Why getting on a rollercoaster can transform your life: From dislodging brain tumours to helping you pass kidney stones
Researchers at Michigan State University in the U.S. rode a rollercoaster at Disney World all day while carrying a life-size replica of the kidney of a patient who ’d passed stones after the ride. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trilobites: A Roller Coaster Remedy for Kidney Stones?
Research shows that an amusement park ride that makes the heart leap and fingertips tingle may also help you pass small stones. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: STEPH YIN Tags: Kidneys Roller Coasters Bladder Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Wartinger, David Mitchell, Marc Source Type: news

Keeping tabs on kidney stones prevents painful attack
Treatment TermsKidney stones Additional SEO Keywords kidney stone, kidney stone disease, kidney stone pain, kidney stone attack, kidney stone surgery SEO Meta Description After Robert Lontz had two kidney stone attacks, he worked with his Duke urologist on a kidney stone disease management plan that helped him successfully avoid Author MaryAnn Fletcher Overview After Robert Lontz had two kidney stone attacks, he worked with his Dukeurologist on akidney stone disease management plan that helped him successfully avoid a third. Hero Image20160928.lontz_.robert.01.blog_.jpg Preview Image Content Blocks Section Head...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - October 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: mf205 at duke.edu Source Type: news

PodMed: A Medical News Roundup From Johns Hopkins (with audio)
(MedPage Today) -- This week's topics include roller coasters and kidney stones, colonoscopy in those older than 70, benefits of exercise in older folks, and the health impact of cleft palate (Source: MedPage Today Endocrinology)
Source: MedPage Today Endocrinology - October 1, 2016 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Rollercoaster therapy: Riding a rollercoaster may actually help you pass a kidney stone
(NaturalNews) Rollercoasters are an integral part of many family vacations. But they may also help some people to release kidney stones, at least according to urological surgeon David Wartinger. Dr. Wartinger is also an emeritus professor at Michigan State University, and has spent... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Myths of Emergency Medicine: Stop Prescribing Tamsulosin to All with Kidney Stones
No abstract available (Source: Emergency Medicine News)
Source: Emergency Medicine News - October 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Myths of Emergency Medicine Source Type: news

Little kidney stone? Ride a roller coaster, says study
When you're trying to pass a kidney stone, you're probably not thinking, in your cloud of agony, "Darn it! I should have ridden a roller coaster." (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Suffer From Kidney Stones? Riding A Roller Coaster May Help
For people suffering kidney stones, Disney World may indeed be the most magical place on Earth. A study conducted at the Florida theme park found that riding roller coasters may help people pass kidney stones with far less pain and no need for surgery. Researchers at Michigan State University carried out the study by riding the park’s Big Thunder Mountain Railroad coaster with a model of a kidney that contained three stones. According to the results, published in Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, the kidney stones passed nearly 70 percent of the time. “This kind of vibratory bouncing-ar...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Suffer From Kidney Stones? Riding A Roller Coaster May Help
For people suffering kidney stones, Disney World may indeed be the most magical place on Earth. A study conducted at the Florida theme park found that riding roller coasters may help people pass kidney stones with far less pain and no need for surgery. Researchers at Michigan State University carried out the study by riding the park’s Big Thunder Mountain Railroad coaster with a model of a kidney that contained three stones. According to the results, published in Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, the kidney stones passed nearly 70 percent of the time. “This kind of vibratory bouncing-ar...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kidney Stone? Try a Roller Coaster Ride
Study supports stories from patients who passed the urinary obstruction while on a thrill ride (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Have A Kidney Stone? This Amusement Park Ride May Help You Pass It
Kidney stones--often the size of a sand grain--are one of the most painful conditions that people may experience in their lifetime. Certainly childbirth, as well as as suffering a heart attack or even a fractured hip, wrist or rib, may rank up there as well. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - September 28, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robert Glatter, MD Source Type: news

Kidney Stone? Try a Roller Coaster Ride
Title: Kidney Stone? Try a Roller Coaster RideCategory: Health NewsCreated: 9/27/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 9/28/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Digestion General)
Source: MedicineNet Digestion General - September 28, 2016 Category: Nutrition Source Type: news

Kidney Stone? Try a Roller Coaster Ride
Study supports stories from patients who passed the urinary obstruction while on a thrill ride Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: Kidney Stones (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - September 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Got kidney stones? This doctor says roller coasters could be the cure
Having kidney stones can be a painful roller coaster ride. But Michigan doctor David Wartinger has just discovered actual roller coaster rides can help treat the condition. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - September 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Radio/As It Happens Source Type: news

Kidney Stone? Try a Roller Coaster Ride
TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 -- Anyone who's suffered a kidney stone just wants the urinary obstruction gone. Now, preliminary research suggests relief might even be fun: a roller coaster ride. There's been anecdotal evidence from patients that these... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 27, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Could riding roller coasters help you pass kidney stones?
Conclusion This experimental study assessed going on roller coasters as a means of passing kidney stones. Prior to this study there had been a number of reports that riding on roller coasters had caused people to pass their kidney stones, with one person claiming to have passed three kidney stones after three consecutive rides on the Big Thunder Mountain Railroad roller coaster at Disney World in Florida. The researchers found a similar effect using their model, and also saw that the seating position on the ride made a big difference, with almost four times the number of stones passing in the rear of the ride compared to ...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Roller coasters could help pass kidney stones
Using a 3-D-printed kidney model, researchers found riding on the Big Thunder Mountain Railroad at Walt Disney World could help pass small kidney stones. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology / Nephrology Source Type: news

Study: Riding roller coasters can dislodge kidney stones
Shawn PriceEAST LANSING, Mich., Sept. 26 (UPI) -- Roller coasters could dislodge small kidney stones, according to a new study from Michigan State University. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Old fashioned roller coasters can help patients pass kidney stones
A urologist has discovered that riding a roller coaster helps patients pass kidney stones with nearly a 70 percent success rate. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 27, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Second Chance on Bladder US
“If you are given a second chance in life, don’t blow it,” you advise your eager resident. It has been an overwhelmingly busy day in the department. Interspersed between the motor vehicle collisions, hypoxic and hypotensive CHF exacerbations, and patients with florid sepsis, your team is trying to see and help all of the ankle pains, throat pains, and dysuria that have also walked through the waiting room doors. The neighborhood clinics are completely overbooked, and your department has been dealing with the overflow all week. Your resident has three charts in her hand and has just finished presenting the...
Source: EPMonthly.com - September 27, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Logan Plaster Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Got kidney stones? Ride a roller coaster! Study shows it is the most pain-free way
A team at Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine confirmed a number of patients passed kidney stones on the mine train ride at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Riding a roller coaster may have surprising health benefit
Researchers find amusement park ride may help patients pass kidney stones – and don't worry, you don't have to ride the really scary kind (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - September 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Roller Coasters Might Help Dislodge Kidney Stones (FREE)
By Kelly Young Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD Roller coasters may help patients pass kidney stones, according to a study published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.Researchers embedded three renal calculi in … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - September 27, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Got kidney stones? Try riding a roller coaster to dislodge them
Just ask any one of the 300,000 Americans who, in any given year, develop kidney stones: What if the excruciating pain of passing one of those little devils could be prevented by strapping yourself into a make-believe runaway mine train, throwing your hands in the air and enduring G-forces as high... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 26, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Try riding a roller coaster to dislodge those painful kidney stones
Just ask any one of the 300,000 Americans who, in any given year, develop kidney stones: What if the excruciating pain of passing one of those little devils could be prevented by strapping yourself into a make-believe runaway mine train, throwing your hands in the air and enduring G-forces as high... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 26, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Second Chance on Bladder US
“If you are given a second chance in life, don’t blow it,” you advise your eager resident. It has been an overwhelmingly busy day in the department. Interspersed between the motor vehicle collisions, hypoxic and hypotensive CHF exacerbations, and patients with florid sepsis, your team is trying to see and help all of the ankle pains, throat pains, and dysuria that have also walked through the waiting room doors. The neighborhood clinics are completely overbooked, and your department has been dealing with the overflow all week. Your resident has three charts in her hand and has just finished presenting the...
Source: EPMonthly.com - September 19, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Logan Plaster Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

CT data predict survival of prostate cancer patients
Patients are said to die with -- not from -- prostate cancer. In fact, more...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: CT scans link arterial calcium to kidney stones Software leverages CT scans to generate bone density data Repeat bone density screening for seniors offers little value (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 14, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Discovery's Edge: The art of science
They ’re not diamonds, but they are stones – kidney stone crystals – that are viewed microscopically and enhanced by polarized light. The wafer of stone shown here is only nanometers thick and was previously inaccessible with visible light microscopes. The photo is by Mayandi Sivaguru and Bruce W. Fouke, and taken as part of a [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - September 13, 2016 Category: Research Source Type: news

Higher Risk for Kidney Stones in Ankylosing Spondylitis (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Consistent with higher rate of comorbidities in general (Source: MedPage Today Rheumatology)
Source: MedPage Today Rheumatology - August 29, 2016 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Discovery's Edge: Just-in-Time Technology Saves Patients
Arthur Poll was visiting family in Tucson, Ariz., when he felt a sharp pain in his left kidney one evening. The next day he saw a doctor, who scanned his abdomen. “He said I’ve got good news and bad news for you,” recalls Poll. “The good news is you don’t have kidney stones. The bad [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - August 16, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Bladder Stone Basics
Bladder stones are not often heard of as they are not nearly as common as kidney stones. Sometimes referred to as urinary tract stones or bladder calculi, they primarily affect men as 95% of all bladder stones cases are found in men. What are bladder stones? Bladder stones are formed when substances such as calcium oxalate concentrate in the urine turning into hard, solid lumps lodging in the bladder. It is more common to have several stones form at the same time. Urine is about 95% water with the other 5% containing minerals such as salt, and waste products such as protein. When the urine is concentrated, often due to ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New guidelines published for physicians treating patients with kidney stones
New extensive guidelines have been published for the surgical management of kidney stones. Kidney stones affect more than 8.8 percent of the population in the United States, with direct and indirect treatment costs estimated to be several billion dollars per year, making it a common and costly disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 10, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

A powerful remedy to dissolve kidney stones
(NaturalNews) Many people who have had kidney stones report that passing them was the greatest pain they had ever experienced. Many women claim that it easily beats childbirth on the pain scale, and men can suffer even more due to the long length of their urethras.Everybody hopes... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New guidelines published for physicians treating patients with kidney stones
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) A UAB urologist has led the development of extensive guidelines of surgical management of kidney stones. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Diet Supplement May Help Prevent Kidney Stones: Study
Title: Diet Supplement May Help Prevent Kidney Stones: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 8/8/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 8/9/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Digestion General)
Source: MedicineNet Digestion General - August 9, 2016 Category: Nutrition Source Type: news

Diet Supplement May Help Prevent Kidney Stones
Researchers suggest it might offer alternative to current treatment that has side effects (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - August 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Compound found in citrus fruit could end kidney stones
A compound known as HCA - found in citrus fruit - is able to inhibit the growth of kidney stones - and even dissolve the crystals, a University of Houston study found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could this be the end of painful kidney stones? Compound found in citrus fruit 'dissolves crystal deposits'
A compound known as HCA - found in citrus fruit - is able to inhibit the growth of kidney stones - and even dissolve the crystals, a University of Houston study found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers propose new treatment to prevent kidney stones
Researchers have found evidence that a natural fruit extract is capable of dissolving calcium oxalate crystals, the most common component of human kidney stones. This finding could lead to the first advance in the treatment of calcium oxalate stones in 30 years. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Diet Supplement May Help Prevent Kidney Stones: Study
MONDAY, Aug. 8, 2016 -- A dietary supplement may hold the power to dissolve a key component of kidney stones, potentially offering a new prevention tool against this painful condition, researchers say. It's too early to be sure if the compound... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 8, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

UPDATE: How Much Vitamin D Should You Take?
Conclusions What is the sweet spot for vitamin D and longevity? All studies are in agreement: 40-50 ng/ml. If I had a (working) magic wand, I'd make this range much broader - but, there it is. Since it is narrow, let's cover the main sources of Vitamin D and figure out how you can get to the exact target. Sources of vitamin D We get vitamin D from supplements, sun and food--and in that order for most of us. Food Considering that we need thousands of IU's of vitamin D per day, food doesn't have that much. Some of the highest sources have only a few hundred units. Food sources of Vitamin D:[13] Salmon: 4 oz. = 500 IU...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What It Means When You See Blood In Your Urine
There are few moments more frightening than seeing blood in your urine. Happily, the cause is often not serious. The condition is more formally known as hematuria, and blood in the urine is usually the only symptom. Note that it does not take much blood to color urine pink or red, and the bleeding is usually not painful. Certain foods - notably rhubarb and beets - can also turn your urine a reddish color. In all instances of detecting blood in your urine, see a doctor. It is symptomatic of a number of ailments, including: • An enlarged prostate. As this gland begins to grow - commonly with the onset of middle age i...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dehydration May Be Cause Of Increase In Kids With Kidney Stones
BOSTON (CBS) – An important reminder to keep your children well hydrated during these hot summer months. Doctors say they are seeing more and more kids suffering with kidney stones. Chase Carucci plays sports but excruciating pain has sidelined him for years. “On a scale from 1 to 10 probably a nine or 10. It’s bad. It’s probably the worst pain you could ever have,” says Chase. The 14-year old has suffered through multiple kidney stones and has needed surgeries. “If you were me, you would take that stone so that you never see your child in that kind of pain,” says Maria Carucci, C...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local CBS Boston Dr. Mallika Marshall Kidney Stones Source Type: news

Diagnosing gout could become easier, more cost-effective with new portable device
UCLA researchers have designed a portable imaging system that can diagnose gout, a condition that affects more than 8 million adults in the U.S. alone. The new system is compact and cost-effective, and it could allow many more primary care doctors to screen for the disease, which is the most common type of inflammatory arthritis. The research, which was published in the journal Scientific Reports, was led by Aydogan Ozcan, UCLA’s Chancellor’s Professor of Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering and associate director of the California NanoSystems Institute, and John FitzGerald, a UCLA clinical professor ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 26, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

What Will It Take To Reduce Infections In The Hospital?
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Austin med tech company acquires Albuquerque startup
HealthTronics Inc., an Austin, Texas, company that provides doctors with machines that zap kidney stones and cancer tumors, has expanded its technology by buying Albuquerque-based-Mobile Medical Marketing LLC for an undisclosed price. It is the seventh acquisition by the Austin medical technology company since it was sold by publicly traded Endo Health Solutions in early 2014 to a private equity firm. John Badal, who cofounded the company in 2003 with his wife Heather, says the acquisition took… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 19, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Will Anderson Source Type: news

What Michelangelo’s hands (can and can’t) tell us about arthritis
This just in: researchers have discovered that Michelangelo had osteoarthritis, not gout as previously thought. The findings are based on depictions of the hands of the painter and sculptor as rendered by other artists and are discussed in a recent issue of the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. While this may not be the most exciting medical news you’ve ever heard (unless you’re particularly interested in arthritis, like me!), this study brings up a number of ideas about the two most common types of arthritis. Each of these seems right. But not all of them are. Does activity cause arthritis or help limi...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - July 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Arthritis Health Healthy Aging Osteoarthritis Source Type: news

What Michelangelo ’s hands (can and can’t) tell us about arthritis
This just in: researchers have discovered that Michelangelo had osteoarthritis, not gout as previously thought. The findings are based on depictions of the hands of the painter and sculptor as rendered by other artists and are discussed in a recent issue of the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. While this may not be the most exciting medical news you’ve ever heard (unless you’re particularly interested in arthritis, like me!), this study brings up a number of ideas about the two most common types of arthritis. Each of these seems right. But not all of them are. Does activity cause arthritis or help limi...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - July 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Arthritis Health Healthy Aging Osteoarthritis Source Type: news

All-natural home remedies for dissolving painful kidney stones
(NaturalNews) As many know, passing kidney stones can be an extremely painful process. One of the most common urinary disorders diagnosed in the United States, kidney stones are formed when excess mineral deposits (usually calcium) clump together inside the kidney to form small pebble... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Acute Renal Infarction Resulting From Fibromuscular DysplasiaAcute Renal Infarction Resulting From Fibromuscular Dysplasia
The emergency department evaluation of this patient with acute abdominal pain resulted in a provisional--but incorrect--diagnosis of urolithiasis. How was the correct diagnosis reached? Journal of Medical Case Reports (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Emergency Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news