Cook Medical Debuts New Device
Cook Medical has a new device to simplify percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) procedures, during which physicians break up and remove large kidney stones, or can use it in the bladder to break up large bladder stones (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - September 6, 2013 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Cook Medical announces LithAssist to streamline stone management and treatment
Cook Medical has a new device to simplify percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) procedures, during which physicians break up and remove large kidney stones, or can use it in the bladder to break up large bladder stones. LithAssist™ combines suction control and provides access for a laser fiber. It is the first device globally to provide suction control and laser fiber access. Approximately 67,000 PCNL procedures are performed each year in the United States, and 466,000 are performed globally... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Vitamin D and Kidney Stone DiseaseVitamin D and Kidney Stone Disease
Is there a relationship between vitamin D levels and the development of kidney stones? This new study investigates the connection. Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nephrology Journal Article Source Type: news

Kidney stone removal breakthrough combines robotic surgery with new cooling technique
A first-ever technique using ice slush and minimally invasive robotic surgery to remove a particularly large type of kidney stone has been reported by urologists at Henry Ford Hospital. Dubbed RANL, for robotic anatrophic nephrolithotomy, the technique was devised to remove staghorn calculi - large kidney stones with sharp, craggy branches - that can cause disease and sometimes death if left untreated... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology / Nephrology Source Type: news

Women Increasingly Prone to Kidney Stones
Title: Women Increasingly Prone to Kidney StonesCategory: Health NewsCreated: 8/28/2013 4:35:00 PMLast Editorial Review: 8/29/2013 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Crohn's Disease General)
Source: MedicineNet Crohn's Disease General - August 29, 2013 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Women Increasingly Prone to Kidney Stones
Rising obesity likely is to blame, study author saysSource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Kidney Stones, Women's Health (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - August 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Cooling Technique For Robotic Surgery Performed On Difficult Kidney Stone
A first-ever technique using ice slush and minimally invasive robotic surgery to remove a particularly large type of kidney stone has been reported by urologists at Henry Ford Hospital.08/28/2013 (Source: Kidney Cancer Association)
Source: Kidney Cancer Association - August 28, 2013 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Risk of kidney stones in women appears to be increasing, along with related ER visits
The risk of women developing kidney stones is rising, as is the number of cases being seen in U.S. emergency departments, while the rate of hospitalization for the disorder has remained stable. Those are among the findings of a new study led by Henry Ford Hospital researchers that set out to look at trends in visits, hospitalization and charges during a four-year period for patients who went to U.S. hospital emergency departments for treatment of kidney stones... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology / Nephrology Source Type: news

New cooling technique for robotic surgery performed on difficult kidney stone
(Henry Ford Health System) A first-ever technique using ice slush and minimally invasive robotic surgery to remove a particularly large type of kidney stone has been reported by urologists at Henry Ford Hospital.Dubbed RANL, for robotic anatrophic nephrolithotomy, the technique was devised to remove staghorn calculi -- large kidney stones with sharp, craggy branches -- that can cause disease and sometimes death if left untreated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 27, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Women at increasing risk of kidney stones, related ER visits
(Henry Ford Health System) The risk of women developing kidney stones is rising, as is the number of cases being seen in US emergency departments, while the rate of hospitalization for the disorder has remained stable. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 26, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Kidney Stones May up CHD Risk in Women, But Not MenKidney Stones May up CHD Risk in Women, But Not Men
The "modestly" increased risk was seen in a combined analysis of three large, well-known cohorts and was independent of CV comorbidities and drug therapies, dietary calcium intake, and other risk factors. Heartwire (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 30, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Kidney Stones Linked to CHD Risk in Women, but Not in Men
(Ivanhoe Newswire)—In an analysis involving more than 240,000 participants, researchers found that a self-reported history of kidney stones was associated with a statistically significant increased risk of coronary heart disease among women, but was not evident for men. (Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com)
Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com - July 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Discovery of gene function may help prevent kidney stones
The discovery of a gene's function in E. coli and other bacteria might lead to a probiotic to prevent the most common type of kidney stone, according to a Purdue University study. Human cells can't metabolize oxalate, an acidic chemical found in nearly all plants we eat, so any oxalate we absorb from food must be excreted from the body. Calcium-oxalate urinary stones can form when oxalate reaches a high concentration in the kidneys. About 80 percent of kidney stones are composed of insoluble calcium oxalate. T... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 26, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

Kidney Stones Linked to Higher Heart Risk (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Women with a history of kidney stones had a modestly increased the risk of coronary heart disease, two large prospective cohort studies showed. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - July 24, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Kidney Stones Tied to Raised Heart Disease Risk in Women
Title: Kidney Stones Tied to Raised Heart Disease Risk in WomenCategory: Health NewsCreated: 7/23/2013 4:36:00 PMLast Editorial Review: 7/24/2013 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Crohn's Disease General)
Source: MedicineNet Crohn's Disease General - July 24, 2013 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Kidney stones associated with modest increased risk of coronary heart disease in women, but not men
An analysis of data from three studies that involved a total of more than 240,000 participants found that a self-reported history of kidney stones was associated with a statistically significant increased risk of coronary heart disease among women but no significant association was evident for men, according to a study in the July 24/31 issue of JAMA. "Nephrolithiasis [kidney stones] is a common condition, with the prevalence varying by age and sex. A recent estimate from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a representative sample of the U.S... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 23, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology / Nephrology Source Type: news

Kidney stones may up CHD risk in women, but not men
The "modestly" increased risk was seen in a combined analysis of three large, well-known cohorts, and was independent of CV comorbidities and drug therapies, dietary calcium intake, and other risk factors. (Source: theHeart.org)
Source: theHeart.org - July 23, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Kidney Stones Tied to Raised Heart Disease Risk in Women
Same link not seen in men, researchers report, although they're not sure why Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Heart Disease in Women, Kidney Stones (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - July 23, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sugary drinks may cause kidney stones
Sodas, fruit drinks, and other sugary beverages have come under attack recently for playing a key role in the obesity epidemic. But did you know that sugary drinks may also raise the risk for at least one other ailment?.... (Source: Sound Medicine)
Source: Sound Medicine - July 21, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Sound Medicine Source Type: news

Solve your 'plumbing' problems
Bladder leakage, UTIs and kidney stones are treatable common ailments. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Experts: Majority Of Americans Are Dehydrated
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: deanreddington Tags: Health Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen consipation dehydration Drinking Water Fatigue headache Paula Ebben Source Type: news

Kidney Stone Causes
Title: Kidney Stone CausesCategory: Doctor's & Expert's views on SymptomsCreated: 7/10/2013 1:02:00 PMLast Editorial Review: 7/10/2013 1:02:15 PM (Source: MedicineNet Crohn's Disease General)
Source: MedicineNet Crohn's Disease General - July 10, 2013 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Kidney Stone Symptoms
Title: Kidney Stone SymptomsCategory: Doctor's & Expert's views on SymptomsCreated: 7/10/2013 1:23:00 PMLast Editorial Review: 7/10/2013 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Crohn's Disease General)
Source: MedicineNet Crohn's Disease General - July 10, 2013 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Kidney problems rise as temperatures soar
Hot weather is directly linked to kidney problems - especially painful kidney stones.07/04/2013 (Source: Kidney Cancer Association)
Source: Kidney Cancer Association - July 4, 2013 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Kidney Stone Treatment
Title: Kidney Stone TreatmentCategory: Doctor's & Expert's views on SymptomsCreated: 6/24/2013 5:24:00 PMLast Editorial Review: 6/24/2013 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Digestion General)
Source: MedicineNet Digestion General - June 24, 2013 Category: Nutrition Source Type: news

Metabolic Syndrome Traits and Severity of Kidney StonesMetabolic Syndrome Traits and Severity of Kidney Stones
Is metabolic syndrome closely linked with the severity of kidney stones? This new study examines the connections. American Journal of Kidney Diseases (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nephrology Journal Article Source Type: news

Pain or Feign?
In the late 1960s, I quickly learned that a large proportion of requests for narcotics in this population were spurious. Patients would simulate renal stone, acute myocardial infarction, and many other painful illnesses in order to obtain narcotic drugs. (Source: Cancer Network)
Source: Cancer Network - June 11, 2013 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Kidney Expert Warns People Are 'In Denial' About Dehydration
A leading surgeon is warning many people in the UK are "in denial" about the consequences of dehydration - resulting in thousands of new cases of kidney stones every year. Mr Bhaskar Somani, a consultant urological surgeon at Southampton General Hospital, said a lack of awareness around regular daily fluid intake was responsible for an annual increase in renal stone admissions... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology / Nephrology Source Type: news

Good Health Lies Just Across the Border
Every year, thousands of Afghan women cross the border into Pakistan in search of medical treatment. Credit: Ashfaq Yusufzai/IPSMuzaffar Shah, a shopkeeper from Kabul, sits in a hospital waiting room, desperate for news. He has travelled nearly 300 km to get to the Khyber Teaching Hospital in Peshawar, capital of northern Pakistan’s Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) province, where his wife is now in intensive care. Just a few days ago, she delivered a baby boy who died within minutes. Shortly after, she started to experience severe vaginal bleeding. “She was initially admitted to the Indira Gandhi Children’s Hospi...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 3, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Ashfaq Yusufzai Tags: Active Citizens Aid Asia-Pacific Civil Society Development & Aid Featured Gender Global Governance Headlines Health Human Rights Population Poverty & MDGs Regional Categories TerraViva Europe TerraViva United Nations Women' Source Type: news

Sugary Drinks Increase Risk Of Kidney Stones
According to new research conducted at Brigham and Women's Hospital, sugar-sweetened drinks are linked to an increased risk of developing kidney stones. Twenty percent of men and 10 percent of women in the U.S. suffer from kidney stones at least once in their lives. Patients with kidney stones are often encouraged to drink more fluids as a means of preventing the condition from recurring... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 26, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology / Nephrology Source Type: news

Sugary drinks might raise kidney stone risk - But beer may help
People who drank one or more sugary cola drinks per day had a 23 percent higher risk of developing kidney stones than their counterparts (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - May 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sugary drinks tied to kidney stone risk
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Adults who drink at least one sugar-sweetened drink a day are slightly more likely to develop kidney stones than people who rarely imbibe them, according to a new study. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Consuming Less Sugar-Sweetened Beverages May Reduce Kidney Stone Risk
Twenty percent of American males and 10 percent of American females will experience a kidney stone at some point in their lifetime. Often, these patients will be advised to drink more fluids as a way to prevent future stone formation. Now, new research from Brigham and Women's Hospital finds that some beverages may be more helpful than others when it comes to preventing recurrent kidney stones... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 17, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology / Nephrology Source Type: news

Sugary Sodas, Fruit Punches May Raise Kidney Stone Risk: Study
Title: Sugary Sodas, Fruit Punches May Raise Kidney Stone Risk: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 5/15/2013 6:36:00 PMLast Editorial Review: 5/16/2013 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Crohn's Disease General)
Source: MedicineNet Crohn's Disease General - May 16, 2013 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Sugary Sodas, Fruit Punches May Raise Kidney Stone Risk: Study
It's important to stay hydrated, but water may be your best choice, experts say (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - May 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sugary Sodas, Fruit Punches May Raise Kidney Stone Risk
It's important to stay hydrated, but water may be your best choice, experts say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Carbohydrates, Kidney Stones (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - May 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Data Suggest Statins May Protect Kidney (CME/CE)
SAN DIEGO (MedPage Today) -- Patients with statin-treated dyslipidemia had about one third fewer kidney stones as compared with nonusers, according to results of a large cohort study. (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - May 10, 2013 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Kidney Stones Prove Occupational Hazard for Surgeons, Mayo Clinic Study Finds
Mayo Clinic urologists presented studies on kidney stone incidence in surgical teams, blood clot risk and survival following bladder cancer surgery, genomic testing for metastatic prostate cancer and other research at the American Urological Association's annual meeting. (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - May 9, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Mayo Clinic Source Type: news

Kidney Stones Prove Occupational Hazard for Surgeons, Mayo Clinic Study Finds
Mayo Clinic urologists presented studies on kidney stone incidence in surgical teams, blood clot risk and survival following bladder cancer surgery, genomic testing for metastatic prostate cancer and other research at the American Urological Association's annual meeting. (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - May 9, 2013 Category: Research Authors: Mayo Clinic Source Type: news

Kidney Stones Prove Occupational Hazard for Surgeons, Mayo Clinic Study Finds
Mayo Clinic urologists presented studies on kidney stone incidence in surgical teams, blood clot risk and survival following bladder cancer surgery, genomic testing for metastatic prostate cancer and other research at the American Urological Association's annual meeting. (Source: Mayo Clinic Rochester News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Rochester News - May 9, 2013 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Mayo Clinic Source Type: news

Increase In Rate Of Complications Related To Kidney Stone Surgery
While the number of people - especially women - who have a minimally invasive procedure to remove kidney stones has risen in recent years, so has the rate of complications related to the surgery, according to a published study by Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The research, from Khurshid R. Ghani, M.D., of Henry Ford Hospital's Vattikuti Urology Institute, is in press in the Journal of Urology. Those findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association in San Diego... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 9, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology / Nephrology Source Type: news

'Micro instruments' could spell the end of hospital stays for kidney stone patients
Doctors at The Royal London Hospital have become the first in the UK to use new tools to treat kidney stones. They are 70 per cent smaller than the old equipment. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exercise Cuts Kidney Stone Risk in WomenExercise Cuts Kidney Stone Risk in Women
Women can reduce their risk for kidney stones by exercising moderately and not eating too much, report researchers. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology News Source Type: news

Light Exercise Still Cuts Kidney Stone Risk (CME/CE)
SAN DIEGO (MedPage Today) -- Women who exercised even minimally had a significantly lower risk of kidney stones, according to an analysis of a large cohort study. (Source: MedPage Today Meeting Coverage)
Source: MedPage Today Meeting Coverage - May 5, 2013 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Exercise May Lower Older Women's Kidney Stone Risk
Exercise may lower older women's risk for kidney stones, according to a new study. The research was conducted by experts from the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center, Georgetown University, and University of Washington School of Medicine who gathered and examined data from over 85,000 postmenopausal women in the U.S. All subjects were aged 50 and older and took part in the Women's Health Initiative study. They were given an exam to measure their weight and height so doctors could determine their BMI (body mass index)... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology / Nephrology Source Type: news

Exercise May Lower Older Women's Risk for Kidney Stones
Study also found that cutting high-calorie foods can help Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Exercise and Physical Fitness, Kidney Stones, Women's Health (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - May 3, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exercise May Lower Older Women's Risk for Kidney Stones
Title: Exercise May Lower Older Women's Risk for Kidney StonesCategory: Health NewsCreated: 5/3/2013 12:35:00 PMLast Editorial Review: 5/3/2013 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Womens Health General)
Source: MedicineNet Womens Health General - May 3, 2013 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

Lower Frequency Improves Extracorporeal Shock Wave LithotripsyLower Frequency Improves Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy
Slowing the frequency of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) from 120 to 60 shock waves per minute improves overall success rates in patients with urolithiasis, but 90 shock waves/minute seems to be the optimal rate. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 12, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology News Source Type: news

‘Apple shape’ poses higher risk for kidney disease than ‘pear shape’
High blood pressure in the kidneys may hold the clueRelated items from OnMedica'Apple' shape no worse than other types of bodily fat distributionAcute kidney injury causes thousands of needless deaths Kidney patients have same risk of MI as cardiac patientsExtra risk of renal disease after kidney stones (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 12, 2013 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Migraine Drug May Set Stage for Kidney Stones (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- ORLANDO - Patients who take topiramate (Topamax) therapy for treatment of migraine appear to deplete citrate in the urine, creating an environment for kidney stones, researchers reported here. (Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry)
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - April 8, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news