Editorial commentary: Preserving myocardium in muscular dystrophy patients using ACE inhibition
Two of the key therapeutic questions for cardiology practitioners caring for muscular dystrophy patients is the efficacy and timing of initiating cardioprotective medications in this inexorably progressive disease. The article by Russo et al. [1] in this issue is an excellent review of this difficult and clinically important topic. The paper is a comprehensive review of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I) therapy in three different muscular dystrophies: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), myotonic dystrophy I, and Emery-Dreyfus muscular dystrophy. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 19, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Michael D. Taylor Source Type: research

Preserving myocardium in muscular dystrophy patients using ACE inhibition
Two of the key therapeutic questions for cardiology practitioners caring for muscular dystrophy patients is the efficacy and timing of initiating cardioprotective medications in this inexorably progressive disease. The article by Russo et. al.[1] is an excellent review of this difficult and clinically important topic. The paper is a comprehensive review of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I) therapy in three different muscular dystrophies: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), myotonic dystrophy I, and Emery-Dreyfus muscular dystrophy. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 19, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Michael D. Taylor Source Type: research

The caveats of cardiac imaging in ebstein anomaly
Ebstein anomaly is a rare but intriguing anomaly comprising a variety of abnormalities predominantly within the right heart with an abnormal tricuspid valve being the most striking feature [1]. The main features of Ebstein anomaly are caused by insufficient delamination of the septal and inferior (posterior) tricuspid valve leaflets from the right ventricular myocardial mass during embryological development of the heart. This leads to abnormal apical displacement of the functional tricuspid valve annulus with various degrees of tricuspid regurgitation. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 19, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Matthias Greutmann, Emanuela R. Valsangiacomo Buechel, Christine Attenhofer Jost Source Type: research

Translational overview of cytokine inhibition in acute myocardial infarction and chronic heart failure
Many cytokines are currently under investigation as potential target to improve cardiac function and outcome in the setting of acute myocardial infarction (MI) or chronic heart failure (HF). Here we aim to provide a translational overview of cytokine inhibiting therapies tested in experimental models and clinical studies. In various experimental studies, inhibition of interleukin-1 (IL-1), -6 (IL-6), -8 (IL-8), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), CC- and CXC chemokines, and tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF-α) had beneficial effects on cardiac function and outcome. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 15, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Minke H.T. Hartman, Hilde E. Groot, Irene Mateo Leach, Jacco C. Karper, Pim van der Harst Source Type: research

Editorial commentary: Epigenetics and cardiovascular disease —From concept to reality
The concept of epigenetic regulation of gene expression has been around for decades, and the underlying observations date back more than a century. The specific term has been attributed to Waddington [1]. The basic idea of epigenetics is that gene expression can be influenced by factors other than the genetic sequence. The various elements of epigenetic control include DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNA interactions with either DNA or mRNA. Epigenetic alterations have been suggested as responsible for a variety of inherited traits, including altered growth, psychological conditions and other physical...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 15, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: J. Kevin Donahue Source Type: research

Translational overview of cytokine inhibition in acute myocardial infarction and chronic heart failure
Many cytokines are currently under investigation as potential target to improve cardiac function and outcome in the setting of acute myocardial infarction (MI) or chronic heart failure (HF). Here we aim to provide a translational overview of cytokine inhibiting therapies tested in experimental models and clinical studies. In various experimental studies, inhibition of interleukin-1 (IL-1), -6 (IL-6), -8 (IL-8), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), CC- and CXC chemokines, and tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF-α) had beneficial effects on cardiac function and outcome. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 15, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Minke H.T. Hartman, Hilde E. Groot, Irene Mateo Leach, Jacco C. Karper, Pim van der Harst Source Type: research

Epigenetics and cardiovascular disease: from concept to reality
The concept of epigenetic regulation of gene expression has been around for decades, and the underlying observations date back more than a century. The specific term has been attributed to Waddington [1]. The basic idea of epigenetics is that gene expression can be influenced by factors other than the genetic sequence. The various elements of epigenetic control include DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNA interactions with either DNA or mRNA. Epigenetic alterations have been suggested as responsible for a variety of inherited traits, including altered growth, psychological conditions and other physical...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 15, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: J. Kevin Donahue Source Type: research

Plant-based diets and cardiovascular health
Plant-based diets, defined in terms of low frequency of animal food consumption, have been increasingly recommended for their health benefits. Numerous studies have found plant-based diets, especially when rich in high quality plant foods such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and nuts, to be associated with lower risk of cardiovascular outcomes and intermediate risk factors. This review summarizes the current evidence base examining the associations of plant-based diets with cardiovascular endpoints, and discusses the potential biological mechanisms underlying their health effects, practical recommendations and applica...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 13, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Ambika Satija, Frank B. Hu Source Type: research

Editorial commentary: Use of cerebral embolic protection devices during transcatheter aortic valve replacement
Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for severe aortic stenosis. Many of these patients have heavily calcified aortic valve and atherosclerotic or porcelain aorta. As reviewed by Vlastra et al. [1] in the present study, these patients are at very high risk for cerebrovascular events due to atherosclerotic and calcific debris embolization during manipulation of wire and large bore catheters in the atherosclerotic aorta as well as manipulation of calcific aortic valve during balloon valvuloplasty and transcatheter valve deployment. (Source: Trends in Car...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Hemang B. Panchal, Timir K. Paul Source Type: research

Non-PCI/CABG therapies for refractory angina
We were pleased to read the article by Dr Ki and Dr Conti: Non-PCI/CABG therapies for refractory angina which was published in October 2017 [1]. The authors presented an excellent review on the currently available and the emerging novel therapies for refractory angina pectoris (RAP). (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Yoav Paz, Amihay Shinfeld Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Editorial commentary: Use of cerebral embolic protection devices during transcatheter aortic valve replacement
Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for severe aortic stenosis. Many of these patients have heavily calcified aortic valve and atherosclerotic or porcelain aorta. As reviewed by Vlastra et al. [1] in the present study, these patients are at very high risk for cerebrovascular events due to atherosclerotic and calcific debris embolization during manipulation of wire and large bore catheters in the atherosclerotic aorta as well as manipulation of calcific aortic valve during balloon valvuloplasty and transcatheter valve deployment. (Source: Trends in Car...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Hemang B. Panchal, Timir K. Paul Source Type: research

Use of Cerebral Embolic Protection Devices during Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement
Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for severe aortic stenosis. Many of these patients have heavily calcified aortic valve and atherosclerotic or porcelain aorta. As reviewed by Vlastra et al. in the present study, these patients are at very high risk for cerebrovascular events due to atherosclerotic and calcific debris embolization during manipulation of wire and large bore catheters in the atherosclerotic aorta as well as manipulation of calcific aortic valve during balloon valvuloplasty and transcatheter valve deployment [1]. (Source: Trends in Car...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Hemang B. Panchal, Timir K. Paul Source Type: research

Letter to the editor
We were pleased to read the article by Dr Ki and Dr Conti: Non-PCI/CABG therapies for refractory angina which was published in October 2017 [1]. The authors presented an excellent review on the currently available and the emerging novel therapies for refractory angina pectoris (RAP). (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Yoav Paz, Amihay Shinfeld Source Type: research

Editorial commentary: Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction —Clinical syndrome with incomplete understanding
Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is widely prevalent, representing approximately 50% of heart failure admissions [1]; however, the pathophysiology of HFpEF is still incompletely understood. Adding to this conundrum are limited therapeutic options for this condition. In this issue of Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine, Xanthipoulos et al. [2] summarize our current understanding of the disease. They propose a simplified classification system for HFpEF into two groups —hypertensive versus non-hypertensive and highlight the available diagnostic tools and potential therapeutic options for this conditi...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Supriya Shore, Paul J. Mather Source Type: research

Potentialities of the internal mammary arteries and refractory angina
Dear Editor, (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Marco Picich è Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Cerebral protection devices during transcatheter aortic valve implantation
Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in patients with aortic valve stenosis is associated with an improvement of clinical outcomes, quality of life, and self-sufficiency. The most feared TAVI-related complication is the occurrence of stroke. In order to reduce peri-procedural cerebral embolizations, diverse cerebral protection devices have been developed. These devices work though deflection or filtering of emboli, and are in different stages of testing. Silent cerebral infarctions identified by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) are used as surrogate primary outcomes, but the clinical signifi...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Wieneke Vlastra, Jeroen Vendrik, Karel T. Koch, Jan Baan, Jan J. Piek, Ronak Delewi Source Type: research

Editorial commentary: The lower the LDL the better but how and how much?
In this issue of Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine, in a comprehensive review, Packard concludes that the lower the level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), the better [1]. This finding should be viewed in the context of the totality of evidence. In descriptive studies, useful to formulate, but not test, hypotheses, before the introduction of western lifestyles, the majority of the adult population of the world had LDLs of about 50mg per deciliter (mg/dL). Japan has had the longest life expectancy in the world as well as the history of the world, due mainly to very low rates of coronary heart disease (CHD). (Sou...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Alexander Gitin, Marc A. Pfeffer, Charles H. Hennekens Source Type: research

Emerging concepts in diagnosis and treatment of syncope by pacing
Neuroendocrine syncope is a newly proposed term to embody both syncope of reflex and adenosine-related etiology. Recent publications on tilt testing have revealed the presence of a hypotensive tendency in some patients, even in the face of severe cardioinhibition. This new understanding may allow better selection of older reflex syncope patients, documented by ECG loop recorder, for successful pacing where tilt testing is ideally negative for a good result in terms of few syncope recurrences and prompts a less aggressive management policy when hypotensive medication is required. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Richard Sutton, Jean-Claude Deharo, Michele Brignole, Mohamed H. Hamdan Source Type: research

Editorial commentary: Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction —Clinical syndrome with incomplete understanding
Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is widely prevalent, representing approximately 50% of heart failure admissions [1]; however, the pathophysiology of HFpEF is still incompletely understood. Adding to this conundrum are limited therapeutic options for this condition. In this issue of Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine, Xanthipoulos et al. [2] summarize our current understanding of the disease. They propose a simplified classification system for HFpEF into two groups —hypertensive versus non-hypertensive and highlight the available diagnostic tools and potential therapeutic options for this conditi...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Supriya Shore, Paul J. Mather Source Type: research

Editorial commentary: The lower the LDL the better but how and how much?
In this issue of Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine, in a comprehensive review, Packard concludes that the lower the level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), the better [1]. This finding should be viewed in the context of the totality of evidence. In descriptive studies, useful to formulate, but not test, hypotheses, before the introduction of western lifestyles, the majority of the adult population of the world had LDLs of about 50mg per deciliter (mg/dL). Japan has had the longest life expectancy in the world as well as the history of the world, due mainly to very low rates of coronary heart disease (CHD). (Sou...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Alexander Gitin, Marc A. Pfeffer, Charles H. Hennekens Source Type: research

Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction: Clinical Syndrome With Incomplete Understanding
Heart Failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is widely prevalent, representing approximately 50% of heart failure admissions [1]; however, the pathophysiology of HFpEF is still incompletely understood. Adding to this conundrum are limited therapeutic options for this condition. In this issue of Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine, Xanthipoulos, Triposkiadis and Starling [2] summarize our current understanding of the disease. They propose a simplified classification system for HFpEF into two groups – hypertensive versus non-hypertensive and highlight the available diagnostic tools and potential therapeutic opt...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Supriya Shore, Paul J. Mather Source Type: research

Potentialities of the internal mammary arteries and refractory angina
Dear Editor, (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Marco Picich è Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Cerebral protection devices during transcatheter aortic valve implantation
Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) in patients with aortic valve stenosis is associated with an improvement of clinical outcomes, quality of life and self-sufficiency. The most feared TAVI related complication is the occurrence of stroke. In order to reduce peri-procedural cerebral embolizations, diverse cerebral protection devices have been developed. These devices work though deflection or filtering of emboli, and are in different stages of testing. Silent cerebral infarctions identified by diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) are used as surrogate primary outcomes, but the clinical signific...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Wieneke Vlastra, Jeroen Vendrik, Karel T. Koch, Jan Baan, Jan J. Piek, Ronak Delewi Source Type: research

The Lower the LDL the Better but How and How Much?
In this issue of Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine, in a comprehensive review, Packard concludes that the lower the level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), the better [1]. This finding should be viewed in the context of the totality of evidence. In descriptive studies, useful to formulate, but not test, hypotheses, before the introduction of western lifestyles, the majority of the adult population of the world had LDLs of about 50 mg per deciliter (mg/dL). Japan has had the longest life expectancy in the world as well as the history of the world, due mainly to very low rates of coronary heart disease (CHD). (So...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Alexander Gitin, Marc A. Pfeffer, Charles H. Hennekens Source Type: research

Emerging concepts in diagnosis and treatment of syncope by pacing
Neuroendocrine syncope is a newly proposed term to embody both syncope of reflex and adenosine-related etiology. Recent publications on tilt testing have revealed the presence of a hypotensive tendency in some patients, even in the face of severe cardioinhibition. This new understanding may allow better selection of older reflex syncope patients, documented by ECG loop recorder, for successful pacing where tilt testing is ideally negative for a good result in terms of few syncope recurrences and prompts a less aggressive management policy when hypotensive medication is required. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - February 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Richard Sutton, Jean-Claude Deharo, Michele Brignole, Mohamed H. Hamdan Source Type: research

Editorial commentary: Novel developments in revascularization for left main coronary artery disease
In this issue of Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine, Akodad and Morice provide a review of left main (LM) coronary artery disease [1]. The authors discuss the anatomy and pathophysiology of LM disease, the technical considerations for LM percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and the latest research and most influential studies of PCI versus coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in LM disease. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Edward T. Carreras, Deepak L. Bhatt Source Type: research

Novel Developments in Revascularization for Left Main Coronary Artery Disease
In this issue of Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine, Akodad and Morice provide a review of left main (LM) coronary artery disease [1]. The authors discuss the anatomy and pathophysiology of LM disease, the technical considerations for LM percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and the latest research and most influential studies of PCI versus coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in LM disease. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Edward T. Carreras, Deepak L. Bhatt Source Type: research

Editorial commentary: Beta blockers and the inertia of evidence-based medicine
One of the key limitations of evidence-based medicine is that most evidence becomes outdated. Secular changes in the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of disease invariably erode the continued relevance of even the most well-conducted trials. As newer therapies are gradually stacked on the backs of older ones, the latter ’s effect sizes should tend to diminish or even disappear. Truly evidence-based medicine therefore requires a continuous reassessment of past successes, ideally through new randomized clinical trials in contemporary cohorts [1]. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 16, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Tristan D. Petrie, Joshua Schulman-Marcus Source Type: research

Beta blockers and the inertia of evidence-based medicine
One of the key limitations of evidence-based medicine is that most evidence becomes outdated. Secular changes in the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of disease invariably erode the continued relevance of even the most well conducted trials. As newer therapies are gradually stacked on the backs of older ones, the latter's effect sizes should tend to diminish or even disappear. Truly evidence-based medicine therefore requires a continuous reassessment of past successes, ideally through new randomized clinical trials in contemporary cohorts [1]. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 16, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Tristan Petrie, Joshua Schulman-Marcus Source Type: research

Cardiac imaging in Ebstein anomaly
Ebstein anomaly is a congenital disorder of right ventricular myocardial development, which affects the tricuspid valve in addition to the right ventricular myocardium. Cardiac imaging by transthoracic echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are the key modalities used to assess timing and type of surgery. In this article, we review the current standards of echocardiographic and magnetic resonance imaging in Ebstein anomaly. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 12, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Muhammad Yasir Qureshi, Patrick W. O ’Leary, Heidi M. Connolly Source Type: research

Cardiac imaging in ebstein anomaly
Ebstein anomaly is a congenital disorder of right ventricular myocardial development, which affects the tricuspid valve in addition to the right ventricular myocardium. Cardiac imaging by transthoracic echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are the key modalities used to assess timing and type of surgery. In this manuscript, we review the current standards of echocardiographic and magnetic resonance imaging in Ebstein anomaly. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 12, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Muhammad Yasir Qureshi, Patrick W. O ’Leary, Heidi M. Connolly Source Type: research

Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: Classification based upon phenotype is essential for diagnosis and treatment
Heart failure (HF) is classified based upon the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a heterogeneous disorder with increasing prevalence in the elderly that remains incompletely understood and inadequately treated as no therapy has shown favorable effects. In this review, we summarize the current theories regarding HFpEF pathogenesis, propose a phenotype-based classification of HFpEF, discuss prevention strategies, explain why clinical trials on HFpEF treatment have failed, and make suggestions for the future. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 9, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Andrew Xanthopoulos, Filippos Triposkiadis, Randall C. Starling Source Type: research

Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction: Classification Based Upon Phenotype is Essential For Diagnosis and Treatment
Heart failure (HF) is classified based upon the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a heterogeneous disorder with increasing prevalence in the elderly that remains incompletely understood and inadequately treated as no therapy has shown favorable effects. In this review, we summarize the current theories regarding HFpEF pathogenesis, propose a phenotype based classification of HFpEF, discuss prevention strategies, explain why clinical trials on HFpEF treatment have failed, and make suggestions for the future. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 9, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Andrew Xanthopoulos, Filippos Triposkiadis, Randall C. Starling Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 7, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 7, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

Current treatment of significant left main coronary artery disease: A  review
Though infrequent, left main stenosis has a major prognostic impact. The management of left main disease has evolved over the last few decades with the growing evidence of the efficacy and safety of percutaneous interventions, as attested by the most recent trials.However, mastery of the technical aspects of left main bifurcation stenting is essential in ensuring optimal results. This review focuses on recent data concerning left main angioplasty results as well as the current technical approaches. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Mariama Akodad, Marie-Claude Morice Source Type: research

Current treatment of significant left main coronary artery disease: A review
Though infrequent, left main stenosis has a major prognostic impact. The management of left main disease has evolved over the last few decades with the growing evidence of the efficacy and safety of percutaneous interventions, as attested by the most recent trials.However, mastery of the technical aspects of left main bifurcation stenting is essential in ensuring optimal results. This review focuses on recent data concerning left main angioplasty results as well as the current technical approaches. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Mariama Akodad, Marie-Claude Morice Source Type: research

Current use of beta-blockers in patients with coronary artery disease
Beta-blockers have long comprised a cornerstone in the symptomatic treatment of ischemic heart disease and in the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction and heart failure. The majority of studies underlying the evidence of a beneficial effect of beta-blockers on outcomes were conducted more than 25 years ago. In a contemporary era where treatment strategies and secondary prophylactic therapy have undergone several changes, the continued role of beta-blockers in ischemic heart disease has been questioned, especially in the absence of heart failure or a recent myocardial infarction. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Charlotte Andreasen, Charlotte Andersson Source Type: research

Editorial commentary: Newborn screening for Fabry disease: Too much too soon?
The possibility to perform newborn screening for many lysosomal storage disorders, using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), is undoubtedly going to change the prospect for patients with these conditions. By providing the opportunity to treat before patients become symptomatic, it may prevent complications and improve quality of life, as has been shown for other inherited metabolic disorders. Examples of successful interventions following the introduction of newborn screening are dietary measures in glutaric aciduria type I, which dramatically reduced the occurrence of movement disorders early in life [1] and NTBC treatment ...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: M. Langeveld Source Type: research

Current use of beta-blockers in patients with coronary artery disease
Beta-blockers have long comprised a cornerstone in the symptomatic treatment of ischemic heart disease and in the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction and heart failure. The majority of studies underlying the evidence of a beneficial effect of beta-blockers on outcomes were conducted more than 25 years ago. In a contemporary era where treatment strategies and secondary prophylactic therapy have undergone several changes, the continued role of beta-blockers in ischemic heart disease has been questioned, especially in the absence of heart failure or a recent myocardial infarction. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Charlotte Andreasen, Charlotte Andersson Source Type: research

Current treatment of significant left main coronary artery disease: A review
Though infrequent, left main stenosis has a major prognostic impact. The management of left main disease has evolved over the last few decades with the growing evidence of the efficacy and safety of percutaneous interventions, as attested by the most recent trials.However, mastery of the technical aspects of left main bifurcation stenting is essential in ensuring optimal results. This review focuses on recent data concerning left main angioplasty results as well as the current technical approaches. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Mariama Akodad, Marie-Claude Morice Source Type: research

Current use of beta blockers in patients with coronary artery disease
Beta-blockers have long comprised a cornerstone in the symptomatic treatment of ischemic heart disease and in the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction and heart failure. The majority of studies underlying the evidence of a beneficial effect of beta-blockers on outcomes were conducted more than 25 years ago. In a contemporary era where treatment strategies and secondary prophylactic therapy have undergone several changes, the continued role of beta-blockers in ischemic heart disease has been questioned, especially in the absence of heart failure or a recent myocardial infarction. (Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine)
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Charlotte Andreasen, Charlotte Andersson Source Type: research

Editorial Commentary: Newborn screening for Fabry disease: too much too soon?
The possibility to perform newborn screening for many lysosomal storage disorders, using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), is undoubtedly going to change the prospect for patients with these conditions. By providing the opportunity to treat before patients become symptomatic, it may prevent complications and improve quality of life, as has been shown for other inherited metabolic disorders. Examples of successful interventions following the introduction of newborn screening are dietary measures in glutaric aciduria type I, which dramatically reduced the occurrence of movement disorders early in life [1] and NTBC treatment ...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - January 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: M. Langeveld Source Type: research

Epigenetic mechanisms in coronary artery disease: The current state and prospects
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. CAD has both genetic and environmental causes. In the past two decades, the understanding of epigenetics has advanced swiftly and vigorously. It has been demonstrated that epigenetic modifications are associated with the onset and progression of CAD. This review aims to improve the understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms closely related to CAD and to provide a novel perspective on the onset and development of CAD. Epigenetic changes include DNA methylation, histone modification, microRNA and lncRNA, which are interrelated with critical genes ...
Source: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine - December 30, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Lian Duan, Chao Liu, Junyuan Hu, Yongmei Liu, Jie Wang, Guang Chen, Zhaoling Li, Hengwen Chen Source Type: research