Weeds take over kelp in high CO2 oceans
(University of Adelaide) Weedy plants will thrive and displace long-lived, ecologically valuable kelp forests under forecast ocean acidification, new research from the University of Adelaide shows. The researchers describe how kelp forests are displaced by weedy marine plants in high CO2 conditions, equivalent to those predicted for the turn of the century. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Gulf of Maine study investigates return of kelp
(Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences) Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences has been awarded funding from Maine Sea Grant for a new study of kelp forests in the Gulf of Maine. The researchers will collaborate with government and industry partners to assess the current state of kelp forests in the region and learn how Maine can maintain a sustainable kelp industry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A lesson from Darwin
(University of California - Santa Barbara) When British naturalist Charles Darwin traveled to the Galapagos Islands in 1835, he took notice of the giant kelp forests ringing the islands. He believed that if those forests were destroyed, a significant number of species would be lost. These underwater ecosystems, Darwin believed, could be even more important than forests on land. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

"Understanding Our Ocean Connections": NSF symposium highlights links among people and marine ecosystems
On April 19, scientists from the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network will take part in the symposium "Understanding Our Ocean Connections." The researchers will present findings on the connections among humans and ocean ecosystems such as coral reefs, kelp forests, mangrove forests, salt marshes, sea ice and the continental shelf. Questions that will be answered at the symposium include: Does the future of coral reefs depend on the ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=244668&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - March 5, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Golden Forest
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Marine biologists author a children's book that explores connections between diverse life in California kelp and on sandy beaches. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New skin patch stimulates insulin production for diabetics
The 'smart' patch delivers a natural substance extracted from brown algae only when needed. Its effectiveness has been proven after tests on mice, says the NIBIB in Maryland, US. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

World War I-era maps help track history of kelp forests in Pacific Northwest
(University of Chicago Medical Center) A UChicago ecologist compared maps produced before World War I to recent surveys of kelp forest in the Pacific Northwest, and finds they have been relatively stable over the past century. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Osteoarthritis: Could this algae extract lead to a cure?
New research has identified an extract from the stem of brown algae that has the potential to stall the progression of osteoarthritis. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Arthritis / Rheumatology Source Type: news

Nippon Instruments Corporation Publishes Method for Measurement of...
Nippon Instruments Corporation has published a new application report detailing the analysis of mercury in dried kelp samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy.(PRWeb August 24, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/08/prweb14631146.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - August 24, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

UNH researchers find significant increase of invasive seaweed changing sea habitat
(University of New Hampshire) Walking along the beaches of New England, it's easy to spot large amounts of fine red seaweed clogging the coastline, the result of sweeping changes beneath the water. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire looked at seaweed populations over the last 30 years in the Southwestern Gulf of Maine and found the once predominant kelp beds are declining and more invasive species have taken their place, altering the seascape and marine food chain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 9, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Canary in the kelp forest: Sea creature dissolves in today's warming, acidic waters
The one-two punch of warming waters and ocean acidification is predisposing some marine animals to dissolving quickly under conditions already occurring off the Northern California coast, according to a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cutting-edge cameras reveal the secret life of dolphins
Dolphins have been recorded in rarely-seen activities of mother-calf interaction, playing with kelp, and intimate social behaviors like flipper-rubbing through the use of largely non-invasive new cameras. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 21, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Failing kelp forests can be rescued by nearby neighbors
, new research indicates. Investigators found that kelp forests can bounce back from destructive storms when the forests are in reasonably close proximity to healthy beds. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 25, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Getting by with a little help from their friends
(University of California - Santa Barbara) A long-term study by UCSB scientists and colleagues demonstrates that failing kelp forests can be rescued by nearby neighbors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Kelp beats the heat
Using long-term ecological data, marine scientists evaluate the sentinel status of giant kelp during a recent marine heat wave. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 13, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Kelp beats the heat
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Using long-term ecological data, marine scientists evaluate the sentinel status of giant kelp during a recent marine heat wave. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 13, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NSF-funded scientists to present on long-term ecological research findings at AGU fall meeting
Climate change effects on the U.S. West Coast's undersea kelp forests. Life in ice. Extreme rainfall patterns and how they affect Midwest crops. These are just a few of the topics scientists affiliated with the National Science Foundation (NSF) Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network will discuss at the upcoming American Geophysical Union (AGU) fall meeting, Dec. 12-16. Scientists funded by ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=190316&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - November 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Culprits behind disappearance of kelp forests revealed
Seaweed-eating fish are becoming increasingly voracious as the ocean warms due to climate change, and are responsible for the recent destruction of kelp forests off the Australian north coast near Coffs Harbour, research shows. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Scoop On Finding A Healthy Plant-Based Protein Powder
Conclusion After completing this study, and factoring in the above, of all the plant based proteins I have tried, I would personally choose Nutiva's Plant Protein Superfood 30 Shake in either vanilla or chocolate as my top choice. For me it is obvious since Nutiva is actually certified organic, is at a great affordable price, low in sugars (and not stevia) and has a great taste. Serving suggestion: Add 2 tablespoons of Hempseeds to your shake for an extra 8g of Protein and 1.7g Omega-3.Consider the addition of 1 tablespoon of Nutiva Coconut Manna (ie coconut butter) and water to eliminate the need for buying cartons of al...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hyperthyroidism: Too Much Of A Good Thing
By: Dr. Alan Christianson When someone you know is living with hypothyroidism, it can be tempting to think that if only the doctor would prescribe an extra helping of thyroid hormone, your friend or loved one would feel so much better and would enjoy life more. And in some cases, an extra helping might be in order. In other cases, not so much. Too much thyroid hormone can actually be dangerous, which is why doctors are loathe to bump the levothyroxin dosage up an extra 25 micrograms or so for one of their patients who's still experiencing hypothyroid symptoms. Tests always come first, and there's a good reason for that....
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

[Report] Climate-driven regime shift of a temperate marine ecosystem
Ecosystem reconfigurations arising from climate-driven changes in species distributions are expected to have profound ecological, social, and economic implications. Here we reveal a rapid climate-driven regime shift of Australian temperate reef communities, which lost their defining kelp forests and became dominated by persistent seaweed turfs. After decades of ocean warming, extreme marine heat waves forced a 100-kilometer range contraction of extensive kelp forests and saw temperate species replaced by seaweeds, invertebrates, corals, and fishes characteristic of subtropical and tropical waters. This community-wide tropi...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 7, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Thomas Wernberg Source Type: news

Marine heatwave triggers dramatic ecosystem transition
Rapid warming off the western coast of Australia has transformed large stretches of kelp forests into tropical and subtropical marine ecosystems, a new study reports. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 7, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Seaweed On Your Dinner Plate: The Next Kale Could Be Kelp
Why are chefs adopting sea greens in their cuisine? They're tasty and nutritious and growing them is good for the planet. In Maine the budding seaweed business is boosting a declining coastal economy. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - June 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Fred Bever Source Type: news

3D printing method offers new approach to fixing damaged cartilage
A new advance in 3D printing technology could lay the groundwork for new approaches to repairing cartilage damaged by arthritis and other injuries.Scientists have found a way to produce cartilage tissue by 3D bioprinting an ink containing human cells, with successful animal tests having been completed. It is hoped that the method could be applied to the creation of precise printed implants for knees, noses and ears.Creating the new ink Led by the Wallenberg Wood Science Center in Sweden, the research team created the new ink by mixing polysaccharides from brown algae and tiny cellulose fibrils from wood or made by bacteria...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 22, 2016 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Wild Otter Swims Into Aquarium's Tide Pool, Gives Birth To Adorable Pup
A California aquarium received an early Christmas present over the weekend when a pregnant wild sea otter swam into its tide pool and gave birth to an adorable pup. The otter in question had been visiting the Monterey Bay Aquarium grounds in Monterey, California, for the past several days -- behavior that had raised some concern among the aquarium's employees. “It’s rare for a healthy sea otter to visit the pool so frequently -- we started to wonder if she was doing all right,” the aquarium staff wrote in a Sunday blog post. All became clear on Saturday morning, when staff members spotted the ot...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 22, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

The six new superfoods that promise to get rid of FAT including wormwood tea
Lifesum Nutritionist Frida Harju explains why these six super foods - which include kelp, cinnamon and pomegranate juice - are able to blast fat faster, resulting in a leaner, and more toned figure. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Southern right whale calf wounding by kelp gulls increased to nearly all over 4 decades
(PLOS) Wounding of southern right whale calves and mothers by kelp gulls has increased from 2 percent to 99 percent over four decades, according to a study published Oct. 21, 2015, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Carina Marón from the University of Utah and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 11, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Safeguarding Our Marine Jewels
Scientists, aquariums, conservationists and coastal businesses are calling on President Obama to create the first National Marine Monument in the U.S. Atlantic, which would protect a vibrant suite of undersea features, including undersea canyons, deep ocean seamounts, and a rich kelp forest in the Gulf of Maine. Designating these areas as a National Marine Monument would permanently protect them from commercial-extractive activities, help ensure the health and biodiversity of the region's ocean waters for generations to come, and sustain the diverse fisheries that are so important to New England's thriving marine economy ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Neurological Diseases vs. the California Stem Cell Agency: Disease-a-Week Challenge #16
First, a seeming digression from the subject of chronic illness. In my youth, I worked as an aquarium diver for Marine World Africa USA in Redwood City, California. Five days a week, I would swim down into the tanks full of wildlife, spending time with sharks, dolphins, eels, seals and other creatures of the sea. The most beautiful tank was a million-gallon tropical fish display, with giant groupers big as cars and tiny cleaner fish that swam in and out of their mouths, and angelfish, surgeonfish, damselfish, wrasses, and more in this man-made reef. But then one day, the fish began to die. One by one I carried them o...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Neurological Diseases vs. the California Stem Cell Agency: Disease-a-Week Challenge #16
First, a seeming digression from the subject of chronic illness. In my youth, I worked as an aquarium diver for Marine World Africa USA in Redwood City, California. Five days a week, I would swim down into the tanks full of wildlife, spending time with sharks, dolphins, eels, seals and other creatures of the sea. The most beautiful tank was a million-gallon tropical fish display, with giant groupers big as cars and tiny cleaner fish that swam in and out of their mouths, and angelfish, surgeonfish, damselfish, wrasses, and more in this man-made reef. But then one day, the fish began to die. One by one I carried them out, ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

VRVK Nutraceuticals, LLC Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Crustacean Shellfish and Milk in Two Lots of Ultimate Antioxidant Tablets
VRVK Nutraceuticals, LLC, DBA DR. VENESSA’S FORMULAS of Orlando, Florida, is voluntarily recalling 3998 bottles of ULTIMATE ANTIOXIDANT TABLETS DIETARY SUPPLEMENT, 120 count bottles, with Kelp Atlantic Powder that may contain crustacean shellfish, an undeclared allergen. This product also contains Hesperidin Complex 40%, Pancreatin Powder and Pepsin, three ingredients that contain undeclared milk. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - August 31, 2015 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Extraction and Purification of Phlorotannins from Brown Algae
We describe here a simple procedure based on the use of water-organic solvent mixtures for the extraction of phlorotannins. Crude extracts are semi-purified and fractionated by separating methods based on both the polarity and the molecular size of compounds. Phenols are then quantified by the Folin-Ciocalteu method and their radical-scavenging activity is characterized using the DPPH test. All along the purification process of phenolic compounds, the efficiency of separation is assessed by 1H-NMR. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Plant Sciences)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Plant Sciences - June 26, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fucoidan Analysis by Tandem MALDI-TOF and ESI Mass Spectrometry
The application of mass spectrometry towards the structural analysis of the most interesting sulfated biopolymers of the brown algae—fucoidans only developed relatively recently. During method development, many problems, both chemical and instrumental, have to be solved. For example, mass spectrometry has a limitation in the analysis of anionic high molecular weight (HMW) polysaccharides because of the labile nature of sulfate groups which cause the polysaccharide to desulfate rather than ionize. Thus, decomposition methods should be developed taking into account the structural features of such a complex and fragile ...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Plant Sciences - June 26, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Characterization of Phlorotannins from Brown Algae by LC-HRMS
Phlorotannins are a class of polyphenols found in brown seaweeds that have significant potential for use as therapeutics, owing to their wide range of bioactivities. Molecular characterization of phlorotannin-enriched extracts is challenging due to the extreme sample complexity and the wide range of molecular weights observed. Herein, we describe a method for characterizing phlorotannins employing ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) operating in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mode combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). (Source: Springer protocols feed by Plant Sciences)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Plant Sciences - June 26, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Extraction, Purification, and NMR Analysis of Terpenes from Brown Algae
Algal terpenes constitute a wide and well-documented group of marine natural products with structures differing from their terrestrial plant biosynthetic analogues. Amongst macroalgae, brown seaweeds are considered as one of the richest source of biologically and ecologically relevant terpenoids. These metabolites, mostly encountered in algae of the class Phaeophyceae, are mainly diterpenes and meroditerpenes (metabolites of mixed biogenesis characterized by a toluquinol or a toluquinone nucleus linked to a diterpene moiety). (Source: Springer protocols feed by Plant Sciences)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Plant Sciences - June 26, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cameras for Conservation: New Technology Helping Developing Countries
False Bay, South Africa is a place where a growing human population collides with a dwindling biodiversity resource. The Castle Rocks no-take zone in the Table Mountain National Park is a marine protected area (MPA), which offers a refuge for the myriad of fish hiding in its kelp forests. These reserves may be controversial, but they are one of the most important tools we have for safeguarding our rapidly disappearing natural heritage. For scientists and resource managers, understanding the diversity and abundance of fish in our MPAs is critical to correctly design, expand and enforce a network of safe havens for vulnera...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 9, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

10 Stunning Photos From The 2015 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest
The 2015 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest inspires a wanderlust within us like nothing else. The photos submitted from all over the world capture the beauty of natural wonder and cultures so different from our own. If you're a photographer that would like to see your work featured in the series, submissions for the photo contest are open until June 30. The winner of the contest will receive an eight-day National Geographic Expedition to Costa Rica and the Panama Canal for two. For the rest of us, we'll just take a tour of the world via our screens. Scroll through the photos below for some awe-inspiring action...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 5, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

What's REALLY in dry shampoo? Alcohol, petroleum and CLAY revealed as ingredients in popular product
The product's four unusual ingredients have been revealed in a new report. While soft clay molecules absorb grease, brown algae helps regulate the production of a natural oil known as sebum. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Our Ocean Crisis -- Solutions Are the Easy Part
Over the last 64 years, the geologic nanosecond in which I've lived my life, 90 percent of the largest pelagic (open ocean) fish -- including hammerhead sharks, bluefin tuna and black marlin -- have been wiped out, along with close to half the world's tropical reefs. Our global ocean faces a cascading disaster from industrial overfishing, oil, chemical, plastic and nutrient pollution, loss of coastal and marine habitat and fossil-fuel-fired climate impacts. A report earlier this year in the journal Science suggests we may soon face a mass extinction in the ocean. It's enough to make you lose hope. To which I respond, ge...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 3, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Ocean Greens: The Least Deadliest Catch
In a food world that flips from fad superfood to superfood, an increasingly skeptical public has to ask which miracle crop has the staying power. In order to be called "the next Kale," a food has to demonstrate not only exceptional nutritional value, but positive environmental and ecological externalities, potential to meet large-scale need, and the ability to create jobs at home. Our nonprofit, GreenWave, and our farm, the Thimble Island Oyster Company, are betting that the new kale won't come from land at all, but rather, from the sea. We believe that long-underutilized seaweeds will become the basis of a new f...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 2, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Seaweed Might Have The Power To Make The Oceans Less Acidic
The thick, slimy brown ribbons are notorious for tangling the ankles of beachgoers and rotting in pungent piles. But kelp, according to its growing fan base, could also prove potent in protecting the health of oceans -- and us. "We've got some bad water heading our way," said Betsy Peabody, founder and executive director of the Puget Sound Restoration Fund. In April, Peabody's small organization in Bainbridge Island, Washington, won a $1.5 million grant from the Paul Allen Family Foundation to investigate how cultivating the seaweed might help lessen the impacts of ocean acidification. Other research has hint...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 28, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Watch Your Back, Kale. Kelp Is Gunning For The Veggie Du Jour Title
With a little help, scientists say that seaweed growing along the Maine and New Hampshire coasts could become the "kale of the sea." The first step is teaching chefs and consumers how to enjoy it.» E-Mail This (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Andrea Shea Source Type: news

Optical features embedded in marine shells may help develop responsive, transparent displays
The blue-rayed limpet is a tiny mollusk that lives in kelp beds along the coasts of Norway, Iceland, the United Kingdom, Portugal, and the Canary Islands. These diminutive organisms -- as small as a fingernail -- might escape notice entirely, if not for a very conspicuous feature: bright blue dotted lines that run in parallel along the length of their translucent shells. Depending on the angle at which light hits, a limpet's shell can flash brilliantly even in murky water. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 26, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Wolves in a Tangled Bank
The wolves' return to Yellowstone and the subsequent recovery of plants that elk had been eating to death in their absence has become one the most popularized and beloved ecological tales. By the 1920s humans had misguidedly wiped out most of the wolves in North America, thinking that the only good wolf was a dead one. Without wolves preying on them, elk and deer (called ungulates) exploded in number. Burgeoning ungulate populations ravaged plant communities, including aspen forests. Decades later, the wolves we reintroduced in Yellowstone hit the ground running, rapidly sending their ecological effects rippling throughout...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 23, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

How can we avoid kelp beds turning into barren grounds?
Urchins are marine invertebrates that mold the biological richness of marine grounds. However, an excessive proliferation of urchins may also have severe ecological consequences on marine grounds as they reduce algal cover and affect the survival of other marine species. To explore global dynamics and the factors that turn kelp beds into barren grounds is the main objective of a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 27, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Avoiding ecosystem collapse: Experts Weigh in
From coral reefs to prairie grasslands, some of the world's most iconic habitats are susceptible to sudden collapse due to seemingly minor events. A classic example: the decimation of kelp forests when a decline of otter predation unleashes urchin population explosions. Three studies hold the promise of helping resource managers predict, avoid, and reverse the tipping points that lead to degraded habitats, economic losses, and social upheaval. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 24, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Bladderwrack: Tougher than suspected
(Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)) The bladderwrack Fucus vesiculosus is actually one of the most important species of brown algae along the North Atlantic coasts. But for years their populations in the Baltic Sea were declining. Looking for the reasons, biologists of GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel now have analyzed the defense mechanisms of bladderwrack against bacterial vermins under different environmental conditions. The surprising result: The defense proved to be very robust to environmental changes. The study is published today in the international online-journal PLOS ONE. (Source: E...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 31, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Turning humble seaweed into biofuel
The sea has long been a source of Norway’s riches, whether from cod, farmed salmon or oil. Now one researcher hopes to add seaweed to this list as he refines a way to produce “biocrude” from common kelp. "What we are trying to do is to mimic natural processes to produce oil," he said. "However, while petroleum oil is produced naturally on a geologic time scale, we can do it in minutes." (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 16, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Beautiful but a threat: Tropical fish invasion destroys kelp forests
The migration of tropical fish as a result of ocean warming poses a serious threat to the temperate areas they invade, because they overgraze on kelp forests and seagrass meadows, a new study concludes. The harmful impact is most evident in southern Japanese waters and the eastern Mediterranean, where there have been dramatic declines in kelps. There is also emerging evidence of damage in Australia and the US from the spread of tropical fish towards the poles. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 9, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

No ocean-borne radiation from Fukushima detected on West Coast shoreline, kelp analysis finds
Scientists working together on Kelp Watch 2014 announced today that the West Coast shoreline shows no signs of ocean-borne radiation from Japan's Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, following their analysis of the first collection of kelp samples along the western U.S. coastline. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 13, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news