Is there a test for Alzheimer ’s disease?
After spending 30 minutes hunting for your car in a parking lot, or getting lost on a familiar route, have you ever considered asking your doctor for a blood test or brain scan to find out if you have Alzheimer’s disease? A number of factors contribute to Alzheimer’s disease. By definition, this form of dementia involves the buildup of a protein in brain called beta-amyloid. Beta-amyloid forms plaques that disrupt communication between brain cells, and ultimately destroys them. For this reason, tests for Alzheimer’s disease focus on beta-amyloid. Blood tests for Alzheimer’s disease are being develop...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Andrew E. Budson, MD Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Healthy Aging Memory Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs

Thunderclap headache: The “worst headache of my life”
Not all headache disorders are the same. An excruciating, sudden-onset headache known as thunderclap headache (TCH) is a medical emergency, very different from more common headache disorders such as migraine and tension headache. If you develop TCH, you should call 911 or immediately go to the closest hospital. TCH is associated with a variety of causes, ranging from benign to potentially fatal. Urgent evaluation in an emergency setting is needed to quickly identify and treat any underlying condition. Diagnosing and treating secondary thunderclap headache When you arrive at the hospital, the medical team will want to confi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aneesh Singhal, MD Tags: Headache Health Source Type: blogs

Cracking the Herpes Encephalitis Code | Causes, Symptoms and Treatment
Conclusion Herpes encephalitis may rule your body but don't allow the infection to take over your brain. Herpes encephalitis is suppressible and so its symptoms if managed with great attention. Antiviral drugs such as Zovirax, acyclovir, Valacyclovir are some of the prominently used drugs in suppressing therapy of herpes infection. You are counseled to see your GP as soon as the very onset of any symptoms described above.You've read Cracking the Herpes Encephalitis Code | Causes, Symptoms and Treatment, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you've enjoyed this, please visit our site f...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - June 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: anilkumar Tags: health and fitness Herpes Encephalitis symptoms of herpes encephalitis Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 28th 2019
In this study, we show that calorie restriction is protective against age-related increases in senescence and microglia activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in an animal model of aging. Further, these protective effects mitigated age-related decline in neuroblast and neuronal production, and enhanced olfactory memory performance, a behavioral index of neurogenesis in the SVZ. Our results support the concept that calorie restriction might be an effective anti-aging intervention in the context of healthy brain aging. Greater Modest Activity in Late Life Correlates with Lower Incidence of Dementia ...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 27, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Towards Reliable, Low-Cost Tests for the Earliest Stages of Alzheimer's Disease
The research community has moved quite determinedly these past few years towards practical, low-cost tests for early Alzheimer's disease. Even with the limited means available to patients today, an early warning might be used to delay the aggregation of amyloid-β that takes place in the initial stages of the condition, before the appearance of cognitive impairment. Lifestyle changes such as weight loss and improved fitness, antiviral therapies, and control of chronic inflammation should all make some difference, given what is known of the mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease. Looking ahead, better options may soon be ava...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 25, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Distinguishing between Orbital and Preseptal Cellulitis
​Some medical conditions have signs and symptoms that significantly overlap, making a diagnosis a little more difficult. Epididymitis, testicular torsion, and torsion of the testicular appendage are examples, but orbital and preseptal cellulitis are others that can cause significant diagnostic confusion.Both conditions are more common in children than in adults, and preseptal or periorbital cellulitis is more common in children under 5. The preseptal and orbital spaces are separated by only a thin membranous septum that originates in the orbital periosteum and inserts into the tarsal plates. It is only this thin septum t...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - December 31, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 22nd 2018
In this report, we propose that the molecular mechanisms of beneficial actions of CR should be classified and discussed according to whether they operate under rich or insufficient energy resource conditions. Future studies of the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial actions of CR should also consider the extent to which the signals/factors involved contribute to the anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and other CR actions in each tissue or organ, and thereby lead to anti-aging and prolongevity. RNA Interference of ATP Synthase Subunits Slows Aging in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 21, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Anti-Amyloid CPHPC Therapy Used in a Clinical Trial for Alzheimer's Disease
CPHPC, now called miridesap, is a cautionary tale of what all too often happens to promising approaches in the field of medical development, once they advance to the point of expensive clinical trials and the requirement for partners with deep pockets to fund those trials. Miridesap was one of the earlier methodologies demonstrated to clear out transthyretin amyloid from tissues. This form of amyloid appears to be an important contribution to risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as a factor in osteoarthritis, and the evidence suggests it is the majority cause of death in supercentenarians. Its accumulation in old tissue...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 18, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Eye Test to Detect Alzheimer ’s Disease Before Symptoms Start
At Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis researchers may have spotted signs of Alzheimer’s disease within patient eyes, potentially leading to a non-invasive and rapid test for the disease. “This technique has great potential to become a screening tool that helps decide who should undergo more expensive and invasive testing for Alzheimer’s disease prior to the appearance of clinical symptoms,” said Bliss E. O’Bryhim, MD, PhD, one of the study authors appearing in journal JAMA Ophthalmology. “Our hope is to use this technique to understand who is accumulatin...
Source: Medgadget - August 27, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Neurology Ophthalmology Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

How to separate good medical students from superb ones
Since the beginning of the fourth year of medical school, I have lived in six different cities and have been fortunate to call a Michigan apple orchard, an island on the Mississippi River, and a little apartment in the Coolidge Corner neighborhood of Boston home. I come to you as an emergency medicine intern fully immersed in the second month of residency excited about what the future holds as a newly minted physician-in-training. Yet, as I continue to integrate myself in a new city and role, I want to take a moment to look back and offer my perspective on a few key qualities that separate good medical students from superb...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/nicholas-p-cozzi" rel="tag" > Nicholas P. Cozzi, MD, MBA < /a > Tags: Education Emergency Medicine Medical school Source Type: blogs

Dr. Jonathan Cusack versus the General Medical Council
By SAURABH JHA   I spoke with Dr. Jonathan Cusack, consultant neonatologist at Leicester Royal Infirmary (LRI), and former supervisor and mentor of Dr. Bawa-Garba, the trainee pediatrician convicted of manslaughter for delayed diagnosis of fatal sepsis in Jack Adcock, a six-year-old boy with Down’s syndrome. We had drinks at The George, pub opposite the Royal Courts of Justice. In the first part of the interview we discussed the events on Friday February 18th, 2011, the day of Jack presented to LRI. In the second part of the interview we talk about the events after fatal Friday – how the crown pr...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: NHS #BawaGarba @roguerad Source Type: blogs

The Doctor Who Thwarted the Charge of the General Medical Council- Part 2
By SAURABH JHA Saurabh Jha This is the second part of Dr. Jha’s conversation with Dr. Jonathan Cusack, who was the former supervisor and mentor of Dr. Bawa-Garba, a pediatrician convicted of manslaughter of fetal sepsis in Jack Adcock. Read the first part of this series here.     Dr. Jonathan Cusack versus the General Medical Council I spoke with Dr. Jonathan Cusack, consultant neonatologist at Leicester Royal Infirmary (LRI), and former supervisor and mentor of Dr. Bawa-Garba, the trainee pediatrician convicted of manslaughter for delayed diagnosis of fatal sepsis in Jack Adcock, a six-year-old boy with Do...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: NHS #BawaGarba @roguerad Source Type: blogs

The Doctor Who Thwarted the Charge of the General Medical Council – Part 1
By  SAURABH JHA After Dr. Hadiza Bawa-Garba was convicted for manslaughter for delayed diagnosis of fatal sepsis in Jack Adcock, a six-year-old boy who presented to Leicester Royal Infirmary with diarrhea and vomiting, she was referred to the Medical Practitioners Tribunal (MPT). The General Medical Council (GMC) is the professional regulatory body for physicians. But the MPT determines whether a physician is fit to practice. Though the tribunal is nested within the GMC and therefore within an earshot of its opinions, it is a decision-making body which is theoretically independent of the GMC. The tribunal met in 2017...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: NHS #BawaGarba @roguerad Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 6th 2018
In this study, we analyzed FGF21 levels and alterations in the expression of genes encoding components of the FGF21-responsive molecular machinery in adipose tissue from aged individuals so as to ascertain whether altered FGF21 responsiveness that develops with aging jeopardizes human health and/or accelerates metabolic disturbances associated with aging. We studied a cohort of 28 healthy elderly individuals (≥70 years) with no overt signs of metabolic or other pathologies and compared them with a cohort of 35 young healthy controls (≤40 years). Serum FGF21 levels were significantly increased in elderly indiv...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 5, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Lumbar puncture in patients on dual antiplatelet therapy
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - August 2, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: hospital medicine neurology quality and safety Source Type: blogs

Undoing Aging: Doug Ethell's Presentation on the Leucadia Therapeutics Approach to Treating Alzheimer's Disease
Doug Ethell has a clear and comparatively easily tested hypothesis on an important cause of Alzheimer's disease: that it results from the progressive failure of drainage of cerebrospinal fluid through one particularly crucial pathway in the skull. This traps ever greater levels of metabolic waste in the brain, such as amyloid-β, tau, and α-synuclein, and leads to the spectrum of well-known neurodegenerative diseases characterized by protein aggregates and resultant dysfunction and death of neurons. Dave Gobel of the Methuselah Foundation backed the first work on this hypothesis a few years back, and the r...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 1, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Accumulation of Gadolinium in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid : Article Reports
In this study  gadolinium was quantified by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry of CSF samples from patients who underwent gadobutrol-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging followed by lumbar puncture within 30 days (gadobutrol group) or patients who underwent lumbar puncture without history of gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging (control group). CSF total protein level of 35 mg/dL or lower was used as a surrogate marker of an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB).Reference :  https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2018171105Famous Radiology Blog http://www.sumerdoc.blogspot.com TeleRad Providers at www...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - July 25, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 009 Humongous HIV Extravaganza
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 009 The diagnosis of HIV is no longer fatal and the term AIDS is becoming less frequent. In many countries, people with HIV are living longer than those with diabetes. This post will hopefully teach the basics of a complex disease and demystify some of the potential diseases you need to consider in those who are severely immunosuppressed. While trying to be comprehensive this post can not be exhaustive (as you can imagine any patient with ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda McConnell Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine AIDS art cryptococcoma cryptococcus HIV HIV1 HIV2 PEP PrEP TB toxoplasma tuberculoma Source Type: blogs

It ’s time to recognize the rights of medical students and residents
Goodbyes were confusing during my third and fourth years of medical school. Even on my way to a 28-hour labor and delivery call, I tended to say, “I’m leaving for school.” Rather quickly, my wife trained me to say, “I’m leaving for work.” I was never quite reconciled to this, as I couldn’t forget the upcoming exams and tuition costs around $30,000 per year. For the uninitiated, “work” as a medical student on clinical rotations takes many forms. Talking with and examining patients, participating in team rounds, sewing up skin lacerations in the ED, assisting with various...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 1, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/thaddeus-r-salmon-iii" rel="tag" > Thaddeus R. Salmon III < /a > Tags: Education Hospital-Based Medicine Medical school Source Type: blogs

What to do if you want to be a cruise ship doctor
In 2013 I began searching for ways I could change my career to reduce my workload, but not give up medicine altogether. During that time I took a cruise and looked at various jobs I could do on a cruise ship. One of the jobs I was qualified for, I thought, was to be a Cruise Ship Doctor. After talking with the ship’s doctor to find out what it was like to be the doctor on a ship, I realized that I would enjoy that life. When I arrived back home I sent in an application to a cruise line. I was promptly informed that general surgeons were not qualified to be a ship’s doctor. They only accept physicians who practi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 25, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/cory-fawcett" rel="tag" > Cory Fawcett, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Practice Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 332
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 332nd LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. Readers can subscribe to LITFL review RSS or LITFL review EMAIL subscription The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Pulmonary...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

When mansplaining kills patients
I hadn’t thought about this call night in a while, as it happened three years ago. It came back into my consciousness this past week, when I re-experienced the events in a dream. (Of note, my stress dreams used to be about my car accident in 2014, which was a high-speed collision that left me in crutches. I guess I can now safely say that some call nights are actually more traumatic than living through a car crash.) This particular night, I was taking care of inpatient floor patients while on call. Another female resident was giving me sign-out about a patient coming up to the floor from the ED. She told me, point-bl...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/defiant-b-md" rel="tag" > Defiant B, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Source Type: blogs

Bedside ultrasound is not yet the standard of care. But it will be.
I just read a Clinical Problem Solving case from the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). It was entitled “Stream of Consciousness“and it told the story of a 65-year-old man who was a patient at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital of Harvard Medical School, arguably one of the finest medical institutions in the world. These cases are presented in single paragraphs to a clinical expert physician who then comments about his or her thought processes and discusses how he or she would have handled the situation. In this narrative, the patient presented to a different hospital in New England with kidney failure...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/janice-boughton" rel="tag" > Janice Boughton, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Hospital-Based Medicine Neurology Source Type: blogs

The art of medicine is slowly being pushed out. Is that a good thing?
One late evening on pediatrics call, a frantic young couple brought in their few weeks old baby. She had spiked a fever which refused to go down and was fussier than normal. The cause of her symptoms could have been anything — at best, a mild respiratory infection, in which case we would simply watch her and manage her symptoms, but at worst, it could be meningitis, an infection attacking the membrane covering her spinal cord and brain. It’s a grave condition that would be fatal if left undiagnosed, but diagnosing it meant doing a lumbar puncture, an extremely invasive procedure for anyone, let alone a baby, in...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/steven-zhang" rel="tag" > Steven Zhang < /a > Tags: Education Mobile health Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Intracranial Hypotension : MRI
Case Report:27 year old female without any previous co-morbidity and not on any medications was diagnosed with hydatidiform mole. Evacuation was done under spinal anesthesia. The next day following the procedure, she developed headache, which was only present on sitting on standing and was relieved on attaining supine position. After 2 days , she developed worsening of the headache which now became continuous and  she also developed right sided focal seizures in upper limb. Initial clinical diagnosis in the background of a hypercoagulable state (hydatiform mole), headache and seizures was cerebral venous thrombosis. H...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - April 8, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 007 Mega Malaria Extravaganza
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 007 When you think tropical medicine, malaria has to be near the top. It can be fairly complex and fortunately treatment has become a lot simpler. This post is designed to walk you through the basic principals with links to more in depth teaching if your niche is travel medicine, laboratory diagnostics or management of severe or cerebral malaria. If you stubbled on this post while drinking a cup of tea or sitting on the throne and want a fe...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 5, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine malaria Plasmodium plasmodium falciparum plasmodium knowles plasmodium malariae plasmodium ovale plasmodium vivax Source Type: blogs

Medicine isn ’t a competition. It’s a team sport.
I love sports analogies. There is so much in competition and team play that mirrors the way departments work in many sectors of medicine. “There is no ‘I’ in ‘team,'” as the adage says. Michael Jordan, for example, did not win his championships in the NBA until he had fairly decent and dependable team of support around him. The stars in many sports cannot achieve the greatest height of success without the team dynamic. Medicine is no different. Physicians in the hierarchy of medicine are often considered the clinical “team leaders.” Yes, there has been an onslaught on physician aut...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 25, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/n-bande-virgil" rel="tag" > N. Bande Virgil, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 484
Answer:Trypanosoma bruceiThis is most likelyT. brucei rhodesiensebased on:The patient's recent travel to Eastern Africa (Kenya),His participation in a game tracking excursion (classic history given that wild ungulates are the reservoir for this subspecies),His rapid onset of symptoms, andThe very high (!) parasitemiaBe sure to check out the video which show the characteristic'auger'like motility of the trypomastigotes (i.e. rotating along its long axis).Thanks to everyone who wrote in with the excellent comments. A lot of good points were raised by all. Ali Mokbel mentioned that we can't exclusively rule outT. b. gambiense...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 4, 2018 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 19th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 18, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Evidence for Tau Accumulation and Failing Cerebrospinal Fluid Clearance to be the Starting Point for Alzheimer's Disease
Alzheimer's disease might be considered as the consequence of the related, interacting buildup of two primary forms of metabolic waste in the brain, tau and amyloid-β. Either, independently, can cause neurodegeneration, but they have a complicated relationship with one another in which the presence of both makes the pathology worse. Which comes first? There is evidence to suggest that amyloid aggregation leads to tau aggregation, and there is also evidence for things to be the other way around, such as that presented in the research materials here. Both of these options could be the case, in that either tau or...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 13, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

To Err is Homicide in Britain – the case of Dr. Hadiza Bawa-Garba  
By, SAURABH JHA The good that doctors do is oft interred by a single error. The case of Dr. Hadiza Bawa-Garba, a trainee pediatrician in the NHS, convicted for homicide for the death of a child from sepsis, and hounded by the General Medical Council, is every junior doctor’s primal fear.   An atypical Friday Though far from usual, Friday February 18th, 2011 was not a typically unusual day in a British hospital. Dr. Bawa-Garba had just returned from a thirteen-month maternity break. She was the on-call pediatric registrar – the second in command for the care of sick children at Leicester Royal Infirmary. A...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: Patients Physicians The Business of Health Care Source Type: blogs

Huge ST Elevation in V2 and V3. What is it?
A 30-something presented with methamphetamine use and agitation. He was sedated, then had an ECG as part of his workup:He was stabilized and observed.He was still confused 8 hours later when I was now on duty, and he was found to have a heart rate of 140, so another ECG was recorded:There is one lead (V2) with massive ST elevation.Since there is very little STE in V1 or V3, there must be lead misplacement.I suspected some lead misplacement and ordered another with the leads corrected:Now there is massive STE in BOTH leads V2 and V3What do you think?What do you want to do?What do you think? This is what I thought:...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - June 4, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Oh, the Things You ’ll See Over an MS Lifetime
I once wrote a toast for a dear couple who were to celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary at the same island hotel where they had honeymooned — well, where they’d spent a weekend after their wedding. As I researched their life together, I realized that some pretty amazing stuff had taken place during the time they’d spent as a couple. They’d seen the rise and fall of the Third Reich, the Iron Curtain, and the Berlin Wall. Their married life encompassed 11 presidents and five popes, and spanned from the age of propeller planes through to manned space travel and the sending of a man-made o...
Source: Life with MS - April 13, 2017 Category: Neurology Authors: Trevis Gleason Tags: multiple sclerosis Everyday Health life with MS Living with MS MS and family MS doctors MS in the news trevis gleason Source Type: blogs

New Blood Test May Make ‘Off the Rack’ MS Treatments Closer to ‘Designer Drugs’
Since the mid-1990s, the diagnosing process for most people suspected of having multiple sclerosis (MS) has included a lumbar puncture (also called a spinal tap) to look for certain antibodies and proteins, and an MRI scan to look for lesions in the brain. Previous to that, immersion into a hot tub (to see if symptoms worsened with heat) and evoked response tests may have been used. In the future, it’s possible that a test for blood biomarkers could become a standard part of the diagnostic process for MS — and it could also help to determine the best form of treatment for those diagnosed. Chemical Identifiers o...
Source: Life with MS - February 16, 2017 Category: Neurology Authors: Trevis Gleason Tags: multiple sclerosis clinical trials drug trial MS treatment research Source Type: blogs

Are you asking students questions or “pimping?”
One of the most respected and skilled clinician-educators — of course, he is an infectious diseases specialist — at our institute came into my office, sat down and immediately starting eating pretzels. “Let me know what you think about this,” he said between bites. He went on to recapitulate a recent interaction he had with the members of the internal medicine team (medical students, house staff and the attending physician) about a week ago. He described a presentation to our emergency department of a young woman with a headache, neck stiffness and fever, who was previously well and had young childr...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 10, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/joseph-cooper" rel="tag" > Joseph Cooper, MD < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Residency Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 45-year-old man with cough and right-sided chest discomfort
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 45-year-old man is evaluated for right-sided chest discomfort and cough of 2 weeks’ duration. His chest discomfort is described as a vague, painful sensation on the right. The cough occasionally produces a small amount of sputum; he reports no hemoptysis or shortness of breath. He has felt feverish with mild fatigue but has had no weight loss. He is a smoker with a 20-pack-year history. He takes no medications. On physical examination, temperature is 37.6 °C (99.7 °F), blood pressure is 1...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 4, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Hemiplegic Migraine and Paraspinous Cervical Injections with Bupivacaine
​I recently treated a patient with hemiplegic migraines successfully with bupivacaine cervical injections, a novel therapeutic technique using paraspinous cervical injections. The technique employs deep intramuscular injections of 1.5 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine bilaterally into the paraspinous muscles of the lower neck. (Read more in my October 2012 blog and see it demonstrated in a video at http://bit.ly/2ewC5n1.)This headache and orofacial pain treatment was first described in 1996 by my twin brother, Gary Mellick, DO, a neurologist who did a pain fellowship. The exact mechanism is unknown, but the treatment appears to wor...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - December 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

progress and next steps
I had an MRI a couple of weeks ago and got the results last week. There has been slight progression in all three tumours in the brain.That's the bad news.The good news is that there are no new tumours and that my spine and cerebrospinal fluid remain clear, with no detectable cancer. This means that the Herceptin must be doing something for things to be progressing relatively slowly.We just have to figure out how to make it better at its job.There is very little research, when it comes to leptomeningeal disease (orleptomeningeal carcinomatosis), so in lots of ways we are making things up as we go along. The first thing we a...
Source: Not just about cancer - November 30, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: brain metastasis breast cancer chemotherapy health care herceptin metastatic things i do for my health weird Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 159
In this study of patients in the NEXUS cohort, aptly titled “Sternal fracture in the age of pan-scan,” they find that otherwise-occult sternal fractures just aren’t that big a deal. Takeaway: if the patient has substantial chest pain, sternal fracture on CXR, or other signs of cardiac contusion, be worried. But, a sternal fracture found incidentally on a panscan is just that. Recommended by Seth Trueger Airway Heard A, et al. Apneic Oxygenation During Prolonged Laryngoscopy in Obese Patients: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Buccal RAE Tube Oxygen Administration. Anesth and Analg 2016. PMID: 276...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 9, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeremy Fried Tags: Airway Clinical Research Education Emergency Medicine Pediatrics R&R in the FASTLANE Trauma EBM literature recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Meningitis FAQ
You know when they say the symptoms of meningitis are commonly a headache and a stiff neck and perhaps purple blotches on the skin that don’t pale when pressed…well…it can be far worse than that and can kill. If you’re in a vulnerable group, make sure you’re vaccinated. It is highly recommended that new university and college students are vaccinated because meningitis is far worse than a spot of “fresher’s flu” (usually just a cold) and can be passed on through coughs and sneezes, close contact and kissing infected people and even just sharing kitchen utensils. If it doesn&...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - October 6, 2016 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Science Source Type: blogs

Would Our Procedural Competence in Medicine Stand Up to the Same Level of Scrutiny as … a Hockey Goalie?
Editor’s Note: This post is one of two pieces on the topic of procedural competence. Read the other piece here. By: Martin Pusic, MD, PhD, assistant professor, Emergency Medicine, and director, Division of Learning Analytics, New York University School of Medicine Institute for Innovations in Medical Education, New York, New York. When I read Vaisman and Cram’s thoughtful Perspective on academic faculty procedural competence, I agreed with most of what they had to say. Academic faculty are certainly having to adapt to a myriad of dislocations as our health systems adapt to new realities. What doesn’t...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - September 13, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective big data deliberate practice faculty procedural competency Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 148
Welcome to the 148th edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. This edition contains 6 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid, Soren Rudolph, Justin Morgenstern and, of course, Chris Nickson. Find more R&R in the Fastlane reviews in the R&R Archive, read more about the R&a...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - August 24, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Justin Morgenstern Tags: Education Emergency Medicine Infectious Disease Neurosurgery R&R in the FASTLANE EBM literature recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Can a Smell Test Predict Early Stages of Alzheimer ’s Disease?
Researchers report that an odor identification test may prove useful in predicting cognitive decline and detecting early-stage Alzheimer ’s disease. By Alzheimer's Reading Room I wrote about the smell test many times here in the Alzheimer's Reading Room. It interests me not only because it would be a good way to detect Alzheimer's; but also I think it relates to why it is often difficult to get dementia patients to eat more food. Thing about it? What usually happens when you smell food cooking? If it smells good - you get hungry. Those saliva glands get in action. How to encourage a dementia patients to eat ...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - July 29, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's and dementia alzheimers care dementia care family caregiving help alzheimer's memory care odor identification smell test Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 144
Welcome to the 144th edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. This edition contains 6 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid, Soren Rudolph, Justin Morgenstern, Anand Swaminathan and, of course, Chris Nickson. Find more R&R in the Fastlane reviews in the R&R Archive, read more...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 28, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeremy Fried Tags: Cardiology Education Intensive Care Neurology R&R in the FASTLANE EBM Emergency Medicine literature recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Medtech Innovator 2016 Semi-Finalists Announced
MedTech Innovator, the medtech industry’s annual start-up competition and virtual accelerator, has just announced their 20 semi-finalists. 430 companies from around the globe applied for these coveted spots, and were reviewed by 90 reviewers from 50 different companies. These ground-breaking semi-finalists will undergo a four month virtual accelerator before attending AdvaMed 2016. There, four finalists will be selected to present and compete for $250,000 in cash prizes, with the winner being selected by audience vote.  In addition, throughout the year there will be additional awards given in three areas: V...
Source: Medgadget - July 6, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Justin Barad Tags: Exclusive News Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 133
This study certainly suggests a benefit to using Dexmedetomidine in these patients. Recommended by: Nudrat Rashid The Best of the Rest Emergency Medicine Beadle KL et al. Isopropyl alcohol nasal inhalation for nausea in the Emergency Department: A randomized controlled trial. Ann Emerg Med. 2015. PMID: 26679977 This is a small double-blinded RCT comparing inhaled isopropyl alcohol to saline placebo for short-term relief of nausea in the ED. Although it is hard to believe patients (and possibly investigators) were truly blinded to the odor of isopropanol, this study found isopropanol superior to placebo for improve...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 5, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nudrat Rashid Tags: Education Emergency Medicine Intensive Care Neurology Neurosurgery critical care examination R&R in the FASTLANE recommendations research and reviews Resuscitation Source Type: blogs

Staff at work
One of the great pleasures of being ex-CEO of a hospital is to visit other places around the world and see the staff in action.  Whatever you might have heard about the stresses and problems faced by doctors and nurses and others, there remains an underlying sense of purpose and commitment that often shines through.Here's a example, from the theatre in which young patients at Royal Children's Hospital receive lumbar punctures and bone marrow tests to receive chemotherapy and/or to assess their progress with regard to leukemia treatments.  I offer the explanation totally in pictures, which pretty well tell the sto...
Source: Not running a hospital - March 4, 2016 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: blogs

Do you know about behcet’s syndrome?
I was reading some medical records the other day and came upon a condition known as Behcet’s syndrome. It is actually a rare disease, but more frequent and severe in patients from the Eastern Mediterranean and Asia. Inherited (genetic) and environmental factors, such as microbe infections, are suspected to be factors that contribute to the development of Behcet’s. The syndrome is not proven to be contagious. The symptoms of Behcet’s syndrome depend on the area of the body affected. Behcet’s syndrome can involve inflammation of many areas of the body. These areas include the arteries that supply bloo...
Source: Nursing Comments - January 24, 2016 Category: Nursing Authors: Stephanie Jewett, RN Tags: Advice/Education Caregiving General Public Nursing/Nursing Students Patients/Specific Diseases Behcet's disease Behcet's syndrome cortisone genital ulcers inflammation mouth ucerations skin test Source Type: blogs