,768 organ transplants were performed in 2017 using organs from both deceased and living donors, according to preliminary data. This total is a 3.4 percent increase over 2016 and ma...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 21, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Cryogenic 3D Printing to Make Replica Brain and Lung Tissues
Printing biological tissues, a necessary precursor to creating replacement organs, is not easy, but constructing extremely soft and fragile tissues that resemble the brain and lungs is even more difficult. Researchers at Imperial College London and Kings College London are now using extremely cold temperatures in combination with 3D printing to create objects out of a composite hydrogel that are about as stiff as grey matter and lung tissue. The team used solid CO2 (dry ice) to quickly cool a composite hydrogel ink below its freezing point while in an alcohol bath, allowing the structure to solidify and take on whatever s...
Source: Medgadget - January 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Materials Source Type: blogs

Two NIGMS MARC Scholars Receive Prestigious Rhodes Scholarship
Oxford University. Credit: Andrew Shiva, Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA. MARC U-STAR Scholars Jasmine Brown and Naomi Mburu were among 32 Americans to recently receive the prestigious Rhodes Scholarship at Oxford University in England. Rhodes Scholars are chosen for their academic and research achievements, as well as their commitment to others and leadership potential. As current MARC U-STAR Scholars, Brown and Mburu are part of an NIGMS research training program for undergraduate junior and senior honor students. MARC is designed to increase the number of people from groups underrepresented in biomedical sciences by prepari...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - January 12, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Juli Rose Tags: Being a Scientist Training Source Type: blogs

Separating the Art of Medicine From Artificial Intelligence
By HUGH HARVEY, MD Artificial intelligence requires data. Ideally that data should be clean, trustworthy and above all, accurate. Unfortunately, medical data is far from it. In fact medical data is sometimes so far removed from being clean, it’s positively dirty. Consider the simple chest X-ray, the good old-fashioned posterior-anterior radiograph of the thorax. One of the longest standing radiological techniques in the medical diagnostic armoury, performed across the world by the billions. So many in fact, that radiologists struggle to keep up with the sheer volume, and sometimes forget to read the odd 23,000 of the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized AI Data Hugh Harvey Radiology Source Type: blogs

Domino heart transplantation – Cardiology MCQ – Answer
 >>>Available Here with Free Look Inside Option Correct answer: 3. Both 1 and 2 In domino heart transplantation, the donor receives heart lung transplantation. The excised heart is transplanted to another recipient so that the donor for recipient of domino heart transplantation is alive, unlike the conventional donor who is brain dead. In one report of 10 cases of domino heart transplantation, one year survival of donor was 60% while that of recipient was 90% [1]. It worthwhile noting that donors had terminal cardio pneumopathy (mostly primary pulmonary hypertension, one case of Eisenmenger syndrome and ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - January 7, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Domino heart transplantation – Cardiology MCQ
 >>>Available Here with Free Look Inside Option Domino heart transplantation is: Living donor heart transplantation Donor undergoes heart lung transplantation Both 1 and 2 Neither 1 nor 2 Please post your answer as a comment below Correct answer will be published on Jan 7, 2018 @ 07:53   (Source: Cardiophile MD)
Source: Cardiophile MD - January 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

The Price of Progress
By ANISH KOKA, MD No one knows who Bennie Solis is anymore. He had the misfortune of being born in the early 1960s marked for death. He had a rare peculiar condition called biliary atresia – a disease defined by the absence of a conduit for bile to travel from his liver to his intestinal tract. Bile acid produced in the liver normally travels to the intestines much like water from a spring travels via ever larger channels to eventually empty into the ocean. Bile produced in the liver with no where to go dams up in the liver and starts to destroy it. That the liver is a hardy organ was a fact known to the ancient Gree...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: anish_koka Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

A Revolution in Access to Healthcare: DIY Labs and Makerspaces
Makerspaces, DIY labs and communities for fabricating objects are multiplying at an unimaginable speed. As such spaces, equipped with 3D printers, laser cutters and many other digital tools, are perfect for building health sensors or medical alert systems, The Medical Futurist team had to experiment with it. I cannot be more enthusiastic about both the idea and its realization! Technology and know-how for everyone I’m curious about how things go today, but I have to warn you that I’m technologically challenged, said a member of The Medical Futurist team at the start of our Makerspace workshop. That was the sent...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 4, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design community digital health DIY future Innovation laboratory makerspace technology wearables Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 1st 2018
Discussion of advocacy for the cause is a usual feature of our community, as we try things and attempt to make progress in persuading the world that rejuvenation research is plausible, practical, and necessary. There are more people engaged in advocacy now than at any time in the past decade, and so discussions of strategy come up often. New ventures kicked off in 2017 include the Geroscience online magazine, and among the existing ventures the LEAF / Lifespan.io volunteers seem to be hitting their stride. The mainstream media continues to be as much a hindrance as a help, and where it is a help you will usually find Aubre...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 31, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Learn pulmonary hypertension with a Medcomic
Pulmonary hypertension (PH) refers to increased pressure in the pulmonary circulation. It develops when pulmonary vessels become constricted and/or obstructed, which can occur in a wide variety of conditions. The increase in pressure is measured by right catheterization, and is defined as a mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥ 25 mm Hg at rest. PH leads to right ventricular hypertrophy and enlargement as the ventricle pumps against increased resistance. Right-sided heart failure (cor pulmonale) can eventually develop. Signs and symptoms of PH include dyspnea on exertion, fatigue, substernal chest pain, syncope, hepatomega...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 30, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jorge-muniz" rel="tag" > Jorge Muniz, PA-C < /a > Tags: Conditions Pulmonology Source Type: blogs

A Look Back at the Science of Longevity and Advocacy for Rejuvenation in 2017
Discussion of advocacy for the cause is a usual feature of our community, as we try things and attempt to make progress in persuading the world that rejuvenation research is plausible, practical, and necessary. There are more people engaged in advocacy now than at any time in the past decade, and so discussions of strategy come up often. New ventures kicked off in 2017 include the Geroscience online magazine, and among the existing ventures the LEAF / Lifespan.io volunteers seem to be hitting their stride. The mainstream media continues to be as much a hindrance as a help, and where it is a help you will usually find Aubre...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 29, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs

Infections in cystic fibrosis and eligibility for lung transplantation
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - December 28, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: infectious disease pulmonary Source Type: blogs

Medgadget ’s Best Medical Technologies of 2017
We reported a surge in the use of augmented reality in healthcare at the end of 2016, with the trend continuing in 2017. Notably, Microsoft’s HoloLens was successfully used for spinal surgery applications by a surgical navigation company named Scopis. There are several advantages to this system including reduced radiation exposure of patients, improved screw placement accuracy, and decreased surgery times. It has been an exciting year for healthcare with many advances in how diseases are diagnosed, treated, and cured. Medical devices are constantly becoming smaller, smarter, cheaper, more precise and user ...
Source: Medgadget - December 26, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs

The 1000th Thread!
Discussion Blog)
Source: Bioethics Discussion Blog - December 24, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: blogs