Bioreactor-based 3D human myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion in vitro model: a novel tool to unveil key paracrine factors upon AMI.
During acute myocardial infarction (AMI), Ischemia/Reperfusion (I/R) injury causes cardiomyocyte (CM) death and loss of tissue function, making AMI one of the major causes of death worldwide. Cell-based in vitro models of I/R injury have been increasingly used as a complementary approach to preclinical research. However, most approaches use murine cells in 2D culture setups, which are not able to recapitulate human cellular physiology, as well as nutrient and gas gradients occurring in the myocardium. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - September 7, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Maria J. Sebasti ão, Patrícia Gomes-Alves, Ivo Reis, Belén Sanchez, Itziar Palacios, Margarida Serra, Paula M. Alves Source Type: research

Key components of engineering vascularized 3-dimensional bioprinted bone constructs
Vascularization has a pivotal role in engineering successful tissue constructs. However, it remains a major hurdle of bone tissue engineering, especially in clinical applications for the treatment of large bone defects. Development of vascularized and clinically-relevant engineered bone substitutes with sufficient blood supply capable of maintaining implant viability and supporting subsequent host tissue integration remains a major challenge. Since only cells that are 100 –200 µm from blood vessels can receive oxygen through diffusion, engineered constructs that are thicker than 400 µm face a challenging ...
Source: Translational Research - September 5, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Fahimeh Shahabipour, Nureddin Ashammakhi, Reza K. Oskuee, Shahin Bonakdar, Tyler Hoffman, Mohammad A. Shokrgozar, Ali Khademhosseini Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Key Components of Engineering Vascularized Three-Dimensional Bioprinted Bone Constructs
Vascularization has a pivotal role in engineering successful tissue constructs. However, it remains a major hurdle of bone tissue engineering, especially in clinical applications for the treatment of large bone defects. Development of vascularized and clinically-relevant engineered bone substitutes with sufficient blood supply capable of maintaining implant viability and supporting subsequent host tissue integration remains a major challenge. Since only cells that are 100-200 µm from blood vessels can receive oxygen through diffusion, engineered constructs that are thicker than 400µm face a challenging oxygenat...
Source: Translational Research - September 5, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Fahimeh Shahabipour, Nureddin Ashammakhi, Reza Kazemi Oskuee, Shahin Bonakdar, Tyler Hoffman, Mohammad Ali Shokrgozar, Ali Khademhosseini Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Ex Vivo Properties of Plasma Clot Formation and Lysis in Patients with Cancer at Risk for Venous Thromboembolism, Arterial Thrombosis, and Death
A prothrombotic state is frequently observed in patients with cancer and contributes to the risks of venous thromboembolism (VTE), arterial thromboembolism (ATE), tumor progression, and death. Altered ex vivo properties of plasma clot formation and lysis have been observed in patients with cancer. The aim of this prospective study was to comprehensively characterize the relationship between plasma clot properties, inflammation, hypercoagulability, thrombotic complications, and mortality in patients with cancer using a tissue-factor-based turbidimetric assay of clot formation and lysis. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 29, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Florian Posch, Stefanie Hofer, Johannes Thaler, Lena Hell, Oliver K önigsbrügge, Ella Grilz, Lisa-Marie Mauracher, Johanna Gebhart, Christine Marosi, Bernd Jilma, Ingrid Pabinger, Cihan Ay Source Type: research

A Comprehensive, Multidisciplinary, Precision Medicine Approach to Discover Effective Therapy for an Undiagnosed, Progressive, Fibro-inflammatory Disease
This report addresses the role of personalized medicine in identifying effective therapy for an undiagnosed disease. A 22-year old woman presented with chronic severe recurrent trismus, facial pain, progressive multicentric inflammatory and fibrotic masses, and high C-reactive protein. Sites of disease included the pterygomaxillary region, masseter muscles, mandible, lung, pericardium, intrabdominal cavity, and retroperitoneum. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 28, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Bernadette R. Gochuico, Shira G. Ziegler, Nicholas S. Ten, Nicholas J. Balanda, Christopher E. Mason, Paul Zumbo, Colleen A. Evans, Carter Van Waes, William A. Gahl, May Christine V. Malicdan Source Type: research

Emerging role of microRNAs in dilated cardiomyopathy: evidence regarding etiology
Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a heart muscle disease characterized by ventricular dilation and systolic dysfunction in the absence of abnormal loading conditions or coronary artery disease. This cardiac disorder is a major health problem due to its high prevalence, morbidity and mortality. DCM is a complex disease with a common phenotype but heterogeneous pathological mechanisms. Early etiological diagnosis and prognosis stratification is crucial for the clinical management of the patient. Advances in imaging technology and genetic tests have provided useful tools for clinical practice. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 23, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Maria Calderon-Dominguez, Thal ía Belmonte, Maribel Quezada-Feijoo, Monica Ramos-Sánchez, Juan Fernández-Armenta, Amparo Pérez-Navarro, Sergi Cesar, Luisa Peña Peña, Àngela Vea, Vicenta Llorente-Cortés, Alipio Mangas, David de Gonzalo-Calvo, Rocio Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Nucleic acid-based theranostics in type 1 diabetes
Application of RNAi interference for type 1 diabetes (T1D) therapy bears tremendous potential. This review will discuss vehicles for oligonucleotide delivery, imaging modalities used for delivery monitoring, therapeutic targets, and different theranostic strategies that can be applied for T1D treatment. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 21, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Bennett Francis Dwan, Anna Moore, Ping Wang Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Nucleic acid based theranostics in type 1 diabetes
Application of RNAi interference for type 1 diabetes (T1D) therapy bears tremendous potential. This review will discuss vehicles for oligonucleotide delivery, imaging modalities used for delivery monitoring, therapeutic targets and different theranostic strategies that can be applied for T1D treatment. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 21, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Bennett Francis Dwan, Anna Moore, Ping Wang Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Geranylgeraniol prevents statin-induced skeletal muscle fatigue without causing adverse effects in cardiac or vascular smooth muscle performance
The administration of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) (or its precursor, geranylgeraniol) has been shown by several in vitro studies to be capable of abrogating statin-induced myotoxicity. Nonetheless, the potential of GGPP repletion to prevent statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS) in vivo is yet to be investigated. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the ability of geranylgeraniol (GGOH) to prevent SAMS in rodents. Female Wistar rats (12 weeks of age) were randomised to one of four treatment groups: control, control with GGOH, simvastatin or simvastatin with GGOH. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 19, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Jordon C. Irwin, Andrew S. Fenning, Rebecca K. Vella Source Type: research

siRNA therapeutics for breast cancer: recent efforts in targeting metastasis, drug resistance, and immune evasion
Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has an established and precise mode of action to achieve protein knockdown. With the ability to target any protein, it is very attractive as a potential therapeutic for a plethora of diseases driven by the (over)expression of certain proteins. Utilizing siRNA to understand and treat cancer, a disease largely driven by genetic aberration, is thus actively investigated. However, the main hurdle for the clinical translation of siRNA therapeutics is to achieve effective delivery of siRNA molecules to tumors and the site of action, the cytosol, within cancer cells. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 19, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Worapol Ngamcherdtrakul, Wassana Yantasee Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Contents
(Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 17, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: research

Masthead
(Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 17, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: research

Editorial Advisory Board
(Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 17, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: research

Author Guidelines
(Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 17, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: research

Information for Readers
(Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 17, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: research

Contents
(Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 17, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: research

Biosensors for Early Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer: A Review
Pancreatic cancer is characterized by extremely high mortality and poor prognosis and is projected to be the leading cause of cancer deaths by 2030. Due to the lack of early symptoms and appropriate methods to detect pancreatic carcinoma at an early stage as well as its aggressive progression, the disease is often quite advanced by the time a definite diagnosis is established. The 5-year relative survival rate for all stages is approximately 8%. Therefore, detection of pancreatic cancer at an early surgically resectable stage is the key to decrease mortality and to improve survival. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 15, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Lisheng Qian, Qiaobin Li, Baryeh Kwaku, Wanwei Qiu, Kun Li, Jing Zhang, Qingcai Yu, Dongqin Xu, Wenju Liu, Randall E. Brand, Xueji Zhang, Wei Chen, Guodong Liu Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

siRNA- and miRNA-Based Therapeutics for Liver Fibrosis
Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing process induced by chronic liver injuries, such as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, hepatitis, alcohol abuse, and metal poisoning. The accumulation of excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) in the liver is a key characteristic of liver fibrosis. Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major producers of ECM and therefore play irreplaceably important roles during the progression of liver fibrosis. Liver fibrogenesis is highly correlated with the activation of HSCs, which is regulated by numerous profibrotic cytokines. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 13, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Zhen Zhao, Chien-Yu Lin, Kun Cheng Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Atherothrombosis and the NLRP3 Inflammasome – Endogenous Mechanisms of Inhibition
Recently, the CANTOS (Canakinumab Anti-Inflammatory Thrombosis Outcomes Study) showed the successful anti-inflammatory benefit of canakinumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting interleukin-1 ß (IL-1ß) towards major cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with a previous myocardial infarction. The magnitude of reduction in MACE was directly attributed to a reduction witnessed in IL-6 and CRP and highlighted the therapeutic potential of selectively targeting IL-1ß for atherosclerotic disease, a notion previously introduced in animal models. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 12, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Mohan Satish, Devendra K. Agrawal Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Exosomal hsa-miR-21-5p derived from growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma promotes abnormal bone formation in acromegaly
Growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma (GHPA), a benign endocrine tumor located in the base of the skull, results in acromegaly. In addition to the mass effect of the tumor itself in the sellar region, GHPA can lead to the overgrowth of almost every organ. Previous findings indicated that the processes underlying acromegaly were partly attributable to hyperactivity of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 (GH/IGF-1) axis. However, the mechanisms driving this syndrome remains largely unknown. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 10, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Yuanyuan Xiong, Yongjian Tang, Fan Fan, Yu Zeng, Chuntao Li, Gaofeng Zhou, Zhongliang Hu, Liyang Zhang, Zhixiong Liu Source Type: research

Abnormalities in Proinsulin Processing in Islets from Individuals with Longstanding T1D
We recently described the persistence of detectable serum proinsulin in a large majority of individuals with longstanding type 1 diabetes (T1D), including individuals with undetectable serum C-peptide. Here, we sought to further explore mechanistic etiologies of persistent proinsulin secretion in T1D at the level of the islet, using tissues obtained from human donors. Immunostaining for proinsulin and insulin was performed on human pancreatic sections from the Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes (nPOD) collection (n=24). (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - August 9, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Emily K. Sims, Farooq Syed, Julius Nyalwidhe, Henry T. Bahnson, Leena Haataja, Cate Speake, Margaret A. Morris, Appakalai N. Balamurugan, Raghavendra G. Mirmira, Jerry Nadler, Teresa L. Mastracci, Peter Arvan, Carla J. Greenbaum, Carmella Evans-Molina Source Type: research

Splenic artery denervation: target micro-anatomy, feasibility, and early preclinical experience
This study sought to evaluate perisplenic artery nerve distribution and the feasibility of splenic artery denervation (SDN). The NEXION radiofrequency catheter was used to perform SDN in healthy and inflammatory arthritis pigs. Splenic artery anatomy, nerve distribution, and splenic norepinephrine (NEPI) levels were evaluated before and after SDN. Perisplenic artery nerves were primarily distributed within 2.5 mm of the arterial lumen and were largely sympathetic on the basis of tyrosine hydroxylase expression. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - July 30, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Mazen Albaghdadi, Fernando Garcia-Polite, Brett Zani, John Keating, Raffaele Melidone, Anna Spognardi, Peter Markham, Abraham Tzafriri Source Type: research

Splenic Artery Denervation: Target Micro-Anatomy, Feasibility, and Early Pre-Clinical Experience
This study sought to evaluate peri-splenic artery nerve distribution and the feasibility of splenic artery denervation (SDN). The NEXION ™ radiofrequency catheter was used to perform SDN in healthy and inflammatory arthritis pigs. Splenic artery anatomy, nerve distribution, and splenic norepinephrine (NEPI) levels were evaluated before and after SDN. Peri-splenic artery nerves were primarily distributed within 2.5mm of the arterial lumen and were largely sympathetic on the basis of tyrosine hydroxylase expression. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - July 30, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Mazen Albaghdadi, Fernando Garcia-Polite, Brett Zani, John Keating, Raffaele Melidone, Anna Spognardi, Peter Markham, Abraham Tzafriri Source Type: research

Amelioration of perivascular adipose inflammation reverses vascular dysfunction in a model of nonobese prediabetic metabolic challenge: potential role of antidiabetic drugs
The onset of vascular impairment precedes that of diagnostic hyperglycemia in diabetic patients suggesting a vascular insult early in the course of metabolic dysfunction without a well-defined mechanism. Mounting evidence implicates adipose inflammation in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and diabetes. It is not certain whether amelioration of adipose inflammation is sufficient to preclude vascular dysfunction in early stages of metabolic disease. Recent findings suggest that antidiabetic drugs, metformin, and pioglitazone, improve vascular function in prediabetic patients, without an indication if this protective ef...
Source: Translational Research - July 29, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Mohammed A.W. Elkhatib, Ali Mroueh, Rim W. Rafeh, Fatima Sleiman, Hosny Fouad, Evan I. Saad, Mohamed A. Fouda, Ola Elgaddar, Khodr Issa, Ali H. Eid, Assaad A. Eid, Khaled S. Abd-Elrahman, Ahmed F. El-Yazbi Source Type: research

Amelioration of perivascular adipose inflammation reverses vascular dysfunction in a model of non-obese prediabetic metabolic challenge: Potential role of anti-diabetic drugs
The onset of vascular impairment precedes that of diagnostic hyperglycemia in diabetic patients suggesting a vascular insult early in the course of metabolic dysfunction without a well-defined mechanism. Mounting evidence implicates adipose inflammation in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and diabetes. It is not certain whether amelioration of adipose inflammation is sufficient to preclude vascular dysfunction in early stages of metabolic disease. Recent findings suggest that anti-diabetic drugs, metformin and pioglitazone, improve vascular function in prediabetic patients, without an indication if this protective ef...
Source: Translational Research - July 29, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Mohammed A.W. Elkhatib, Ali Mroueh, Rim W. Rafeh, Fatima Sleiman, Hosny Fouad, Evan I. Saad, Mohamed A. Fouda, Ola Elgaddar, Khodr Issa, Ali H. Eid, Assaad A. Eid, Khaled S. Abd-Elrahman, Ahmed F. El-Yazbi Source Type: research

Peptide carriers to the rescue: Overcoming the barriers to siRNA delivery for cancer treatment
Cancer is a significant health concern worldwide and its clinical treatment presents many challenges. Consequently, much research effort has focused on the development of new anticancer drugs to combat this disease. One area of exploration, in particular, has been in the therapeutic application of RNA interference (RNAi). Although RNAi appears to be an attractive therapeutic tool for the treatment of cancer, one of the primary obstacles towards its pervasive use in the clinic has been cell/tissue type-specific cytosolic delivery of therapeutic small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - July 29, 2019 Category: Research Authors: James C. Cummings, Haiwen Zhang, Andrew Jakymiw Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

RNAi Therapeutic Strategies for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), replacing the clinical term acute lung injury (ALI)1, involves serious pathophysiological lung changes that arise from a variety of pulmonary and non-pulmonary injuries and currently have no pharmacological therapeutics. RNA interference (RNAi) has the potential to generate therapeutic effects that would increase patient survival rates from these conditions. It is the purpose of this review to discuss potential targets in treating ARDS with RNAi strategies, as well as to outline the challenges and of oligonucleotide delivery to the lung and tactics to circumvent these delivery ba...
Source: Translational Research - July 27, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Melissa L. Jagrosse, David A. Dean, Arshad Raman, Bradley L. Nilsson Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Binding to carboxypeptidase M mediates protective effects of fibrinopeptide B β15-42
During fibrinolysis a 28-amino-acid peptide is generated besides other degradation products of fibrin. This peptide, called B β15–42, which is cleaved by plasmin from the end of the fibrin Bβ-chain, is protective in myocardial and renal ischemia/reperfusion injury and improves the outcome in experimental sepsis. Bβ15–42 has been shown to mediate different beneficial effects in endothelial cells through binding to va scular endothelial-cadherin. Here, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that Bβ15–42 has additional cell protective activity in tubular cells, which is caused by a dist...
Source: Translational Research - July 26, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Inga S örensen-Zender, Rongjun Chen, Rong Song, Sascha David, Anette Melk, Hermann Haller, Roland Schmitt Source Type: research

Binding to carboxypeptidase M mediates protective effects of fibrinopeptide B β(15-42)
During fibrinolysis a 28 amino acid peptide is generated besides other degradation products of fibrin. This peptide, called B β15–42, which is cleaved by plasmin from the end of the fibrin Bβ-chain, is protective in myocardial and renal ischemia/reperfusion injury and improves the outcome in experimental sepsis. Bβ15–42 has been shown to mediate different beneficial effects in endothelial cells through binding to va scular endothelial-cadherin. Here, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that Bβ15–42 has additional cell protective activity in tubular cells, which is caused by a dist...
Source: Translational Research - July 26, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Inga S örensen-Zender, Rongjun Chen, Rong Song, Sascha David, Anette Melk, Hermann Haller, Roland Schmitt Source Type: research

Efficient Nanocarriers of siRNA Therapeutics for Cancer Treatment
Nanocarriers as drug delivery systems are promising and becoming popular, especially for cancer treatment. In addition to improving the pharmacokinetics of poorly soluble hydrophobic drugs by solubilizing them in a hydrophobic core, nanocarriers allow cancer-specific combination drug deliveries by inherent passive targeting phenomena and adoption of active targeting strategies. Nanoparticle-drug formulations can enhance the safety, pharmacokinetic profiles and bioavailability of locally or systemically administered drugs, leading to improved therapeutic efficacy. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - July 22, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Md Abdus Subhan, V.P. Torchilin Source Type: research

Increased Renal Cellular Senescence in Murine High-fat Diet: Effect of the Senolytic Drug Quercetin
Obesity and dyslipidemia can be associated with cellular senescence, and may impair kidney function. However, whether senescence contributes to renal dysfunction in these conditions remains unclear. Quercetin is an abundant dietary flavonoid that selectively clears senescent cells by inhibiting PI3K/AKT and p53/p21/serpines and inducing apoptosis. We hypothesized that high-fat-diet-induced obesity causes renal senescence, which would be mitigated by quercetin. Methods: C57BL/6J mice fed either standard chow or high-fat diets were treated with quercetin (50mg/kg) or vehicle 5-days biweekly via oral gavage for 10-weeks. (Sou...
Source: Translational Research - July 15, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Seo Rin Kim, Kai Jiang, Mikolaj Ogrodnik, Xiaojun Chen, Xiang-Yang Zhu, Hannah Lohmeier, Leena Ahmed, Hui Tang, Tamara Tchkonia, LaTonya J. Hickson, James L. Kirkland, Lilach O. Lerman Source Type: research

High frequency, real-time neurochemical and neuropharmacological measurements in situ in the living body
The beautiful and complex brain machinery is perfectly synchronized, and our bodies have evolved to protect it against a myriad of potential threats. Shielded physically by the skull and chemically by the blood brain barrier, the brain processes internal and external information so that we can efficiently relate to the world that surrounds us while simultaneously and unconsciously controlling our vital functions. When coupled with the brittle nature of its internal chemical and electric signals, the brain's “armor” render accessing it a challenging and delicate endeavor that has historically limited our underst...
Source: Translational Research - July 13, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Karen Scida, Kevin W. Plaxco, Brian G. Jamieson Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

CTC analysis: an update on technological progress
There is a growing need for a more accurate, real-time assessment of tumor status and the probability of metastasis, relapse, or response to treatment. Conventional means of assessment include imaging and tissue biopsies that can be highly invasive, may not provide complete information of the disease's heterogeneity, and not ideal for repeat analysis. Therefore, a less-invasive means of acquiring similar information at greater time points is necessary. Liquid biopsies are samples of a patients ’ peripheral blood and hold potential of addressing these criteria. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - July 11, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Izhar S. Batth, Abhisek Mitra, Sierra Rood, Scott Kopetz, David Menter, Shulin Li Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

CTCs analysis: an update on technological progress
There is a growing need for a more accurate, real-time assessment of tumor status and the probability of metastasis, relapse, or response to treatment. Conventional means of assessment include imaging and tissue biopsies which can be highly invasive, may not provide complete information of the disease's heterogeneity, and not ideal for repeat analysis. Therefore, a less invasive means of acquiring similar information at greater time points is necessary. Liquid biopsies are samples of a patients ’ peripheral blood and hold potential of addressing these criteria. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - July 11, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Izhar S. Batth, Abhisek Mitra, Sierra Rood, Scott Kopetz, David Menter, Shulin Li Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Applications of RNA interference in the treatment of arthritis
RNA interference (RNAi) is a cellular mechanism for post-transcriptional gene regulation mediated by small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA. siRNA-based therapy holds significant promise for the treatment of a wide-range of arthritic diseases. siRNA selectively suppresses the expression of a gene product and can thus achieve the specificity that is lacking in small molecule inhibitors. The potential use of siRNA-based therapy in arthritis, however, has not progressed to clinical trials despite ample evidence for efficacy in pre-clinical studies. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - July 10, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Muhammad Farooq Rai, Hua Pan, Huimin Yan, Linda J. Sandell, Christine T.N. Pham, Samuel A. Wickline Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Spliceosome Component SF3B1 as Novel Prognostic Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Prostate Cancer
Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common cancers types among men. Development and progression of PCa is associated to aberrant expression of oncogenic splicing-variants (e.g. AR-v7), suggesting that dysregulation of the splicing process might represent a potential actionable target for PCa. Expression levels (mRNA and protein) of SF3B1, one of the main components of the splicing-machinery, were analysed in different cohorts of PCa-patients [clinically-localized (n=84), highly-aggressive PCa (n=42) and TCGA dataset (n=497)]. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - July 9, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Juan M. Jimenez-Vacas, Vicente Herrero-Aguayo, Enrique G ómez-Gómez, Antonio J. León-González, Prudencio Sáez-Martínez, Emilia Alors-Pérez, Antonio C. Fuentes-Fayos, Ana Martínez-López, Rafael Sánchez-Sánchez, Teresa González-Serrano, Daniel J Source Type: research

Soluble Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 Levels in Chronic Heart Failure is Associated with Decreased Exercise Capacity and Increased Oxidative Stress-mediated Endothelial Dysfunction
The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between serum soluble angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (sACE2), parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise testing and plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a marker of oxidative stress-induced endothelial dysfunction. This has not been previously evaluated. We assessed fifty consecutive ambulatory patients with chronic systolic heart failure and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45%. Their blood samples were collected for sACE2 and ADMA tests before they underwent symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing and transthoracic echocardiography. (Source: ...
Source: Translational Research - July 4, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Zhili Shao, Andres Schuster, Allen G. Borowski, Akanksha Thakur, Lin Li, W.H. Wilson Tang Source Type: research

Lifetime cardiovascular risk is associated with a multimarker score of systemic oxidative status in young adults independently of traditional risk factors
Cardiovascular risk (CVR) tends to be estimated in the short-term, which underestimates lifetime (LT)-CVR of young subjects. We determined whether LT-CVR is associated with a multimarker score of oxidative status in young adults and whether this association is independent of traditional CVR factors. Seventy-two young adults were stratified into: 1) low or 2) high LT-CVR, and 3) stable coronary artery disease (SCAD). CVR was estimated with QRisk and Atherosclerotic CV disease (ASCVD) Risk Estimators, or Second Manifestations of Arterial Disease (SMART) Risk Score. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - June 29, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Elena Rodr íguez-Sánchez, José Alberto Navarro-García, Jennifer Aceves-Ripoll, Laura González-Lafuente, Nerea Corbacho-Alonso, Paloma Martinez, Eva Calvo-Bonacho, Gloria Alvarez-Llamas, Maria G. Barderas, Luis Miguel Ruilope, Gema Ruiz-Hurtado Source Type: research

Morphology-based classification of mycobacteria-infected macrophages with Convolutional Neural Network: Reveal EsxA-induced morphological changes indistinguishable by naked eyes
In this study, we use light microscopy and deep learning-based image analysis to classify the morphological changes of macrophages infected by Mycobacterium marinum (Mm), a surrogate model for Mtb. Macrophages were infected either with the mCherry-expressing Mm wild type strain (Mm(WT)), or a mutant strain with deletion of the esxA-esxB operon (Mm( ΔEsxA:B)). (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - June 28, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Yanqing Bao, Xinzhuo Zhao, Lin Wang, Wei Qian, Jianjun Sun Source Type: research

Alpha-1-Acid Glycoprotein 1 is Upregulated in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma and Confers a Poor Prognosis
Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy that carries a high mortality rate. A major contributor to the poor outcome is the lack of effective molecular markers. The purpose of this study was to develop protein markers for improved prognostication and non-invasive diagnosis. A mass spectrometry (MS)-based discovery approach was applied to pancreatic cancer tissues and healthy pancreas. In the verification phase, extracellular proteins with differential expression were further quantified in targeted mode using parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - June 28, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Qimin Zhou, Roland Andersson, Dingyuan Hu, Monika Bauden, Agata Sasor, Thomas Bygott, Krzysztof Pawlowski, Indira Pla, Gy örgy Marko-Varga, Daniel Ansari Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Contents
(Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - June 9, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: research

Masthead
(Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - June 9, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: research

Editorial Advisory Board
(Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - June 9, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: research

Author Guidelines
(Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - June 9, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: research

Information for Readers
(Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - June 9, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: research

Contents
(Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - June 9, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: research

Bioprinting of freestanding vascular grafts and the regulatory considerations for additively manufactured vascular prostheses
Vasculature is the network of blood vessels of an organ or body part that allow for the exchange of nutrients and waste to and from every cell, thus establishing a circulatory equilibrium. Vascular health is at risk from a variety of conditions that includes disease and trauma. In some cases, medical therapy can alleviate the impacts of the condition. Intervention is needed in other instances to restore the health of abnormal vasculature. The main approaches to treat vascular conditions are endovascular procedures and open vascular reconstruction that often requires a graft to accomplish. (Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - June 3, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Sara Abdollahi, Joseph Boktor, Narutoshi Hibino Source Type: research

Contents
(Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - May 30, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: research

Masthead
(Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - May 30, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: research

Editorial Advisory Board
(Source: Translational Research)
Source: Translational Research - May 30, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: research