Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 26th 2021
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 25, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Worse Oral Microbiome Correlates with Some Metrics Indicating Alzheimer's Risk
There has been some evidence for the oral microbiome, particularly the harmful bacterial species responsible for gingivitis, to contribute to systemic inflammation throughout the body. This in turn raises the risk of suffering from dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. The mechanisms look plausible, but the epidemiological evidence is mixed, suggesting that this is a small contribution to overall risk. Alzheimer's is a condition characterized by a long slow buildup of amyloid, and a later and more damaging aggregation of tau protein. Researchers here find that the presence of harmful microbial species in the oral microb...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 19, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Iris Needle Guidance for Lumbar Punctures: Interview with Dev Mandavia, CEO of Ethos Medical
Ethos Medical, a startup founded by Georgia Tech alumni, has developed the Iris needle guidance system to assist clinicians in successfully performing lumbar punctures. The system allows a clinician to visualize the needle traveling through tissue in real time. Tracking the needle path in this way is intended to improve the success rate and reduce the chance of complications in such procedures. Lumbar punctures are used to diagnose several diseases, including multiple sclerosis and meningitis. However, they aren’t always straight-forward, with certain patients posing a unique challenge to clinicians because of the...
Source: Medgadget - March 18, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Anesthesiology Exclusive Neurology Neurosurgery Radiology Source Type: blogs

Is there a test for Alzheimer ’s disease?
After spending 30 minutes hunting for your car in a parking lot, or getting lost on a familiar route, have you ever considered asking your doctor for a blood test or brain scan to find out if you have Alzheimer’s disease? A number of factors contribute to Alzheimer’s disease. By definition, this form of dementia involves the buildup of a protein in brain called beta-amyloid. Beta-amyloid forms plaques that disrupt communication between brain cells, and ultimately destroys them. For this reason, tests for Alzheimer’s disease focus on beta-amyloid. Blood tests for Alzheimer’s disease are being developed Recently, res...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Andrew E. Budson, MD Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Healthy Aging Memory Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs

Thunderclap headache: The “worst headache of my life”
Not all headache disorders are the same. An excruciating, sudden-onset headache known as thunderclap headache (TCH) is a medical emergency, very different from more common headache disorders such as migraine and tension headache. If you develop TCH, you should call 911 or immediately go to the closest hospital. TCH is associated with a variety of causes, ranging from benign to potentially fatal. Urgent evaluation in an emergency setting is needed to quickly identify and treat any underlying condition. Diagnosing and treating secondary thunderclap headache When you arrive at the hospital, the medical team will want to confi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aneesh Singhal, MD Tags: Headache Health Source Type: blogs

Cracking the Herpes Encephalitis Code | Causes, Symptoms and Treatment
Conclusion Herpes encephalitis may rule your body but don't allow the infection to take over your brain. Herpes encephalitis is suppressible and so its symptoms if managed with great attention. Antiviral drugs such as Zovirax, acyclovir, Valacyclovir are some of the prominently used drugs in suppressing therapy of herpes infection. You are counseled to see your GP as soon as the very onset of any symptoms described above.You've read Cracking the Herpes Encephalitis Code | Causes, Symptoms and Treatment, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you've enjoyed this, please visit our site f...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - June 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: anilkumar Tags: health and fitness Herpes Encephalitis symptoms of herpes encephalitis Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 28th 2019
In this study, we show that calorie restriction is protective against age-related increases in senescence and microglia activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in an animal model of aging. Further, these protective effects mitigated age-related decline in neuroblast and neuronal production, and enhanced olfactory memory performance, a behavioral index of neurogenesis in the SVZ. Our results support the concept that calorie restriction might be an effective anti-aging intervention in the context of healthy brain aging. Greater Modest Activity in Late Life Correlates with Lower Incidence of Dementia ...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 27, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Towards Reliable, Low-Cost Tests for the Earliest Stages of Alzheimer's Disease
The research community has moved quite determinedly these past few years towards practical, low-cost tests for early Alzheimer's disease. Even with the limited means available to patients today, an early warning might be used to delay the aggregation of amyloid-β that takes place in the initial stages of the condition, before the appearance of cognitive impairment. Lifestyle changes such as weight loss and improved fitness, antiviral therapies, and control of chronic inflammation should all make some difference, given what is known of the mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease. Looking ahead, better options may soon be availab...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 25, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Distinguishing between Orbital and Preseptal Cellulitis
​Some medical conditions have signs and symptoms that significantly overlap, making a diagnosis a little more difficult. Epididymitis, testicular torsion, and torsion of the testicular appendage are examples, but orbital and preseptal cellulitis are others that can cause significant diagnostic confusion.Both conditions are more common in children than in adults, and preseptal or periorbital cellulitis is more common in children under 5. The preseptal and orbital spaces are separated by only a thin membranous septum that originates in the orbital periosteum and inserts into the tarsal plates. It is only this thin septum t...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - December 31, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 22nd 2018
In this report, we propose that the molecular mechanisms of beneficial actions of CR should be classified and discussed according to whether they operate under rich or insufficient energy resource conditions. Future studies of the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial actions of CR should also consider the extent to which the signals/factors involved contribute to the anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and other CR actions in each tissue or organ, and thereby lead to anti-aging and prolongevity. RNA Interference of ATP Synthase Subunits Slows Aging in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 21, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Anti-Amyloid CPHPC Therapy Used in a Clinical Trial for Alzheimer's Disease
CPHPC, now called miridesap, is a cautionary tale of what all too often happens to promising approaches in the field of medical development, once they advance to the point of expensive clinical trials and the requirement for partners with deep pockets to fund those trials. Miridesap was one of the earlier methodologies demonstrated to clear out transthyretin amyloid from tissues. This form of amyloid appears to be an important contribution to risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as a factor in osteoarthritis, and the evidence suggests it is the majority cause of death in supercentenarians. Its accumulation in old tissue...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 18, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Eye Test to Detect Alzheimer ’s Disease Before Symptoms Start
At Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis researchers may have spotted signs of Alzheimer’s disease within patient eyes, potentially leading to a non-invasive and rapid test for the disease. “This technique has great potential to become a screening tool that helps decide who should undergo more expensive and invasive testing for Alzheimer’s disease prior to the appearance of clinical symptoms,” said Bliss E. O’Bryhim, MD, PhD, one of the study authors appearing in journal JAMA Ophthalmology. “Our hope is to use this technique to understand who is accumulating abnormal proteins in the brain...
Source: Medgadget - August 27, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Neurology Ophthalmology Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

How to separate good medical students from superb ones
Since the beginning of the fourth year of medical school, I have lived in six different cities and have been fortunate to call a Michigan apple orchard, an island on the Mississippi River, and a little apartment in the Coolidge Corner neighborhood of Boston home. I come to you as an emergency medicine intern fully immersed in the second month of residency excited about what the future holds as a newly minted physician-in-training. Yet, as I continue to integrate myself in a new city and role, I want to take a moment to look back and offer my perspective on a few key qualities that separate good medical students from superb...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/nicholas-p-cozzi" rel="tag" > Nicholas P. Cozzi, MD, MBA < /a > Tags: Education Emergency Medicine Medical school Source Type: blogs

The Doctor Who Thwarted the Charge of the General Medical Council- Part 2
By SAURABH JHA Saurabh Jha This is the second part of Dr. Jha’s conversation with Dr. Jonathan Cusack, who was the former supervisor and mentor of Dr. Bawa-Garba, a pediatrician convicted of manslaughter of fetal sepsis in Jack Adcock. Read the first part of this series here.     Dr. Jonathan Cusack versus the General Medical Council I spoke with Dr. Jonathan Cusack, consultant neonatologist at Leicester Royal Infirmary (LRI), and former supervisor and mentor of Dr. Bawa-Garba, the trainee pediatrician convicted of manslaughter for delayed diagnosis of fatal sepsis in Jack Adcock, a six-year-old boy with Do...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: NHS #BawaGarba @roguerad Source Type: blogs