Responses to birth trauma and prevalence of posttraumatic stress among Australian midwives.
CONCLUSION: Midwives carry a high psychological burden related to witnessing birth trauma. Posttraumatic stress should be acknowledged as an occupational stress for midwives. The incidence of traumatic birth events experienced by women and witnessed by midwives needs to be reduced. PMID: 27425165 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - July 14, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Leinweber J, Creedy DK, Rowe H, Gamble J Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Herbal remedies for perceived inadequate milk supply are perhaps not as safe as women think: A brief case report.
PMID: 27396295 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - July 5, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Şahin B, Kaymaz N, Yıldırım Ş Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Culturally capable and culturally safe: Caseload care for Indigenous women by Indigenous midwifery students.
CONCLUSIONS: Midwifery philosophy aligns strongly with the Indigenous health philosophy and this provides a learning platform for Indigenous student midwives. Privileging Indigenous culture within midwifery education programs assists students develop a sense of purpose and affirms them in their emerging professional role and within their community. The findings from this study illustrate the demand for, and pertinence of, continuity of care midwifery experiences with Indigenous women as fundamental to increasing the Indigenous midwifery workforce in Australia. Australian universities should provide this experience for Indi...
Source: Women Birth - July 5, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: West R, Gamble J, Kelly J, Milne T, Duffy E, Sidebotham M Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Racial disparities in birth care: Exploring the perceived role of African-American women providing midwifery care and birth support in the United States.
CONCLUSION: Results demonstrate the continued existence and important role of diverse types of African-American birth care providers in minority communities in the US. Recognition, support, and increasing the number of midwives of colour is important in tackling racial inequalities in health. Further research should explore minority access to woman-centred care. PMID: 27364419 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - June 27, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Guerra-Reyes L, Hamilton LJ Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Health related quality of life of women at the sixth week and sixth month postpartum by mode of birth.
CONCLUSION: While mode of birth is not directly associated with health-related quality of life, it does have an indirect relationship in the short term. Women who reported the lowest health-related quality of life were those with postpartum urinary incontinence. Most women with postpartum urinary incontinence were in the forceps group. PMID: 27353728 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - June 25, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Triviño-Juárez JM, Romero-Ayuso D, Nieto-Pereda B, Forjaz MJ, Criado-Álvarez JJ, Arruti-Sevilla B, Avilés-Gamez B, Oliver-Barrecheguren C, Mellizo-Díaz S, Soto-Lucía C, Plá-Mestre R Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Malawi women's knowledge and use of labour and birthing positions: A cross-sectional descriptive survey.
CONCLUSION: Childbirth education should include information on the various labour and birthing positions. Midwives should be equipped with appropriate skills to help women use different positions during childbirth. PMID: 27329996 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - June 18, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Zileni BD, Glover P, Jones M, Teoh KK, Zileni CW, Muller A Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Fetal movements: What are we telling women?
CONCLUSION: As giving correct, evidence based information about what to do in the event of an episode of reduced fetal movement may be a matter of life or death for the unborn baby it is important that midwives use existing guidelines in order to deliver consistent information which is based on current evidence to women in their care. PMID: 27329997 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - June 18, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Warland J, Glover P Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Caring for women wanting a vaginal birth after previous caesarean section: A qualitative study of the experiences of midwives and obstetricians.
CONCLUSION: Midwives and doctors in this study were positively oriented towards assisting and supporting women to attempt a VBAC. Care providers considered that women who have experienced a prior CS need access to midwifery continuity of care with a focus on support, information-sharing and effective communication. PMID: 27318563 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - June 15, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Foureur M, Turkmani S, Clack DC, Davis DL, Mollart L, Leiser B, Homer CS Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Safe management of expressed breast milk: A systematic review.
CONCLUSION: While there is a generally low risk of pathogen transmission via breastmilk, benefits must be considered against potential disease severity. Short-term refrigeration is generally acceptable for storage and transport. Freezing is often safe but causes degradation of immunological components. Universally, equipment used for expression and storage of breast milk should be well washed and disinfected. Effective breastmilk management policies can reduce risks of misdelivery. PMID: 27318564 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - June 15, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Peters MD, McArthur A, Munn Z Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Do women of reproductive age presenting with pelvic floor dysfunction have undisclosed anal incontinence: A retrospective cohort study.
CONCLUSION: Women presenting with urinary incontinence or other markers of pelvic floor dysfunction should be actively screened for anal incontinence as the prevalence of this condition is high amongst childbearing women. PMID: 27317128 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - June 14, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Tucker J, Grzeskowiak L, Murphy EM, Wilson A, Clifton VL Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Falling short of dietary guidelines - What do Australian pregnant women really know? A cross sectional study.
Abstract BACKGROUND: Maternal diets are not consistent with dietary guidance and this may affect the health of mothers and their infants. Nutrition knowledge and motivation may be important factors. AIMS: To assess pregnant women's diets in relation to consistency with the Australian Guidelines for Healthy Eating (AGHE); factors influencing women's adherence to the recommendations; and women's attitudes towards pregnancy-specific nutrition information. METHODS: A cross-sectional study using convenience sampling was undertaken at five hospitals in New South Wales (Australia) and through an online link (Oc...
Source: Women Birth - June 14, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Bookari K, Yeatman H, Williamson M Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

The differences between pregnant women who request elective caesarean and those who plan for vaginal birth based on Health Belief Model.
CONCLUSION: Comprehensive childbirth knowledge can lead to positive maternal attitude towards vaginal birth and may improve birth confidence. PMID: 27293112 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - June 9, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Darsareh F, Aghamolaei T, Rajaei M, Madani A, Zare S Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Women's, midwives' and obstetricians' experiences of a structured process to document refusal of recommended maternity care.
CONCLUSION: Clinicians felt protected and reassured by the structured documentation and communication process and valued keeping women engaged in hospital care. This, in turn, protected women's access to maternity care. However, the process could not guarantee favourable responses from other clinicians subsequently involved in the woman's care. Ongoing discussions of risk, perceived by women and some midwives to be pressure to consent to recommended care, were still evident. These limitations may have been attributable to the absence of agreed criteria for initiating the MCP process and fragmented care. Varying awareness a...
Source: Women Birth - June 8, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Jenkinson B, Kruske S, Stapleton H, Beckmann M, Reynolds M, Kildea S Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

"It's Like a Disease": Women's perceptions of caesarean sections in Ghana's Upper West Region.
DISCUSSION: Accordingly, caesarean sections position women in a multifaceted situation of vulnerability. This underscores the need for context appropriate maternal health programmes in developing countries. PMID: 27265201 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - June 2, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Rishworth A, Bisung E, Luginaah I Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Mothers and midwives perceptions of birthing position and perineal trauma: An exploratory study.
CONCLUSION: Care is not based on current evidence and embedded practices, i.e. birthing in lithotomy position and routine episiotomies are commonly used. However, this survey did find a willingness to change, adapt practice and consider different birthing positions and this may lead to fewer episiotomies being performed. PMID: 27237831 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - May 26, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Diorgu FC, Steen MP, Keeling JJ, Mason-Whitehead E Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Association between childbirth attitudes and fear on birth preferences of a future generation of Australian parents.
CONCLUSION: Adults reported fear levels that warrant attention prior to a future pregnancy. Although the majority would choose a vaginal birth, they require awareness of benefits and risks for both vaginal and caesarean births to ensure their decisions reflect informed choice rather than influences of inadequate knowledge or fear. PMID: 27233945 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - May 24, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Hauck YL, Stoll KH, Hall WA, Downie J Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

"It's like a puzzle": Pregnant women's perceptions of professional support in midwifery care.
CONCLUSION: Pregnant women prepare for childbirth and parenting by using several different types of professional support in midwifery care: a strategy that could be described as piecing together a puzzle. When the women put the puzzle together, each type of professional support works as a valuable piece in the whole puzzle. Through this, professional support could contribute to women's mental preparedness for childbirth and parenting. PMID: 27199171 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - May 16, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Bäckström CA, Mårtensson LB, Golsäter MH, Thorstensson SA Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

An overview of the first 'no exit' midwifery group practice in a tertiary maternity hospital in Western Australia: Outcomes, satisfaction and perceptions of care.
CONCLUSIONS: Mixed methods enabled systematic examination of this new 'no exit' MGP confirming safety and acceptability. Findings contribute to our knowledge of MGP models. PMID: 27199172 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - May 16, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Lewis L, Hauck YL, Crichton C, Pemberton A, Spence M, Kelly G Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Midwives' experiences of routine enquiry for intimate partner violence in pregnancy.
CONCLUSION: Routine enquiry about IPV is a valuable and important midwifery role. Midwives described frustration and fear when women disclosed violence. The perceived level of support from health services varied according to practice contexts and needs to be improved. PMID: 27178111 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - May 10, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Eustace J, Baird K, Saito AS, Creedy DK Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Maternal stress after preterm birth: Impact of length of antepartum hospital stay.
GM Abstract BACKGROUND: Preterm birth is associated with increased parental stress, worry, and anxiety, and affects parental-child interactional behaviour. AIM: To evaluate the influence of length of antepartum hospital stay on maternal stress after the birth of a preterm infant. METHODS: A prospective two-centre pilot case-control study was performed at two tertiary level Neonatal-Intensive-Care-Units (NICU). Mothers of preterm infants
Source: Women Birth - May 4, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Pichler-Stachl E, Pichler G, Baik N, Urlesberger B, Alexander A, Urlesberger P, Cheung PY, Schmölzer GM Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Providing family-centred care for rare diseases in maternity services: Parent satisfaction and preferences when dysmelia is identified.
CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to improve the family-centeredness of care when dysmelia is identified. Offering signposting information to relevant third-sector organisations may increase parent satisfaction and address parent preferences. These findings could have implications for parents of children with other rare diseases identified in maternity services. PMID: 27156021 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - May 4, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Johnson J, Adams-Spink G, Arndt T, Wijeratne D, Heyhoe J, Taylor P Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Prenatal attachment and its association with foetal movement during pregnancy - A population based survey.
CONCLUSION: Perceiving frequent foetal movements at least during three occasions per 24h periods in late pregnancy was associated with prenatal attachment. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: encouraging women to focus on foetal movements may positively affect prenatal attachment, especially among multiparous women>35 years. PMID: 27140328 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - April 29, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Malm MC, Hildingsson I, Rubertsson C, Rådestad I, Lindgren H Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Breastfeeding among Somali mothers living in Norway: Attitudes, practices and challenges.
CONCLUSIONS: Despite the strong focus on breastfeeding in Norway, Somali-born mothers encounter obstacles in their breastfeeding practices. These may be due to lack of information about exclusive breastfeeding and to the conflicting information they received. Breastfeeding practices may be enhanced by promoting culturally sensitive communication, and relations of trust at health-care centers. PMID: 27117640 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - April 22, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Wandel M, Terragni L, Nguyen C, Lyngstad J, Amundsen M, de Paoli M Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

An evaluation of perinatal mental health interventions: An integrative literature review.
CONCLUSION: To improve perinatal mental health outcomes, innovative modes of providing effective perinatal mental health interventions that address the unique needs of women in the perinatal period are needed. Future development of perinatal mental health interventions require adaptions of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Behavioral Activation and/or Mindfulness-based methods to address mental health outcomes for women in the perinatal period. PMID: 27118000 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - April 21, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Lavender TJ, Ebert L, Jones D Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Village midwives and their changing roles in Brunei Darussalam: A qualitative study.
CONCLUSION: Brunei village midwives are trusted by women, and their practices may still be widely accepted in Brunei. Further research is necessary to confirm their existence, determine the detailed scope and appropriateness of their practices and verify the feasibility of them working together with healthcare professionals. PMID: 27105748 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - April 19, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Abdul-Mumin KH Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Immediate stress reduction effects of yoga during pregnancy: One group pre-post test.
Abstract BACKGROUND: Excessive stress during pregnancy may cause mental disorders in pregnant women and inhibit fetal growth. Yoga may alleviate stress during pregnancy. AIM: To verify the immediate effects of yoga on stress response during pregnancy. METHODS: One group pre-post test was conducted at a hospital in Japan. We recruited 60 healthy primiparas without complications and asked them to attend yoga classes twice a month and to practice yoga at their homes using DVD 3 times a week from 20 gestational weeks until childbirth. Salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase concentration were measured before and...
Source: Women Birth - April 16, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Kusaka M, Matsuzaki M, Shiraishi M, Haruna M Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Effects of prenatal maternal mental distress on birth outcomes.
CONCLUSION: Adverse birth outcomes were somewhat predictable by maternal mental distress; therefore, we suggested that prenatal visits incorporate psychological assessment for early detection and management to prevent possible adverse birth outcomes. PMID: 27079210 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - April 11, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Liou SR, Wang P, Cheng CY Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Narrowing the Gap? Describing women's outcomes in Midwifery Group Practice in remote Australia.
CONCLUSION: Continuity of Midwifery Care can be effectively provided to remote dwelling Aboriginal women and appears to improve outcomes for women and their infants. PMID: 27050200 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - March 31, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Lack BM, Smith RM, Arundell MJ, Homer CS Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Women's experience of childbirth - A five year follow-up of the randomised controlled trial "Ready for Child Trial".
CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS: Women's overall birth experience is important as it has a long term influence on the future health of the woman and her family. Reporting a good birth experience in the long term is more likely when attending a structured antenatal programme and if medical intervention is avoided during birth. PMID: 27038559 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - March 30, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Maimburg RD, Væth M, Dahlen H Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

'Expecting and Connecting' Group Pregnancy Care: Evaluation of a collaborative clinic.
CONCLUSION: The 'Expecting and Connecting' group antenatal care service was highly regarded by participant mothers, midwives and midwifery students and provided an additional source of midwifery student placement. PMID: 27038560 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - March 30, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Craswell A, Kearney L, Reed R Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Australian midwives and provision of nutrition education during pregnancy: A cross sectional survey of nutrition knowledge, attitudes, and confidence.
CONCLUSION: Australian midwives' attitudes towards nutrition during pregnancy and their role in educating pregnant women about it were positive but their knowledge and confidence did not align with these attitudes. This could be due to minimal nutrition education during midwifery education or during practice. Continued education to improve midwives' nutrition knowledge and confidence is essential. PMID: 27020228 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - March 25, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Arrish J, Yeatman H, Williamson M Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Birthplace as the midwife's work place: How does place of birth impact on midwives?
CONCLUSION: Given the excellent outcomes of midwifery led care, we should focus on how we can facilitate the work of midwives in all settings. This study suggests that the culture of the birthplace rather than the physicality is the highest priority. PMID: 26996415 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - March 17, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Davis DL, Homer CS Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Functional status of women with and without severe maternal morbidity: A prospective cohort study.
Abstract BACKGROUND: Little is known regarding the impact on maternal functional status in women who have survived severe obstetric complications. OBJECTIVE: To compare the maternal functional status score between women with and without severe morbidity at one month and six months postpartum in Kelantan, Malaysia. METHODS: A prospective cohort study design was applied at two tertiary referral hospitals over a six-month period. The study population included all postpartum women who gave birth in 2014. Postpartum women with severe maternal morbidity and without severe maternal morbidity were selected as th...
Source: Women Birth - March 10, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Norhayati MN, Nik Hazlina NH, Aniza AA Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Exploring midwifery prescribing in Australia.
CONCLUSION: Prescribing was viewed positively by midwives, but only a small proportion of suitably educated midwives were able to translate this into prescribing. Prolonged and complicated registration processes, restrictive drug formularies, and a lack of prescribing roles for public sector midwives were clear barriers. Supportive professional relationships, quality education and personal motivation and confidence assisted midwives in overcoming these barriers. Offering mentoring may help midwives to move into prescribing practice and use it in a manner that best meets the health needs of women and infants in midwifery ca...
Source: Women Birth - March 7, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Small K, Sidebotham M, Gamble J, Fenwick J Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Caring for parents at the time of stillbirth: How can we do better?
This study aimed to survey parents who experienced stillbirth in a tertiary referral centre. There were seven question areas including receiving bad news, involvement of the multidisciplinary team, facilitation to grieve and have time with baby, autopsy communication process, post-discharge support and the importance parents placed on aspects of care. Mothers were contacted months following stillbirth to obtain verbal consent, before surveys were posted to both parents. Data were analysed using IBM SPSS Statistics version 22.0. FINDINGS: 70% (n=21) of mothers and 51% (n=15) of fathers responded. Responses between part...
Source: Women Birth - February 22, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: O'Connell O, Meaney S, O'Donoghue K Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Randomised controlled trial using smartphone website vs leaflet to support antenatal perineal massage practice for pregnant women.
CONCLUSION: There was no significant difference in continuance rate of antenatal perineal massage practice between those using a smartphone website and those with a leaflet, however, the rate was better than no instructions. PMID: 26906970 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - February 18, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Takeuchi S, Horiuchi S Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Potential predictors of nipple trauma from an in-home breastfeeding programme: A cross-sectional study.
CONCLUSION: Nipple trauma was associated with commonly taught techniques that involved the cross-cradle hold and manoeuvres of the breast, nipple and baby that resulted in nipple malalignment and facio-mandibular asymmetry. This practice, appeared to interfere with the baby's intra-oral function by restricting movement of the cranio-cervical spine and nuchal ligament. The combination appeared to limit the baby's instinctive ability to activate neuro-sensory mammalian behaviours to freely locate and effectively draw the nipple and breast tissue without causing trauma. Changes to the first and early breastfeeding techniques ...
Source: Women Birth - February 16, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Thompson R, Kruske S, Barclay L, Linden K, Gao Y, Kildea S Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Trends in seasonal influenza vaccine uptake during pregnancy in Western Australia: Implications for midwives.
Abstract BACKGROUND: Antenatal influenza vaccination is an important public health intervention for preventing serious illness in mothers and newborns, yet uptake remains low. AIM: To evaluate trends in seasonal influenza vaccine coverage and identify determinants for vaccination among pregnant women in Western Australia. METHODS: We conducted an annual telephone survey in a random sample of post-partum women who delivered a baby in Western Australia between 2012 and 2014. Women were asked whether influenza vaccination was recommended and/or received during their most recent pregnancy; women were also as...
Source: Women Birth - February 12, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Regan AK, Mak DB, Hauck YL, Gibbs R, Tracey L, Effler PV Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Labour induction for late-term or post-term pregnancy.
CONCLUSION: Ultimately, after receiving accurate, evidence-based information and guidance from health care providers, women have the right to decide whether they prefer to induce labour, or wait for spontaneous labour with appropriate foetal monitoring, as both are reasonable options. PMID: 26879103 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - February 12, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Dekker RL Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

An Australian survey of women's use of pregnancy and parenting apps.
CONCLUSION: Apps are becoming important as a source of information and self-monitoring and for providing reassurance for Australian pregnant women and mothers with young children. Midwives and other healthcare professionals providing care and support for pregnant women and women in the early years of motherhood need to take women's app use into account and recognise both the potential and limitations of these apps. PMID: 26874938 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - February 10, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Lupton D, Pedersen S Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

The Milky Way educational and support programme: Structure, content and strategies.
CONCLUSION: The programme is evidence-based, theoretically informed and woman-centred. This paper provides the necessary information to health professionals who are trained to educate and support breastfeeding women to implement similar programmes in their workplaces. PMID: 26868045 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - February 8, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Meedya S, Fahy K, Parratt JA Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

The attitudes of healthcare professionals towards women using illicit substances in pregnancy: A cross-sectional study.
CONCLUSION: This research provides useful insight into the attitudes of healthcare professionals. While larger scale research is needed, the positive findings of this study may work towards reducing fear of stigma as a barrier to care for women. PMID: 26853504 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - February 4, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Fonti S, Davis D, Ferguson S Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women's experiences accessing standard hospital care for birth in South Australia - A phenomenological study.
CONCLUSION: Indigenous women in this study expressed and shared some of their cultural needs, identifying culturally unsafe practices. Recommendations to address these include the extension of current care planners to include cultural needs; Aboriginal Maternal Infant Care (AMIC) workers for women from rural and remote areas; AMIC workers on call to assist the women and midwives; increased education, employment and retention of Indigenous midwives; increased review into the women's experiences; removal of signs on the door restricting visitors in the birth suite; flexibility in the application of hospital rules and regulat...
Source: Women Birth - February 3, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Brown AE, Fereday JA, Middleton PF, Pincombe JI Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

What happens after you submit a paper to Women and Birth: An insider's view of editorial and review processes.
PMID: 26821846 [PubMed - in process] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - January 31, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Fahy PK Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Measuring maternal satisfaction with maternity care: A systematic integrative review: What is the most appropriate, reliable and valid tool that can be used to measure maternal satisfaction with continuity of maternity care?
CONCLUSION: Women's satisfaction with maternity services is an important measure of quality. Most satisfaction surveys in maternity appear to reflect fragmented models of care though continuity of care models are increasing in line with the evidence demonstrating their effectiveness. It is important that robust tools are developed for this context and that there is some consistency in the way this is measured and reported for the purposes of benchmarking and quality improvement. PMID: 26782087 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - January 15, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Perriman N, Davis D Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Midwifery practice during birth: Ritual companionship.
CONCLUSION: Midwives performed two types of practices which intersected with women's experience of birth in differing and contested ways. Conceptualising the role of the midwife as a 'ritual companion' and actions and words as rituals enables a deeper exploration of the values transmitted and reflected by midwifery practice. This study contributes to a discourse about midwifery practice during birth, women's experience of birth, and the influence of the institution on the nature of mother-midwife relationship. PMID: 26782088 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - January 15, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Reed R, Rowe J, Barnes M Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Developing clinical teaching capacities of midwifery students.
CONCLUSIONS: Despite limited educational activities for clinical teaching, the midwifery students made explicit connections of the relational interdependence of workplace-based experiences and their learning. Students were clearly able to identify ways in which their own learning experiences and the culture in which this learning is embedded, assists them to develop clinical teaching skills, ready to support the next generation of midwifery students. PMID: 26774616 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - January 13, 2016 Category: Midwifery Authors: Rance S, Sweet L Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Pronurturance Plus at birth: A risk reduction strategy for preventing postpartum haemorrhage.
CONCLUSION: Pronurturance Plus is a psycho-biologically grounded theory which is consistent with existing evidence. It is free, natural and socially desirable. PMID: 26724899 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - December 24, 2015 Category: Midwifery Authors: Saxton A, Fahy K, Hastie C Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Midwifery students experience of teamwork projects involving mark-related peer feedback.
CONCLUSION: Teamwork skills should be specifically taught and assessed. These skills take time to develop. Students, therefore, should be engaged in a teamwork assignment in each semester of the entire program. Peer feedback should be moderated by the teacher and not directly related to marks. PMID: 26725516 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - December 22, 2015 Category: Midwifery Authors: Hastie CR, Fahy KM, Parratt JA, Grace S Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research

Putting intelligent structured intermittent auscultation (ISIA) into practice.
CONCLUSION: Intelligent structured intermittent auscultation provides midwives with a robust means of demonstrating their critical thinking and clinical reasoning and supports their understanding of normal physiological birth. PMID: 26710972 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Women Birth)
Source: Women Birth - December 19, 2015 Category: Midwifery Authors: Maude RM, Skinner JP, Foureur MJ Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research