The Victims of Agent Orange the U.S. Has Never Acknowledged
America has never taken responsibility for spraying the herbicide over Laos during the Vietnam War. But generations of ethnic minorities have endured the consequences. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: George Black and Christopher Anderson Tags: Agent Orange (Defoliant) United States Defense and Military Forces Vietnam War Defoliants and Herbicides Dioxin Central Intelligence Agency United States Air Force Leahy, Patrick J Laos Vientiane (Laos) Source Type: news

International Women ’s Day, 2021Why Green Growth and Climate Action Fall Short Without Addressing Gender Inequality
Credit: GGGIBy Frank Rijsberman, Ingvild Solvang and Bertha Wakisa ChiudzaSEOUL, Republic of Korea, Mar 8 2021 (IPS) As the global effort to address climate change has strengthened over the last few years, so has the realization that rising temperatures and climactic disruptions disproportionately impact women, particularly in developing countries, as they tend to be more dependent upon natural resources and are thus overrepresented in resource-intensive economic sectors. Furthermore, inherent in gender inequality are disadvantages for and discrimination against women in all facets of society, including in the economy and ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Frank Rijsberman - Ingvild Solvang - Bertha Wakisa Chiudza Tags: Climate Change Development & Aid Economy & Trade Education Environment Gender Global Green Economy Headlines Health Human Rights Inequity Labour Natural Resources Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Women & Climate Chan Source Type: news

What Role Can South-South Cooperation Play in Post COVID-19 Recovery?
By Matteo MarchisioBEIJING, Mar 2 2021 (IPS) Five years ago, at the 70th anniversary of the foundation of the United Nations, world leaders adopted the ambitious Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development. The Agenda was to be accomplished through the achievement of 17 Sustainable Development Goals by 2030: eradicating poverty, ending hunger, addressing climate change – just to name a few. Matteo MarchisioThe COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 suddenly disrupted advancement toward meeting this goal, in many cases rolling back years of progress. The World Bank, for example, estimated that COVID-19 has pushed an additional 88 to ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Matteo Marchisio Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Food & Agriculture Food Security and Nutrition Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Poverty & SDGs South-South TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Local cassia tree in Thailand can help dissolve dangerous blood clots
(Natural News) Cassia siamea, commonly known as yellow cassia or Siamese senna, is an evergreen tree native to Southeast Asia, particularly in the countries of Myanmar, Malaysia, Laos, Vietnam and Thailand. Known as a source of high-quality firewood, yellow cassia is also grown as an ornamental because of the bright yellow flowers it produces throughout... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

If Covid-19 is Primarily a ‘First World’ Virus, Why is the Global South in Lockdown?
A lockdown closer home. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres walking the empty corridors of the UN Secretariat building in New York in 2020. Credit: United NationsBy Darini Rajasingham-SenanayakeCOLOMBO, Sri Lanka, Jan 7 2021 (IPS) The currently available Covid-19 vaccines have been authorized for ‘emergency use ‘in Europe and North America. This is due to an apparent spike in Covid-19 flu cases in the northern hemisphere as winter advances. Highly advertised vaccines are being produced and rolled out at ‘warped speed’ by powerful pharmaceutical and bio-technology companies headquartered in Euro-Ameri...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Darini Rajasingham-Senanayake Tags: Aid Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Investigating the experience of local community networks of disaster self-management: a qualitative study in Thailand - Nuntaboot K, Boonsawasdgulchai P, Bubpa N, Benner MT.
BACKGROUND: Thailand is exposed to multiple climate-related hazards. Those cause disaster, instability and destruction to human life and property. People affected by disasters need self-help capabilities. Therefore, local administration organizations (LAOs... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Community-Based Prevention Source Type: news

UCLA model ID ’s areas that should have priority for vaccine, other COVID-19 help
To help slow the spread of COVID-19 and save lives, UCLA public health and urban planning experts have developed a predictive model that pinpoints which populations in which neighborhoods of Los Angeles County are most at risk of becoming infected.The researchers hope the new model, which can be applied to other counties and jurisdictions as well,will assist decision makers, public health officials and scientists in effectively and equitably implementing vaccine distribution, testing, closures and reopenings, and other virus-mitigation measures.The model maps Los Angeles County neighborhood by neighborhood, based on four i...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 18, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Secretive Mega-Trade Deal Rules Could Harm Asia ’s Covid-19 Recovery
Community Health warriors (Anganwadi center in Chennai, Tamil Nadu). Credit: Public Services International (PSI)By Lyndal RowlandsBANGKOK, Thailand, Nov 13 2020 (IPS) Fifteen countries will sign a mega-trade deal at the ASEAN conference this weekend imposing secretive restrictions on how governments help workers through the pandemic, trade union leaders and parliamentarians have warned. The text of the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) agreement is so secretive that even elected representatives have not been allowed to see it, even though it will potentially lock future governments into rules that will li...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Lyndal Rowlands Tags: Asia-Pacific Climate Change Development & Aid Economy & Trade Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Labour TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Starbucks targets new market, in coffee exporting Laos
The company said it plans to open the shop in the Laotian capital Vientiane by next summer (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The power of union learning
“A few years ago … I wouldn’t have said boo to a goose, but my confidence and my own self-worth have grown.” Those are the words of Sharon Thompson, hospital catering assistant and UNISON member, and one of the many, many workers who has benefited from union learning. Sharon had, at one time, wanted to study child psychology, but university wasn’t possible. Some years down the line, when she was having difficulties at work, UNISON learning rep Hazel Kjebekk suggested learning to her. Together, they came up with a plan for her to study counselling, starting with a confidence workshop available...
Source: UNISON Health care news - October 23, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: Amanda Kendal Tags: Article News laos save union learning Source Type: news

Vaccine proves effective against the most severe type of pneumonia
(Murdoch Childrens Research Institute) A pneumococcal vaccine was effective at protecting children in Laos against the most severe type of pneumonia, a new study has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research links Southeast Asia megadrought to drying in Africa
(University of Pennsylvania) Physical evidence found in caves in Laos connects the end of the Green Sahara, when once heavily vegetated Northern Africa became a hyper-arid landscape, and a previously unknown megadrought that crippled Southeast Asia 4,000 to 5,000 years ago. Scientists at the University of California, Irvine, University of Pennsylvania, William Paterson University of New Jersey and other international institutions explain how this major climate transformation led to a shift in human settlement patterns in Southeast Asia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Illegal trade with terrestrial vertebrates in markets and households of Laos
(Pensoft Publishers) Scientists provide the first interdisciplinary assessment of human involvement into the terrestrial vertebrate trade in Laos and its impact on the survival of the local fauna populations. Sixty-six traded species found on wildlife trade markets were documented in the paper, published in the open-access journal Nature Conservation, and more than half of them were found to be the species protected either by national law or international convention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Consumption of products derived from vulnerable wildlife species pervasive in Laos
(San Diego Zoo Global) A new study of wildlife consumption in northern Laos by San Diego Zoo Global researchers found widespread use of products made from sun bears, Asiatic bears and serows--goat-like mammals found throughout Asia--among other vulnerable species. The findings indicate that efforts are needed to reduce the unsustainable harvest of bears and serows, in particular, 'before this demand becomes a significant conservation challenge,' the authors wrote. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 1, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

U.S. and Chinese Scientists Trace Evolution of Coronaviruses in Bats
Researchers whose canceled U.S. grant caused an outcry from other scientists urge preventive monitoring of viruses in southwestern China. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: James Gorman Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Bats SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) EcoHealth Alliance National Institutes of Health Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Daszak, Peter Ebright, Richard H Trump, Donald J China Laos Myanmar Source Type: news

UCLA creates multilingual website for coronavirus information
It ’s abundantly clear that the COVID-19 pandemic has not hit all people equally, and part of that disparity is informational. Many communities have an increased vulnerability because of a lack access to official news, public health information and safety recommendations in a language other than Engl ish.To help remedy that, faculty from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and the Asian American Studies Center quickly came together recently to launchTranslateCovid.org. This new website presents health and safety recommendations and other information in more than 40 languages, including Spanish, Chinese, Korean,...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 29, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Coronavirus: online learning update
Health and safety resources Coronavirus is, above all, a health and safety issue. From making the argument for PPE for key workers, to ensuring that members can work safely from home, the role of the health and safety rep has never been more important. Working through our learning and organising team. UNISON has compiled some of the best online resources for our health and safety reps. Some are particularly relevant to these times; some are more generally useful. Virtual learning for health and safety reps during the coronavirus outbreak   Focus on care workers This is a very hard time for many of our members, especia...
Source: UNISON Health care news - April 21, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: Tony Braisby Tags: Article activist education activist training adult social care care workers health and safety health and safety reps health and social care laos learning learning and organising member learning Source Type: news

Vietnam Winning New War Against Invisible Enemy
By Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame SundaramSYDNEY and KUALA LUMPUR, Apr 14 2020 (IPS) Vietnam, just south of coastal China, is the 15th most populous country in the world with 97 million people.According to its Ministry of Health (MoH), as of 13 April, there were 262 confirmed cases of COVID-19, with 144 recovering or discharged from hospitals, and no deaths. Poor country, early action With officials acting quickly to trace and test contacts, as well as quarantine and treat the infected, Vietnam contained the first wave of infections in January. Following a second wave of 41 new cases, Vietnam imposed a national isolation o...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Asia-Pacific Featured Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Jomo Kwame Sundaram & Anis Chowdhury Source Type: news

Introducing new remote learning opportunities
UNISON is keen to ensure that members still have access to the high-quality training that the union provides, even though it’s not possible to meet face-to-face during the current coronavirus crisis. That’s why the union has formed a partnership with the Skills Academy to give members access to over 550 free online courses, from time priority management to how to manage virtual teams to remote workers’ security. In this time of heightened anxiety and stress, it’s more important than ever to take care of ourselves and our own wellbeing, so the union has also produced an online version of our popular ...
Source: UNISON Health care news - March 30, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: Amanda Kendal Tags: Article News laos learning online learning Source Type: news

While you ’ re helping the nation, UNISON is working for you
UNISON nationally and regionally is working hard to ensure that the union is supporting members to the best of its ability during the coronavirus crisis. These are extraordinary and unprecedented times – and we are acting accordingly. Amongst the union’s key aims has been to negotiate around the impact of the pandemic on members at work. Christina McAnea, assistant general secretary responsible for bargaining, negotiations and equalities said today: “Giving advice and support to our members during this time of crisis has been of paramount importance to our bargaining teams. “We are well aware that t...
Source: UNISON Health care news - March 24, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: matheoud Tags: Article News coronavirus pay negotiating and bargaining Source Type: news

Biometric devices help pinpoint factory workers' emotions and productivity
(Hiroshima University) Happiness, as measured by a wearable biometric device, was closely related to productivity among a group of factory workers in Laos, reveals a recent study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 2, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

JLK Inspection partners with Laos ’ National TB Center and CHAI to expand access to TB screening
The " JLD-02K " solution provides convenience to clinicians while also supporting higher precision of analysis. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - February 28, 2020 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Landscape-level surveys are necessary to address large-scale wildlife losses from poaching
(Forschungsverbund Berlin) Widespread poaching in tropical biodiversity hotspots is causing unprecedented declines in wildlife populations, known as defaunation. A new study provides evidence that large-scale systematic surveys and novel methods of data collection and analysis, are necessary to assess the extent and distribution of poaching and its impact on biodiversity in forest exposed to severe defaunation. The research team, led by the Leibniz-IZW, comprised scientists, conservationists and government counterparts, including representatives from WWF-Vietnam and WWF-Laos. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 5, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Transiting knowledge in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam
EU-funded researchers are working with counterparts in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam to help all three Southeast Asian nations boost their transition economies, among the fastest growing in the world, by developing local skills and putting knowledge into practice. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 17, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Shocked doctors remove nearly 2,000 gallstones from a 60-year-old woman's stomach
Medics in Nong Khai, Thailand - on the border of Laos - conducted a scan and found hundreds of gallstones inside her gallbladder. They spent 40 minutes removing the lumps. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Multidrug-Resistant Malaria Spreading in Southeast Asia -Study Multidrug-Resistant Malaria Spreading in Southeast Asia -Study
Malaria parasites resistant to two key anti-malarial medicines are becoming more dominant in Vietnam, Laos and northern Thailand after spreading rapidly from Cambodia, scientists warned on Monday.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Resistant malaria spreading in South East Asia
Drug-resistant malaria parasites have moved from Cambodia to Laos, Thailand and Vietnam. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - July 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Multidrug-resistant malaria spreading in Southeast Asia: study
Strains of malaria resistant to two key anti-malarial medicines are becoming more dominant in Vietnam, Laos and northern Thailand after spreading rapidly from Cambodia, scientists warned on Monday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Multidrug-resistant malaria spreading in Asia
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) Genomic surveillance has revealed that malaria resistance to two first-line antimalarial drugs has spread rapidly from Cambodia to neighboring countries in Southeast Asia. Researchers discovered that descendants of one multi-drug resistant malaria strain are replacing the local parasites in Vietnam, Laos and northeastern Thailand, and are picking up additional new genetic changes which could further enhance resistance. The study in The Lancet Infectious Diseases reveals the importance of ongoing genomic surveillance in malaria control strategies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Rapidly spreading multidrug-resistant parasites render frontline malaria drug ineffective in southeast Asia
(The Lancet) Multidrug-resistant forms of Plasmodium falciparum parasites, the most lethal species causing human malaria, have evolved even higher levels of resistance to antimalarial drugs and spread rapidly since 2015, becoming firmly established in multiple regions of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam, where they are causing alarmingly high treatment failure rates to a widely used frontline malaria drug combination. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 22, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

From Satellites to the Moon and Mars, China Is Quickly Becoming a Space Superpower
Nestled among the crimson dunes of China’s Gobi Desert, a warren of domes and squat white buildings rises from the parched earth. Inside is a research and educational facility for budding astronauts — and the latest manifestation of Beijing’s bid to position itself as a leading space power. “Mars Base 1,” built by private Chinese company C-Space, is like a space station on Earth, boasting an airlock, greenhouse, gymnasium, living quarters and control room. Solar-powered buggies and lunar probes scour the red dust landscape of northeastern Gansu province, whose barren expanses bear an eerie res...
Source: TIME: Science - July 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Charlie Campbell Tags: Uncategorized apollo1150 China onetime space Source Type: news

Philippines bans pig imports from Laos due to swine fever: WTO
The Philippines has banned imports of pigs and pig products from Laos due to an African swine fever outbreak, it said in filings published by the World Trade Organization on Tuesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Thailand bans pig imports from Laos after African swine fever outbreak
Thailand will ban pig imports from Laos for 90 days after its neighbor confirmed the first outbreak of deadly African swine fever, an official notice said. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

China bans pig imports from Laos due to African swine fever
China said on Friday it has banned direct and indirect imports of pigs, wild boars and related products from Laos due to the first African swine fever outbreaks reported by the Southeast Asian nation on June 20. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Laos confirms first cases of African swine fever - OIE
Laos has reported its first cases of African swine fever (ASF), confirming outbreaks in the southern province of Saravane, the Paris-based World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Thursday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Asian Nations Scramble to Contain Pig Disease Outbreaks
By HAU DINH and SAM McNEIL HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Asian nations are scrambling to contain the spread of highly contagious African swine fever, with Vietnam culling 2.6 million pigs and China reporting more than a million dead in an unprecedentedly huge epidemic some fear is out of control.Smaller outbreaks have been reported in Hong Kong, Taiwan, North Korea, Cambodia and Mongolia after cases were first reported in China's northeast in August. The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization released a weekly update on the scale of infections on Thursday which reported a new outbreak in Laos.With pork supplies dwindling as ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 20, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: International News Patient Care Source Type: news

Asian Nations Scramble to Contain Pig Disease Outbreaks
By HAU DINH and SAM McNEIL HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Asian nations are scrambling to contain the spread of highly contagious African swine fever, with Vietnam culling 2.6 million pigs and China reporting more than a million dead in an unprecedentedly huge epidemic some fear is out of control.Smaller outbreaks have been reported in Hong Kong, Taiwan, North Korea, Cambodia and Mongolia after cases were first reported in China's northeast in August. The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization released a weekly update on the scale of infections on Thursday which reported a new outbreak in Laos.With pork supplies dwindling as ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 20, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: International News Patient Care Source Type: news

More mysterious jars of the dead unearthed in Laos
(Australian National University) Archaeologists have discovered 15 new sites in Laos containing more than one hundred 1,000-year-old massive stone jars possibly used for the dead. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Thursday ’s Daily Brief: Ebola in DR Congo, malnutrition in Laos, baby health, support for Sahel force, #ClimateAction
On Thursday, we cover: more support needed for Sahel force, fears in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) as Ebola response funding dwindles; food and nutrition concerns in Laos; an update on low birthweight babies across the world; and the UN chief ’s trip for climate action in the Pacific continues. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - May 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'A Million Elephants' No More: Conservationists In Laos Rush To Save An Icon
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ashley Westerman Source Type: news

‘Once in a generation opportunity to put younger workers at the heart of our union’
Delegates at UNISON’s health conference today welcomed moves to better recruit, represent and include young members. As Shipha Begum of the Young Members Forum (above) told the conference: “We’re not the future of the union – we’re right here, right now, getting active, getting organised and building the union. “And we want to make sure that all our colleagues in the NHS and across the health sector are right beside us.” The TUC has highlighted the fact that less than 8% of workers aged 16-24 are in a union, while almost 40% of union members are aged 50 or over. Like the TUC, UNISO...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - April 10, 2019 Category: Food Science Authors: Demetrios Matheou Tags: Article News 2019 Health Conference health care Year of Young Workers young members Source Type: news

Gruesome footage shows a LEECH being removed from a boy's nose
The seven-year-old boy - who has not been named - had been playing in a muddy canal in Xaignabouli, northwest Laos, when he felt something get stuck in his left nostril. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Severe blunt trauma in Finland and Estonia: comparison of two regional trauma repositories - Saar S, Brinck T, Laos J, Handolin L, Talving P.
PURPOSE: Evolving trauma system of Estonia has undergone several reforms; however, performance and outcome indicators have not been benchmarked previously. Thus, we initiated a baseline study to compare demographics, management and outcomes of severely inj... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Could the cure for cancer be found in orchids?
(Natural News) Research published in Phytomedicine identified an orchid found in Southeast Asia to contain multiple therapeutic properties. In the study, scientists from the University of Vienna reported that Eulophia macrobulbon — a type of orchid native to Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia — has antioxidant properties and can protect the body against inflammation. The study also identified the plant to be... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

From spectacular orchids to towering trees – 2018's top new plant discoveries
Around the world, species hunters unearth 128 vascular plants and 44 species of fungi, many already facing extinctionA spectacular orchid sold from a barrow in a Laos market, a flower which may contain cancer-fighting chemicals, and a tall tree found beside an African highway, are among more than 100 plants that were newly discovered by science in 2018. But experts warn it is a “race against time” to discover many new species before they become extinct.Species hunters scouring the globe for the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and its partners, this year found about 128 vascular plants and 44 species of fungi.Contin...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham Tags: Plants Biology Kew Gardens Endangered species Guinea Environment Science Endangered habitats Conservation Cameroon Sierra Leone Laos Wildlife Source Type: news

The Ecosystem in Immigrants ’ Guts Is Shaped by the Place They Call Home
By studying the relationship among ethnicity, migration history and the digestive system ’ s microbiome, researchers hope to gain insights on health disparities in diverse communities. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: STEPH YIN Tags: Microbiology Immigration and Emigration Digestive Tract Hmong Tribe Obesity Diet and Nutrition Refugees and Displaced Persons Cell (Journal) Nature Medicine (Journal) Karen (ethnic group) Minnesota Amsterdam (Netherlands) Laos My Source Type: news

How to Wipe Out Malaria for Good
Malaria has plagued humanity for thousands of years. Caused by a tiny parasite transported from person to person by a certain kind of mosquito, the disease poses a risk to nearly half the world’s population. The WHO attempted to eradicate malaria in the 1960s and while it succeeded in ridding many countries of the disease, it fell short of the goal due to growing drug resistance and by failing to focus enough attention on Africa. Every year on World Malaria Day, April 25, the malaria community celebrates progress made to date and focuses on the challenges ahead. This year is especially exciting as just this past Fri...
Source: TIME: Health - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Erin M. Stuckey Tags: Uncategorized Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Malaria World Malaria Day Source Type: news

A Breath of Fresh Air in India
Vehicle ownership in India is projected to hit 400 million by 2040 from the 170 million recorded in 2015, which could prompt a five-fold increase in poisonous gases emitted by cars and trucks. Credit: Neeta Lal/IPSBy Ranjit DevrajNEW DELHI, Mar 20 2018 (IPS)With India’s citizens clamouring for breathable air and efficient energy options, the country’s planners are more receptive than ever to explore sustainable development options, says Frank Rijsberman, Director-General of the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI).Rijsberman, who was in India to attend the first International Solar Alliance Summit on March 11, ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ranjit Devraj Tags: Aid Asia-Pacific Biodiversity Climate Change Combating Desertification and Drought Development & Aid Energy Environment Featured Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) Green Economy Headlines Health Natural Resources Population Source Type: news

Pushing for Asbestos Bans in Southeast Asia
Dr. Ken Takahashi is doing more than just talking about a global ban on asbestos products and the eventual end of asbestos-related diseases. He is traveling the world to help make it happen — one small step at a time. Takahashi, who is the director of the Asbestos Diseases Research Institute (ADRI) and consultant for the World Health Organization (WHO), met recently with government officials in Laos, currently one of the highest per capita consumers of asbestos. And he liked what he heard. “I am optimistic there, but with caution,” Takahashi told Asbestos.com. “Ultimately, it is a battle for the cau...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 19, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Walter Pacheco Source Type: news

12 People Got Worms from Eating Raw Wild Boar at a Party
Twelve people developed the parasitic infection trichinellosis after eating raw wild boar at a party in California, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Humans and animals typically develop trichinellosis after eating raw or undercooked meat that contains Trichinella worm larvae, according to the CDC. The worms are released into the small intestine after consumption, where they mature and lay eggs. Eventually, those eggs hatch into immature worms and reach the arteries and muscles. The infection spreads when a human or animal eats meat from an animal with larvae already in it...
Source: TIME: Health - March 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news