Relationship between optic nerve sheath diameter measured by magnetic resonance imaging, intracranial pressure, and neurological outcome in cardiac arrest survivors who underwent targeted temperature management
Studies on the prognostic performance of optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors (OHCA) have reported conflicting results. We aimed to investigate the usefulness of ONSD measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to estimate its association with intracranial pressure (ICP) and 6-month neurological outcomes in CA survivors treated with targeted temperature management (TTM). (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - October 16, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Changshin Kang, Jin Hong Min, Jung Soo Park, Yeonho You, Insool Yoo, Yong Chul Cho, Wonjoon Jeong, Hong Joon Ahn, Seung Ryu, Jinwoong Lee, Seung Whan Kim, Sung Uk Cho, Se Kwang Oh, In Ho Lee, Byungkook Lee, Donghun Lee, Minjung Kathy Chae Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

May Emoji improve CPR knowledge?
Treatment of extra-hospital cardiac arrest requires prompt intervention. In fact, the shorter the response time, the greater the survival and neurological outcomes.1 Among the factors identified, the response time of a bystander was found to be crucial. Today, there are numerous ways to inform and disseminate cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques to the community and the introduction of numerous smartphone applications have allowed bystanders to intervene early and improve the overall quality of the resuscitation. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - October 15, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Francesco Adami, Maurizio Cecchini Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

DAE RespondER: the Emilia Romagna app for a Regional “community saving lives” system
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is the third leading cause of death in industrialized countries.1 In Italy OHCA has an incidence of 116 per 100,000 population per year: bystander CPR is initiated in 29,7% only of instances; overall, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) occurs in 16,6% with a poor 6.4% survival to hospital discharge.2 Outcome could improve up to four-folds3 if basic life support (BLS) with defibrillation would be provided timely by bystanders, before emergency medical service (EMS) arrival. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - October 15, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Donatella Del Giudice, Federico Semeraro, Giuseppe Ristagno, Cosimo Picoco, Fiorella Cordenons, Oscar Dell ’Arciprete, Fabio Mora, Andrea Scapigliati, Giovanni Gordini Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Reply to: Comment on: “The effect of prehospital critical care on survival following out of hospital cardiac arrest: A prospective observational study”
We thank ter Avest et al. for their interest in our research, which examined the effect of prehospital critical care on survival following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA).1 (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - October 15, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Johannes von Vopelius-Feldt, Richard W Morris, Jonathan Benger Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Comment on: “The effect of prehospital critical care on survival following out of hospital cardiac arrest: A prospective observational study”
We read the article “The effect of pre-hospital critical care on survival following out of hospital cardiac arrest: A prospective observational study”1 with great interest. The authors should be complimented for their effort to answer the question whether or not pre-hospital critical care teams contribute to the su rvival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. In their study, they could not demonstrate a positive association between pre-hospital critical care and survival to hospital discharge, which was their primary endpoint. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - October 15, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: E. ter Avest, D. Bateman, R.M. Lyon Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

The association between lipid profiles and the neurologic outcome in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Lipid profiles are known to be a risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. However, the relationship between lipid profiles and outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors remains unclear. We aimed to examine the association between lipid profiles and neurologic outcome in OHCA survivors. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - October 15, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Hyoung Youn Lee, Dong Hun Lee, Byung Kook Lee, Kyung Woon Jeung, Yong Hun Jung, Jung Soo Park, Jin Hong Min, Yong Il Min Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

The effects of route of admission to a percutaneous coronary intervention centre among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Patients with OHCA who are not transported directly to a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)-capable hospital may eventually undergo an inter-hospital transfer (IHT). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of route of admission to a PCI centre among patients with OHCA. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - October 11, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joohyun Suh, Ki Ok Ahn, Sang Do Shin Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

The frequency and nature of clinician identified medication-related rapid response system calls
This study aimed to determine the frequency and nature of rapid response system (RRS) calls that clinicians perceived were medication-related using RRS quality arm data. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - October 11, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Bianca J. Levkovich, Gordon Bingham, Judit Orosz, D.J. (Jamie) Cooper, Carl M. Kirkpatrick, Michael J. Dooley, Daryl A. Jones Tags: Short paper Source Type: research

Chest-compression-only after drowning: a call for more research
Every now and again a publication appears that challenges long-held beliefs: that by Fukunda and colleagues from Japan, published in the current issue of Resuscitation, is surely one such.1 The authors ’ conclusion, from a large observational study of cases of drowning, is that there was no difference in the one-month neurologically-favourable survival between those victims who received bystander-initiated conventional CPR and those who received compression-only CPR. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - October 10, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Anthony J. Handley Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Influence of comorbidity on survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the United States
Association between survival rate and Elixhauser Comorbidity Index (ECI) among individuals suffering an Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) in the United States (US) (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - October 10, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Deepak Kumar Pasupula, Anusha Ganapati Bhat, Srinidhi J. Meera, Sudeep K. Siddappa Malleshappa Tags: Short paper Source Type: research

Letter by Li et al. Regarding Article, “Optimal timing to measure optic nerve sheath diameter as a prognostic predictor in post-cardiac arrest patients treated with targeted temperature management”
We read with great interest the recent article by Park et al,1 “Optimal timing to measure optic nerve sheath diameter as a prognostic predictor in post-cardiac arrest patients treated with targeted temperature management.” However, we have some concerns in regard to their study conclusion. The authors recommend that performing optic nerve sheath diameter (O NSD) measurement using ultrasonography at 24 h after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), rather than immediately after ROSC, to predict neurologic outcome in post-cardiac arrest patients treated with target temperature management (TTM). (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - October 10, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Li Hui-Ming, Wu Ying, Huang Chao-Li Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Reply to: Optimal timing to measure optic nerve sheath diameter as a prognostic predictor in post-cardiac arrest patients treated with targeted temperature management
Sedatives may reduce intracranial pressure (ICP) by several mechanisms as your points.1 First, they reduce cerebral metabolic rate, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral blood volume. Second, sedation reduce agitation which may cause arterial hypertension and increment ICP. Third, sedatives reduce intrathoracic pressure, which can reduce jugular venous outflow and raise ICP.2 Sedation in traumatic brain injury may reduce both systemic and intracranial hypertension, although one concern with sedative administration is a decrease in systemic blood pressure causing a decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - October 10, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jin Hong Min, Yeonho You, Jung Soo Park Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Timing of Brain Computed Tomography and Accuracy of Outcome Prediction after Cardiac Arrest
Gray-white-matter ratio (GWR) calculated from head CT is a radiologic index of tissue changes associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy after cardiac arrest (CA). Evidence from previous studies indicates high specificity for poor outcome prediction at GWR thresholds of 1.10-1.20. We aimed to determine the relationship between accuracy of neurologic prognostication by GWR and timing of CT. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - October 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kaspar Josche Streitberger, Christian Endisch, Christoph J. Ploner, Robert Stevens, Michael Scheel, Martin Kenda, Christian Storm, Christoph Leithner Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

Ethnic disparities in the incidence and outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A New Zealand observational study
Background: New Zealand (NZ) has an ethnically diverse population. International studies have demonstrated significant differences in health equity by ethnicity; however, there is limited evidence in the context of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in NZ. We investigated whether heath disparities in incidence and outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest exist between NZ ethnic groups.Method: A retrospective observational study was conducted using NZ cardiac arrest registry data for a 2-year period. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - October 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Bridget Dicker, Verity Todd, Bronwyn Tunnage, Andy Swain, Kate Conaglen, Tony Smith, Michelle Brett, Chris Laufale, Graham Howie Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

The usefulness of neuron-specific enolase in cerebrospinal fluid to predict neurological prognosis in cardiac arrest survivors who underwent target temperature management: a prospective observational study
We examined the prognostic performance between CSF NSE and serum NSE levels in out-of-cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors who had undergone target temperature management (TTM). (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - October 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Yeonho You, Jung Soo Park, Jinhong Min, Insool Yoo, Hong Joon Ahn, Yongchul Cho, Seung Ryu, Jinwoong Lee, Seungwhan Kim, Sunguk Cho, Sekwang Oh, Wonjoon Jeong, Changshin Kang, Eungseok Oh, In Ho Lee, Byungkook Lee, Donghun Lee, Chun Song Youn Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

Intraosseous needles in pediatric cadavers: rate of malposition
Intraosseous vascular access is a commonly conducted procedure especially in pediatric resuscitation. Very high success rates for intraosseous (IO) devices are reported. Aim of the study was to describe the rates of malposition of intraosseous needles (ION) in pediatric cadavers via post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT). (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - October 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Daniel Maxien, Stefan Wirth, Oliver Peschel, Alexander Sterzik, Sonja Kirchhoff, Uwe Kreimeier, Maximilian F. Reiser, Fabian G. M ück Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

A Local Neighborhood Volunteer Network Improves Response Times for Simulated Cardiac Arrest
Each minute is crucial in the treatment of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (CA). Immediate chest compressions and early defibrillation are keys to good outcomes. We hypothesized that a coordinated effort of alerting trained local neighborhood volunteers (vols) simultaneously with 911 activation of professional EMS providers would result in substantial decreases in call-to-arrival times, leading to earlier CPR and defibrillation. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 30, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kern KB, TP Colberg, C Wunder, C Newton, MJ Slepian Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

Optimal timing of coronary intervention in patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest without ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI): A systematic review and meta-analysis
Performing immediate coronary angiography (CAG) in patients with a cardiac arrest and a non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) remains a highly debated topic. We performed a meta-analysis aiming to evaluate the influence of immediate, delayed, and no CAG in patients with cardiac arrest and NSTEMI. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 30, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mahmoud Barbarawi, Yazan Zayed, Babikir Kheiri, Owais Barbarawi, Ahmad Al-Abdouh, Harsukh Dhillon, Fatima Rizk, Ghassan Bachuwa, Mohammad L. Alkotob Tags: Review Source Type: research

Stress and decision-making in resuscitation: A systematic review
During resuscitation decisions are made frequently and based on limited information in a stressful environment. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 25, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Christopher James Groombridge, Yesul Kim, Amit Maini, De Villiers Smit, Mark Christopher Fitzgerald Tags: Review Source Type: research

Exercise related sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the young — Pre-mortal characterization of a Swedish nationwide cohort, showing a decline in SCD among athletes
To study the frequency, etiology, and premortal abnormalities in exercise-related sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the young in Sweden. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 24, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Aase Wisten, Mats B örjesson, Peter Krantz, Eva-Lena Stattin Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

Electroencephalographic Patterns Preceding Cardiac Arrest in Neonates Following Cardiac Surgery
To identify EEG changes that could predict impending cardiac arrest (CA) in neonates with congenital heart disease undergoing postoperative continuous EEG monitoring. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 24, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Shavonne L. Massey, Nicholas S. Abend, J. William Gaynor, Daniel J. Licht, Vinay M. Nadkarni, Alexis A. Topjian, Rui Xiao, Maryam Y. Naim Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

Coronary angiographic findings after cardiac arrest in relation to ECG and comorbidity
This study aims to describe the coronary artery findings after cardiac arrest in relation to ECG and comorbidity. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 24, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: R. Lagedal, L. Elfw én, M. Jonsson, E. Lindgren, D. Smekal, L. Svensson, S. James, P. Nordberg, S. Rubertsson Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

Exercise related sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the young – pre-mortal characterization of a Swedish nationwide cohort, showing a decline in SCD among athletes
To study the frequency, etiology, and premortal abnormalities in exercise-related sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the young in Sweden. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 24, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Aase Wisten, Mats B örjesson, Peter Krantz, Eva-Lena Stattin Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

Chest compression release velocity factors during out-of-hospital cardiac resuscitation
Higher chest compression release velocity (CCRV) has been associated with better outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), and patient factors have been associated with variations in chest wall compliance and compressibility. We evaluated whether patient sex, age, weight, and time in resuscitation were associated with CCRV during pre-hospital resuscitation from OHCA. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 24, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Samuel Beger, John Sutter, Tyler Vadeboncoeur, Annemarie Silver, Chengcheng Hu, Daniel W. Spaite, Bentley Bobrow Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

Reply letter to "Machine learning as a supportive tool to recognize cardiac arrest in emergency calls"
We thank Dr. M üller and Dr. Brejnebøl for their interest in our recently published study on machine-learning in cardiac arrest recognition. We appreciate the interest in our publication and are happy to take part in further discussion. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 23, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: S.N. Blomberg Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Reply to: Regional variation in cardiac arrest for patients with sepsis
We appreciate the comments by Drs. Rush and Hertz in response to our paper regarding the regional variation in the incidence and outcomes of sepsis-associated in-hospital cardiac arrest (SA-IHCA) in the United States (US).1,2 The authors have three main remarks on the paper and we would like to discuss them individually. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 23, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Rupak Desai, Tarang Parekh, Bishoy Hanna, Rajesh Sachdeva, Gautam Kumar Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Regional variation in cardiac arrest for patients with sepsis
We read with great interest the recent paper published by Desai et al. regarding their analysis of the regional trends in cardiac arrest for patients with sepsis.1 We complement the authors on an interesting study however there are several limitations in the methodology of the manuscript, along with database limitations that need to be highlighted. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 23, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Barret Rush, Paul Hertz Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Elimination of glutamate using CRRT for 72  h in patients with post-cardiac arrest syndrome: A randomized clinical pilot trial
Glutamine and glutamate are major mediators of secondary brain cell death during post-cardiac arrest syndrome. As there is an equilibrium between brain tissue and plasma concentrations of glutamine and glutamate, their elimination from systemic circulation by extracorporeal blood purification may ultimately lead to reduced secondary cell death in the brain. We hypothesized that systemic glutamine and glutamate can be significantly reduced by continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF). (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 23, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jens Nee, Achim J örres, Alexander Krannich, Christoph Leithner, Tim Schroeder, Anna Lena Munk, Philip Enghard, Christoph Moore, Sonja Steppan, Christian Storm Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 21, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Ultra-early application of prognostic tests for outcome after resuscitation from cardiac arrest
This issue of RESUSCITATION contains a noteworthy article by Scarpino et al.1 that demonstrates that testing within the first 24  h or cardiac arrest provides robust prognostic information. The study was prompted by the need for better prognostic criteria, with 0% false positives (0%FP) for establishing a poor prognosis (CPC of 4 or 5 categories or 3–5 categories; i.e. death/brain death or vegetative state or severe disab ility to death, respectively) at 6 months. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 21, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: G. Bryan Young Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Effect of team-based cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for emergency medical service providers on pre-hospital return of spontaneous circulation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients
This study aimed to assess whether team-based cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training for emergency medical service (EMS) providers improved the pre-hospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) rates of non-traumatic adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 21, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jong-Hak Park, Sungwoo Moon, Hanjin Cho, Eusang Ahn, Tae-kyoung Kim, Bentley J. Bobrow Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

Reply to: Methodological issues in the study of inter-hospital transfer in low-volume and high-volume emergency departments and survival outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
We welcome to the opportunity to reply to PhD Guanghua Tang ’s discussion of our study1. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 21, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeong Ho Park, Seung Chul Lee Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Methodological issues in the study of inter-hospital transfer in low-volume and high-volume emergency departments and survival outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
We read with great interest the article by Park and colleagues,1 who found that inter-hospital transfer (IHT) group had better neurological recovery than the non-IHT group in low-volume emergency departments (LVEDs) visitors, while for the patients in high-volume emergency departments (HVEDs), the IHT group did not show better neurological recovery than the non-IHT group. Though this study sounds scientific, some critical methodological issues should be discussed. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 21, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Guanghua Tang, Xianshi Zhou Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Face mask respiratory support for preterm infants: Takes their breath away?
Descriptions of the revival of apparently lifeless newborn babies pre-date Christian times.1 After some curious diversions – electrocution, rectal insufflation of tobacco smoke, alternate immersion in hot and cold water– breathing support became the mainstay of treatment in the last century. In the 1970’s, a pattern of resuscitating babies emerged based on studies of acutely and profoundly asphyxiated term Rhesus monkeys.2 Courses teaching neonatal resuscitation were developed in the 1980s.3,4 They recommended assessing babies’ breathing and heart rate, and giving positive pressure ventilation (PPV)...
Source: Resuscitation - September 21, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Colm P.F. O ’Donnell Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Comments on: “Machine learning as a supportive tool to recognize cardiac arrest in emergency calls”
We have with great interest read the recent article in Resuscitation entitled “Machine learning as a supportive tool to recognize cardiac arrest in emergency calls” by Blomberg et al. accepted on the 11th of January 2019.1 While the study was interesting and did highlight one possible application for machine learning, we believe the way in which it has been reported is pa rtially misleading and fails to address some concerns, which we would like to comment upon. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 20, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Felix C. M üller, Mathias W. Brejnebøl Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Reply to: “Machine learning as a supportive tool to recognize cardiac arrest in emergency calls”
We have with great interest read the recent article in Resuscitation entitled “Machine learning as a supportive tool to recognize cardiac arrest in emergency calls” by Blomberg et al. accepted on the 11th of January 2019.1 While the study was interesting and did highlight one possible application for machine learning, we believe the way in which it has been reported is pa rtially misleading and fails to address some concerns, which we would like to comment upon. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 20, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Felix C. M üller, Mathias W. Brejnebøl Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Cardioplegia defibrillation of circulatory and metabolic phase ventricular fibrillation in a swine model
We previously found potassium cardioplegia followed by rapid calcium reversal (Kplegia) can achieve defibrillation in a swine model of electrical phase of ventricular fibrillation (VF) comparable to standard care. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 18, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith A. Marill, David D. Salcido, Matthew L. Sundermann, Allison C. Koller, James J. Menegazzi Tags: Experimental paper Source Type: research

Factors associated with return to work among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Although out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major cause of global mortality, survival rates have increased over the last decade. As such, there is an increasing need to explore long-term functional outcomes of survivors, such as return to work (RTW). (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 17, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jason Kearney, Kylie Dyson, Emily Andrew, Stephen Bernard, Karen Smith Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

Prehospital advanced airway management for paediatric patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A nationwide cohort study
Although prehospital advanced airway management (AAM) (i.e., endotracheal intubation [ETI] and insertion of supraglottic airways [SGA]) has been performed for paediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), the effect of AAM has not been fully studied. We evaluated the association between prehospital AAM for paediatric OHCA and patient outcomes. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 17, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Masashi Okubo, Sho Komukai, Junichi Izawa, Koichiro Gibo, Kosuke Kiyohara, Tasuku Matsuyama, Takeyuki Kiguchi, Taku Iwami, Clifton W. Callaway, Tetsuhisa Kitamura Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

High-Quality CPR Training: Let ’s get smart!
High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) delivered by the lay public is a key link in the chain of survival for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Bystander CPR has been associated with higher survival rates in comparison with no CPR both for cardiac1,2 and non-cardiac origin.3 (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 17, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sachin Agarwal, Benjamin S. Abella Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

The futility of resuscitating an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cannot be summarized by three simple criteria
In this study, the authors conducted a retrospective analysis of the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) database and included 1,750 subjects, 223 of whom met all three criteria. In order to a ssess the external validity of these criteria, we applied them on the French National Cardiac Arrest Registry which counted 85,519 OHCAs in March 2018. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 17, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Fran çois Javaudin, Quentin Le Bastard, Jean-Baptiste Lascarrou, Valentine Baert, Hervé Hubert, the GR-RéAC Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

The Cardiac Arrest Survival Score: A Predictive Algorithm for In-Hospital Mortality after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with high mortality. Current methods for predicting mortality post-arrest require data unavailable at the time of initial medical contact. We created and validated a risk prediction model for patients experiencing OHCA who achieved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) which relies only on objective information routinely obtained at first medical contact. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 17, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Prakash Balan, Brian Hsi, Manoj Thangam, Yelin Zhao, Dominique Monlezun, Salman Arain, Konstantinos Charitakis, Abhijeet Dhoble, Nils Johnson, H. Vernon Anderson, David Persse, Mark Warner, Daniel Ostermayer, Samuel Prater, Henry Wang, Pratik Doshi Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

Putting it all together: important links between team performance and CPR quality
Chest compression quality directly impacts patient outcomes from cardiac arrest; thus, ensuring high quality delivery is a crucial component of code team management.1 While evidence-based resuscitation guidelines emphasize CPR quality and health professionals are broadly trained in these skills, performance gaps persist in actual practice, including long pauses in compression delivery.2,3 Teamwork and care coordination during cardiac arrest also has been demonstrated to have an influence on CPR quality. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 17, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lauren W. Conlon, Benjamin S. Abella Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Reply to “the futility of resuscitating an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cannot be summarized by three simple criteria.”
We thank Javaudin et al. for their thoughtful response to our recent publication A simple decision rule predicts futile resuscitation of cardiac arrest, in which they apply our decision rule to the French National Cardiac Arrest Registry. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 17, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nancy K. Glober, Christopher R. Tainter, David Kim Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Chest compression components (rate, depth, chest wall recoil and leaning): a scoping review
To understand whether the science to date has focused on single or multiple chest compression components and identify the evidence related to chest compression components to determine the need for a full systematic review. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 16, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Julie Considine, Ra úl J. Gazmuri, Gavin D Perkins, Peter J. Kudenchuk, Theresa M. Olasveengen, Christian Vaillancourt, Chika Nishiyama, Tetsuo Hatanaka, Mary E. Mancini, Sung Phil Chung, Raffo Escalante-Kanashiro, Peter Morley Tags: Review Source Type: research

Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcome Reports: Update of the Utstein Resuscitation Registry Template for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Utstein-style reporting templates provide a structured framework with which to compare systems of care for cardiac arrest. The 2004 Utstein reporting template encompassed both out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest. A 2015 update of the Utstein template focused on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, which makes this update of the in-hospital template timely. Representatives of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation developed an updated in-hospital Utstein reporting template iteratively by meeting face-to-face, by teleconference, and by online surveys between 2013 and 2018. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 16, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jerry P. Nolan, Robert A. Berg, Lars W. Andersen, Farhan Bhanji, Paul S. Chan, Michael W. Donnino, Swee Han Lim, Matthew Huei-Ming Ma, Vinay M. Nadkarni, Monique A. Starks, Gavin D. Perkins, Peter T. Morley, Jasmeet Soar, On behalf of the Utstein Collabor Tags: Statement paper Source Type: research

Succeeding with rapid response systems — a never-ending process: A systematic review of how health-care professionals perceive facilitators and barriers within the limbs of the RRS
Meta-analyses show that hospital Rapid response systems (RRS) are associated with reduced rates of cardiorespiratory arrest and mortality. However, many RRS fail to provide appropriate outcomes. Thus an improved understanding of how to succeed with a RRS is crucial. By understanding the barriers and facilitators within the limbs of a RRS, these can be addressed. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 13, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Siri Lerst øl Olsen, Eldar Søreide, Ken Hillman, Britt Sætre Hansen Tags: Review Source Type: research

Succeeding with rapid response systems- a never-ending process: A systematic review of how health-care professionals perceive facilitators and barriers within the limbs of the RRS
Meta-analyses show that hospital Rapid response systems (RRS) are associated with reduced rates of cardiorespiratory arrest and mortality. However, many RRS fail to provide appropriate outcomes. Thus an improved understanding of how to succeed with a RRS is crucial. By understanding the barriers and facilitators within the limbs of a RRS, these can be addressed. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 13, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Siri Lerst øl Olsen, Eldar Søreide, Ken Hillman, Britt Sætre Hansen Tags: Review Source Type: research

Cardiac arrest in the intensive care unit: An assessment of preventability
Cardiac arrest in the intensive care unit (ICU-CA) is a common and highly morbid event. We investigated the preventability of ICU-CAs and identified targets for future intervention. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 12, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ari Moskowitz, Katherine M. Berg, Michael N. Cocchi, Maureen Chase, Jesse Yang, Jennifer Sarge, Anne Grossestreuer, Todd Sarge, Sharon O ’ Donoghue, Michael W. Donnino Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research

The effect of a face mask for respiratory support on breathing in preterm infants at birth
Applying a mask on the face for respiratory support could induce a trigeminocardiac reflex leading to apnoea and bradycardia. We have examined the effect of applying a face mask on breathing and heart rate in preterm infants at birth. (Source: Resuscitation)
Source: Resuscitation - September 12, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kristel L.A.M. Kuypers, Tereza Lamberska, Tessa Martherus, Janneke Dekker, Stefan B öhringer, Stuart B. Hooper, Richard Plavka, Arjan B. te Pas Tags: Clinical paper Source Type: research