Uncommon Skin Response to the Stings of Tropical Fire Ant Solenopsis geminata
Publication date: Available online 23 August 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental MedicineAuthor(s): Buddhika T.B. Wijerathne, Geetha K. Rathnayake, R.K. Sriyani Dias, Nuwan D Wickramasinghe, Sujeewa P.B. Thalgaspitiya, Anuruddha H. Karunaratne, Suneth B. Agampodi (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - August 24, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Data Depiction and Analysis
Publication date: Available online 16 August 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental MedicineAuthor(s): Neal W. Pollock (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - August 18, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Dr. Emmanuel Cauchy (1960−2018)—Reflections from Around the World
Publication date: Available online 3 August 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental MedicineAuthor(s): Linda E. Keyes, Beat H. Walpoth, Marc Blancher, François Becker (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - August 3, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Methoxyflurane for Procedural Analgesia at 4470 m Altitude
We report its use for procedural analgesia during suprapubic aspiration for acute urinary retention at a remote rescue post at night, in cold winter conditions, at 4470 m altitude in Machermo, Nepal. We found that methoxyflurane provided rapid, effective analgesia for our patient’s visceral and procedural pain. The inhaler was easy to administer, and the patient remained responsive to voice, with satisfactory oxygen saturation and respiratory rate throughout. We also briefly review the administration, dosing, efficacy, and safety of methoxyflurane and its role in remote medical care. (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 27, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Cover photo: Wild lupines
Publication date: Available online 10 March 2010Source: Wilderness & Environmental MedicineAuthor(s): Alastair Hodges (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Relations Between Self-Reported and Linguistic Monitoring Assessments of Affective Experience in an Extreme Environment
ConclusionsFuture research should build on this initial study to further test the links between self-reported affect and emotional states monitored via linguistics. This could help develop methods for monitoring psychological health in extreme environments and support organizational decision making. (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Psychological Attributes of Ultramarathoners
ConclusionsAlthough only a screening, the number of positive screens on the Exercise Addiction Inventory suggests use of screening measures with an ultramarathon running population. Athletes with positive screening tests should be fully evaluated for depression and exercise addiction because this would enable appropriate athlete support and treatment referral. (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Prehospital Emergencies in Illegal Gold Mining Sites in French Guiana
We report the characteristics of, and the medical responses to, medical emergencies in illegal gold mining sites.MethodsWe performed a retrospective study of all medical emergencies reported from illegal gold mining sites to the centralized call office of SAMU 973 from 1998 through 2000 and from 2008 through 2010. According to the national health care system, any medical emergency within the territory is handled by the prehospital emergency medical service (SAMU 973), irrespective of the patients’ legal status. Data were extracted from the SAMU 973 notebook registry (1998–2000) or the SAMU 973 computerized data...
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Core Content for Wilderness Medicine Training: Development of a Wilderness Medicine Track Within an Emergency Medicine Residency
The objective of this study is to create a longitudinal wilderness medicine curriculum that can be incorporated into an EM residency program. Interest-specific tracks are becoming increasingly common in EM training. We chose this model to develop our curriculum specific to wilderness medicine. Outlined in the article is a 3-year longitudinal course of study that includes a core didactic curriculum and a plan for graduated level of responsibility. The core content is specifically related to the required EM core content for residency training with additions specific to wilderness medicine for the residents who pursue the tra...
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

A Case of Autosplenectomy in Sickle Cell Trait Following an Exposure to High Altitude
Publication date: March 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 1Author(s): Uday Yanamandra, Reena Das, Pankaj Malhotra, Subhash VarmaA 24-year-old man presented with acute abdominal pain upon ascent to moderate altitude (3500 m). An immediate evaluation revealed a splenic infarct, and he was evacuated to sea level. Upon recovery, he was sent back to 3500 m without detailed etiological evaluation, whereupon he experienced recurrent episodes of left-side subcostal pain. Imaging suggested autosplenectomy, and workup revealed a negative thrombophilia profile but was positive for sickle cell trait...
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Pott’s Disease Resulting in Complete Cervical Vertebral Destruction
We present a case report of a military veteran presenting with neck pain and initially diagnosed with cervical disc disease. The patient’s pain progressed to the point of developing paresthesias in his bilateral upper extremities. Eventually, cervical spine radiographs were obtained that revealed complete cervical vertebral body destruction from spinal tuberculosis. Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the disorder are discussed. (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia Following Three Different Species of Hump-Nosed Pit Viper (Genus: Hypnale) Envenoming in Sri Lanka
We report a series of 3 patients who developed MAHA after being bitten by each species of hump-nosed pit viper. The first patient was bitten by H hypnale and developed a severe form of MAHA associated with acute kidney injury and thrombocytopenia falling into the category of thrombotic microangiopathy. The other 2 developed MAHA that resolved without any complications. (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

An Effective Treatment in the Austere Environment? A Critical Appraisal into the Use of Intra-Articular Local Anesthetic to Facilitate Reduction in Acute Shoulder Dislocation
The objective of this systematic review of the literature was to determine if intra-articular local anesthetic (IAL) is an effective treatment that could have prehospital application. A methodical search of MEDLINE, PubMed, and EMBASE databases targeted publications from January 1, 1990 until January 1, 2017. Eligible articles compared IAL with other analgesic techniques in patients 16 years or older experiencing acute glenohumeral dislocation. Reduction success, complications, and patient-reported outcome measures underwent comparison. All identified publications originated from the hospital setting. Procedural success ra...
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Amatoxin-Containing Mushroom Poisonings: Species, Toxidromes, Treatments, and Outcomes
Publication date: March 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 1Author(s): James H. DiazAmatoxins are produced primarily by 3 species of mushrooms: Amanita, Lepiota, and Galerina. Because amatoxin poisonings are increasing, the objective of this review was to identify all amatoxin-containing mushroom species, present a toxidromic approach to earlier diagnoses, and compare the efficacies and outcomes of therapies. To meet these objectives, Internet search engines were queried with keywords to select peer-reviewed scientific articles on amatoxin-containing mushroom poisoning and management. Des...
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

A Puff of Spores
Publication date: March 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 1Author(s): James H. Diaz (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Common Bite—Bizarre Rash
Publication date: March 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 1Author(s): Simant Singh Thapa, Buddha Basnyat (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Elevation 3 mm: A Case of a Cardiac Emergency and Rescue on Mount Monadnock
Publication date: March 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 1Author(s): Benjamin J. Church, Nicholas J. Daniel (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Wilderness First Responder: Are Skills Soon Forgotten?
Publication date: March 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 1Author(s): Alexandra L. Rhue, Beth VanDerveerWilderness first responders are trained to provide competent medical care in wilderness settings or until evacuation for more advanced treatment can be obtained. In light of the isolated environments in which they are called upon to respond to illnesses and injuries, their ability to effectively apply their training is crucial. Despite the responsibility assigned to them, there is an absence of research assessing the skill and knowledge retention of wilderness first responders, creatin...
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Human–Snake Encounters and Folk Remedies in Nepal
Publication date: March 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 1Author(s): Alok Atreya, Tanuj Kanchan (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Acetazolamide Use in Ultrarunners at Altitude: Issues with Doping
Publication date: March 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 1Author(s): Suvash Dawadi (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Mismanagement of Severe Altitude Illness in a Tertiary Hospital in Nepal: A Cautionary Tale
Publication date: March 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 1Author(s): Santosh Baniya, Buddha Basnyat (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Jellyfish Blooms Causing Mass Envenomations in Aquatic Marathonists: Report of Cases in S and SE Brazil (SW Atlantic Ocean)
Publication date: March 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 1Author(s): Vidal Haddad, André C. Morandini, Lucia E. Rodrigues (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

An Iconic Pit Viper of the Central American Rainforests
Publication date: March 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 1Author(s): Pablo Deschepper, Raf Aerts (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Journal Shopping and Pruning the Literature
Publication date: March 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 1Author(s): Neal W. Pollock (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

2017 Wilderness & Environmental Medicine Peer Reviewers
Publication date: March 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 1Author(s): Alicia Byrne (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Helicopter Mountain Rescue in Slovenia from 2011 to 2015
ConclusionsA significant number of mountain rescue operations were conducted in Slovenia from 2011 through 2015. Most of these were needed for injured, ill, or deceased persons. A notable number of rescues in 2015 required a helicopter. (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Use of a Parabolic Microphone to Detect Hidden Subjects in Search and Rescue
This study compares a parabolic microphone to unaided hearing in detecting and comprehending hidden callers at ranges of 322 to 2510 m.MethodsEight subjects were placed 322 to 2510 m away from a central listening point. The subjects were concealed, and their calling volume was calibrated. In random order, subjects were asked to call the name of a state for 5 minutes. Listeners with parabolic microphones and others with unaided hearing recorded the direction of the call (detection) and name of the state (comprehension).ResultsThe parabolic microphone was superior to unaided hearing in both detecting subjects and comprehendi...
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Frequency of Polycythemia and Other Abnormalities in a Tibetan Herdsmen Population Residing in the Kham Area of Sichuan Province, China
ConclusionsThere is a higher frequency of polycythemia in the Kham Tibetans when compared with reported studies from other Tibetan ethnic subgroups living on the Qinghai-Tibet plateau. (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Update on the Epidemiology of Scorpion Envenomation in the South of Tunisia
ConclusionThis study found that the outcome of scorpion-stung patients has clearly improved. This enhancement can be explained by early medical consultation and standardized management of patients with predictive factors for cardiac dysfunction. (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

An Update on Fatalities Due to Venomous and Nonvenomous Animals in the United States (2008–2015)
ConclusionsAppropriate education and prevention measures aimed at decreasing injury from animals should be directed at the high-risk groups of agricultural workers and young children with dogs. Public policy and treatment pricing should align to ensure adequate available medication for those at risk of anaphylaxis from stings from Hymenoptera. (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Cutaneous Vascular Responses of the Hands and Feet to Cooling, Rewarming, and Hypoxia in Humans
This study investigated skin vasomotor responses in the fingers and toes during cooling and rewarming with and without normobaric hypoxia.MethodsFourteen volunteers (8 males and 6 females) were exposed to gradual air cooling (mean±SD: −0.4±0.1oC·min−1) followed by rewarming (+0.5±0.1oC·min−1) while breathing normoxic air (FIO2 0.21 at 761±3 mm Hg) or hypoxic gas (FIO2 0.12, at 761±3 mm Hg, equivalent to ~5000 m above sea level). Throughout the gradual cooling and rewarming phases, rectal temperature was measured, and skin temperatures and laser Doppler skin...
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Knowledge of the Avalanche Victim Resuscitation Checklist and Utility of a Standardized Lecture in Italy
Publication date: March 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 1Author(s): Giacomo Strapazzon, Daniel Migliaccio, Diego Fontana, Agnieszka Elzbieta Stawinoga, Mario Milani, Hermann BruggerIntroductionTo explore baseline knowledge about avalanche guidelines and the Avalanche Victim Resuscitation Checklist (AVReCh) in Italy and the knowledge acquisition from a standardized lecture.MethodsStandardized lecture material discussing AVReCh was presented during 8 mountain medicine courses from November 2014 to April 2016 in different regions of Italy. To determine the knowledge acquisition from the l...
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Penetrating Anorectal Injury Caused by a Wild Boar Attack: A Case Report
In this report, we highlighted the characteristics of anorectal trauma caused by a wild boar attack. We conclude that penetrating anorectal injuries caused by this type of attack can be associated with extensive soft-tissue damage despite externally appearing to be simple puncture wounds. Anorectal combat injuries have demonstrated similar extensive surrounding soft-tissue injuries and propensity for infection; therefore, this case supports adopting a similar treatment strategy, that of serial and radical debridement, to treat certain wild boar injuries. (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Research Gaps in Wilderness Medicine
ConclusionOverall, few studies were being conducted to address research gaps in wilderness medicine. Heat-related illness had the most new or ongoing research, whereas no studies were being conducted to address gaps in eye injuries, basic wound management, or spine immobilization. Animals, cadavers, and mannequin research are useful in cases in which human evidence is difficult to obtain. Establishing research priorities is recommended for addressing research gaps identified by guideline panels. (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Following a Crotalus horridus Envenomation
We report a case of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) occurring in a 73-year-old man after an envenomation by a juvenile canebrake rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus). The man was bitten on the left index finger and subsequently developed localized edema followed by hypotension, chest pain, and altered mental status. His initial electrocardiogram revealed ST-segment elevation in the inferior and lateral leads. His hospital course included emergent left heart catheterization with thrombectomy and cardiac stent placement. This case captures the unique medical situation involving the approach to tr...
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

A Survey of Wilderness Medicine Analgesia Practice Patterns
ConclusionsWilderness medicine practitioners prefer analgesic agents recommended by the WMS for the treatment of acute pain. Respondents most frequently preferred acetaminophen and NSAIDs. (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Megalopyge opercularis Caterpillar Stings Reported to Texas Poison Centers
ConclusionsM opercularis caterpillar stings reported to Texas poison centers were more frequently reported in July and October to November. Most of the patients were adults. The majority of patients were managed outside of healthcare facilities and did not have serious outcomes. Most of the adverse clinical effects were dermal in nature. (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Alaska Mountain Wilderness Ski Classic: Alterations in Caloric Expenditure and Body Composition
The objective of the study was to evaluate the influence of the 2016 Alaska Mountain Wilderness Ski Classic on caloric expenditure and body composition.MethodsCaloric expenditure was estimated using GT3x+ Actigraph accelerometers and ActiLife software. Lean tissue mass, total fat mass, visceral fat mass, and bone mineral density were measured using a General Electric iDXA before and after the event. Data are presented as mean±SD. Differences were analyzed using paired t tests with significance at P
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Potential Environmental and Ecological Effects of Global Climate Change on Venomous Terrestrial Species in the Wilderness
ConclusionsTemperature extremes and changes to climatic norms may have a dramatic effect on venomous terrestrial species. As climate change affects the distribution, populations, and life histories of these organisms, the chance of encounters could be altered, thus affecting human health and the survivability of these creatures. (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Close Encounter With a Prickly Soccer Ball: An Injury From an Indian Crested Porcupine
In this report, we describe the injuries and management of a man who sustained injury from H indica quills. (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Whiptail Stingray Injury
We describe the case of a 24-year-old man with tension pneumothorax due to a Himantura fai stingray injury to the left chest. The chest wound was unremarkable, with no external bleeding or evidence of a foreign body. Decompression was performed at the scene with an improvised knife procedure and a hollow writing pen, which served as a chest tube. At the local hospital, a standard-sized chest tube was inserted, the wound cleaned, and the patient given antibiotics active against marine organisms. Computed tomography visualized the stinger and revealed hemopneumothorax and pneumomediastinum. The local hospital did not have a ...
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Wireless and Low-Weight Technologies: Advanced Medical Assistance During a Cave Rescue: A Case Report
We describe an advanced medical rescue performed by the Italian Corpo Nazionale del Soccorso Alpino e Speleologico, in which extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma and an ultrasound-guided adductor canal block were performed on a patient with a knee distortion directly in the cave. The rescue team inside the cave shared data on patient monitoring and the ultrasound scanning in real time with rescuers at the entrance, using a video conference powered by the new Ermes system. The use of handheld, battery-powered, low-weight, multiparametric monitors, ultrasound machines, and digital data transmission systems ...
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

International Commission for Mountain Emergency Medicine Consensus Guidelines for On-Site Management and Transport of Patients in Canyoning Incidents
Publication date: June 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 2Author(s): Giacomo Strapazzon, Oliver Reisten, Fabien Argenone, Ken Zafren, Greg Zen-Ruffinen, Gordon L. Larsen, Inigo SoterasCanyoning is a recreational activity that has increased in popularity in the last decade in Europe and North America, resulting in up to 40% of the total search and rescue costs in some geographic locations. The International Commission for Mountain Emergency Medicine convened an expert panel to develop recommendations for on-site management and transport of patients in canyoning incidents. The goal of the ...
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Challenges of Military Health Service Support in Mountain Warfare
ConclusionsTo overcome the restrictions of mountain environments, proper planning and preparation, including sustained mountain mobility training, in-depth mountain medicine training with a special emphasize on prolonged field care, knowledge of acclimatization strategies, adapted time calculations, mountain-specific equipment, air rescue strategies and makeshift evacuation strategies, and thorough personnel selection, are vital to guarantee the best possible medical support. The specifics of managing risks in mountain environments are also critical for civilian rescue missions and humanitarian aid. (Source: Wilderness and...
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Reported Resuscitation of a Hypothermic Avalanche Victim With Assisted Ventilation in 1939
We present a historical case of a 12-year-old boy who survived a reported avalanche burial in 1939 in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The boy was completely buried for at least 3 h, head down, at a depth of about 1 m. He was extricated without signs of life and likely hypothermic by his father, who took him to his home. There, the father performed assisted ventilation for 3 hours using the Schäfer method, a historical method of artificial ventilation, without any specific rewarming efforts. The boy recovered neurologically intact. This case illustrates the importance of attempting resuscitation, possibly prolonged, o...
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

In response to HMOX1 microsatellite polymorphism by Cao et al
Publication date: June 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 2Author(s): Gaurav Sikri, Srinivasa Bhattachar (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

In Reply to Drs Sikri and Bhattachar
Publication date: June 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 2Author(s): Xue-Feng Cao, Ri-Li Ge (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Is the Water Rescue Service in Poland Heading in the Right Direction? Preparing Lifeguards to the Standards of First Aid in Europe
Publication date: June 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 2Author(s): Iwona Tabaczek-Bejster, Jerzy Kiszka, Dorota Ozga (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

Enviromedics: The Impact of Climate Change on Human Health, Jay Lemery, Paul Auerbach. Rowman & Littlefield Lanham (2017), USD $28 (hardcover), 214 pages
Publication date: June 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 2Author(s): Timothy B. Erickson (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research

ERRATUM in Wilderness Environ Med. 29/1
Publication date: June 2018Source: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Volume 29, Issue 2Author(s): (Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine)
Source: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine - July 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research