Professional perspectives on applying the NICE and British Psychological Society Guidelines for the management of Behaviours that Challenge in dementia care: an e-survey
CONCLUSION: Professionals were cautiously positive regarding the guidance for BtC management, but highlighted a need for improved clarity about the use of non-pharmacological approaches, and more specificity about how these can be implemented in clinical settings. Tailored 'setting-specific' toolkits are required to update and refine the BPS-DCP (2013) if the aspirations of the NICE Dementia Guideline 97 (2018) are to inform professional practice.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Owing to major concerns about the problematic side effects of using psychotropics in the treatment of behaviours that challenge (BtC), there is a need for nat...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 22, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kristina Lily Gray Esme Moniz-Cook Katharina Reichelt Frances Duffy Ian Andrew James Source Type: research

Professional perspectives on applying the NICE and British Psychological Society Guidelines for the management of Behaviours that Challenge in dementia care: an e-survey
CONCLUSION: Professionals were cautiously positive regarding the guidance for BtC management, but highlighted a need for improved clarity about the use of non-pharmacological approaches, and more specificity about how these can be implemented in clinical settings. Tailored 'setting-specific' toolkits are required to update and refine the BPS-DCP (2013) if the aspirations of the NICE Dementia Guideline 97 (2018) are to inform professional practice.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Owing to major concerns about the problematic side effects of using psychotropics in the treatment of behaviours that challenge (BtC), there is a need for nat...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 22, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kristina Lily Gray Esme Moniz-Cook Katharina Reichelt Frances Duffy Ian Andrew James Source Type: research

Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) has potential but is not sufficient: How can it better meet the range of primary care mental health needs?
CONCLUSIONS: Improving Access to Psychological Therapies provision and research at present does not adequately consider the complexity of its clientele in the context of treatment outcomes and service delivery. Recommendations are provided for future research and practice to tackle these deficiencies.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) has significantly increased access to psychological therapies within primary care over the last decade, though it is unclear whether its interventions are sufficiently tailored to meet the actual levels of complexity of its clientele and prevent them from ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 14, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Carla Martin Zaffer Iqbal Nicola D Airey Lucy Marks Source Type: research

Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) has potential but is not sufficient: How can it better meet the range of primary care mental health needs?
CONCLUSIONS: Improving Access to Psychological Therapies provision and research at present does not adequately consider the complexity of its clientele in the context of treatment outcomes and service delivery. Recommendations are provided for future research and practice to tackle these deficiencies.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) has significantly increased access to psychological therapies within primary care over the last decade, though it is unclear whether its interventions are sufficiently tailored to meet the actual levels of complexity of its clientele and prevent them from ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 14, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Carla Martin Zaffer Iqbal Nicola D Airey Lucy Marks Source Type: research

Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) has potential but is not sufficient: How can it better meet the range of primary care mental health needs?
CONCLUSIONS: Improving Access to Psychological Therapies provision and research at present does not adequately consider the complexity of its clientele in the context of treatment outcomes and service delivery. Recommendations are provided for future research and practice to tackle these deficiencies.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) has significantly increased access to psychological therapies within primary care over the last decade, though it is unclear whether its interventions are sufficiently tailored to meet the actual levels of complexity of its clientele and prevent them from ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 14, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Carla Martin Zaffer Iqbal Nicola D Airey Lucy Marks Source Type: research

Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) has potential but is not sufficient: How can it better meet the range of primary care mental health needs?
CONCLUSIONS: Improving Access to Psychological Therapies provision and research at present does not adequately consider the complexity of its clientele in the context of treatment outcomes and service delivery. Recommendations are provided for future research and practice to tackle these deficiencies.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) has significantly increased access to psychological therapies within primary care over the last decade, though it is unclear whether its interventions are sufficiently tailored to meet the actual levels of complexity of its clientele and prevent them from ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 14, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Carla Martin Zaffer Iqbal Nicola D Airey Lucy Marks Source Type: research

Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) has potential but is not sufficient: How can it better meet the range of primary care mental health needs?
CONCLUSIONS: Improving Access to Psychological Therapies provision and research at present does not adequately consider the complexity of its clientele in the context of treatment outcomes and service delivery. Recommendations are provided for future research and practice to tackle these deficiencies.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) has significantly increased access to psychological therapies within primary care over the last decade, though it is unclear whether its interventions are sufficiently tailored to meet the actual levels of complexity of its clientele and prevent them from ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 14, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Carla Martin Zaffer Iqbal Nicola D Airey Lucy Marks Source Type: research

Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) has potential but is not sufficient: How can it better meet the range of primary care mental health needs?
CONCLUSIONS: Improving Access to Psychological Therapies provision and research at present does not adequately consider the complexity of its clientele in the context of treatment outcomes and service delivery. Recommendations are provided for future research and practice to tackle these deficiencies.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) has significantly increased access to psychological therapies within primary care over the last decade, though it is unclear whether its interventions are sufficiently tailored to meet the actual levels of complexity of its clientele and prevent them from ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 14, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Carla Martin Zaffer Iqbal Nicola D Airey Lucy Marks Source Type: research

Fear of compassion is associated with treatment ambivalence and negative expectations for treatment in people with anxiety
CONCLUSIONS: Fear of compassion is associated with treatment ambivalence and treatment expectations and may be an important target early in treatment.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Fears of receiving compassion and self-compassion were related to treatment ambivalence and negative treatment expectations There may be benefit in targeting fear of compassion early in treatment.PMID:34117792 | DOI:10.1111/bjc.12313 (Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology)
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 12, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Olivia A Merritt Christine Purdon Source Type: research

Organizational perspectives on outdoor talking therapy: Towards a position of 'environmental safe uncertainty'
CONCLUSIONS: Whether therapy is located in a consulting room, outdoors, clients' homes, or digitally, practitioners, clients, and services are encouraged to maintain a position of environmental safe uncertainty.PRACTITIONER POINTS: The therapy process and outcomes are influenced by the physical environment in which talking therapy is situated. Practitioners have often remained fixed in their preferred therapy environment, such as the indoor consulting room, without exploring the potential benefits of alternative environments or involving the client in this decision-making (i.e., 'environmental certainty'). Outdoor environm...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 12, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sam J Cooley Ceri R Jones Duncan Moss Noelle Robertson Source Type: research

Fear of compassion is associated with treatment ambivalence and negative expectations for treatment in people with anxiety
CONCLUSIONS: Fear of compassion is associated with treatment ambivalence and treatment expectations and may be an important target early in treatment.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Fears of receiving compassion and self-compassion were related to treatment ambivalence and negative treatment expectations There may be benefit in targeting fear of compassion early in treatment.PMID:34117792 | DOI:10.1111/bjc.12313 (Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology)
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 12, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Olivia A Merritt Christine Purdon Source Type: research

Organizational perspectives on outdoor talking therapy: Towards a position of 'environmental safe uncertainty'
CONCLUSIONS: Whether therapy is located in a consulting room, outdoors, clients' homes, or digitally, practitioners, clients, and services are encouraged to maintain a position of environmental safe uncertainty.PRACTITIONER POINTS: The therapy process and outcomes are influenced by the physical environment in which talking therapy is situated. Practitioners have often remained fixed in their preferred therapy environment, such as the indoor consulting room, without exploring the potential benefits of alternative environments or involving the client in this decision-making (i.e., 'environmental certainty'). Outdoor environm...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 12, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sam J Cooley Ceri R Jones Duncan Moss Noelle Robertson Source Type: research

Fear of compassion is associated with treatment ambivalence and negative expectations for treatment in people with anxiety
CONCLUSIONS: Fear of compassion is associated with treatment ambivalence and treatment expectations and may be an important target early in treatment.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Fears of receiving compassion and self-compassion were related to treatment ambivalence and negative treatment expectations There may be benefit in targeting fear of compassion early in treatment.PMID:34117792 | DOI:10.1111/bjc.12313 (Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology)
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 12, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Olivia A Merritt Christine Purdon Source Type: research

Organizational perspectives on outdoor talking therapy: Towards a position of 'environmental safe uncertainty'
CONCLUSIONS: Whether therapy is located in a consulting room, outdoors, clients' homes, or digitally, practitioners, clients, and services are encouraged to maintain a position of environmental safe uncertainty.PRACTITIONER POINTS: The therapy process and outcomes are influenced by the physical environment in which talking therapy is situated. Practitioners have often remained fixed in their preferred therapy environment, such as the indoor consulting room, without exploring the potential benefits of alternative environments or involving the client in this decision-making (i.e., 'environmental certainty'). Outdoor environm...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 12, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sam J Cooley Ceri R Jones Duncan Moss Noelle Robertson Source Type: research

No evidence that implicit identification with mental illness predicts recovery
CONCLUSIONS: The current research suggests that implicit identification with mental illness can be considered a marker of ongoing recovery, but is not predictive of subsequent recovery. Hence, these data suggest that implicit identification with mental illness is unlikely to play an independent role in the recovery process.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Research regarding the mental health consequences of implicit identification focuses on symptomatology. Recovery is more than a reduction in symptoms, however, and thus, a broader conceptualization of recovery was examined. Implicit identification with being mentally unwell was assoc...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 7, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Courtney von Hippel Loren Brener Grenville Rose Kathleen Kjelsaas William von Hippel Source Type: research

Evaluation of a parent-led cognitive behaviour therapy programme in routine clinical practice: A controlled trial
Br J Clin Psychol. 2021 Jun 7. doi: 10.1111/bjc.12309. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTParent-led cognitive behavioural therapy for child anxiety disorders have garnered a growing evidence base. However, it is unclear how such approaches translate into routine clinical practice. The current study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an 8-session treatment (From Timid to Tiger) in reducing child anxiety and behavioural difficulties, as well as family accommodation. The parents of 71 children (aged 4-11) were assigned to the treatment or a waitlist control. Parent report measures were completed pre-treatment, at treatment-end...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 7, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gary Byrne Graham Connon Elaine Martin Suzanne McHugh Liz Power Source Type: research

No evidence that implicit identification with mental illness predicts recovery
CONCLUSIONS: The current research suggests that implicit identification with mental illness can be considered a marker of ongoing recovery, but is not predictive of subsequent recovery. Hence, these data suggest that implicit identification with mental illness is unlikely to play an independent role in the recovery process.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Research regarding the mental health consequences of implicit identification focuses on symptomatology. Recovery is more than a reduction in symptoms, however, and thus, a broader conceptualization of recovery was examined. Implicit identification with being mentally unwell was assoc...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 7, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Courtney von Hippel Loren Brener Grenville Rose Kathleen Kjelsaas William von Hippel Source Type: research

Evaluation of a parent-led cognitive behaviour therapy programme in routine clinical practice: A controlled trial
Br J Clin Psychol. 2021 Jun 7. doi: 10.1111/bjc.12309. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTParent-led cognitive behavioural therapy for child anxiety disorders have garnered a growing evidence base. However, it is unclear how such approaches translate into routine clinical practice. The current study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an 8-session treatment (From Timid to Tiger) in reducing child anxiety and behavioural difficulties, as well as family accommodation. The parents of 71 children (aged 4-11) were assigned to the treatment or a waitlist control. Parent report measures were completed pre-treatment, at treatment-end...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 7, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gary Byrne Graham Connon Elaine Martin Suzanne McHugh Liz Power Source Type: research

No evidence that implicit identification with mental illness predicts recovery
CONCLUSIONS: The current research suggests that implicit identification with mental illness can be considered a marker of ongoing recovery, but is not predictive of subsequent recovery. Hence, these data suggest that implicit identification with mental illness is unlikely to play an independent role in the recovery process.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Research regarding the mental health consequences of implicit identification focuses on symptomatology. Recovery is more than a reduction in symptoms, however, and thus, a broader conceptualization of recovery was examined. Implicit identification with being mentally unwell was assoc...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 7, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Courtney von Hippel Loren Brener Grenville Rose Kathleen Kjelsaas William von Hippel Source Type: research

Evaluation of a parent-led cognitive behaviour therapy programme in routine clinical practice: A controlled trial
Br J Clin Psychol. 2021 Jun 7. doi: 10.1111/bjc.12309. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTParent-led cognitive behavioural therapy for child anxiety disorders have garnered a growing evidence base. However, it is unclear how such approaches translate into routine clinical practice. The current study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an 8-session treatment (From Timid to Tiger) in reducing child anxiety and behavioural difficulties, as well as family accommodation. The parents of 71 children (aged 4-11) were assigned to the treatment or a waitlist control. Parent report measures were completed pre-treatment, at treatment-end...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 7, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gary Byrne Graham Connon Elaine Martin Suzanne McHugh Liz Power Source Type: research

No evidence that implicit identification with mental illness predicts recovery
CONCLUSIONS: The current research suggests that implicit identification with mental illness can be considered a marker of ongoing recovery, but is not predictive of subsequent recovery. Hence, these data suggest that implicit identification with mental illness is unlikely to play an independent role in the recovery process.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Research regarding the mental health consequences of implicit identification focuses on symptomatology. Recovery is more than a reduction in symptoms, however, and thus, a broader conceptualization of recovery was examined. Implicit identification with being mentally unwell was assoc...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 7, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Courtney von Hippel Loren Brener Grenville Rose Kathleen Kjelsaas William von Hippel Source Type: research

Evaluation of a parent-led cognitive behaviour therapy programme in routine clinical practice: A controlled trial
Br J Clin Psychol. 2021 Jun 7. doi: 10.1111/bjc.12309. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTParent-led cognitive behavioural therapy for child anxiety disorders have garnered a growing evidence base. However, it is unclear how such approaches translate into routine clinical practice. The current study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an 8-session treatment (From Timid to Tiger) in reducing child anxiety and behavioural difficulties, as well as family accommodation. The parents of 71 children (aged 4-11) were assigned to the treatment or a waitlist control. Parent report measures were completed pre-treatment, at treatment-end...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 7, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gary Byrne Graham Connon Elaine Martin Suzanne McHugh Liz Power Source Type: research

Frequency and impact of childhood sexual and physical abuse on people using IAPT services
CONCLUSIONS: CSA/CPA history appears as an important feature in a sizable minority of IAPT clients; further work is required to meet clients' trauma-related needs.PRACTITIONER POINTS: A sizable minority of IAPT clients (14%) present with a history of CSA/CPA as recorded in clinical notes. CSA/CPA history is associated with more complex and enduring presentations in IAPT clients. The reported CSA/CPA frequency is likely to be underestimates of the actual prevalence and impact of adverse childhood experiences in IAPT clients. Trauma-informed inquiry and trauma-specific screening tools would help practitioners to meet clients...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 3, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Irini Laura Verbist Kate Allsopp Dale Huey Filippo Varese Source Type: research

Frequency and impact of childhood sexual and physical abuse on people using IAPT services
CONCLUSIONS: CSA/CPA history appears as an important feature in a sizable minority of IAPT clients; further work is required to meet clients' trauma-related needs.PRACTITIONER POINTS: A sizable minority of IAPT clients (14%) present with a history of CSA/CPA as recorded in clinical notes. CSA/CPA history is associated with more complex and enduring presentations in IAPT clients. The reported CSA/CPA frequency is likely to be underestimates of the actual prevalence and impact of adverse childhood experiences in IAPT clients. Trauma-informed inquiry and trauma-specific screening tools would help practitioners to meet clients...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 3, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Irini Laura Verbist Kate Allsopp Dale Huey Filippo Varese Source Type: research

Frequency and impact of childhood sexual and physical abuse on people using IAPT services
CONCLUSIONS: CSA/CPA history appears as an important feature in a sizable minority of IAPT clients; further work is required to meet clients' trauma-related needs.PRACTITIONER POINTS: A sizable minority of IAPT clients (14%) present with a history of CSA/CPA as recorded in clinical notes. CSA/CPA history is associated with more complex and enduring presentations in IAPT clients. The reported CSA/CPA frequency is likely to be underestimates of the actual prevalence and impact of adverse childhood experiences in IAPT clients. Trauma-informed inquiry and trauma-specific screening tools would help practitioners to meet clients...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 3, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Irini Laura Verbist Kate Allsopp Dale Huey Filippo Varese Source Type: research

Frequency and impact of childhood sexual and physical abuse on people using IAPT services
CONCLUSIONS: CSA/CPA history appears as an important feature in a sizable minority of IAPT clients; further work is required to meet clients' trauma-related needs.PRACTITIONER POINTS: A sizable minority of IAPT clients (14%) present with a history of CSA/CPA as recorded in clinical notes. CSA/CPA history is associated with more complex and enduring presentations in IAPT clients. The reported CSA/CPA frequency is likely to be underestimates of the actual prevalence and impact of adverse childhood experiences in IAPT clients. Trauma-informed inquiry and trauma-specific screening tools would help practitioners to meet clients...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 3, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Irini Laura Verbist Kate Allsopp Dale Huey Filippo Varese Source Type: research

Depression predicts emotion acceptance beliefs in early adolescence: A longitudinal investigation
CONCLUSIONS: Greater beliefs about the unacceptability of experiencing or expressing emotions do not appear to predispose young people to depression. Rather, these beliefs appear to emerge following earlier experiences of depressive symptoms. Further research is needed over multiple measurement waves to further elucidate the relationship between emotion acceptance beliefs and depressive symptoms across adolescence into adulthood and whether such beliefs may predict future depressive episodes indirectly via difficulties in emotion regulation.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Current findings suggest that more negative beliefs about emot...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - June 2, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lauren J Harvey Fiona A White Claire E McAulay Source Type: research

Attachment styles moderate Theory of Mind differences between persons with schizophrenia, first-degree relatives and controls
CONCLUSIONS: Attachment anxiety is related to poorer levels of ToM in patients, suggesting this may have a contributory role in schizophrenia. The findings stress the need for longitudinal research into the directionality of the relationship between ToM and attachment anxiety.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Relationships with significant others might be a factor that influence the way in which social information is processed by persons with diagnosis of psychotic disorders. In patients, higher levels of attachment anxiety - that is, low self-worth, fear of abandonment and rejection, continuous vigilance of threat-related cues - were ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 26, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Luis F Varela Katie H T Wong Sukhi S Shergill Anne-K J Fett Source Type: research

Attachment styles moderate Theory of Mind differences between persons with schizophrenia, first-degree relatives and controls
CONCLUSIONS: Attachment anxiety is related to poorer levels of ToM in patients, suggesting this may have a contributory role in schizophrenia. The findings stress the need for longitudinal research into the directionality of the relationship between ToM and attachment anxiety.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Relationships with significant others might be a factor that influence the way in which social information is processed by persons with diagnosis of psychotic disorders. In patients, higher levels of attachment anxiety - that is, low self-worth, fear of abandonment and rejection, continuous vigilance of threat-related cues - were ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 26, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Luis F Varela Katie H T Wong Sukhi S Shergill Anne-K J Fett Source Type: research

Attachment styles moderate Theory of Mind differences between persons with schizophrenia, first-degree relatives and controls
CONCLUSIONS: Attachment anxiety is related to poorer levels of ToM in patients, suggesting this may have a contributory role in schizophrenia. The findings stress the need for longitudinal research into the directionality of the relationship between ToM and attachment anxiety.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Relationships with significant others might be a factor that influence the way in which social information is processed by persons with diagnosis of psychotic disorders. In patients, higher levels of attachment anxiety - that is, low self-worth, fear of abandonment and rejection, continuous vigilance of threat-related cues - were ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 26, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Luis F Varela Katie H T Wong Sukhi S Shergill Anne-K J Fett Source Type: research

Attachment styles moderate Theory of Mind differences between persons with schizophrenia, first-degree relatives and controls
CONCLUSIONS: Attachment anxiety is related to poorer levels of ToM in patients, suggesting this may have a contributory role in schizophrenia. The findings stress the need for longitudinal research into the directionality of the relationship between ToM and attachment anxiety.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Relationships with significant others might be a factor that influence the way in which social information is processed by persons with diagnosis of psychotic disorders. In patients, higher levels of attachment anxiety - that is, low self-worth, fear of abandonment and rejection, continuous vigilance of threat-related cues - were ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 26, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Luis F Varela Katie H T Wong Sukhi S Shergill Anne-K J Fett Source Type: research

Attachment styles moderate Theory of Mind differences between persons with schizophrenia, first-degree relatives and controls
CONCLUSIONS: Attachment anxiety is related to poorer levels of ToM in patients, suggesting this may have a contributory role in schizophrenia. The findings stress the need for longitudinal research into the directionality of the relationship between ToM and attachment anxiety.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Relationships with significant others might be a factor that influence the way in which social information is processed by persons with diagnosis of psychotic disorders. In patients, higher levels of attachment anxiety - that is, low self-worth, fear of abandonment and rejection, continuous vigilance of threat-related cues - were ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 26, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Luis F Varela Katie H T Wong Sukhi S Shergill Anne-K J Fett Source Type: research

Attachment styles moderate Theory of Mind differences between persons with schizophrenia, first-degree relatives and controls
CONCLUSIONS: Attachment anxiety is related to poorer levels of ToM in patients, suggesting this may have a contributory role in schizophrenia. The findings stress the need for longitudinal research into the directionality of the relationship between ToM and attachment anxiety.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Relationships with significant others might be a factor that influence the way in which social information is processed by persons with diagnosis of psychotic disorders. In patients, higher levels of attachment anxiety - that is, low self-worth, fear of abandonment and rejection, continuous vigilance of threat-related cues - were ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 26, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Luis F Varela Katie H T Wong Sukhi S Shergill Anne-K J Fett Source Type: research

Negative interpretations of ambiguous 'psychosis-like' and 'anxiety-like' experiences in recovery from psychosis or anxiety
CONCLUSIONS: People in self-defined recovery from psychosis or anxiety are more likely to negatively interpret ambiguous experiences relating to their previous mental health difficulties. Clinical and future research implications are outlined.PRACTITIONER POINTS: People in recovery from psychosis or anxiety appraise possible symptoms of their previous difficulties negatively/catastrophically (as indicating relapse) relative to those without prior MH problems. Clinicians should consider attending to how people in recovery appraise possible symptoms when encouraging early signs monitoring as part of relapse prevention. This ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Sired Emma Griffith Taruna Jamalamadaka Paul Salkovskis Source Type: research

Negative interpretations of ambiguous 'psychosis-like' and 'anxiety-like' experiences in recovery from psychosis or anxiety
CONCLUSIONS: People in self-defined recovery from psychosis or anxiety are more likely to negatively interpret ambiguous experiences relating to their previous mental health difficulties. Clinical and future research implications are outlined.PRACTITIONER POINTS: People in recovery from psychosis or anxiety appraise possible symptoms of their previous difficulties negatively/catastrophically (as indicating relapse) relative to those without prior MH problems. Clinicians should consider attending to how people in recovery appraise possible symptoms when encouraging early signs monitoring as part of relapse prevention. This ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Sired Emma Griffith Taruna Jamalamadaka Paul Salkovskis Source Type: research

Negative interpretations of ambiguous 'psychosis-like' and 'anxiety-like' experiences in recovery from psychosis or anxiety
CONCLUSIONS: People in self-defined recovery from psychosis or anxiety are more likely to negatively interpret ambiguous experiences relating to their previous mental health difficulties. Clinical and future research implications are outlined.PRACTITIONER POINTS: People in recovery from psychosis or anxiety appraise possible symptoms of their previous difficulties negatively/catastrophically (as indicating relapse) relative to those without prior MH problems. Clinicians should consider attending to how people in recovery appraise possible symptoms when encouraging early signs monitoring as part of relapse prevention. This ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Sired Emma Griffith Taruna Jamalamadaka Paul Salkovskis Source Type: research

Negative interpretations of ambiguous 'psychosis-like' and 'anxiety-like' experiences in recovery from psychosis or anxiety
CONCLUSIONS: People in self-defined recovery from psychosis or anxiety are more likely to negatively interpret ambiguous experiences relating to their previous mental health difficulties. Clinical and future research implications are outlined.PRACTITIONER POINTS: People in recovery from psychosis or anxiety appraise possible symptoms of their previous difficulties negatively/catastrophically (as indicating relapse) relative to those without prior MH problems. Clinicians should consider attending to how people in recovery appraise possible symptoms when encouraging early signs monitoring as part of relapse prevention. This ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Sired Emma Griffith Taruna Jamalamadaka Paul Salkovskis Source Type: research

Negative interpretations of ambiguous 'psychosis-like' and 'anxiety-like' experiences in recovery from psychosis or anxiety
CONCLUSIONS: People in self-defined recovery from psychosis or anxiety are more likely to negatively interpret ambiguous experiences relating to their previous mental health difficulties. Clinical and future research implications are outlined.PRACTITIONER POINTS: People in recovery from psychosis or anxiety appraise possible symptoms of their previous difficulties negatively/catastrophically (as indicating relapse) relative to those without prior MH problems. Clinicians should consider attending to how people in recovery appraise possible symptoms when encouraging early signs monitoring as part of relapse prevention. This ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Sired Emma Griffith Taruna Jamalamadaka Paul Salkovskis Source Type: research

Negative interpretations of ambiguous 'psychosis-like' and 'anxiety-like' experiences in recovery from psychosis or anxiety
CONCLUSIONS: People in self-defined recovery from psychosis or anxiety are more likely to negatively interpret ambiguous experiences relating to their previous mental health difficulties. Clinical and future research implications are outlined.PRACTITIONER POINTS: People in recovery from psychosis or anxiety appraise possible symptoms of their previous difficulties negatively/catastrophically (as indicating relapse) relative to those without prior MH problems. Clinicians should consider attending to how people in recovery appraise possible symptoms when encouraging early signs monitoring as part of relapse prevention. This ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Sired Emma Griffith Taruna Jamalamadaka Paul Salkovskis Source Type: research

Negative interpretations of ambiguous 'psychosis-like' and 'anxiety-like' experiences in recovery from psychosis or anxiety
CONCLUSIONS: People in self-defined recovery from psychosis or anxiety are more likely to negatively interpret ambiguous experiences relating to their previous mental health difficulties. Clinical and future research implications are outlined.PRACTITIONER POINTS: People in recovery from psychosis or anxiety appraise possible symptoms of their previous difficulties negatively/catastrophically (as indicating relapse) relative to those without prior MH problems. Clinicians should consider attending to how people in recovery appraise possible symptoms when encouraging early signs monitoring as part of relapse prevention. This ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Sired Emma Griffith Taruna Jamalamadaka Paul Salkovskis Source Type: research

Negative interpretations of ambiguous 'psychosis-like' and 'anxiety-like' experiences in recovery from psychosis or anxiety
CONCLUSIONS: People in self-defined recovery from psychosis or anxiety are more likely to negatively interpret ambiguous experiences relating to their previous mental health difficulties. Clinical and future research implications are outlined.PRACTITIONER POINTS: People in recovery from psychosis or anxiety appraise possible symptoms of their previous difficulties negatively/catastrophically (as indicating relapse) relative to those without prior MH problems. Clinicians should consider attending to how people in recovery appraise possible symptoms when encouraging early signs monitoring as part of relapse prevention. This ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Sired Emma Griffith Taruna Jamalamadaka Paul Salkovskis Source Type: research

Negative interpretations of ambiguous 'psychosis-like' and 'anxiety-like' experiences in recovery from psychosis or anxiety
CONCLUSIONS: People in self-defined recovery from psychosis or anxiety are more likely to negatively interpret ambiguous experiences relating to their previous mental health difficulties. Clinical and future research implications are outlined.PRACTITIONER POINTS: People in recovery from psychosis or anxiety appraise possible symptoms of their previous difficulties negatively/catastrophically (as indicating relapse) relative to those without prior MH problems. Clinicians should consider attending to how people in recovery appraise possible symptoms when encouraging early signs monitoring as part of relapse prevention. This ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Sired Emma Griffith Taruna Jamalamadaka Paul Salkovskis Source Type: research

Negative interpretations of ambiguous 'psychosis-like' and 'anxiety-like' experiences in recovery from psychosis or anxiety
CONCLUSIONS: People in self-defined recovery from psychosis or anxiety are more likely to negatively interpret ambiguous experiences relating to their previous mental health difficulties. Clinical and future research implications are outlined.PRACTITIONER POINTS: People in recovery from psychosis or anxiety appraise possible symptoms of their previous difficulties negatively/catastrophically (as indicating relapse) relative to those without prior MH problems. Clinicians should consider attending to how people in recovery appraise possible symptoms when encouraging early signs monitoring as part of relapse prevention. This ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Sired Emma Griffith Taruna Jamalamadaka Paul Salkovskis Source Type: research

Negative interpretations of ambiguous 'psychosis-like' and 'anxiety-like' experiences in recovery from psychosis or anxiety
CONCLUSIONS: People in self-defined recovery from psychosis or anxiety are more likely to negatively interpret ambiguous experiences relating to their previous mental health difficulties. Clinical and future research implications are outlined.PRACTITIONER POINTS: People in recovery from psychosis or anxiety appraise possible symptoms of their previous difficulties negatively/catastrophically (as indicating relapse) relative to those without prior MH problems. Clinicians should consider attending to how people in recovery appraise possible symptoms when encouraging early signs monitoring as part of relapse prevention. This ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Sired Emma Griffith Taruna Jamalamadaka Paul Salkovskis Source Type: research

Emotion network density is a potential clinical marker for anxiety and depression: Comparison of ecological momentary assessment and daily diary
CONCLUSIONS: Greater inflexibility of NE and lower inflexibility of PE, indexed by emotion network density, are potential clinical markers of anxiety and depressive disorders when assessed at intra-daily levels as opposed to daily levels. Considering emotion network density, as well as the mean level and variability of emotions in daily life, may contribute to diagnostic prediction of anxiety and depressive disorders.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Emotion network density, or the degree to which prior emotions predict and influence current emotions, indicates an inflexible or change-resistant emotion system. Emotional inflexibility o...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 8, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ki Eun Shin Michelle G Newman Nicholas C Jacobson Source Type: research

Emotion network density is a potential clinical marker for anxiety and depression: Comparison of ecological momentary assessment and daily diary
CONCLUSIONS: Greater inflexibility of NE and lower inflexibility of PE, indexed by emotion network density, are potential clinical markers of anxiety and depressive disorders when assessed at intra-daily levels as opposed to daily levels. Considering emotion network density, as well as the mean level and variability of emotions in daily life, may contribute to diagnostic prediction of anxiety and depressive disorders.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Emotion network density, or the degree to which prior emotions predict and influence current emotions, indicates an inflexible or change-resistant emotion system. Emotional inflexibility o...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 8, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ki Eun Shin Michelle G Newman Nicholas C Jacobson Source Type: research

Emotion network density is a potential clinical marker for anxiety and depression: Comparison of ecological momentary assessment and daily diary
CONCLUSIONS: Greater inflexibility of NE and lower inflexibility of PE, indexed by emotion network density, are potential clinical markers of anxiety and depressive disorders when assessed at intra-daily levels as opposed to daily levels. Considering emotion network density, as well as the mean level and variability of emotions in daily life, may contribute to diagnostic prediction of anxiety and depressive disorders.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Emotion network density, or the degree to which prior emotions predict and influence current emotions, indicates an inflexible or change-resistant emotion system. Emotional inflexibility o...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 8, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ki Eun Shin Michelle G Newman Nicholas C Jacobson Source Type: research

Emotion network density is a potential clinical marker for anxiety and depression: Comparison of ecological momentary assessment and daily diary
CONCLUSIONS: Greater inflexibility of NE and lower inflexibility of PE, indexed by emotion network density, are potential clinical markers of anxiety and depressive disorders when assessed at intra-daily levels as opposed to daily levels. Considering emotion network density, as well as the mean level and variability of emotions in daily life, may contribute to diagnostic prediction of anxiety and depressive disorders.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Emotion network density, or the degree to which prior emotions predict and influence current emotions, indicates an inflexible or change-resistant emotion system. Emotional inflexibility o...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 8, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ki Eun Shin Michelle G Newman Nicholas C Jacobson Source Type: research

Child abuse and suicidality in the context of the Interpersonal Psychological Theory of Suicide: A network analysis
CONCLUSION: The major limitation of this study was the modest sample size which reduced the number of variables able to be included in the network. Regarding child abuse, the results underline that emotional abuse plays a central role in this network and may be important for suicide risk assessment. Future research should address this topic in a larger sample.PRACTITIONER POINTS: Emotional abuse was the most central kind of abuse in this network analysis. Sexual abuse was the only kind of abuse with a direct relation to suicidal ideation. Capability for suicide had just a marginal position in the network analysis. Early in...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 5, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Antje Sch ├Ânfelder Dajana Rath Thomas Forkmann Laura Paashaus Luise Lucht Tobias Teismann Katarina Stengler Georg Juckel Heide Glaesmer Source Type: research

Relating behaviours and therapeutic actions during AVATAR therapy dialogue: An observational study
CONCLUSIONS: AVATAR therapy supports voice-hearers in becoming more assertive towards a digital representation of their abusive voice. Direct dialogue with carefully characterized avatars aims to build the voice-hearers' positive sense of self, supporting the person to make sense of their experiences.PRACTITIONER POINTS: AVATAR therapy enables voice-hearers to engage in face-to-face dialogue with a digital representation ('avatar') of their persecutory voice. Fine-grained analyses showed how relating behaviours and therapeutic actions evolve during active AVATAR therapy dialogue. Carefully characterized avatars and direct ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - May 5, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Conan O'Brien Mar Rus-Calafell Tom Kj Craig Philippa Garety Thomas Ward Rachel Lister Miriam Fornells-Ambrojo Source Type: research