The cross-country and cross-time measurement invariance of positive and negative affect scales: Evidence from European Social Survey
This study applies both the traditional exact and the more recent Bayesian approximate approach to assess whether the affect scales are measurement invariant. The approximate approach detected several non-invariant items that are problematic for cross-national comparison and should be dropped from the scales. Consequently, measurement invariance was established in all countries over the two rounds for the reduced scales, allowing researchers to meaningfully compare their latent mean scores and the relationships with other theoretical constructs of interest. Thus, the study highlights the advantages of using multiple indica...
Source: Social Science Research - October 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Ethnicity, inequality, and perceived electoral fairness
Publication date: Available online 12 October 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Anaïd Flesken, Jakob HartlAbstractEstablishing electoral legitimacy across the population is vital for democratic stability, yet in contrast to other measures of political support, perceived electoral fairness has received scant scholarly attention. Moreover, while research into other measures of political support has shown that they differ by both ethnicity and socio-economic status, no study examines both at once, potentially overlooking important interrelationships between the two variables. This paper combines data from the...
Source: Social Science Research - October 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Nonlinear models of distribution of talking in small groups
Publication date: Available online 11 October 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Barbara F. MeekerAbstractThis paper develops a mathematical model of the distribution over time of talking in discussion groups. Researchers of small group processes and social inequality have long recognized that interaction in small discussion groups is usually not equally distributed and that being a person who talks more than others is associated with having higher status outside the group and greater prestige and influence within the group. There is also a history of mathematical approaches to describing this phenomenon. As an ...
Source: Social Science Research - October 12, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Reputations in mixed-role markets: A theory and an experimental test
Publication date: Available online 10 October 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Judith Kas, Rense Corten, Arnout van de RijtAbstractThe traditional understanding of reputation systems is that they secure trust between strangers by publicly calling out cheaters. In modern, online markets, it is increasingly common for providers of a good to also act as consumers, and vice versa. We argue that in such mixed-role markets, reputation systems serve a second important function: They allow providers who lend out their possessions (such as their house, car or tools) to earn reputational credits that can be spent on fut...
Source: Social Science Research - October 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The economic benefits of volunteering and social class
Publication date: Available online 10 October 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): John Wilson, Noemi Mantovan, Robert SauerAbstractA theory that the economic benefits of volunteering are contingent on social class (as defined by similarities in labour market situation) is tested using seven waves of longitudinal data from the British Household Panel Study gathered between 1996 and 2008 and fixed-effects models. Volunteering has a positive effect on earnings, but it is confined to people in professional and managerial occupations. Employees in white and blue collar jobs do not benefit. The study suggests that inco...
Source: Social Science Research - October 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

School suspension and social selection: Labeling, network change, and adolescent, academic achievement
Publication date: Available online 7 October 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Scott W. Duxbury, Dana L. HaynieAbstractThe growing body of research detailing the pronounced effects of criminal stigma on inequality in the US underscores the importance of labeling theory. In spite of the renewed interest in labeling, little research has evaluated the theoretical mechanisms underlying the theory. Drawing on the labeling perspective, this article evaluates mechanisms underlying the relationship between school punishment and reductions in adolescent academic achievement. It uses recent innovations in longitudinal ne...
Source: Social Science Research - October 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Race/ethnicity, human capital, and the selection of young children into early childhood education
Publication date: Available online 5 October 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Robert W. Ressler, Elizabeth Ackert, Arya Ansari, Robert CrosnoeAbstractMexican-origin families face complex ethnic and immigration-based barriers to enrollment in early childhood education programs. As such, reducing barriers to enrollment for this population requires a better understanding of how Mexican-origin families work with, against, or around both general and group-specific constraints on educational opportunities. Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study–Birth Cohort, this study tailored broad social theory to the...
Source: Social Science Research - October 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The role of parenthood in shaping the gender wage gap – A comparative analysis of 26 European countries
Publication date: Available online 26 September 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Ewa Cukrowska-Torzewska, Anna LovaszAbstractWe use cross-national data on 26 EU countries to estimate how parenthood contributes to the gender wage gap, and assess how institutional elements affect this relationship. We find that irrespective of cultural norms and policies, fathers receive a wage premium, which increases the gender gap. Motherhood gaps vary across countries. The highest gaps are seen in Eastern European countries, where policies and norms lead to long absences from work. Moderate to small penalties are found in Co...
Source: Social Science Research - September 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The impact of suspension on participation in school-based extracurricular activities and out-of-school community service
In this study, we investigate the relationship between suspension (i.e., in-school suspension, out-of-school suspension, or both) and youth participation in extracurricular activities, both in-school and outside of school, using data from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002. Results suggest students who are suspended are less likely to participate in school clubs (e.g., student government, yearbook, band/choir), and are also less likely to participate in volunteer work/community service. This suggests the impact of school discipline extends beyond the schooling context. These results provide insight into how suspens...
Source: Social Science Research - September 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Educational expansion and educational wage premiums of young male employees: A long-term analysis for West Germany 1976–2010
Publication date: Available online 16 September 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Holger Alda, Anett Friedrich, Daniela Rohrbach-SchmidtAbstractFor decades, Western societies have experienced educational expansion accompanied by an upgrading of skills. The literature provides competing hypotheses on the consequences for educational wage returns—among them are the positional value theory, routine-biased technological change, and the social closure theory. We test these theoretical perspectives empirically on young, male full-time workers in West Germany between 1976 and 2010 in two ideal-type occupational ...
Source: Social Science Research - September 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

A tangled web: The reciprocal relationship between depression and educational outcomes in China
Publication date: Available online 13 September 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Wensong ShenAbstractResearch on depression and education usually focuses on a unidirectional relationship. This paper proposes a reciprocal relationship, simultaneously estimating the effects of depression on education and of education on depression. China, which has the world's largest education system, is used as a case study. This paper applies structural equation modeling to three datasets: the China Family Panel Studies, the China Education Panel Survey, and the Gansu Survey of Children and Families. Analyses reveal a recipro...
Source: Social Science Research - September 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Partnered women's contribution to household labour income: Persistent inequalities among couples and their determinants
Publication date: Available online 7 September 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Martina Dieckhoff, Vanessa Gash, Antje Mertens, Laura Romeu GordoAbstractThis paper explores earnings inequalities within dual-earner couples in East and West Germany drawing on household-level panel data from 1992 to 2016. It has three aims: (1) to analyze how the partner pay gap (the pay gap between partners within one household) has developed over time, given institutional change, and whether the extent of inequality and temporal development vary between East and West Germany; (2) to explore variation in the partner pay gap by m...
Source: Social Science Research - September 8, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Kin location and racial disparities in exiting and entering poor neighborhoods
Publication date: Available online 3 September 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Elizabeth Ackert, Amy Spring, Kyle Crowder, Scott J. SouthAbstractBlacks and Latinos/as are less likely than Whites to move from a poor neighborhood to a non-poor neighborhood and are more likely to move in the reverse direction. Using individual-level data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (1980–2013) and neighborhood-level census data, this study explores the role that the spatial location of familial kin networks plays in explaining these racially and ethnically disparate mobility patterns. Blacks and Latinos/as live...
Source: Social Science Research - September 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Maternal employment when children are in preschool: Variations by race, ethnicity, and nativity
Publication date: Available online 3 September 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Christel KeslerAbstractPreschool programs in the United States have expanded dramatically in recent decades. There has been significant scholarly attention to the implications of this for inequalities in children's educational outcomes, but less attention to the implications for the work-family lives of parents. Drawing on data from 2001 to 2017 American Community Surveys, this paper examines how children's preschool enrollment is associated with maternal employment, with particular attention to differences by mothers' race, ethnic...
Source: Social Science Research - September 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Welfare deservingness opinions from heuristic to measurable concept: The CARIN deservingness principles scale
Publication date: Available online 3 September 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Bart Meuleman, Femke Roosma, Koen AbtsAbstractA steadily growing number of studies investigate how popular support for social policies targeting particular groups is rooted in citizens’ deservingness opinions. According to theory, people fall back on five criteria – Control, Attitude, Reciprocity, Identity and Need (CARIN) – to distinguish the deserving from the undeserving. Deservingness opinions are assumed to be important predictors of support for particular welfare arrangements. A striking feature of this emer...
Source: Social Science Research - September 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Is healthcare the new manufacturing?: Industry, gender, and “good jobs” for low- and middle-skill workers
Publication date: Available online 3 September 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Janette Dill, Melissa HodgesAbstractUsing the 2004 and 2008 panels of the Survey for Income and Program Participation (SIPP), we examine whether the heavily feminized health care industry produces “good jobs” for workers without a college degree as compared to other major industries. For women, we find that jobs in the health care industry are significantly more likely than the food service and retail industries to provide wages above $15 per hour, health benefits, fulltime hours, and job security. Jobs in the health ca...
Source: Social Science Research - September 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Job quality differences among younger and older workers in Europe: The role of institutions
Publication date: Available online 4 September 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): José M. Arranz, Carlos García-Serrano, Virginia HernanzAbstractWe compare non-wage aspects of job quality of younger and older workers across European countries and relate the differences between them to the prevailing institutional settings. Microdata from the European Union Labour Force Survey are used to carry out the measurement of a job quality index during the period 2005–2015, while aggregate indicators are used to approximate a set of labour market institutions. Our findings support the notion that the i...
Source: Social Science Research - September 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Public school accountability, workplace culture, and teacher morale
Publication date: Available online 2 September 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Kristen Erichsen, John ReynoldsAbstractEducational scholars claim that teacher morale has suffered from accountability pressures and constrained professionalism, but exactly what is most diminished by these pressures remains unclear. Drawing on recent theoretical work on public school organizational culture, we hypothesize that accountability pressures hurt teacher morale and increase the risk of turnover by undermining the professional culture of the school and by diminishing teacher cooperation and trust. We find support for this...
Source: Social Science Research - September 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Exploring the origin of sentencing disparities in the Crown Court: Using text mining techniques to differentiate between court and judge disparities
Publication date: Available online 3 September 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Jose Pina-Sánchez, Diana Grech, Ian Brunton-Smith, Dimitrios SferopoulosAbstractResearch on sentence consistency in England and Wales has focused on disparities between courts, with differences between judges largely ignored. This is largely due to the limitations in official data. Using text mining techniques from Crown Court sentence records available online we generate a sample of 7,212 violent and sexual offences where both court and judge are captured. Multilevel time-to-event analyses of sentence length demonstrate tha...
Source: Social Science Research - September 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Disentangling the role of income in the academic achievement of migrant children
Publication date: Available online 31 August 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Monique Gagné, Magdalena Janus, Nazeem Muhajarine, Anne Gadermann, Eric Duku, Constance Milbrath, Anita Minh, Barry Forer, Carly Magee, Martin GuhnAbstractPoverty has a well-established association with poor developmental outcomes in children but is often found to be a weak predictor of outcomes for migrant children. Building on theory focused on the developmental competencies of minority children, the current study used a systematic and novel analytic approach to disentangle the relationship between income and developmental o...
Source: Social Science Research - September 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Degrees of inequality: The Great Recession and the college earnings premium in U.S. metropolitan areas
Publication date: Available online 17 August 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Angran Li, Michael Wallace, Allen HydeAbstractThe Great Recession had devastating impacts on the U.S. labor market as millions of workers lost their jobs while others faced declining earnings, erosion of job security, and loss of dignity at work. While workers of all education levels experienced rising unemployment and declining earnings, it is unclear if workers of all educational levels were equally affected. In this paper, we examine the impact of the Great Recession on variations in the college earnings premium—the ratio of...
Source: Social Science Research - August 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: September 2019Source: Social Science Research, Volume 83Author(s): (Source: Social Science Research)
Source: Social Science Research - August 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Publisher’s Note
Publication date: September 2019Source: Social Science Research, Volume 83Author(s): (Source: Social Science Research)
Source: Social Science Research - August 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Using cultural and structural indicators to explain measurement noninvariance in gender role attitudes with multilevel structural equation modeling
Publication date: Available online 16 July 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Daniel Seddig, Vera LomazziAbstractThe current study explores the reasons for noninvariance of the measurements of gender role attitudes across countries. While previous studies have shown that noninvariance is a problem for comparative research and pointed out methods to alleviate the risks of drawing invalid conclusions, none has so far tried to explain why measurements of gender role attitudes are nonequivalent. Therefore, we use multilevel structural equation modeling to exploring measurement invariance and explain its absence. We ...
Source: Social Science Research - July 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

.Status and collaboration: The case of pro bono network inequalities in corporate law
Publication date: Available online 3 July 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Diego F. Leal, Anthony Paik, Steven A. BoutcherAbstractWe examine how status shapes intersectoral collaboration between large US corporate law firms and public interest legal organizations (PILOs). We draw from status theories to derive competing hypotheses about the status processes that generate organizational collaboration within this network. Supporting a status-signaling hypothesis, high-status law firms tend to collaborate with similarly high-status pro bono organizations. This gives rise to a highly unequal playing field where a ...
Source: Social Science Research - July 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

A time-sensitive analysis of the work-crime relationship for young men
Publication date: Available online 12 July 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Angela Wang LeeAbstractTheories of the work-crime relationship suggest that employment reduces crime by offering routines, income, and supervision. However, selection into and out of jobs could also explain the negative association between work and crime: people may start working when they are already offending less and stop working when they are already offending more. To evaluate these possibilities, I model month-to-month, within-person changes in offending during the periods surrounding job transitions. Using data from the Pathways...
Source: Social Science Research - July 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: August 2019Source: Social Science Research, Volume 82Author(s): (Source: Social Science Research)
Source: Social Science Research - July 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Trends in the demographic composition of poverty among working families in Germany and in Israel, 1991–2011
Publication date: Available online 4 July 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Asaf Levanon, Evgeny Saburov, Markus Gangl, Jan BrülleAbstractWhile the working poverty rate in advanced economies is about 7%, the demographic composition of the working poor varies considerably across countries. Providing an in-depth look at the demographic composition of working poverty, this paper builds on a typology of three major antecedents of poverty among workers – age, household structure, and minority status - and documents their changing association with the likelihood of poverty in Germany and Israel for a 21-ye...
Source: Social Science Research - July 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Asymmetric issue evolution in the American gun rights debate
Publication date: Available online 4 July 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Mark A. ConleyAbstractIssue Evolution is a rare form of voter realignment where a single issue drives massive partisan shifts. These types of realignment occurred regarding race relations in post-war America, and regarding reproductive rights beginning in the mid-1980s. The current American gun rights debate meets the requisite conditions for issue evolution: longevity, salience, and ease of acquisition. Opposition to gun rights requires organization, attention, and political activity, whereas visible support for gun rights can be as si...
Source: Social Science Research - July 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The effect of informal caregiving on social capital investments
Publication date: Available online 5 July 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Andreas EberlAbstractSocial capital is a resource derived from a person's social network and is important for various outcomes. Social capital declines over time and requires investments to avoid further declines or to increase the stock. However, certain life events can negatively affect social capital. This paper analyzes how informal caregiving, defined as unpaid assistance to persons who cannot perform the usual activities of daily living without help, affects social capital investments. Drawing on the German Socio-Economic Panel (G...
Source: Social Science Research - July 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Unravelling the relationship between parental resources and disability pension in young adulthood
This article analyses how parental income and education are associated with offsprings' disability pension in young adulthood (19–27 years) among 1980–1985 birth cohorts using Finnish register data. The results of discrete-time event history analysis demonstrate that parental income and education have contrasting impacts. High parental income is found to decrease, and parental education to increase, the probability of offspring having disability pension, although mainly among offspring with compulsory education. Further, young adults with high parental resources are better off two years after their first disabi...
Source: Social Science Research - July 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Barring progress: The influence of paternal incarceration on families’ neighborhood attainment
In this study, we use the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 3288) to investigate the relationships between paternal incarceration and the neighborhood outcomes of the children of incarcerated fathers and their mothers. Specifically, we examine whether children whose fathers are currently and/or have recently been incarcerated experience more residential instability, live in more socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods, and/or live in less socially cohesive neighborhoods. We find that paternal incarceration is associated with moving more frequently, greater socioeconomic neighborhood disadvantage, an...
Source: Social Science Research - July 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Explaining attitudes toward minority groups with human values in Germany - What is the direction of causality?
Publication date: Available online 3 July 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Marcus EisentrautAbstractThis paper examines the reciprocal relations between values and attitudes toward minorities over a period of fourteen months in 2015 and 2016. A representative sample of the adult population in Germany completed four waves of a panel study in which attitudes and values were each measured two times. Reciprocal relations over time between Schwartz's (1992) higher-order value of conservation and the value of universalism as well as attitudes toward four different minorities (Muslims, refugees, foreigners, Sinti/Rom...
Source: Social Science Research - July 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The social integration of lesbians, gay men and bisexuals: Exploring the role of the municipal context
Publication date: Available online 3 July 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Mirjam M. Fischer, Matthijs Kalmijn, Stephanie SteinmetzAbstractThis paper examines possible differences between lesbians, gay men and bisexuals (LGBs) compared to heterosexuals with respect to their integration into the residential neighbourhood. By means of a multi-level analysis, we examine if there is a gap in social integration between LGBs compared to heterosexuals, and if so, to what extent municipality characteristics can account for variations in this gap. Specifically, we test a cultural hypothesis (i.e., how liberal or conser...
Source: Social Science Research - July 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Status and collaboration: The case of pro bono network inequalities in corporate law
Publication date: Available online 3 July 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Diego F. Leal, Anthony Paik, Steven A. BoutcherAbstractWe examine how status shapes intersectoral collaboration between large US corporate law firms and public interest legal organizations (PILOs). We draw from status theories to derive competing hypotheses about the status processes that generate organizational collaboration within this network. Supporting a status-signaling hypothesis, high-status law firms tend to collaborate with similarly high-status pro bono organizations. This gives rise to a highly unequal playing field where a ...
Source: Social Science Research - July 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Information on biodiversity and environmental behaviors: A European study of individual and institutional drivers to adopt sustainable gardening practices
In conclusion, we provide recommendations for the design of dedicated public policies, specific to a national or local level of decision. (Source: Social Science Research)
Source: Social Science Research - July 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Marketization and anti-immigrant attitudes in cross-national perspective
This study builds upon an evolving research agenda by assessing the utility of three predictors of anti-immigrant attitudes: a “marketized mentality,” its aggregated level analogue – a “marketized anomic culture,” and an institutional imbalance characterized by the dominance of the economy over other social institutions. Drawing upon Institutional Anomie Theory (IAT), a macro-sociological theory originally advanced to explain crime, previous research has reported that persons who strongly embrace market-based values are prone to be prejudiced to legitimize the exclusion of groups that do not c...
Source: Social Science Research - July 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Lack of skills or formal qualifications? New evidence on cross-country differences in the labor market disadvantage of less-educated adults
Publication date: Available online 2 July 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Jan Paul Heisig, Maurice Gesthuizen, Heike SolgaAbstractWe use PIAAC data on the literacy and numeracy skills of 49,366 25-to-54-year-olds in 27 countries to shed new light on cross-national variation in the labor market disadvantage of less-educated adults (i.e., those who have not completed upper secondary education). Our empirical analysis focuses on the occupational status gap between less-educated adults and those with a degree at the upper secondary level and yields three main findings. First, individual-level differences in liter...
Source: Social Science Research - July 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Household wealth and adolescents' social-emotional functioning in schools
This study attempts a two-part shift in educational research narrowly fixated on the socioeconomic determinants of student test-score performance. First, we focus on variations in how to measure wealth. Second, we move beyond achievement and focus on the wealth determinants of adolescents' social-emotional competencies. Using data from a nationally-representative sample of US eighth graders, we find that the correlation between wealth and social-emotional competencies varies according to how the partitions among the upper class, the middle and working classes, and the poor are defined. By emphasizing wealth in the producti...
Source: Social Science Research - July 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Investigating the impact of the economic crisis on children's wellbeing in four European countries
Publication date: Available online 2 July 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Antonella D'Agostino, Caterina Giusti, Francesca Gagliardi, Antoanneta PotsiAbstractThis paper analyses the impact of the economic crisis on children's wellbeing from a comparative European perspective using a multidimensional and fuzzy methodology. Comparisons of children's wellbeing based solely on monetary resources are likely to give a partial picture, because wellbeing can be related to different capabilities and the economic crisis impacted them differently. The use of several indicators captures the multidimensional and interrela...
Source: Social Science Research - July 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Decomposing patterns of college marital sorting in 118 countries: Structural constraints versus assortative mating
Publication date: Available online 27 June 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Albert Esteve, Joan Garcia, Iñaki PermanyerAbstractTwo broad forces shape the patterns of marital sorting by education: structural constraints and assortative mating. However, we lack specific and comparative quantification of the extent of these two forces. In this paper, we measure the specific contributions of (i) assortative mating, (ii) the level of college education and (iii) the gender gap in education on marital sorting patterns and the corresponding polarization levels between college and non-college educated couples. U...
Source: Social Science Research - June 28, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Spousal migration and married adults’ psychological distress in rural China: The roles of intimacy, autonomy and responsibility
Publication date: Available online 21 June 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Yuying Tong, Feinian Chen, Binbin ShuAbstractSpousal separation due to migration is a prevalent phenomenon in the developing world, but its psychological consequences for left-behind partners are largely understudied. Using data from 2010, 2012 and 2014 China Family Panel Studies (CFPS), this paper first examined whether spousal migration causes rural married adults any psychological distress; this finding was then advanced by testing the mechanisms that could potentially explain the linkage between these two variables. Inverse Probabi...
Source: Social Science Research - June 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Explaining the cross-national variation in the relationship between religious organization membership and civic organization participation
Publication date: Available online 11 June 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Yun Lu, Jong Hyun Jung, Shawn BauldryAbstractWe examine the relationship between belonging to religious organizations and participating in nonreligious civic organizations through use of a large international sample of individuals. Moreover, we assess how this relationship is contingent upon social context, that is Protestant percentage, economic condition, and democratic level of a nation. Using data from the sixth wave of the World Values Survey (2010–2014), our multilevel analyses reveal that religious organization members are...
Source: Social Science Research - June 12, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Media messages and attitudes toward muslims and ethnic minorities: A panel study among ethnic majority adolescents in the Netherlands
This study uses large-scale panel data on adolescents in combination with newspaper data and takes advantage of an extensive fieldwork period during which media salience of Muslims has fluctuated. All unmeasured time-invariant characteristics are accounted for by adopting a fixed-effects panel design. The results provide evidence of immediate attitudinal responses to media salience: the more media salience of Muslims on the day of survey participation, the more negative adolescents feel about Muslims. However, the results do not point toward a secondary transfer effect because media-induced negative attitudes toward Muslim...
Source: Social Science Research - June 12, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: July 2019Source: Social Science Research, Volume 81Author(s): (Source: Social Science Research)
Source: Social Science Research - May 25, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Revisiting economic threat and cultural concerns: Public opinion toward immigration and non-citizens by race
Publication date: Available online 18 May 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Maruice MangumAbstractThis research examines opinions on issues related to immigration and non-citizens. Using ordered logit, this study assesses whether the cultural theory and realistic group conflict theory, through cultural considerations and economic threat, respectively, describes best the opinions across racial groups. Unlike most other studies on the subject, I find that while Americans are not very much concerned about cultural influences from immigrants, they clearly perceive immigrants as an economic threat. Also, unlike most...
Source: Social Science Research - May 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The skill divide in post-unemployment job quality
We examined whether unemployment promoted the skill divide in job quality with a variety of post-unemployment job-quality indicators. Using a large German panel survey, we found that high-skilled respondents were more prone to decreased post-unemployment job quality with regard to financial and job security aspects, yet more likely to experience better skill-matches. Further analyses revealed that this finding can be attributed to a considerable post-unemployment downward mobility of the high-skilled respondents. We discuss a possible ‘floor-effect’ for low-skilled workers. (Source: Social Science Research)
Source: Social Science Research - May 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Assessing the spatial scale of context effects: The example of neighbourhoods’ educational composition and its relevance for individual aspirations
Publication date: Available online 15 May 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Andreas Hartung, Steffen HillmertAbstractThe neighbourhood environment has repeatedly proven to be a relevant context for central aspects of individuals' lives, such as educational attainment. The conventional approach of measuring neighbourhood characteristics within disjunct geographical units fixed at a particular scale is less suitable for representing the characteristics of individual action spaces in everyday activities and for detecting scale-dependent relationships. We, therefore, adapted an ego-centred context approach by aggre...
Source: Social Science Research - May 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Can non-cognitive skills compensate for background disadvantage? -- the moderation of non-cognitive skills on family socioeconomic status and achievement during early childhood and early adolescence
Publication date: Available online 2 May 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): Airan LiuAbstractCombining the theory of resources substitution and recent evidence on the importance of children's non-cognitive skills from social sciences, this study asks whether family socioeconomic status' effects on achievement are contingent on or moderated by children's non-cognitive skills. I address this question from a longitudinal perspective by focusing on two developmental stages: early childhood and early adolescence. To overcome the methodological challenges involved in answering these questions, I use Structural Nested ...
Source: Social Science Research - May 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The utility of a follow-up interview for respondents to a longitudinal survey with frequent measurement
Publication date: Available online 4 May 2019Source: Social Science ResearchAuthor(s): James Wagner, Mick P. Couper, William G. Axinn, Heather GatnyAbstractSocial processes that change quickly are difficult to study, because they require frequent survey measurement. Weekly, daily, or even hourly measurement may be needed depending on the topic. With more frequent measurement comes the prospect of more complex patterns of missing data. The mechanisms creating the missing data may be varied, ranging from technical issues such as lack of an Internet connection to refusal to complete a requested survey. We examine one approach...
Source: Social Science Research - May 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research