Leeuwenhoek: scientist who saw ‘animalcules’
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek and a drawing of animalcules   Some discover their aptitude for science by natural curiosity, which causes them to investigate their surroundings. In doing so they find many hidden secrets that only curiosity like theirs could have revealed. However, an inquisitive nature alone doesn’t make one a scientist. Explorers, adventurers, reporters, and criminal investigators all lead lives based on it too. Something special happens when curiosity is coupled with an empirical mind. That combination begins to approach the scientific method. The only thing left is to provide a record of findings so...
Source: GIDEON blog - September 17, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Microbiology News Source Type: blogs

Is Public Health Outreach All Sunnyside Up or Is It A Shell Game?
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Last week, I received an automated phone call from my local grocery chain saying that I had purchased some hardboiled eggs that were part of a recall and I should return the eggs for a full refund. My initial reaction was that the call was a wonderful public health outreach program. The company that processed and distributed the eggs issued a recall after 7 people were infected with Listeria monocytogenes (4 were hospitalized; 1 died). A CDC investigation (https://www.cdc.gov/listeria/outbreaks/eggs-12-19/index.html) found that all of the infected patients had eaten hardboiled egg products from one ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Ethics Featured Posts Privacy Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 26th 2018
This study is the culmination of a decade of research that has repeatedly demonstrated that this vaccine can effectively and safely target in animal models what we think may cause Alzheimer's disease. I believe we're getting close to testing this therapy in people." Although earlier research established that antibodies significantly reduce amyloid buildup in the brain, researchers needed to find a safe way to introduce them into the body. A vaccine developed elsewhere showed promise in the early 2000s, but when tested in humans, it caused brain swelling in some patients. The new idea was to start with DNA codin...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 25, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Additional Evidence for Lymph Node Degeneration to be an Important Obstacle for Attempts at Thymus Rejuvenation
The thymus atrophies with age, and since its primary function is to support the maturation of T cells, this means that the supply of new T cells, fresh and ready for action, also declines with age. This contributes greatly to immunosenescence, the progressive age-related failure of the immune system to respond to pathogens and destroy damaged or malfunctioning cells. Numerous research groups are attempting to restore the thymus to youthful size and activity, and thus also restore the supply of T cells, and reverse loss of immune function. A wide variety of approaches are under development, from gene therapies and small mol...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 20, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Meningitis vaccines: What parents need to know
Meningitis can be a very scary infection — and vaccines can help prevent it. What is meningitis? The meninges are a membrane that covers and protects the brain and spinal cord. When that membrane gets inflamed, it’s called meningitis. One of the ways this inflammation can happen is from infection. Common symptoms of an infection of the meninges are fever, headache, and a stiff neck. There are many different germs that can infect the meninges. Viruses cause most cases, and while this can be serious, most people with viral meningitis get better without treatment. Some may not even realize they’ve had mening...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Adolescent health Infectious diseases Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs

Arguing that Cytomegalovirus is Beneficial for Old Immune Systems
Researchers here make the intriguing argument that persistent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection results in a better rather than worse immune system in old age, for at least some measures. This stands in opposition to the current consensus and broad range of evidence to show that much of the disarray of the aged immune system is due to CMV and similar latent viral infections. Too large a portion of the limited resources of the adaptive immune system becomes devoted to these foes, at a point in life when new T cells are created slowly, if at all. The thymus, where T cells mature, atrophies in later life, while the hematopoieti...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 13, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 009 Humongous HIV Extravaganza
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 009 The diagnosis of HIV is no longer fatal and the term AIDS is becoming less frequent. In many countries, people with HIV are living longer than those with diabetes. This post will hopefully teach the basics of a complex disease and demystify some of the potential diseases you need to consider in those who are severely immunosuppressed. While trying to be comprehensive this post can not be exhaustive (as you can imagine any patient with ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda McConnell Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine AIDS art cryptococcoma cryptococcus HIV HIV1 HIV2 PEP PrEP TB toxoplasma tuberculoma Source Type: blogs

Disease Outbreaks due to Sprouts
As of June, 2018 the Gideon database (www.GideonOnline.com) chronicles 22,777 published Infectious Diseases outbreaks.  Sprouts were implicated in 13.4% of outbreaks which specify a disease vehicle (5.2% of salmonellosis outbreaks).  Salmonellae were responsible for 83% of outbreaks associated with sprouts.  The remainder were caused by Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes or Bacillus cereus. [1] References: 1 Berger S. Gideon Guide to Outbreaks, 2018. 2,011 pages, 5,272 tables, 51,622 references. Gideon e-books,  https://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/outbreaks/ The post Disease Outbreaks due to Sprou...
Source: GIDEON blog - June 22, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Outbreaks ProMED Source Type: blogs

Smartphone System Detects Food Borne Pathogens
At Purdue University, a team of engineers and food scientists has developed a smartphone-powered device, and accompanying underlying technology, for detecting food borne pathogenic bacteria. The technology relies on using specially designed phages, which are viruses that infect bacteria. These phages are mixed into water that was used to wash a sample of produce. A special solution is then added that makes the phages glow ever so slightly. This glow is detected by a tiny luminometer, a device for measuring the intensity of light. Depending on how much light is measured by the luminometer indicates whether the phages were a...
Source: Medgadget - May 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Pathology Public Health Source Type: blogs

Is Your Antacid Medication Ruining Your Gut?
Proton Pump Inhibitors are a class of Antacid Medication that are so common and considered to be so safe that they were even declassified as prescription drugs and are now available over-the-counter so that anyone can use them if they happen to have heartburn. With names like Omeprazole, Nexium, and Prilosec, the ‘little purple pill’ is advertised everywhere on billboards and TV ads with barely a mention that their might be consequences to suppressing stomach acid. There are consequences of any Acid Reflux Medication, however, like the Side Effects of Omeprazole and other proton pump inhibitors can lead to oste...
Source: Immune Health Blog - March 2, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: Kerri Knox, RN Tags: Digestive Health Infections Source Type: blogs

Key Ingredient Left Out Of Food Safety Rules
The sign inside my favorite Trader Joe’s announced a recall of raw cashew pieces due to concern over Salmonella. The soup for my dinner party would switch from a cauliflower-cashew to a sweet potato one. Minor inconvenience for me; major one for the food producer and anyone potentially made ill from the contaminant. Salmonella is a nasty pathogen. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) noted that most people infected with the pathogen will develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps within 12 to 72 hours. The illness continues for four to seven days. Yet, in some people the infection manifests as reac...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - February 17, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Robin Stombler Tags: Featured Public Health Quality CDC e-coli Food and Health food quality Food Safety Modernization Act Salmonella Source Type: blogs

Rethinking our Thinking about Diagnostic tests: There is nothing Positive or Negative about a Test result
By ROBERT McNUTT, MD Making a diagnosis is easy if the test we use to make the diagnosis defines the disease. These sorts of tests, called “reference-standard” tests, when present at any level of the test’s result, make the diagnosis. A spinal fluid culture growing listeria or opioids in the urine are examples. Using reference-standard tests in clinical medicine, however, is not the norm. The reason for this is that reference-standard tests often don’t exist and if they do they may be dangerous, difficult to obtain, and costly. Hence, we use most often non-reference standard tests that can only rais...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Simon Nath Tags: THCB Robert McNutt Source Type: blogs

Nutrition for Pregnancy and Beyond
Moms-to-be already know how important nutrition is to the health of their developing child, but experts say expecting parents should also pay close attention to the food itself. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 1 in 6 Americans are stricken by food poisoning every year, with 128,000 Americans going to the hospital as a result of contaminated food.   The immune system is changed during pregnancy, which can make expecting mothers more susceptible to these types of bacteria, according to Dr. Pamela Schultz, an Oakhurst obstetrician-gynecologist who is affiliated with Jersey Shore University M...
Source: Cord Blood News - December 20, 2014 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: joyce at mazelabs.com Tags: babies blood disorder Cord Blood medical research parents pregnancy stem cells cord blood informtion pregnancy nutrition Source Type: blogs

Foods to Avoid During Pregnancy
You may find yourself craving strange combinations of foods or foods that you didn’t even care for before you were pregnant. Though most foods are safe to eat, there are some foods that should be avoided during pregnancy, and the list of foods that are off-limits may be surprising. Many of these foods are foods that you may have eaten regularly pre-pregnancy with no problem. However, during pregnancy the bacteria or parasites found in these foods can be extremely dangerous to your baby. Three Common Foodborne Bacteria and Parasites Listeria is a type of bacteria that can cause complications during pregnancy. It ...
Source: Cord Blood News - June 7, 2014 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: joyce at mazelabs.com Tags: babies brain development Cord Blood medical research parents pregnancy due dates healthy pregnancy eating healthy pregnancy food parenting raw food sushi what not to eat when pregnant why save cord blood Source Type: blogs

Putting the fear of God into people is bad medicine
Emily Oster has a book coming out entitled Take Back Your Pregnancy. In preparation for the book launch, as most authors do, she wrote a nice piece in the Wall Street Journal about decision-making, risks, and how some of what OB/GYNs recommend during pregnancy isn’t always evidence based. In particular, she mentions listeria, a bacteria that is a food borne illness with potentially devastating outcomes during pregnancy. Osher quotes the risk of about 1/8,000 and felt that she should cut out queso fresco, but was still ok with eating deli meats. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you on...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 23, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, August 14, 2013
From MedPage Today: Retina May Be Window Into Stroke Risk. Damage to the retina from hypertension independently pointed to elevated stroke risk, even when blood pressure was controlled by medication. High-Deductible Plans Mean More Hospital Red Ink. As employers and insurance companies shift more health costs into workers’ pockets, hospitals are making a discovery. The pockets aren’t bottomless. Special Diet Quells Genetic Risk of Stroke. The Mediterranean diet may lower the risk of stroke in patients with a certain genetic variant that makes them susceptible to type 2 diabetes and metabolic troubles. To...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 14, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Infectious disease Neurology Source Type: blogs

Keeping Listeria Away from Your Kitchen
Bacteria is everywhere, outside the body and even inside the body but not all kinds bacteria are harmful, there are some beneficial bacterias too.Contributor: Dart PetersonPublished: Jul 27, 2013 (Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content)
Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content - July 27, 2013 Category: Other Conditions Source Type: blogs

Real-time PCR Methods for the Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in Foods
from David Rodríguez-Lázaro and Marta Hernández writing in Real-Time PCR in Food Science: Current Technology and Applications:Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen that causes serious localized and generalized infections in humans. Traditional detection methods of this pathogen involves two enrichment steps and a final isolation in two specific culture media, and a final confirmation using biochemical and/or molecular techniques, and therefore more than 5 days are needed for a final confirmation. An alternative to accelerate results in diagnostics of this pathogen in food is the application of...
Source: Microbiology Blog: The weblog for microbiologists. - June 17, 2013 Category: Microbiology Source Type: blogs

Radioactive Bacteria Fights Cancer Metastasis (w/video)
Pancreatic cancer is a vicious killer, metastasising quickly and spreading across the body with little treatment options available to do much about it. A drastic new approach, that of using radioactive bacteria to target tumors large and small, has been demonstrated in a promising animal study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine.An attenuated form of Listeria bacteria has been known to selectively infect cancer cells, leaving healthy tissue alone. That is because the immune system around cancer cells is dysfunctional and so Listeria is able to survive. While other researchers worked on...
Source: Medgadget - April 30, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: in the news... Source Type: blogs

Guest Post: Pregnancy, Miscarriage, and Type 1 Diabetes.
Today's guest post comes from my dear friend Kate Boylan, who has experienced a journey with diabetes, pregnancy, and miscarriage.  I'm grateful that there are people like Kate who put it out there like this, even when it must still feel raw.  I hope there's some healing found for her in sharing.*   *   * “It has absolutely nothing to do with diabetes.”

That is what the renowned Boston-area high-risk obstetrician reported to me and my husband right after she told us that I was miscarrying my first pregnancy. She went on, “Based on the irregular heartbeat, and the lack of growth in...
Source: Six Until Me. - January 14, 2013 Category: Diabetes Source Type: blogs

Epidemiology Pathogenesis Ecology and Genetics of Listeria monocytogenes
Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Ecology and Genetics of Listeria monocytogenesfrom Sangmi Lee, Robin M. Siletzky and Sophia Kathariou writing in Foodborne and Waterborne Bacterial Pathogens: Epidemiology, Evolution and Molecular Biology:Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive foodborne pathogen that causes a severe, potentially fatal illness (listeriosis) in animals and humans. The only human pathogen within the genus Listeria, this bacterium is equipped with sophisticated mechanisms to invade mammalian cells and proliferate inracellularly. Population genetics data indicate that some groups of L. monocytogenes are more frequ...
Source: Microbiology Blog: The weblog for microbiologists. - January 7, 2013 Category: Microbiology Source Type: blogs