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This Girl Tr òn: The Forgotten Subject of Vietnam War Photographer Larry Burrows
Larry Burrows was a seasoned veteran of the Vietnam War when, in early 1968, he met 12-year-old Nguyễn Thị Tròn. Operating out of Saigon, the southern Republic of Vietnam’s capital, the photographer had been covering the conflict for LIFE magazine since 1962. He shadowed American troops, documenting ferocious firefights, surviving hours in the air with helicopter-gunship crews, and freeze-framing harrowing moments of bravery and despair, exhaustion, and appalling violence in combat zones. Though much of his best work had been shot in the thick of the action, he had come to be haunted by the trauma visited ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gary Jones/ Suối Đá Tags: Uncategorized Larry Burrows LIFE Magazine photography Vietnam Vietnam War Source Type: news

Scientists hope to breed Asian ‘unicorns’ – if they can find them
Conservationists see only one hope for the saola: a risky captive breeding programmeIn 1996, William Robichaud spentthree weeks with Martha before she died. Robichaud studied Martha – a beautiful, enigmatic, shy saola – with a scientist’s eye but also fell under the gracile animal’s spell as she ate out of his hand and allowed herself to be stroked. Captured by local hunters, Martha spent those final days in a Laotian village, doted on by Robichaud.Since losing Martha, Robichaud has become the coordinator of theSaola Working Group (SWG) at the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). H...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jeremy Hance Tags: Environment Science Biology Laos Vietnam Animals Conservation Asia Pacific World news Endangered species Wildlife Source Type: news

' Wombs for Rent' Business Flourishes in Communist Laos'Wombs for Rent' Business Flourishes in Communist Laos
Dozens of fertility clinics have mushroomed in land-locked Laos after scandals over commercial surrogacy have spurred wealthier southeast Asian neighbors to ban the controversial procedure since 2015.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

'Wombs for rent' business flourishes in communist Laos
VIENTIANE (Reuters) - Dozens of fertility clinics have mushroomed in land-locked Laos after scandals over commercial surrogacy have spurred wealthier southeast Asian neighbors to ban the controversial procedure since 2015. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

PharmaMar and STAsia sign licensing and marketing agreement for lurbinectedin
(Pharmamar) PharmaMar (MSE:PHM) today announced an agreement with Singapore-based Specialised Therapeutics Asia Pte, Ltd (STA) to market the marine-based anti-tumour compound of the Company, lurbinectedin (PM1183) for the treatment of platinum-resistant ovarian cancer, small-cell lung cancer, BRCA 1/2 -associated metastatic breast cancer and other future oncology indications in Australia, New Zealand and in 12 Asian countries (Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore, Timor-Leste, Thailand and Vietnam). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Road traffic injury among child motorcyclists in Vientiane Capital, Laos: a cross-sectional study using a hospital-based injury surveillance database - Wada T, Nakahara S, Bounta B, Phommahaxay K, Phonelervong V, Phommachanh S, Mayxay M, Manivong T, Phoutsavath P, Ichikawa M, Kimura A.
This study investigated the distribution of motorcyclists, including drivers and passengers, who were involved in road traffic crashes and admitted to hospital in Vientiane Capital, Laos. The focus was on child motorcycle drivers and passengers under 15 ye... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Population-based autopsy study of traumatic fatalities - Saar S, Lomp A, Laos J, Mihnovit š V, Šalkauskas R, Lustenberger T, Vali M, Lepner U, Talving P.
BACKGROUND: Injuries result in 5.8  million global fatalities annually and are the leading cause of death in younger individuals. Nevertheless, population-based autopsy investigations on traumatic deaths are scarce. We set out to study all consecutive auto... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 9, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Malaria superbugs threaten global malaria control, scientists say
LONDON (Reuters) - Multidrug-resistant malaria superbugs have taken hold in parts of Thailand, Laos and Cambodia, threatening to undermine progress against the disease, scientists said. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Malaria superbugs threaten global malaria control
(Infectious Diseases Data Observatory) A lineage of multidrug resistant P. falciparum malaria superbugs has widely spread and is now established in parts of Thailand, Laos and Cambodia, causing high treatment failure rates for the main falciparum malaria medicines, artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs), according to a study published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 1, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UNISON bursaries for activists
UNISON is able to offer bursaries for union activists studying trade union and labour studies or women’s studies at certificate, diploma or degree level. The size of the bursary or grant depends on the level of the qualification. Certificate or diploma courses: grants of up to £300 for members on trade union and labour movement or women’s studies courses. BA degrees: grants of up to £500 for members on trade union and labour movement or women’s studies courses. Masters degrees: grants of up to one-third of fees for a union representative studying trade union and labour studies or women’...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - January 9, 2017 Category: Food Science Authors: Tony Braisby Tags: Article News activist training pathways activists activists' learning bursaries grants laos ruskin college trade union and labour studies women women's studies Source Type: news

No, You Weren't Imagining It: 2016 Was Very, Very Hot
“Record heat forecast on Christmas Day.” “New record Halloween temperature.” “Record-breaking fall heat wave.” “Earth’s hot streak continues.” A cursory scan of some of last year’s headlines reveals a trend: 2016 was scorching. In November, the U.N.’s World Meteorological Organization reported that 2016, fueled by climate change and the effects of a strong El Niño, would almost certainly be the warmest year on record ― making it the third straight year of record-breaking heat.   The ignominious title should come as no surprise. From Janua...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 5, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

[In Depth] Dam-building threatens Mekong fisheries
Laos and its neighbors hungry for electric power are embarking on a dam-building spree on the Mekong River and on major tributaries that threatens to trigger a food security crisis. By blocking migration routes and cutting sediment flow to the Mekong delta, the projects could wipe out more than a third of the lower Mekong Basin's annual haul of river fish—a serious blow to the region's 60 million people. Hoping to forestall catastrophe, environmentalists and scientists are pressing the hydropower companies to incorporate "fish-friendly" turbines, ladders, and locks for migratory fish into their dam designs....
Source: ScienceNOW - December 1, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Richard Stone Tags: Conservation Source Type: news

Traveling To Southeast Asia? Here's What You Need To Know About Zika Virus
The Zika virus epidemic in Latin America and the Caribbean has infected potentially millions of people and is pegged as the cause of congenital Zika syndrome, a birth defect affecting thousands of children in the region. It can cause brain damage, seizures, deafness, blindness and other neurological and physiological problems.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued travel advisories for 59 countries and territories throughout the world, including neighborhoods in Miami where the Zika virus continues to spread locally. Most of these areas are in Latin America and the Caribbean, while eight...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Traveling To Southeast Asia? Here's What You Need To Know About Zika Virus
The Zika virus epidemic in Latin America and the Caribbean has infected potentially millions of people and is pegged as the cause of congenital Zika syndrome, a birth defect affecting thousands of children in the region. It can cause brain damage, seizures, deafness, blindness and other neurological and physiological problems.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued travel advisories for 59 countries and territories throughout the world, including neighborhoods in Miami where the Zika virus continues to spread locally. Most of these areas are in Latin America and the Caribbean, while eight...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Archaeologists use drones to trial virtual reality
(Australian National University) Archaeologists at The Australian National University and Monash University are conducting a trial of new technology to build a 3-D virtual-reality map of one of Asia's most mysterious sites -- the Plain of Jars in Laos. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The Demon On Your Chest And Other Terrifying Tales Of Sleep Paralysis
An unusual condition called sleep paralysis has been frightening people for centuries, and now a new review sums up the many creepy stories from different cultures that try to explain the episodes of waking up and being unable to move. Cultural explanations that try to account for the terrifying experience of waking up feeling paralyzed range from alien abductions to strange demons creeping into people’s bedrooms and sitting on their chests, according to the review, published in September in the journal Frontiers in Psychology. Together, the stories show how a single biological phenomenon can be interpreted different...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

U.S. Officials Launch A Zika Travel Advisory For Southeast Asia
U.S. health officials issued a Zika virus travel warning on Thursday, recommending that pregnant women consider postponing nonessential travel to 11 counties in Southeast Asia. The new travel warning was issued for Brunei, Myanmar (Burma), Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Maldives, Philippines, Thailand, Timor-Leste (East Timor) and Vietnam, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Travelers have returned from certain areas of Southeast Asia with Zika virus infection,” the agency noted on its website. On Friday, officials reported two cases of Zika-linked microcephaly in Thailand, ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CDC issues Zika travel notice for 11 Southeast Asian countries
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a travel notice Thursday urging pregnant women to consider postponing nonessential travel to 11 countries in Southeast Asia because of the risk of Zika virus infections. The countries are Brunei, Burma (Myanmar), Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Maldives, Philippines, Thailand, East Timor and Vietnam. The travel information is […]Related:CDC officials worry that new flu vaccine recommendations could reduce useMystery Zika case in Utah was likely spread through sweat or tearsCancer immunotherapy is moving fast. Here’s what you need to know. (Source: Wash...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - September 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

PACS brings improved quality of care to Laos hospital
With so many other pressing healthcare priorities, resource-strapped hospitals...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Support grows for more rigorous training on dose AIUM: Ultrasound offers promise for preventing maternal death WhatsApp enables teleultrasound in Nigeria Breast cancer risk profiles differ in developing nations Is point-of-care ultrasound the new stethoscope? (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 8, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Earthquake Strikes Myanmar, Shocks Felt Across Region
YANGON ― A powerful earthquake of 6.8 magnitude struck central Myanmar on Wednesday, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and local authorities said, shaking buildings across the Southeast Asian nation and the region. The quake hit the town of Chauk, southwest of Mandalay, the Myanmar government said, with tremors felt as far away as Bangkok, where witnesses reported high rise buildings swaying, and the Bangladeshi capital Dhaka. There were no immediate reports of casualties and initial reports suggested limited damage. “My house shook during the quake. Many people were scared and they ran out of the buildings,”...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 24, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Is Federalism Pro-poor?
By Jeresa May C. OchaveJul 7 2016 (Manila Times)Poverty, according to the United Nations, is “a denial of choices and opportunities, a violation of human dignity. It means lack of basic capacity to participate effectively in society. It means not having enough to feed and clothe a family, not having a school or clinic to go to, not having the land on which to grow one’s food or a job to earn one’s living, not having access to credit. It means insecurity, powerlessness and exclusion of individuals, households and communities. It means susceptibility to violence, and it often implies living in marginal or f...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 7, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Jeresa May Tags: Aid Crime & Justice Development & Aid Economy & Trade Education Financial Crisis Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Human Rights Labour Poverty & SDGs Trade & Investment Water & Sanitation Source Type: news

Alan Bell obituary
My friend and brother-in-law, Alan Bell, who has died aged 67 after a motorcycle accident on holiday in Laos, was a world expert on DVD security and copyright protection who was granted more than 20 US patents.Alan was a key member of the team at the RCA technology firm in the US that developed the first optical disk and invented the recording medium that coated the disk’s surface, a breakthrough central to the subsequent developments of the CD and the DVD. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 29, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Tom Plimmer Tags: Technology Digital video Computing Digital music and audio Data and computer security Physics Science Source Type: news

Whatever happened to the ASEAN medical device directive?
By Stewart Eisenhart, Emergo Group Back in 2012 and 2013, Emergo and other medical device industry news sources began reporting on an effort by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) trade bloc to establish harmonized device registration systems across 10 countries in the region. Now, while a few member countries have made significant progress toward realizing that effort, the ASEAN Medical Device Directive (AMDD) as a whole remains a work in progress. According to the AMDD agreement as drafted, uniform (or at least highly similar) requirements for device registration, quality system compliance and related iss...
Source: Mass Device - April 27, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Blog Emergo Group Source Type: news

Student motorcyclists' mobile phone use while driving in Vientiane, Laos - Phommachanh S, Ichikawa M, Nakahara S, Mayxay M, Kimura A.
To investigate mobile phone use while driving among student motorcyclists in Laos, we conducted a school-based questionnaire survey in central Vientiane in May 2014. Of the 883 high school students who reported to drive motorcycles at least once a week, 40... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 23, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

Cassava in south-east Asia under threat from witches' broom disease
Climate change menacing yet another food crop by fuelling explosion in pests and diseases that are attacking cassava plantsClimate change and globalisation are fuelling an explosion in the pests and diseases that afflict south-east Asia’s cassava crops, threatening a multi-billion dollar industry and the staple food of millions of people, a report warns. Related: Bananas facing a bleak future as staple African crops decline Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Sam Jones Tags: Food security Global development Agriculture Science Climate change Asia Pacific Cambodia Environment Indonesia Insects & drink Vietnam Philippines Laos Thailand World news Source Type: news

For The First Time In A Century, Wild Tiger Numbers Are On The Rise
For wild tigers, the numbers have not been kind. In 1900, an estimated 100,000 tigers roamed free on our planet. Yet within a hundred years, that number plummeted by more than 95 percent -- the result of rampant poaching and widespread habitat loss. But it seems the tide may finally be turning for the majestic cat. On Sunday, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) announced that wild tiger numbers were on the rise for the first time in over a century. There are now an estimated 3,890 tigers in the wild, up from about 3,200 in 2010, said WWF, citing national tiger survey numbers.  The increase could partly be attributed to risi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

6 Amazing Tips for Staying in Shape While Traveling
Staying fit while on the road (and otherwise) is extremely important and somehow I feel that fitness and travel go hand in hand. If you travel a lot , you tend to stay fit and if you are not fit, traveling is just not as much fun, or important anymore -- after all, health always comes first, right? I would like to think of myself as a fit traveler though I am always striving towards harder fitness goals. Staying focused and motivated is the key. As a traveler, any sort of "regular" gym sessions are impossible , however, if you are focused, you can exercise literally anywhere in the world. You don't need a fancy g...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

6 Amazing Tips for Staying in Shape While Traveling
Staying fit while on the road (and otherwise) is extremely important and somehow I feel that fitness and travel go hand in hand. If you travel a lot , you tend to stay fit and if you are not fit, traveling is just not as much fun, or important anymore -- after all, health always comes first, right? I would like to think of myself as a fit traveler though I am always striving towards harder fitness goals. Staying focused and motivated is the key. As a traveler, any sort of "regular" gym sessions are impossible , however, if you are focused, you can exercise literally anywhere in the world. You don't need a fancy ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

African Rhinos May Be Extinct In 10 Years Or Less, Experts Warn
It was only 150 years ago that more than 1 million black and white rhinos roamed the savannas of Africa. Since then, poaching has decimated populations across the continent. By 1990, there were just 6,000 white rhino and 2,400 black rhino left in the wild. Conservation efforts and a global crackdown on wildlife crime saved the threatened animals from the brink of extinction. By 2008, white rhino numbers in Africa had ballooned to almost 20,000 while the black rhino population nearly doubled. It looked like a perfect comeback story, a narrative of hope and survival in the face of terrible odds, but then, the tale of th...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

[Editorial] Global science engagement
In rural Laos, more than 50% of newborns will be stunted by age 2 due to chronic malnourishment. Worldwide, 161 million children under the age of 5, many of them in Africa and Asia, suffered irreversible stunting as of 2013. The developed world is not immune. As recently as 2010, stunting affected 8 to 9% of babies enrolled in U.S. federal food-subsidy programs. Next week in Washington, DC, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS is the publisher of Science) will convene its annual meeting (11 to 15 February), where world leaders will discuss food security and other major challenges that lie ahead in ...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 29, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Geraldine Richmond Source Type: news

UNISON bursaries for activists
UNISON is able to offer bursaries for union activists studying trade union and labour studies or women’s studies at certificate, diploma or degree level. The size of the bursary or grant depends on the level of the qualification. Certificate or diploma courses: grants of up to £300 for members on trade union and labour movement or women’s studies courses. BA degrees: grants of up to £500 for members on trade union and labour movement or women’s studies courses. Masters degrees: grants of up to one-third of fees for a union representative studying trade union and labour studies or women’...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - January 27, 2016 Category: Food Science Authors: tonyb Tags: Article News activist training pathways activists activists' learning bursaries grants laos ruskin college trade union and labour studies women women's studies Source Type: news

Facts & Figures Report: Cancer Rates Vary Widely Among Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders
By Stacy SimonA new report from the American Cancer Society details the rates of new cancer cases and the rates of cancer deaths among Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AANHPIs). The rates vary widely among this population, mostly because of significant differences in exposure to cancer risk factors. The report is published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians and also as a Special Section in Cancer Facts & Figures 2016.Asian American refers to people with origins in the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent. This group includes, but is not limited to, Asian Indians, Cambodians,...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - January 19, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Disparities Source Type: news

First discovery of a hibernating primate outside Madagascar
Up to now, three species of lemurs on Madagascar were the only primates known to hibernate. Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna in Austria, now show for the first time that another primate species that lives in Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and China, the pygmy slow loris, also uses hibernation to save energy. The results were published in Scientific Reports this week. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 3, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Weekend Roundup: Advent of the Third Industrial Revolution
The WorldPost strives every day to chronicle the ongoing contest between two competing futures. One future is a world coming together through the convergence of new technologies that promise ecological stability, the empowerment of diversity and opportunity for all. The other is a world falling apart through bitter partisanship, religious warfare and the return of geopolitical blocs. This week we begin a new series that takes sides. Futurist Jeremy Rifkin lays out a vision of "the Third Industrial Revolution" that, through digital connectivity, clean energy and smart transportation all tied together through the ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 23, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

As world seeks to eradicate polio, Laos suffers vaccine-linked case
GENEVA/LONDON (Reuters) - Laos has suffered a case of vaccine-derived polio, the World Health Organization said on Monday, in a new setback to a global plan to eradicate the crippling disease after the virus resurfaced in Ukraine and Mali. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Primary Care Strengthening in Southeast Asia (Laura Goldman MD)
The developing countries of Southeast Asia have until recently allocated very little human and economic capital in the health care system. Within the region, however, the stage of development of primary care is very disparate. Vietnam is poised to transform its health care system with the adoption of the Family Medicine model throughout the country. Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar lack both the workforce and the organization to provide comprehensive primary care. Despite this, there is significant momentum and interest. In our work as consultants, we have developed programs in all these countries to strengthen primary care. We ...
Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded - September 28, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Road traffic injuries in Northern Laos: trends and risk factors of an underreported public health problem - Slesak G, Inthalath S, Wilder-Smith A, Barennes H.
OBJECTIVES: Road traffic injuries (RTI) have become a leading cause for admissions at Luang Namtha Provincial Hospital in rapidly developing northern Laos. OBJECTIVEs were to investigate trends, risk factors, and better estimates of RTI. ME... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - July 4, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Pedestrians and Bicycles Source Type: news

Issues surrounding children as motorcycle pillion rider in ASEAN country - Paiman NF, Ariffin AH, Hamzah A, Husin SFM, Jawi ZM, Solah MS, Mohamed N.
BACKGROUND: In ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) countries (Brunei, Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam) where motorcycles are the main mode of transportation, it is worth to explore on... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - June 24, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

A Nobel Scientist Just Made a Breathtakingly Sexist Speech at International Conference
Renowned scientist and Nobel prize winner Tim Hunt told a room full of high-ranking scientists and science journalists Wednesday that the trouble with “girls” working in science is that “three things happen when they are in the lab … You fall in love with them, they fall in love with you and when you criticize them, they cry.” Hunt, who was speaking at the World Conference of Science Journalists in the South Korean capital, Seoul, went on to say that scientists should work in gender-segregated labs, adding that he hoped not “to stand in the way of women,” the Guardian reports. Hun...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - June 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: alissagreenberg Tags: Uncategorized Chauvinism gaffe human behavior nobel prize Science sexism South Korea STEM twitter women in science Source Type: news

Researcher finds rare Vietnamese rabbit
A rare and elusive rabbit has been found, held and photographed by a researcher. The Annamite striped rabbit, found in the forests of Laos and Vietnam, was first documented by rabbit expert Dr Diana Bell in 1999. It has rarely been seen since. A British researcher set out on a three-month expedition to track the recently discovered rabbit and study its habitat. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Despite Setbacks, Global Sanitation Makes Progress, Says Fund
An open drainage ditch in Ankorondrano-Andranomahery, Madagascar. Credit: Lova Rabary-Rakontondravony/IPSBy Thalif DeenUNITED NATIONS, Jun 2 2015 (IPS)When the United Nations hosted a panel discussion last year urging its partners to “break their silence” on open defecation, Singapore’s deputy permanent representative Mark Neo was outspoken in his characterisation: “Open defecation is a euphemism. What we are talking about is shitting in the open.”And over one billion people worldwide do so every day.“This is a crucial step towards achieving better health, reducing poverty and ensuring e...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 2, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Thalif Deen Tags: Aid Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Inequity IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs Water & Sanitation Women's Health Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) India open def Source Type: news

Thorny frog and dementor wasp among new species discovered in Mekong
139 new species were identified in South East Asian region in 2014, including four moths named after Thai princesses and a new mammalA “dementor” wasp named after the Harry Potter creatures, a stick insect more than half a metre long, and a colour-changing thorny frog are among new species discovered in South East Asia’s Greater Mekong region.The discoveries also include a bent-toed gecko which is the 10,000th reptile to be recorded on Earth, a feathered coral whose nearest relatives are found in Africa and four moths named after Thai princesses. Related: Flying squirrel and eyeless spider discovered in G...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 26, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Wildlife Environment Cambodia Laos Burma Thailand Vietnam World news Asia Pacific South and Central Asia Source Type: news

Masters in Family Medicine in Laos: A Pilot Distance Learning Program (Laura Goldman MD)
Conclusions: This novel Family Medicine retraining program in Laos was effective in promoting individual skills improvement among participants, and colleagues working with participants were impressed with their performance, including the extension of lessons to other rural staff. Consensus suggested the program should be continued and expanded to additional sites in Laos. (Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded)
Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded - April 29, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Two ancient human fossils from Laos reveal early human diversity
An ancient human skull and a jawbone found a few meters apart in a cave in northern Laos add to the evidence that early modern humans were physically quite diverse, researchers report. The skull has fully modern features while the jaw is a mix of modern and archaic traits. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 8, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

The 'Unicorn' DOES Exist, And It's About To Go Extinct
Unicorns are real. Or at least, there's a creature on the brink of extinction that some think looks a lot like our favorite fabled horse-like beast. Plus, it's just about as rare. There may only be a few dozen of the antelope-like saola left on earth, and one man is trying to find them. William deBuys, who penned "The Last Unicorn: A Search for One of Earth’s Rarest Creatures" in 2011, has been traveling to Laos in Southeast Asia to find the saola since it was discovered by scientists in 1992. "Its long, nearly straight horns are elegantly tapered, and in profile they seem to blend into a single h...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 6, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

As Cost Of Renewables Falls, Large-Scale Hydropower Seen As A Risky Bet
This story originally appeared on Climate Central. As investments in wind and solar power climb, backing major hydropower projects may be seen as a risky bet in a warming world, as studies show that reservoirs may be major sources of methane emissions and climate change itself could make rain and snowfall less certain in some regions. An indicator of where renewables investors are focusing their attention, large hydropower was left out of a major United Nations and Bloomberg report published this week showing that global investments in renewables spiked 17 percent in 2014. The Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River in A...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 3, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Politics of Extinction
An Introduction to the Most Beautiful Animal You'll Never See Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com Maybe baby steps will help, but the world needs a lot more than either the United States or China is offering to combat the illegal traffic in wildlife, a nearly $20-billion-a-year business that adds up to a global war against nature. As the headlines tell us, the trade has pushed various rhinoceros species to the point of extinction and motivated poachers to kill more than 100,000 elephants since 2010. Last month China announced that it would ban ivory imports for a year, while it “evaluates” the effectiveness of ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 16, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

UN agency photo competition shines spotlight on ‘family meal’ in achieving 'Zero Hunger'
Scenes of families eating together in Burundi, Laos and the Philippines today won a photo competition judged by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver aimed at demonstrating “the simple yet powerful role provided by sitting tougher and eating as a family,” the World Food Programme (WFP) announced. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - February 23, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Photo competition shines spotlight on ‘family meal’ in achieving UN zero hunger goal
Scenes of families eating together in Burundi, Laos and the Philippines today won a photo competition judged by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver aimed at demonstrating “the simple yet powerful role provided by sitting tougher and eating as a family,” the World Food Programme (WFP) announced. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - February 23, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Laos targets green energy in new Asian economic bloc
As ten South-East Asian nations move to a single market this year, Laos plans to ramp up research in key areas. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - January 6, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news