Is Nitrous Oxide Sedation an Aerosol Generating Procedure?
No abstract available (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Letters to the Editors Source Type: research

Effect of SARS-CoV-2 on the Incidence of Appendicitis: The Role of Quarantine
No abstract available (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Letters to the Editors Source Type: research

Intranasal Ketamine for Treatment of Acute Pain in Pediatrics: A Systematic Review
Conclusions Intranasal ketamine was safe and effective in the 6 clinical studies included in this systematic review. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Chlamydia Conjunctivitis in 2 Prepubertal Children: An Uncommon Presentation of Child Sexual Abuse
This report details the presentation of 2 children with conjunctivitis who were subsequently diagnosed as having C. trachomatis conjunctivitis. One child was also diagnosed as having rectal and pharyngeal C. trachomatis infection, and the other also had genital C. trachomatis infection. Even with multisite C. trachomatis infection as an indication of sexual abuse, neither child gave a detailed disclosure of abuse to account for their infections. The absence of a clear disclosure is not uncommon. Previous literature reports that a disclosure in these circumstances occurs in less than half of cases. In this report, we review...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Illustrative Cases Source Type: research

Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis in Hereditary and Autoimmune Forms With 2 Cases
Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a respiratory pathology characterized by the accumulation and increase of surfactant-derived material in the lungs. In clinical practice, PAP may present as the primary form, which includes autoimmune and hereditary PAP, or as the secondary form. Diffuse alveolar radiopacities on chest x-ray and the crazy-paving pattern on high-resolution computed tomography are important, although not specific findings for PAP. Bronchoalveolar lavage biopsy is a diagnostic method, and whole-lung lavage remains the criterion standard for the treatment of PAP. Evidence is required regarding treatment ...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Illustrative Cases Source Type: research

Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma in an Infant
A spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is a collection of blood in the spinal epidural space that occurs in the absence of trauma. They most commonly present in the fourth to fifth decade in life with acute onset neck or back pain with delayed neurologic deficit. However, this presentation is often complicated in children because of the limitations in the pediatric neurologic exam. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosis. Here is a rare case of an infant spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma whose diagnosis was delayed because of a recent history of fever and viral pharyngitis before his d...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Illustrative Cases Source Type: research

Attitudes and Opinions of Adolescent Females Regarding 2 Methods of Bladder Filling for Transabdominal Ultrasound: A Q-Sort Study
Conclusions Adolescent female patients varied in their attitudes and opinions regarding intravenous catheter hydration and Foley catheter placement for transabdominal ultrasound. Knowledge of adolescent viewpoints may help better inform practitioner-patient communication for this procedure. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Patient Experience in a Spanish Pediatric Emergency Department
Conclusions The patient experience of children in our PED was positive, although some aspects should be improved such as offering entertainment in the waiting area, increasing privacy during the medical visit, and giving better explanations to the children. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Performance of Emergency Medical Service Providers in Pediatric and Adult Simulation of Unstable Supraventricular Tachycardia
Conclusions Emergency medical service providers did not have a significant difference in time to cardioversion between pediatric and adult unstable supraventricular tachycardia simulations. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Topical Ketoprofen Versus Placebo in Children Presenting With Ankle Sprain to the Emergency Department: A Randomized Controlled Study
Conclusions Ketoprofen gel is superior to placebo in ceasing pain in children presenting with ankle sprain to the ED with a high safety profile. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Epidemiology of Admissions From the Emergency Department Among Febrile Infants Younger Than 90 Days in the United States, 2002 to 2012
We examined uncomplicated febrile infants younger than 90 days seen in the ED from 2002 to 2012 who did not have an explicit infectious diagnosis, critical illness, or chronic condition. Results We identified 38,224 infants, among whom, 11,600 (31%) were admitted. We observed a 3% increase in ED admission every year during the study period (P (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Use of Ondansetron for Vomiting After Head Trauma: Does It Mask Clinically Significant Traumatic Brain Injury?
Conclusions Ondansetron use during an initial emergency department visit for head trauma in children not requiring neuroimaging is associated with a higher likelihood of return within 72 hours and subsequent admission. There were no differences in rates of missed skull fractures, intracranial injury, intensive care admission, or operative intervention for groups who were and were not treated with ondansetron; however, this study was underpowered to detect significant differences in these categories. Future investigations with greater numbers would be required to confidently assess these critical differences. (Source: Ped...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Implications of Increased Weight Status for the Occurrence of Fall-Induced Intracranial Hemorrhage in Children Aged 4 Years or Younger
Conclusions Increased weight status is associated with fall-induced ICH in children aged 4 years or younger. Information on weight status could be potentially helpful in predicting ICH in young children with fall-induced head injury. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Point-of-Care Ultrasound to Assess Gastric Content
Gastric ultrasound (US) is a growing modality within the point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) field. It provides the ability to directly measure an individual patient's gastric content and has potential use as both a clinical and a research tool. Here, we review the historical development of current gastric US models and their clinical application within the field of general anesthesia, describe the US findings and technique for using POCUS to assess gastric content, and discuss the current and potential applications of gastric POCUS within the emergency department. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Ultrasound Case Review Source Type: research

Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Meningitis and Encephalitis—Biofire
No abstract available (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: CME Review Article Source Type: research

Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Meningitis and Encephalitis—BioFire
Meningitis and encephalitis (ME) are important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Patients suspected of having ME are often hospitalized and started on empiric antimicrobial treatment, because of the potential adverse consequences of delaying the diagnosis or treatment. Multiplexed polymerase chain reaction panels are one of several rapid diagnostic technologies that have the potential to overcome some of the limitations of conventional diagnostic methods for ME. The BioFire FilmArray Meningitis/Encephalitis Panel was the first Food and Drug Administration–cleared multiplex polymerase chain reaction for the...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: CME Review Article Source Type: research

Hospital-Based Emergency Department Visits With Pediatric Burns: Characteristics and Outcomes
Conclusions Pediatric burn injuries require significant resources for stabilization and treatment by EDs. The present study highlights the burden and impact of pediatric burn injuries in the United States. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Interhospital Transport of Pediatric Patients in Denmark: A Survey of Current Practice
Conclusions Great heterogeneity was found in the local transport strategies and practical skill sets of accompanying physicians. Overall, there is room for improvement in the management of interhospital transport of critically ill children in Denmark, perhaps by increasing the availability of specialized pediatric transport services for critically ill children nationwide. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

The Utility of a Travel Screen at Triage in Pediatric Emergency Medicine
Background The travel screen was implemented by emergency departments (EDs) across the country in 2014 to detect patients exposed to Ebola early and prevent local outbreaks. It remains part of the triage protocol in many EDs to detect communicable disease from abroad and has become a defacto screen for other travel-related illness. Its utility has not been studied in the pediatric ED. Methods This was a retrospective review of electronic medical records across 3 EDs from January 1, 2016, to December 31, 2016. The screening question reads, “Has the child or a close contact of the child traveled outside the United...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

A Study of Red Cell Distribution Width in Neonatal Sepsis
The objective of this study was to evaluate a new nontraditional value of the red cell distribution width (RDW) in predicting the clinical outcome of neonatal sepsis. Methods In this retrospective study, data were collected from the medical files of 500 full-term neonates with a diagnosis of early onset or late onset sepsis. Baseline RDW and other traditional biomarkers, including C-reactive protein (CRP), total leucocytic count, and platelet count were analyzed in light of the clinical data. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. Results Red cell distribution width was significantly higher in nonsurvivors compare...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Variation in the Presentation of Intussusception by Age
Conclusions Intussusception presents differently in children younger than 24 months compared with older children. “Traditional” clinical predictors of intussusception should be interpreted with caution when assessing children older than 2 years. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

The Differential Diagnosis of Vertigo in Children: A Systematic Review of 2726 Cases
Conclusions Although the most common causes of pediatric vertigo include vestibular migraine and benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood, the etiologies are myriad. Rates and credible intervals are provided to permit a probabilistic diagnostic approach to these children. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

New Oxidative Stress Markers Useful in the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis in Children: Thiol/Disulfide Homeostasis and the Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Level
Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate 2 new oxidative stress markers, thiol/disulfide homeostasis status and the asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) level, in children with acute appendicitis (AA) and to evaluate their diagnostic utility. Methods This case-control study included 45 patients with AA and 35 healthy children. Age, sex, white blood cell count, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) level, ultrasonographic findings, thiol/disulfide homeostasis parameters (native and total thiol levels, native thiol/total thiol ratios [antioxidant parameters], and disulfide, d...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Does Specialty Training and Practice Setting Affect Adherence to the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network Criteria for Pediatric Head Trauma?
Objective The goal was to determine the effects of specialty training and practice settings on the adherence to the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) criteria. Methods A retrospective study was conducted on a 2-campus hospital. Chart documentation was used to determine adherence to PECARN criteria. Inclusion criteria were any traumatic head injury within 24 hours in patients younger than 18 years over a 1-year period. Specialty training was subdivided into 3 groups: pediatric emergency medicine, emergency medicine (EM), and general pediatrics. The 2 hospital campuses are distinctly different p...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - August 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

How Often Does Witnessed Shaking Cause Intracranial Injuries?
No abstract available (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Letters to the Editors Source Type: research

High Risk of Bias in a Systematic Review of Rib Fractures and Abuse by Paine et al (2019)
No abstract available (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Letters to the Editors Source Type: research

Liquid Nicotine Intoxication Due to Dangerous Packaging
No abstract available (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Letters to the Editors Source Type: research

A Response to “Pediatric Referrals to an Emergency Department From Urgent Care Centers”
No abstract available (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Letters to the Editors Source Type: research

Feedback at the Point of Care to Decrease Medication Alert Rates in an Electronic Health Record
Conclusions User-centered, context-specific alert feedback can be used for selecting suboptimal, interruptive medication alerts. Frequently overridden alerts in the electronic health record can highlight alerts that may need revision. This method is a way of fine-tuning clinical decision support. We evaluated the feasibility of a complementary, yet different method that directly involved pediatric emergency department (PED) providers in identifying additional medication alerts that were potentially incorrect or intrusive. We then evaluated the effect subsequent resulting modifications had on alert salience. (Source: Ped...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: IT in the ED Source Type: research

Health Equity Demands Health Literacy: Ethics in the Pediatric Emergency Department
The ability of the patient or the parent, in pediatrics, to read, understand, and act upon health information is termed health literacy. Health literacy has been shown to be of primary importance when determining a patient's ability to achieve optimal health. As physicians, we often fail to recognize the enormous obstacles facing our patients. In the pediatric emergency department (PED), communication is complicated. Physicians must be able to effectively relay information to the patient's caregiver while still not forgetting to provide developmentally appropriate instructions to the child. Individuals who do not have a go...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

A 7-Year-Old Boy With Recurring Episodes of Abdominal Pain
Recurrent abdominal pain is a relatively common complaint in children who present to the emergency department. The etiology is often thought to be psychogenic, with an underlying organic cause present in less than 10% of patients. Intermittent ureteropelvic junction obstruction is usually not considered in the differential diagnosis of recurrent acute abdominal pain in children, which can cause a significant delay in diagnosis. In this condition, intermittent obstruction of the flow of urine from the renal pelvis to the proximal ureter occurs, which causes intermittent acute colicky abdominal pain and vomiting. This acute ...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Illustrative Cases Source Type: research

Stiff Neck and Drooling in a Young Girl
A 3-year-old girl was brought to the emergency department 4 days after she was playing with a button battery and subsequently had a choking episode. The patient was seen immediately at a different emergency department and was discharged home after a normal chest x-ray finding and able to tolerate an oral challenge with liquids. She was later evaluated by her primary care physician and started on amoxicillin for possible pharyngitis. On examination in our emergency department, the patient had pooling of secretions and was unwilling to range her neck due to pain. Soft tissue neck x-ray confirmed a 20-mm button battery in the...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Illustrative Cases Source Type: research

Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Due to Ventricular Fibrillation in a 5-Year-Old Pediatric Patient
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in pediatric population is rare and predominantly has respiratory aetiology. Authors present the relatively unique case of out-of hospital cardiac arrest in 5-years old pediatric patient due to ventricular fibrillation (VF) as the initial rhythm during the advanced life support. The patient was resuscitated by his parents and the initial rhythm was VF. After defibrillation the patient was admitted to the pediatric intensive care were another two episodes of VF was detected and treated. After standard postresuscitation care, patient was weaned from sedation and extubated with good neurologic o...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Illustrative Cases Source Type: research

Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus in Childhood: Assessment of Volume Status and Appropriate Fluid Replenishment
Patients affected by nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) can present with hypernatremic dehydration, and first-line rehydration schemes are completely different from those largely applied in usual conditions determining a mild to severe hypovolemic dehydration/shock. In reporting the case of a patient affected by NDI and presenting with severe dehydration triggered by acute pharyngotonsillitis and vomiting, we want to underline the difficulties in managing this condition. Restoring the free-water plasma amount in patients affected by NDI may not be easy, but some key points can help in the first line management of these p...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Illustrative Cases Source Type: research

Oculocardiac Reflex in a Pediatric Trauma Patient
We describe the case of a 6-year-old boy who presented to a tertiary care emergency department after a motor vehicle accident with facial trauma and bradycardia. The patient was found to have an orbital floor fracture and inferior rectus muscle entrapment with resulting bradycardia secondary to the oculocardiac reflex. The oculocardiac reflex is an uncommon cause of bradycardia in the setting of trauma but should be considered because it can necessitate surgical intervention. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Illustrative Cases Source Type: research

Intentional Asphyxiation Using Baby Wipes: A Case Report and Review of the Literature
We present the case of a 2-month-old infant with colic who was forcibly suffocated with a baby wipe by a female babysitter. He presented to the emergency department in respiratory distress, and the foreign body was removed in the operating room by otorhinolaryngology. He was found to have intraoral lacerations and a left diaphyseal humeral fracture. To our knowledge, there is only 1 other collection of case reports of abusive suffocation with baby wipes. This case highlights the importance of considering abuse in cases of oral injury and foreign body aspiration in pediatric patients. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Illustrative Cases Source Type: research

Assessment of Emergency Department Antibiotic Discharge Prescription Dosing Errors for Pediatric Patients in a Community Hospital Health System
Conclusions Underdosing of amoxicillin in acute otitis media was a dosing error that occurred frequently throughout our community health system. Further research is needed to identify the clinical impact these errors have on pediatric patients. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Management of Croup in the Emergency Department: The Role of Multidose Nebulized Epinephrine
Objectives Croup occasionally requires medical intervention for respiratory distress. Mainstays of treatment are corticosteroids and nebulized epinephrine. Diagnosis and assessment of severity remain clinical. Safety of discharge from an emergency department (ED) after treatment with corticosteroids and 1 nebulized epinephrine has been established. No evidence exists regarding risk associated with discharge after multidose nebulized epinephrine. Many patients requiring multidose nebulized epinephrine are reflexively admitted. The purpose of this study was to provide a descriptive analysis of the current management of cro...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Adolescent Sexual Behavior and Emergency Department Use
Conclusion Adolescents who reported engaging in high-risk sexual behaviors were less likely to identify a PCP, as well as more likely to prefer ED-based care and make more ED visits. However, ED clinicians infrequently obtained sexual histories and performed STI testing in asymptomatic youth, thereby missing opportunities to screen high-risk adolescents who may lack access to preventive care. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Use of Complementary Health Approaches for Acute Complaints Presenting to the Emergency Department
This study aimed to determine the prevalence of complementary health approaches (CHAs) specifically for acute complaints in patients assessed in a pediatric emergency department (ED) and factors associated with use. Methods A cross-sectional survey was offered to patients between the age of 28 days and 18 years assessed at a tertiary pediatric ED between December 2014 and July 2015. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify variables associated with CHA use. Results Of 475 potential participants, 412 (86.7%) participated, of which 369 (89.5%) completed the survey. Overall, 28.7% (95% conf...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Patients at High Risk of Intervention for Pediatric Traumatic Liver Injury
Conclusions We identified 5 high-risk criteria associated with intervention for traumatic liver laceration in pediatric patients. Prospective studies are necessary to validate these results before using them to determine disposition of pediatric patients with traumatic liver injuries. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Promethazine and Oral Midazolam Preanesthetic Children Medication
Conclusions This study shows that both test groups reduce stress at the time of anesthetic induction and separation from their parents with similar effect. Both of the anesthetics are easily administered without the necessity of an additional equipment. A shorter period to maximal sedation for midazolam is an advantage, thus, making the drug helpful, mostly in the outpatient setting. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Does the Use of a Vein Visualization Device for Peripheral Venous Catheter Placement Increase Success Rate in Pediatric Patients?: Erratum
No abstract available (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Erratum Source Type: research

Abdominal Pain in a Young Female Adolescent: Point-of-Care Ultrasound Added Value
An adolescent female patient presented to the emergency department with diffuse, severe lower abdominal pain and vomiting. The initial suspected diagnosis was appendicitis. Point-of-care ultrasound did not visualize the appendix but demonstrated a suspected left ovarian torsion, which was confirmed by radiology-performed ultrasound. The clinical presentation, in combination with images obtained via point-of-care ultrasound, helped to expedite gynecology consultation and immediate surgery. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Ultrasound Case Review Source Type: research

Appendectomy or Not? An Update on the Evidence for Antibiotics Only Versus Surgery for the Treatment of Acute Appendicitis in Children
No abstract available (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: CME Review Article Source Type: research

Appendectomy or Not? An Update on the Evidence for Antibiotics Only Versus Surgery for the Treatment of Acute Appendicitis in Children
Appendicitis is a common diagnosis in children being evaluated in the emergency department. After diagnosis, standard treatment has been surgical appendectomy; however, in recent years there is a growing body of evidence evaluating the possibility of nonoperative management in both children and adults. This review will present the current state of the pediatric literature that suggests patients may be successfully treated with antibiotics alone (ie, without surgery), but that a proportion of these patients will have recurrent appendicitis. Given that the literature regarding the option of antibiotic-only management compare...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: CME Review Article Source Type: research

Implementation of an Innovative, Multiunit, Postevent Debriefing Program in a Children's Hospital
Conclusions Several departments at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia have incorporated hot and cold debriefings into their clinical practice as part of their continuous quality improvement programs. By disseminating the tools and lessons learned from the implementation process, the collaborative hopes that other institutions will benefit from their lessons learned to successfully create their own debriefing programs. Widespread adoption of debriefing programs will enable a more scientific approach to studying the outcomes of debriefing. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Research-QI Source Type: research

A Relationship Between Clinical and Laboratory Characteristics in Children With Severe Scorpion Envenomation in Çukurova, Turkey
Objective Scorpion stings are an important health problem in many parts of the world. The aim of this study was to retrospectively examine cases of scorpion stings to evaluate their epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory features and to determine strategies that can reduce morbidity and mortality in these cases. Methods Scorpion stings experienced by children between 2007 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were categorized into groups based on severities of toxicities, and demographic, clinical, and laboratory features were compared between the groups. Results The mean ± SD age of the 18...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Diagnostic Value of Serum Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor in Children With Acute Appendicitis
Conclusions The incorporation of uPAR count and ANC could be a strong predictor of AA in children. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

How Much Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Does a Pediatric Emergency Provider Perform in 1 Year? A Video-Based Analysis
Conclusions Performing CCs on children in the ED is a rare event, with a median of 3 minutes per provider per year. Future studies should determine training methods to optimize readiness for these rare occurrences. (Source: Pediatric Emergency Care)
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - July 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research