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From the Rescuer to the Aggressor – understanding the 10 types of human
Why do some people chase noble dreams while others torture to stay sane? Barrister Dexter Dias ’s new book draws on ‘moral cognition’ to explain FGM, the crimes of child soldiers – and why we happily pay to punish a cheatWhy do human beings hurt other human beings? That, says the barrister and sometime judge,Dexter Dias QC, is the most fundamental question in his book Ten Types of Human. In it, we meet sex traffickers, the sex-trafficked, a woman whose career was very nearly ended when she blew the whistle in Bosnia, a man whose life very nearly was, when he tried to stage a rescue. We go from thepo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Zoe Williams Tags: Evolution Biology UK criminal justice Science Law Source Type: news

Scientists can read minds to communicate with paralyzed patients
The NIRS/EEG brain-computer interface system is worn by a model in Switzerland. [Photo courtesy Laurent Bouvier/Wyss Centre/Handout]An international research team has developed a way to read brain chemistry to enable communication in patients who are paralyzed and unable to talk. The brain-computer interface (BCI) reads the blood oxygen levels in the brain and deciphers the thoughts of the paralyzed patient. The system was tested with four patients with complete locked-in syndrome who couldn’t even move their eyes to communicate and had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ALS is a neurodegenerative disease affecting...
Source: Mass Device - February 9, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Neurological ALS brain-computer interface Source Type: news

Brain Computer Interface Allows Completely Locked-In People to Communicate
Brain computer interface that deciphers thoughts of people unable to communicate could revolutionize lives of those with completely locked-in syndrome (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - February 4, 2017 Category: Disability Tags: Computer Devices and Software Source Type: news

Lab notes: all mouth (but no anus) - a gobby week for science
It looks like a hell-beast from the depth of Lovecraft ’s imagination, but this creature with itshuge mouth and no anus this could be our earliest known ancestor. Thought to have lived 540 million years ago, the discovery ofSaccorhytus coronarious fossils sheds light on the early stages of evolution. And if you need more nighttime fear-fuel, how about contemplatingwhat makes a frog ’s tongue a near inescapable trap. Apparently frog saliva has special properties: it switches between being thin and watery as the whip-like tongue hits its target, to thick and sticky as the insect is reeled in. Yum. But if understa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Tash Reith-Banks Tags: Science Source Type: news

Brain-Computer Interface Allows Completely Locked-in People to Communicate
A brain-computer interface that can decipher the thoughts of people who are unable to communicate could revolutionize the lives of those living with complete locked-in syndrome according to a new paper published in PLOS Biology. Counter to expectations, the participants in the study reported being "happy" despite their condition. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - February 3, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

'Computer helps patients with severe MND communicate'
Conclusion It's hard to imagine the situation of being alert, aware of what's happening around you, but unable to move, respond or communicate with the outside world. So it is comforting, then, to hear that people with complete locked-in syndrome may be able to communicate – and may be relatively content with their situation. However, it's important to remember the limitations of this study. It's very small. Only four people took part, and full results are available for only three of them. The results may only apply to people with this very specific type of neurodegenerative disease, not to people with other typ...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Source Type: news

'Breakthrough in communication for patients with severe MND', study claims
Conclusion It's hard to imagine the situation of being alert, aware of what's happening around you, but unable to move, respond or communicate with the outside world. So it is comforting, then, to hear that people with complete locked-in syndrome may be able to communicate – and may be relatively content with their situation. However, it's important to remember the limitations of this study. It's very small. Only four people took part, and full results are available for only three of them. The results may only apply to people with this very specific type of neurodegenerative disease, not to people with other typ...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Source Type: news

Groundbreaking system allows locked-in syndrome patients to communicate
Using a device which detects patterns in brain activity, patients paralysed by ALS can answer ‘yes’ or ‘no’ – and tell doctors they are ‘happy’ with lifeDoctors have used a brain-reading device to hold simple conversations with“locked-in” patients in work that promises to transform the lives of people who are too disabled to communicate.The groundbreaking technology allows the paralysed patients – who have not been able to speak for years – to answer “yes” or “no” to questions by detecting telltale patterns in their brain activity.Con...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 1, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Neuroscience Medical research Disability Source Type: news

Device could help people with 'locked-in' syndrome
To help people with locked-in syndrome to communicate, researchers at the Wyss Centre for Bio and Neuroengineering in Geneva created a new brain-computer interface. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brain-computer interface allows completely locked-in people to communicate
A computer interface that can decipher the thoughts of people who are unable to communicate could revolutionize the lives of those living with completely locked-in syndrome, according to a new article. Counter to expectations, the participants in the study reported being " happy, " despite their extreme condition. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 31, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Brain-computer interface allows completely locked-in people to communicate
(PLOS) A brain-computer interface that can decipher the thoughts of people who are unable to communicate could revolutionize the lives of those living with completely locked-in syndrome, according to a new paper publishing Jan. 31, 2017, in PLOS Biology. Counter to expectations, the participants in the study reported being 'happy', despite their extreme condition. The research was conducted by a multinational team, led by Professor Niels Birbaumer, at the Wyss Center for Bio and Neuroengineering in Geneva, Switzerland. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Hope for Patients With Locked-In Syndrome Hope for Patients With Locked-In Syndrome
Dr Laurie Barclay details findings of a case report that may have applicability in other neurodegenerative conditions.Medscape Neurology (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - December 20, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Viewpoint Source Type: news

Choosing Hospital Over Heaven: A Life Worth Living
(MedPage Today) -- Is death better than locked-in syndrome? (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - May 1, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Clodagh Dunlop describes terror of waking up with locked-in syndrome
Clodagh Dunlop, 35, from Magherafelt, County Londonderry, said she became a 'prisoner' in her own body after getting locked-in syndrome, following a massive stroke. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 7, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Technology Could Restore Paralysis Patients' Power Of Speech
Individuals suffering from speech disorders or severe muscular weakness soon may have a way to communicate with doctors and loved ones just by breathing their words. A new augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) device uses an algorithm that learns speech patterns from a patient’s breath, and researchers say the technology could prove particularly useful in intensive care units by establishing early diagnosis of locked-in syndrome. (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - September 4, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

European Court rejects British pair’s right-to-die case
Paralysed man and widow of victim of locked-in syndrome took legal challenge (Source: The Irish Times - Health)
Source: The Irish Times - Health - July 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Right-to-die: European court rejects Paul Lamb and Tony Nickinson's widow case
Paralysed former builder and family of late locked-in syndrome sufferer lose latest right-to-die legal challenge at European Court of Human Rights (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - July 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Paul Lamb locked-in ECHR Tony Nicklinson European Court of Human Rights rejected right-to-die Source Type: news

Man sings Les Misérables song Bring Him Home for brother with locked-in syndrome
Footage of Mark McMullan from Northern Ireland singing to his severely disabled brother has gone viral online (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - March 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

South Africa: Imagine Being Trapped Inside Your Own Body for 12 Years - With Only Barney the Purple Dinosaur to Keep You Company
[The Daily Vox]Martin Pistorius, who suffered from "locked-in syndrome", spent 12 years in a vegetative state. Entirely conscious - but unable to communicate - he was placed in a care home, where he was left to watch reruns and almost driven mad by a certain purple dinosaur. Today he's made a recovery, is married, and has a successful career. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 15, 2015 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Locked-in syndrome caused by the pressure exerted by the sound gun - Ozer AB, Demirel I, Bayar MK, Gunduz G, Tokdemir M.
A 19-year-old male patient who wounded himself with a gun in the cranial region had a Glasgow coma scale of 3E. At posttraumatic day 7, locked-in syndrome was considered upon detection of vertical eye movements, meaningful winks, and quadriplegia. Apart fr... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - January 10, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

'Brain box' allows paralyzed to make music
Ever since musician Eduardo Miranda met a patient with locked in syndrome 11 years ago, he has been on a mission to create a way for the paralyzed to make music. (Source: WDSU.com - Health)
Source: WDSU.com - Health - December 23, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tears of joy as woman with locked-in syndrome comes home
Catherine O’Leary had series of strokes during surgery after complaining of constant hiccups (Source: The Irish Times - Health)
Source: The Irish Times - Health - September 2, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dawn Faizey-Webster: a triumph of the heart
Dawn Faizey-Webster, who has near total paralysis, tells Victoria Lambert about a life full of achievements (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - August 10, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: blinking locked-in syndrome dawn faizey webster degree Source Type: news

Mother with locked-in syndrome "cried inside" over baby son
Dawn Faizey Webster was struck down with locked-in syndrome and now only sees her baby boy during the holidays (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - August 9, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AUDIO: Locked-in syndrome mum passes degree
A mother with locked-in syndrome has passed her university degree after six years. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - August 5, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tony Nicklinson: A father's fight for right to die is carried on after his death
The nine-year legal challenge started by Tony Nicklinson, who suffered from 'locked-in' syndrome for seven years, ends next week. His family tell Sarah Rainey about their battle (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - June 21, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What it's like to have locked-in syndrome
After suffering a stroke, Richard Marsh was unable to move but could still hear a conversation between doctors and his wife about whether to turn off his life support (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - June 5, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Approach to Bedside Communication for Locked-In SyndromeNew Approach to Bedside Communication for Locked-In Syndrome
Technology using bedside near-infrared spectroscopy is allowing communication with a patient with ALS who was completely locked in for than 2 years, breaking the 'unbearable silence.' Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - May 23, 2014 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Episode #4: Poisoning and the diagnosis of brain death
Conclusion: unclear how long to wait before pronouncing brain death as many factors such as pharmacogenetics can alter normal metabolism   Summary Drug overdose can mimic brain death Be especially cautious in overdose involving the scary B’s: baclofen, barbiturate, benzodiazepine The 3-5 half life rule for drug clearance cannot be applied in the cases of overdose Half lives are measured at therapeutic levels Multiple other factors can alter metabolism in overdoses, such as pharmacogenetics, and cross reactivity with other ingestants Consult a toxicologist if there is any question regarding possible overdose...
Source: The Poison Review - May 20, 2014 Category: Toxicology Authors: LeonThe Poison Review Tags: Podcast Source Type: news

Locked-in Syndrome - A Rare Neurological Disorder
'Locked-in syndrome,' is a rare form of neurological disorder, one that involves a state of awareness and wakefulness with quadriplegia and paralysis of the person's lower cranial nerves, resulting in an inability to show facial expressions, to move or speak, or to communicate with the exception of by coded eye movements. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - May 5, 2014 Category: Disability Tags: Neurological Disorders Source Type: news

PET scans may improve brain injury diagnosis
ConclusionThis is a valuable diagnostic study that tested how accurate PET and fMRI imaging are at distinguishing between different levels of conscious state and helping to predict recovery. Diagnostic assessments are traditionally made using bedside clinical tests – but as the researchers say, judging the level of awareness in people with severe brain damage can be difficult.In particular, the researchers wanted to see whether the scans could accurately distinguish between people with “unresponsive wakefulness syndrome” and “minimally conscious state”, as distinguishing between...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 16, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Neurology Source Type: news

Eye-tracking technology that makes 'life worth living'
Eye gaze technology can give people with locked-in syndrome a freedom of independence that was previously unimaginable     (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - March 13, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Locked-in footballer given ovation
Former footballer Gary Parkinson receives a standing ovation from fans while attending his first game since being diagnosed with locked-in syndrome. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - December 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Right-to-die case at Supreme Court
The family of late locked-in syndrome sufferer Tony Nicklinson and paralysed road accident victim Paul Lamb renew their right-to-die court fight in the Supreme Court. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - December 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Assistive technology offers a brighter future for locked-in syndrome
A team of researchers from Montreal has found that stroke patients living with Locked-In Syndrome (LIS) who cannot move, swallow or even breathe on their own, can regain a remarkable level of independence with technological help. The team's findings, presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress, stem from a 20-year study that followed the rehabilitation of 25 LIS patients, people who are aware and awake but cannot move or communicate verbally due to complete paralysis of nearly all voluntary muscles... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Unlocking a brighter future for locked-in syndrome
(Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada) A team of researchers from Montreal has found that stroke patients living with Locked-In Syndrome who cannot move, swallow or even breathe on their own, can regain a remarkable level of independence with technological help. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 17, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

British Court Dismisses Landmark Right-to-Die AppealBritish Court Dismisses Landmark Right-to-Die Appeal
A British court rejected appeals for the right to die by a paralyzed road accident victim and the family of a deceased locked-in syndrome sufferer, saying only parliament should decide on matters of life and death. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news

Right-to-die campaigners lose battle
The family of late locked-in syndrome sufferer Tony Nicklinson and paralysed road accident victim Paul Lamb lose their right-to-die Appeal Court challenges. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - July 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Right-to-die: campaigners lose fight for legalised euthanasia
Family of late locked-in syndrome sufferer Tony Nicklinson and paralysed Paul Lamb have lost their right-to-die appeals.     (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - July 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Right to die fight: judges to rule on cases
Leading judges are set to rule on the latest round of a major right to die legal challenge to Britain's euthanasia laws started by locked-in syndrome sufferer Tony Nicklinson.     (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - July 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Most Feared And Devastating Strokes Described By Neurologists
Among the most feared and devastating strokes are ones caused by blockages in the brain's critical basilar artery system. When not fatal, basilar artery strokes can cause devastating deficits, including head-to-toe paralysis called "locked-in syndrome." However, a minority of patients can have good outcomes, especially with new MRI technologies and time-sensitive treatments... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Neurologists describe most feared and devastating strokes
(Loyola University Health System) Among the most feared and devastating strokes is a type that causes head-to-toe paralysis called locked-in syndrome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 9, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news