Effect of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training on Improving Prolapse-related Symptoms After Surgery
This study compared the total score (Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20) and the scores of the Urinary Distress Inventory-6/Colorectal Anal Distress Inventory-8/Pelvic Organ Prolapse Distress Inventory-6 at admission, discharge, and 42 and 60 days after surgery. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - July 9, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Yi Liang, Xiaodan Li, Jianliu Wang, Yuanyuan Liu, Yang Yang, Meiling Dong Tags: Original Research Source Type: research

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Preexposure Prophylaxis: A Quick Guide for Primary Care Practice
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is when HIV-negative persons use antiretroviral medication to prevent HIV acquisition. It is up to 96% efficacious. Patients at risk for HIV warrant PrEP, and contraindications include being HIV positive and an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - July 8, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Patrick O ’Byrne Tags: Featured Article Source Type: research

Cardiac Rehabilitation for Women Post –Coronary Artery Bypass Graft
Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is underused in the United States, yet it potentially can improve the health and quality of many lives after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. One major reason patients do not attend CR is because of a lack of referrals from health care professionals. Unfortunately, women are less likely to be referred, attend, and complete CR compared with men after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Nurse practitioners in primary care are in a position to assist with increased referrals for women, especially those with race, age, and socioeconomic status disparities. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - July 5, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Danielle Emenhiser, Nila Reimer Tags: Feature Article Source Type: research

Beyond Brief Intervention: Pharmacologic Management of Alcohol Use Disorder
Over 50 years ago, alcohol use disorder (AUD) was recognized as a treatable medical disorder negatively affecting millions of adults, yet pharmacologic management is underused. Most patients seeking AUD treatment are referred to an outpatient program or a peer support group. Relapse is common because frequently medications to treat AUD are recommended yet not prescribed for routine use concurrently with support programs. Therefore, comprehensive treatment of AUD must include pharmacologic management to prevent a relapse to alcohol use. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - July 5, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Claudia Pearson, Elsie Duff Tags: Feature Article Source Type: research

Preserving Pulmonary Function: A Palliative Intervention
Morbidity and mortality rates from advanced symptomatic pulmonary disease (APD) is a global concern. Of the 10 leading causes of death worldwide, 3 are pulmonary conditions. Ensuring accurate diagnosis and differentiating between obstructive and restrictive airways disease determines optimal patient outcomes. Palliative interventions offer aggressive symptom management, reducing incidence of exacerbation and hospitalization, preserving pulmonary function, and maintaining physical function. APD patients have a complex set of issues requiring an interdisciplinary team. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - July 4, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Kim K. Kuebler Tags: Featured Article Source Type: research

Primary Care-Nonprofit Partnerships: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Screening and Treatment for Veterans
Veterans using civilian health care may suffer from undiagnosed posttraumatic stress disorder and have barriers to care. Through a primary care and nonprofit partnership, we trialed a posttraumatic stress disorder risk screening tool and referral process. Of almost 850 screened patients, 100 self-identified as veterans. Of those, 15 were deemed at-risk and referred, and 13 requested and received services from the nonprofit. Postimplementation feedback from staff and provider focus groups was positive, but inconsistent screening compliance and nonprofit organizational instability were barriers to optimal implementation and ...
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - July 4, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Nickolai C. Detert, Rebecca Kitzmiller, Leslie Sharpe Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

AANP Forum
By Taynin Kopanos, VP, State Government Affairs (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: AANP Forum Source Type: research

New President has Global Vision for  AANP
It is my honor to begin my role as president of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners ® (AANP), the largest professional membership organization for nurse practitioners of all specialties. I thank you, our members, for electing me to lead our organization, and I thank our former president, Dr. Joyce Knestrick, for her honorable and steadfast leadership over the past two years. She h as been a gracious mentor, preparing me to assume the presidency. I am ready! (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Sophia L. Thomas Tags: From the AANP President Source Type: research

The Journal for Nurse Practitioners Continuing Education Credit Application
(Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: CE Test and Application Source Type: research

Language Makes a Difference
One of the biggest health crises facing the United States is substance use disorder (SUD). It is discussed not only in private patient rooms but on the news and now, finally, in the places where policies and laws are made. However, how SUD is spoken of and the language used to describe those who are involved often causes stigma and invokes shame. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Julee Waldrop, Leslie Neal-Boylan Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

To Do or Not to Do
Thanks to the efforts of our federal, state, and local policy advocates, nurse practitioners (NP) enjoy full practice authority in 22 states and the District of Columbia. However, with this authority comes legal accountability, based on rules, regulations, and state statutes. This authority is regulated by scope of practice for each role and population focus. In essence, the scope determines the role. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Kenneth Miller Tags: Guest Editorial Source Type: research

Tumor Lysis Syndrome: A Practical Guide for Nurse Practitioners
Tumor lysis syndrome is an oncologic emergency that occurs when malignant cancer cells are lysed rapidly and the intracellular contents are released into the systemic circulation. It is most commonly seen in patients with hematologic cancers. The surge of electrolytes can cause renal failure, cardiac arrhythmias, seizures, and sudden death due to multiorgan failure. Tumor lysis syndrome can pose threatening complications. It is essential that nurse practitioners be prepared to monitor and treat prophylactically to prevent life-threatening consequences. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Thao-Tammy T. Ly, Elizabeth J. Winokur Tags: Featured Article Source Type: research

Nurse Practitioner Transition to Practice: Development of a Residency Program
This article describes the development of a primary care nurse practitioner residency program at a large academic medical center in the mid-Atlantic region. Organizational factors related to program development and support as well as fiscal and human resource considerations are presented. Curricular considerations inclusive of both clinical and didactic content are presented in conjunction with a curricular outline. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - June 28, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Jennifer Painter, Aaron M. Sebach, Lisa Maxwell Tags: By Faculty for Faculty Source Type: research

Beliefs and Use of Intrauterine Devices (IUDs) Among Women ’s Health Care Providers
The unintended pregnancy rate in the United States is 50%. The intrauterine device (IUD) affords highly effective contraception, yet remains underused. An educational intervention on evidence-based IUD best practices was presented to 36 providers. IUD use rates and IUD beliefs were measured before and after the intervention, and participants answered open-ended questions. Provider beliefs favoring IUD provision (P (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - June 21, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Christa Palancia Esposito, Jenna LoGiudice Tags: Featured Article Source Type: research

Intervisit Management of Patients With Diabetes: Synchronized Phone Calls
The US health care model continues to struggle with providing chronic disease management. Innovation focusing on improving care delivery systems to bridge this gap will be necessary to improve chronic care in the United States. This quality improvement project focused on patients with type 2 diabetes. This innovation was designed to change patient and provider engagement in follow-up care by providing a protected synchronous time in the form of a scheduled phone call to work on glycemic goals through improving patient ’s diabetes self-management techniques and, when appropriate, medication titration. (Source: The Jou...
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - June 19, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Maura Moran Brain, Candace Reynolds, Hannah Nesbeda, Maureen Walsh, Roberta Fem, Abigail Magruder, Barbara Rosato, Jessica Koval Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Assessment of Post –Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Ambulatory Care by Advanced Practice Providers
This study compared clinical and financial outcomes in post –percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) ambulatory patients (n = 308) managed by advanced practice providers (APPs) versus cardiologists (Physician Providers [PPs]) over a period of 12 months. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - June 12, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Abhishek Mishra, Shilpkumar Arora, Divya Joshi, Warren Acker, Edo Kaluski, Dwight Stapleton Tags: Featured Article Source Type: research

A Toolkit on Patient Centered Transgender Care for Nurse Practitioner Faculty and Clinicians
The purpose of the Patient Centered Transgender Health: A Toolkit for Nurse Practitioner Faculty and Clinicians is to improve clinical care and reduce health disparities by closing the gap in knowledge of nurse practitioner faculty and practicing clinicians by providing evidence-based information on caring for this population. Resources, vetted by practicing clinicians in the field of transgender care who are also nurse practitioner/certified nurse midwife faculty, are provided. Faculty and clinicians can use this multimedia information to create evidence-based learning modules for students or clinicians and modify clinica...
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - June 10, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculty Tags: Feature Article Source Type: research

When the Patient Has Vague Symptoms, Ask the Right Questions
Differential diagnoses of vague neurologic symptoms in patients without significant medical history provide challenges for the advanced practice registered nurse to accurately diagnose a condition. A detailed inquiry highlights the nurse practitioner ’s ability to hear the patient’s story, formulate an evidence-based diagnosis, and collaborate with the patient for delivering safe and effective care with appropriate referrals for specialist follow-up care. This case study emphasizes the importance of clustering symptoms that align, allowing f or a better understanding of vague complaints, which helps the provide...
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - June 10, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Jill Brennan-Cook, Christine Tocchi Tags: Case Challenge Source Type: research

Physical Activity and Exercise Adherence in People With Hematologic Malignancies
People with hematologic malignancies face serious physical and psychologic adverse health outcomes, such as fatigue and functional impairments, resulting from the underlying cancer, the cancer treatment, or both. Physical activity and exercise are widely recommended to address these concerns and optimize health during and after treatment. People with hematologic malignancies face critical health challenges, such as neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, which affect their ability to initiate or maintain a physical activity or exercise program; thus, adherence becomes problematic. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - June 6, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Eileen Danaher Hacker Tags: Featured Article Source Type: research

A 17-Year-Old Male With Abdominal Pain in Primary Care
This case study presents an adolescent male whose complaint of abdominal pain in the primary care office resulted in immediate referral to a children's hospital for specialized care. Abdominal pain is frequently a benign condition that presents in primary care. However, clinicians must be astute to the potential surgical or emergent causes of abdominal pain. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - June 4, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Teresa Whited, Albrey Berber Tags: Case Challenge Source Type: research

When You Hear Hoofbeats, Think Horses —But Be Prepared for Zebras
As you were first learning about the differential diagnosis process, you were likely exposed to the maxim, “When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not zebras.” In other words, when diagnosing patients’ signs and symptoms, remember that many diagnoses (horses) are common, and the chance that a patient has a rare diagnosis (a zebra) is small. This wise phrase is attributed to Theodore Woodward, MD (1 914-2005),1 a respected physician, researcher, and teacher at the University of Maryland who also was a charter member of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - June 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Ann Marie Hart, Karen S. Moore Tags: Guest Editorial Source Type: research

Continued Vigilance is Required to Combat Vaccine-Preventable Disease and Deaths
Welcome to JNP ’s special issue on infectious diseases (IDs). In this issue you can read about many topics related to ID caused by all types of infectious agents; a few of these can be prevented or significantly attenuated with vaccines. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - June 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Julee Waldrop Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

AANP Forum
By MaryAnne Sapio, VP, Federal Government Affairs (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - June 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: AANP Forum Source Type: research

It Has Been an Honor ….
It ’s hard to believe two years could slip by so quickly. It has been my distinct pleasure to serve as your American Association of Nurse Practitioners® (AANP) president! I want to thank you, our members, for your support during my tenure. AANP has made great progress these past two years. We now ha ve over 98,000 members. Construction on our national headquarters is complete in Austin with staff in place and our government affairs staff in DC has relocated to nearby Crystal City. We also launched the national We Choose NPs multimedia campaign, with its focus on the quality care provided by NPs . (Source: The Jou...
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - June 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Joyce Knestrick Tags: From the AANP President Source Type: research

June 2019 Continuing Education Credit Application
(Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - June 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: CE Test and Application Source Type: research

Delayed Gastric Emptying and Symptom Variation
Gastroparesis, also known as stomach paralysis, is a motility disorder that has become a rising concern. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - June 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Amanda Brown, Colleen Beener, Samantha H. Smith Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Preconception Care Quick Reference and Clue Period Tracker Mobile Apps
This month the Preconception Care Quick Ref app will be reviewed for clinicians, and the Clue Period Tracker app will be reviewed for patients and health care consumers using the NPMEDAPP criteria (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nurpra.2015.10.005). The Preconception Care Quick Ref app can be located at https://beforeandbeyond.org/2018/new-mobile-app-preconception-care-quick-reference/. The Clue Period Tracker app can be located at https://helloclue.com/. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - May 27, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Patricia Biller Krauskopf Tags: Mobile Apps for NPs Source Type: research

Increasing Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Rates Among Adolescents: Overcoming Vaccine Hesitancy and Using Practice Improvements
This article provides recommendations to help pediatric and family practice providers increase rates of uptake of the HPV vaccine among adolescent patients, including communication strategies, and practice improvements that encourage vaccination. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - May 21, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Andrew Shawhan, Rebekah L. Ruppe Tags: Featured Article Source Type: research

Going With The Flow
In the summer between 8th grade and high school, I finally got what I had been wishing for —my menses. It came without warning because I didn’t recognize the symptoms that later would become very familiar. I was now a member of the unofficial period club among the girls. Fortunately, the flow was light, so I was able to protect my clothes from any further staining using a wad of toile t paper until I got home. My mom was ready for me with a booklet that was titled something like “Now That You’re a Woman,” a box of pads, and a “sanitary belt” to hold them in place. (Source: The Jour...
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - May 17, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Denise Link Tags: Quality Care for Women ’s Health Source Type: research

Preparing the FNP Workforce for the Increasingly Complex Work Environment
In 1965, the University of Colorado became the first university to develop a curriculum for the nurse practitioner role, preparing clinicians to meet contemporaneous, across-the-life span, general-practice health care needs. However, in the succeeding 5 decades, individual- and population-level health care needs have grown both in scope and complexity (eg, management of multifaceted chronic diseases and behavioral health conditions). Therefore, family nurse practitioner (FNP) education programs must themselves evolve to match the current, evolving health care environment. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - May 16, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Krista Estes, Rosario Medina, Glenda Robertson Tags: By Faculty for Faculty Source Type: research

The Health Action Process Approach-Based Program's Effects on Influenza Vaccination Behavior
This study investigated the effect of the Health Action Process Approach-based program on the influenza vaccination rate of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 88 patients with COPD. Data analysis was performed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The influenza vaccine was received by 63.6% of the participants in the intervention group and 29.5% of the participants in the control group, and the difference between the groups was significant. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - May 14, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Sumbule Koksoy Vayisoglu, Handan Zincir Tags: Original Research Source Type: research

Supporting Preceptors and Strengthening Academic-Practice Partnerships: Preceptors ’ Perceptions
Preceptors play a critical role in the education of nurse practitioner students. However, preceptors are in short supply. This descriptive study (n  = 29) used an online survey to seek preceptors’ perceptions on motivators for precepting and how academic institutions can recruit and support preceptors and strengthen academic-practice partnerships. Resources for effective preceptor experiences included a better understanding of the curriculum , student learning objectives, contact with faculty, and formal preceptor training. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - May 8, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Karen A. Amirehsani, Laurie Kennedy-Malone, Md Towfiqul Alam Tags: By Faculty for Faculty Source Type: research

The Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Expanded to Middle Age Adults
There is a vaccine that can prevent persistent infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), the etiological agent in many HPV-related cancers worldwide and within the United States. Globally, approximately 570,000 females and 60,000 males are diagnosed annually with a cancer that is related to the HPV.1 More than 90% of all cases of cervical and anal cancers are caused by persistent infection with the HPV, and it causes 75% of all cases of vaginal cancer, 70% of all cases of oropharyngeal and vulvar cancer, and 60% of penile cancer. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - May 8, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Denise Linton, Staci Taylor Tags: Quality Care for Women ’s Health Source Type: research

Chronic Abdominal Pain and Rectal Bleeding: A Missed Opportunity
Abdominal pain and rectal bleeding among men who have sex with men are common complaints treated in primary and urgent care settings. These common primary care complaints —often vague and recurrent—require a comprehensive and thorough investigation of the patient’s history and lifestyle to ensure an accurate diagnosis and treatment. This case highlights the importance of removing barriers to care from the patient’s and provider’s perspectives to more accura tely diagnose and effectively treat common symptoms experienced among men who have sex with men. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - May 7, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Courtney Pitts Tags: Case Challenge Source Type: research

Adolescent Endocrine Challenges: A Diagnostic Case Study
In this case study challenge, a relatively healthy 15-year-old female adolescent presents to a family practice clinic with complaints of frequent urination, chills, constant drowsiness, difficulty concentrating, and thirst. Distinguishing between possible disorders can be challenging for practitioners because many endocrine disease processes present with similar clinical features. The key to successfully diagnosing endocrine disorders includes rapidly ruling out the most urgent and life-threatening possibilities. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - May 7, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Bonnie L. Nickasch, Jessalyn Wallace-Leese, Rachelle Lancaster Tags: Case Challenge Source Type: research

Strongyloidiasis
Strongyloides stercoralis is a parasite that can transmit from contaminated soil found in endemic areas through intact skin of a human host. Many patients who contract strongyloidiasis are asymptomatic or experience vague, nonspecific symptoms with persistent eosinophilia. If untreated, it can become a lifelong infection. The prognosis is good in immunocompetent hosts. Immunocompromised patients may develop hyperinfection syndrome or disseminated disease where a high number of larvae are present and the mortality rate is high. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - May 3, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Mary DiGiulio Tags: Featured Article Source Type: research

Pharmacotherapeutic Preparation for Nurse Practitioner Full Practice  Authority
Nurse practitioners (NPs) across the country are gaining full practice authority that includes authorization to prescribe legend and controlled drugs. Unrestricted prescriptive authority is necessary for NPs to practice to the full extent of their education and training. We reviewed the literature, state requirements, and accreditation criteria related to teaching advanced pharmacology content to NP students for preparation for prescribing. Nursing educators and advanced practice nursing leaders might consider establishment of standardized content for teaching advanced pharmacology to NP students to ensure graduates meet p...
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - May 2, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Lauren Diegel Vacek, Karen M. Vuckovic Tags: By Faculty for Faculty Source Type: research

Autism Spectrum Disorder Screening and Early Action
Since its diagnostic inception, autism has garnered stigma and fear, often to the exclusion of action. Early detection and treatment of autism spectrum disorders have become crucial priorities of the National Institutes of Health. The primary care provider is the point of entry to the health care system for infants/children showing risk factors for autism spectrum disorders and/or symptoms of the disorder. Despite the existence of low-cost, well-tested developmental screening tools, many primary care providers rely solely on clinical judgment to ascertain developmental status. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - May 2, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Jayne Jennings Dunlap Tags: Feature Article Source Type: research

The New Nicotine Threat
In 2016 the US Surgeon General ’s report on e-cigarette use and the public health threat it brings was a first but not the first on tobacco.1 It was the 33rd report on tobacco—that is how big of a threat tobacco products have been and still are to the nation’s health. But it gets worse: the latest figures from 2017-2018 on e-cigarette and electronic nicotine delivery system (ENDS) use in youth should frighten all nurse practitioners. There was an increase in use by 1.3 million teenagers in 1 year, and it was largely attributable to e-cigarettes and ENDS; the reported use of other tobacco products (i.e. (S...
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - May 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Julee Waldrop Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

May 2019 Continuing Education Credit Application
(Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - May 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: CE Test and Application Source Type: research

May Laundry and Social Media
I have always loved May. It was during this time when my mother would do her spring cleaning and launder what seemed like everything in the house. She ’d then hang our laundry out on the line to dry. And as much as I loved to smell the fresh sheets and blankets, I was sometimes embarrassed by the sight of our old worn out items displayed for our neighbors to see. I was particularly ashamed of our underwear with holes. I irrationally believed the consequences of someone seeing my shabby underwear and clothes could impact my ability to move forward in life. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - May 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Joyce Knestrick Tags: From the AANP President Source Type: research

AANP Forum
By MaryAnne Sapio, VP, Federal Government Affairs (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - May 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: AANP Forum Source Type: research

Brief Educational Sessions to Promote Health App Use
The increase in smartphone ownership by underserved populations provides a unique opportunity to use technology to improve health. Health apps are often free and have programs to empower individuals to engage in health promotion and self-management of chronic illnesses. To promote the use of health apps in an underserved community, investigators provided brief educational sessions to teach individuals to how access and use health apps. Educational sessions increased health app knowledge, comfort in using health apps, and likelihood of using health apps. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - April 28, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Karen Higgins, Christianne Nesbitt, Laura Horan, Alfreda Curtis, Kate Richard, Christie Stallter, Simone Verela Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

PneumoRecs VaxAdvisor and Solve the Outbreak Mobile Apps
In keeping with the infectious disease focus for this month ’s issue, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) PneumoRecs VaxAdvisor app will be reviewed for clinicians, and the CDC Solve the Outbreak app will be reviewed for patients and health care consumers using the NPMEDAPP criteria (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nurpra.2015.10.005). The CDC Pn eumoRecs app can be located at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/pneumo/hcp/pneumoapp.html. The CDC Solve the Outbreak app website is https://www.cdc.gov/mobile/applications/sto/index.html. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - April 28, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Patricia Biller Krauskopf Tags: Mobile Apps for NPs Source Type: research

Alcoholic Liver Disease: Implications for the Advanced Practice Provider
This article discusses the pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, screening tools, clinical presentation, and predictors of mortality. Medical management using the most recent clinical guidelines from the 2018 American College of Gastroenterology and the American Gastroenterological Association Institute are reviewed. Supportive care, abstinence promotion, cognitive behavioral therapy, nutritional needs, pharmacotherapy, alcohol withdrawal management, intensive care, and liver transplantation are discussed, as well as future research directions. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - April 26, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Hender Rojas Tags: Feature Article Source Type: research

Channeling anger and frustration into action
It ’s clear that many Americans have a new or renewed interest and engagement in politics. The 2018 national and state elections got a lot of media attention as more women, people of color and LGBT individuals filed for office in record numbers. In Michigan, where only 23% of state lawmakers were wom en in 2016, there were women on the 2018 ballot for governor, attorney general, secretary of state, and in 63% of the state’s Senate races and 71% of House races, according to a Reuters report. A similar phenomenon played out in North Carolina where I live and serve in the state House. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - April 26, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Gale Adcock Tags: Under the Dome Source Type: research

Success of a Nurse Practitioner –led Interdisciplinary Team
The nurse practitioner –led interdisciplinary team (IDT) was established to reduce readmissions by optimizing care for a select group of high-risk patients. Two new standards of care were established: weekly IDT meetings leading to implementation of a shared care plan and standard workflows for posthospital visits. The new standard of care resulted in a median readmission rate reduction from 28% (10%-32%) to 9% (4%-12%). The nurse practitioner–led IDT reduced the median readmission rate by 64%. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - April 25, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Mary Zozaya-Monohon, Andrea R. Corona Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

The Ubiquitous Lateral Ankle Sprain: Time to Reconsider Our Management?
Ankle sprains are one of the more common musculoskeletal injuries among physically active individuals, but these are not benign injuries. The rate of recurrence, the chronicity of symptoms, and the rising costs of the evaluation and management of lateral ankle sprains should give us pause. Lateral ankle sprains are simultaneously over- and undertreated, creating a burden on the health care system. Rethinking our approach to the management of lateral ankle sprains is important to improving patient outcomes. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - April 24, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Katherine Newsham Tags: Featured Article Source Type: research

Physiologic Steroid Tapering
For patients with chronic conditions that require long-term steroid therapy, the goal is to maximize therapeutic effect while minimizing adverse events. Complications of overprescribing glucocorticoids (GCs) can be serious, leading to a variety of adverse events. Responsible management and tapering of steroids requires nurse practitioners to monitor dose and duration of therapy and to provide patient education on potential adverse effects of GC therapy. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - April 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Amber Siegel, Kathryn Kreider Tags: Prescription Pad Source Type: research

Should Nurse Practitioner Programs Share Courses?
There is much debate in educational circles over whether advanced practice nursing (APRN) students from various specialties should be educated together or separately. Educating them together has obvious advantages, including cost savings, leveraging expertise, and forging bonds across specialties that enhance clinical training and, ideally, professional practice after students graduate. On the other hand, providing specialty education separately helps to ensure the degree of focus that is what specialty education is all about. (Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners)
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - April 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Donald Gardenier, Mary M. Benbenek, Cheri L. Friedrich Tags: Point/Counterpoint Source Type: research