Editorial Board
(Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Updates on activities of tEACH, the teaching subcommittee of EACH
(Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Qualitative methods can test and challenge what we think we know about clinical communication – if they are not too constrained by methodological ‘brands’
Because clinical communication is the vehicle for health care,the rigour of the scientific discipline that studies and shapes it is crucial for the quality of health care in the future. Claims to rigour in clinical communication science have tended to rest on quantitative methods. For instance, findings that surgeons miss 62% of ‘empathic opportunities’ are embedded in the discipline as evidence that doctors’ communication with patients is too doctor-centred [1]. However, quantifying clinical communication provides less certainty than is sometimes appreciated. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Peter Salmon, Bridget Young Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Take Charge, Get Cured: The development and user testing of a culturally targeted mHealth decision tool on HCV treatment initiation for methadone patients
An estimated 150 million people have chronic hepatitis C infection (HCV) [1], 3.5 million of whom live in the United States [2]. Half are thought to be unaware of their status since many experience no adverse symptoms of infection until late in progression [3], but 20% will develop cirrhosis, 10% end-stage liver disease or cancer, and approximately 3% will require a liver transplant or die [4]. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Sarah Bauerle Bass, Amy Jessop, Muhamed Gashat, Laurie Maurer, Mohammed Al Hajji, Jon Forry Source Type: research

Barrier-belief lifestyle counseling in primary care: a randomized controlled trial of efficacy
Engaging in regular moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (PA) and a healthy daily diet are both associated with physical and mental well-being [1 –3], as well as reduced risk of all-cause mortality from lifestyle-related chronic diseases and premature death [4–7]. However, in Western societies the majority of the population is not sufficiently engaged in PA [8], and a high percentage of people across the world fail to meet recommendations for a healthy diet [9,10]. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Adrie J. Bouma, Paul van Wilgen, Koen APM Lemmink, Roy Stewart, Arie Dijkstra, Ron L Diercks Source Type: research

Beyond words: What can help first year medical students practice effective empathic communication?
Teaching medical students in empathic communication is a core objective of clinical skills training in medical school, as it is well documented that a positive relationship exists between empathy and enhanced patient outcomes, including satisfaction with and trust in their healthcare provider [1 –4]. In addition, displaying compassion is perceived by nurses, patients and physicians alike as a central component of professional behavior [5]. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jennifer B. Plotkin, Robert Shochet Source Type: research

Current decisions on neoadjuvant chemotherapy for early breast cancer: experts ’ experiences in the Netherlands
Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is an important initial strategy for the management of operable breast cancer (BC). In accordance with international guidelines, the Dutch national breast cancer guideline recommends NAC as an option for all patients aged5  cm) to increase resectability and the rate of breast conserving surgery and axillary preserving surgery [5]. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: P.E.R. Spronk, K.M. de Ligt, A.C.M. van Bommel, S. Siesling, C.H. Smorenburg, M.T.F.D. Vrancken Peeters, On behalf of the NABON Breast Cancer Audit Source Type: research

Patient Preferences for the Delivery of Cardiac Rehabilitation
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death globally [1] and in Australia [2]. In 2015, CVD accounted for 45,392 or 29% of all deaths in Australia [3]. A high proportion of CVD events occur in people already diagnosed with Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) with one in four people having a repeat event [4]. These repeat events have a high risk of death, 21% for women and 14% for men [5]. In Australia the cost of repeat Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) events exceeded $8 billion in 2010 with predictions that the number of hospitalisations due to repeat events is likely to increase by more than 30% by 2020 [5]. (Source...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Mary Boyde, Jenny Rankin, Jennifer A. Whitty, Robyn Peters, Julie Holliday, Charmaine Baker, Rita Hwang, Donna Lynagh, Dariusz Korczyk Source Type: research

Development of the Knowledge of Genome Sequencing (KOGS) Questionnaire
Whole-genome sequencing is gradually being incorporated widely into research and clinical care. For whole-genome sequencing to be integrated effectively and safely it is important that individuals make informed choices before consenting. For informed decision-making there are several patient-reported factors [1], of which knowledge is a central component [2]. It is important that measures of knowledge about whole-genome sequencing are available so that healthcare providers can evaluate whether patients are making informed choices about having whole-genome sequencing done. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Saskia C Sanderson, Bao Sheng Loe, Maddie Freeman, Camila Gabriel, Danielle Stevenson, Chris Gibbons, Lyn Chitty, Celine Lewis Source Type: research

A Psychometric Study of the Decisional Conflict Scale in Surrogate Decision Makers
As institutions look to adopt programs and processes that promote shared decision-making, it is important to find measures that adequately assess how such interventions affect patients ’ or surrogates’ ability to make treatment decisions. The Decisional Conflict Scale (DCS) can be a helpful tool because it measures decision uncertainty, the factors that contribute to uncertainty, and perceived effective decision-making [1]. The DCS was originally evaluated in populations makin g decisions about influenza immunization and breast cancer screening, and the scale was found to be both valid and reliable [1]. (Source...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Kristen E. Pecanac, Roger. L. Brown, Jay Steingrub, Wendy Anderson, Michael A. Matthay, Douglas B. White Source Type: research

An integrated experiential training programme with coaching to promote physical activity, and reduce fatigue among children with cancer: A randomised controlled trial
Cancer-related fatigue is the most commonly reported symptom in children with cancer [1] and negatively affects their quality of life (QoL) [2]. Despite strong evidence that regular physical activity reduces fatigue [3], most children with cancer experience a decline in physical activity levels after diagnosis [3,4]. Physical inactivity induces muscle catabolism and atrophy, which further deteriorate cancer-related fatigue [5]. Health education alone may be insufficient to alter children ’s behaviour [6]. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Katherine K.W. Lam, William H.C. Li, O.K. Chung, K.Y. Ho, S.Y. Chiu, H.S. Lam, Godfrey C.F. Chan Source Type: research

Creating Space to Discuss End-of-Life Issues in Cancer Care
As patient-centered care1 becomes routine in the provision of modern, quality healthcare [1 –5], shared decision making (SDM) and patient-centered communication (PCC) are promoted as key vehicles for meeting the standard. [6–8]. As a consequence, attention has increasingly been paid to the patient-physician interactions, to ensure that a patient’s voice, agency, and rights are consid ered. Despite the concerns, this ideological shift has met major impediments [9] and is unrealized in routine practice. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Dagoberto Cortez, Douglas W. Maynard, Toby C. Campbell Source Type: research

Various experiences and preferences of Dutch parents in prenatal counseling in extreme prematurity
Prospective parents should receive prenatal counseling to be informed about potential risks and outcomes of babies who are extremely premature, and about treatment modalities (active care or palliative comfort care). This is an essential but challenging task for professionals in perinatal care. According to several international recommendations on care in extreme prematurity, parents should have a role in decision-making [1 –3]. So stated the Dutch guideline from 2010 on perinatal practice in extreme premature delivery, requiring informed consent of parents when initiating intensive care at 24 weeks GA [4]. (Source: ...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Rosa Geurtzen, Jos Draaisma, Rosella Hermens, Hubertina Scheepers, Mallory Woiski, Arno van Heijst, Marije Hogeveen Source Type: research

Impact of a Brief Faculty Training to Improve Patient-Centered Communication while Using Electronic Health Records
As clinicians increasingly integrate Electronic Health Records (EHRs) into clinical practice, it is important to consider the impact of EHR use on patient-doctor communication. While benefits of computerization in health care are well described, important drawbacks exist [1]. Some studies found that EHR use can prevent doctors from focusing on patients, impede communication, and be detrimental to the patient –doctor communication [2–5]. When providers use the EHR, negative behaviors such as poor eye contact, prolonged screen gazing, and typing during sensitive discussions can emerge and have been found to under...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Wei Wei Lee, Maria L. Alkureishi, J. Harry Isaacson, Mark Mayer, Richard M. Frankel, Daniel A. London, Kristen E. Wroblewski, Vineet M. Arora Source Type: research

Associations of Collective Self-Help Activity, Health Literacy and Quality of Life in Patients with Tinnitus
This study analyzes whether SHG-participation is associated with tinnitus-related Health Literacy (HLit) and Quality of Life (QoL). (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Christopher Kofahl Source Type: research

Online health information seeking by adults hospitalized for acute coronary syndromes: who looks for information, and who discusses it with healthcare providers?
In 2013, nearly three-quarters of adults using the Internet (online adults) in the United States looked online for health information.[1] Among adults generally, online information-seeking differs across groups, such as those defined by sex, age, and or education.[2,3] It has long been known that the quality of health information online varies widely,[4,5] and the widespread accessibility of inaccurate and potentially harmful health information on the Internet emphasizes the importance of communication between patients and healthcare providers. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Molly E. Waring, David D. McManus, Daniel J. Amante, Chad E. Darling, Catarina I. Kiefe Source Type: research

Treatment decision making involving patients with dementia in acute care: A scoping review
Older persons with dementia (PWD) are frequently treated in acute care settings, with prevalence estimates of up to 40% [1], where they may receive aggressive, nonbeneficial care [2,3]. About 10% of nursing home residents with advanced cognitive impairment, including dementia, are admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) [2] and half of patients with advanced dementia who receive mechanical ventilation die within 30 days of admission [3]. Decisions about initiating or limiting certain treatments or care (a “treatment decision”) occur frequently at the end of life but may occur at any stage of the disease. (Sou...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Kristen E. Pecanac, Mary Wyman, Amy J.H. Kind, Corrine I. Voils Source Type: research

The impact of the use of video-based educational interventions on patient outcomes in hospital settings: A scoping review
The World Health Organization recognizes that patient education is essential for improving patient participation in disease management [1]. According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, more than 50% of adults and nearly 90% of seniors in Canada have difficulty in reading or understanding the information provided with their medical prescriptions [2]. It has also been shown that lower health literacy is consistently associated with increased hospitalization, emergency care visits, and non-adherence to patient medication regimes [3]. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Murtaza Dahodwala, Rose Geransar, Julie Babione, Jill de Grood, Peter Sargious Source Type: research

Perceived Advantages and Disadvantages of Oral Anticoagulants, and the Trade-offs Patients Make in Choosing Anticoagulant Therapy and Adhering to Their Drug Regimen
Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) is proven to be highly effective for stroke prevention in patients suffering from atrial fibrillation (AF) [1,2]. Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), particularly warfarin, which is the most commonly used VKA, have long been the standard of care to prevent AF-related stroke [3]. However, in recent years the European Medicines Agency has approved a number of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) as (possible) alternatives to VKAs. The perceived benefits of DOACs include their high efficacy and low risk of bleeding, the rapid onset/offset of action, fewer food and drug interactions, and predictable ph...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Melissa C.W. Vaanholt, Marieke G.M. Weernink, Clemens von Birgelen, Catharina G.M. Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Maarten J. Ijzerman, Janine A. van Til Source Type: research

Accelerating Implementation of Shared Decision-Making in the Netherlands: An Exploratory Investigation
Shared decision-making (SDM) combines patient-centered communication skills with evidence-based medicine to achieve high-quality patient care [1]. It facilitates a process of collaboration and deliberation, based on “team talk,” “option talk,” and “decision talk” [2]. Professionals may use several steps and accompanying communication strategies to implement SDM [3]. While there is convincing evidence for the use of patient decision aids to support SDM [4], most of these aids have not subsequently be en implemented in the complexity of clinical practice. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - July 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Haske van Veenendaal, Trudy van der Weijden, Dirk T. Ubbink, Anne M. Stiggelbout, Linda A. van Mierlo, Carina G.J.M. Hilders Source Type: research

The Evaluation of a Brief Motivational Intervention to Promote Intention to Participate in Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Cardiovascular disease (CVD), to which acute coronary syndrome (ACS; myocardial infarction, unstable angina) is a major contributor [1], represents the leading cause of global mortality [2]. CVD is also responsible for reduced quality of life and substantial annual healthcare costs [3,4]. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is an empirically supported treatment to address risk factors and reduce mortality associated with CVD, and ACS in particular [5,6]. There is clear evidence of improved morbidity, survival, psychological distress, and cost-effectiveness resulting from CR [7 –10], but its therapeutic benefits and full popu...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Codie R. Rouleau, Kathryn M. King-Shier, Lianne M. Tomfohr-Madsen, Simon L. Bacon, Sandeep Aggarwal, Ross Arena, Tavis S. Campbell Source Type: research

Fertility patients demonstrate an unmet need for the provision of psychological information: a cross sectional study
Infertility, defined as the inability to conceive after 12 months of unprotected sexual intercourse, affects approximately 11 to 16 % of Canadian couples [1]. The psychological consequences of infertility, such as increased stress, anxiety, depressive symptomatology, and stigma have been well documented [2 –4]. In addition to being distressed because of involuntary childlessness, a fertility patient may also experience stress because of the physically arduous and time-consuming nature of their treatment [5,6]. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Shrinkhala Dawadi, Janet Takefman, Phyllis Zelkowitz Source Type: research

Should patients still be copied into their letters? A rapid review
The World Health Organisation (WHO) framework identifies five overarching strategies to encourage health services across the globe to become better integrated and more people-centred (Box 1). The first strategy describes the need to engage and empower people and communities in decision-making about their health [1]. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Emma Harris, Priyanka Rob, Janet Underwood, Peter Knapp, Felicity Astin Tags: Review article Source Type: research

On how to define and measure SDM
In their paper in this issue of PEC, Callon et al. introduce an expanded framework to define and measure shared decision making (SDM) between clinicians and parents making decisions about elective otolaryngology surgery for their children [1]. They aim to allow for a more comprehensive understanding and analysis of SDM. Their endeavor to develop the coding scheme was based on their felt need to supplement the more theoretical ‘top-down’ approach through which existing coding schemes often were developed with a descriptive ‘bottom-up’ approach, based on observation of patient-clinician dialogue. (Sou...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Arwen H. Pieterse, Hanna Bomhof-Roordink, Anne M. Stiggelbout Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Decision satisfaction among women choosing a method of pregnancy termination in the setting of fetal anomalies and other pregnancy complications: A qualitative study
Between 2% and 3% of all births are complicated by a major congenital anomaly [1]. When anomalies are diagnosed prenatally, many women will choose to terminate the pregnancy [2 –4]. Because prenatal diagnoses of fetal anomalies are most often made in the second trimester, terminations for these reasons typically occur between 14 and 24 weeks’ gestation. Other pregnancy complications such as maternal illness, preterm premature rupture of membranes prior to fetal viabili ty or fetal demise also may prompt a woman to seek termination services; these can occur at any time during pregnancy, including the second trim...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jennifer L. Kerns, Alexis Light, Vanessa Dalton, Blair McNamara, Jody Steinauer, Miriam Kuppermann Source Type: research

Motivational interviewing training for medical students: a pilot pre-post feasibility study
Current ideas in medical ethics favour the promotion of greater patient autonomy, placing patients at the heart of the healthcare system [1]. Practitioners must seek to establish a therapeutic alliance with patients, encouraging them to accept care or adopt healthier behaviours. The practitioner ’s empathy towards the patient is a determining factor in therapeutic management [2–4]. The use of patient-centred communication by physicians and the training of medical students in communication skills are also associated with higher levels of satisfaction and lower levels of psychological dis tress in patients, espec...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Antoine Ch éret, Christine Durier, Nicolas Noël, Katia Bourdic, Chantal Legrand, Catherine D’Andréa, Evelyne Hem, Cécile Goujard, Patrick Berthiaume, Silla M. Consoli Source Type: research

Do Visual Aids Influenced Patients ’ Risk Perceptions for Rare and Very Rare Risks?
Patients with rheumatic diseases are being increasingly asked to participate in treatment decisions with their physicians. This is especially true for clinical scenarios in which multiple options exist, such as escalating care to treat-to-target in rheumatoid arthritis. In order to effectively participate in medical decisions, patients must be able to differentiate between competing risks. While informed decision making does not require patients to be able to recall specific verbatim numeric information, it does require patients to be able to distinguish between a rare and very rare (e.g., 1% versus a 0.1%) probability of ...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Liana Fraenkel, Valerie Reyna, Raluca Cozmuta, Diana Cornell, Julia Nolte, Evan Wilhelms Source Type: research

Affective communication during bad news consultation. Effect on analogue patients ’ heart rate variability and recall
The communication of an incurable cancer diagnosis has many implications for patients. While experiencing an intense emotional involvement related to their future perspective, patients are often asked to take quick decisions about their health. As a consequence feelings of anxiety, apprehension and nervousness are frequently reported [1,2]. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Olivia Purnima Danzi, Cinzia Perlini, Federico Tedeschi, Mimma Nardelli, Alberto Greco, Enzo Pasquale Scilingo, Gaetano Valenza, Lidia Del Piccolo Source Type: research

What adolescents living with long-term conditions say about being involved in decision-making about their healthcare: A systematic review and narrative synthesis of preferences and experiences
Adolescence is a critical period of psychosocial development in which people experience a change in interpersonal roles, responsibilities and identity [1,2]. Unsurprisingly, these years can be more complex for those living with a long-term health condition (LTC). Adolescents with LTCs increasingly take on self-management responsibility, sometimes doing the majority of self-care tasks by the age of 13 [3 –7]. However, self-management and health outcomes of patients with LTCs often decline during adolescence, which can lead to increased likelihood health complications and hospital admissions [7–9]. (Source: Patie...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Amber Jordan, Fiona Wood, Adrian Edwards, Victoria Shepherd, Natalie Joseph-Williams Tags: Review article Source Type: research

Improving informed consent in cardiac surgery by enhancing preoperative education
‘Informed consent’ refers to the process of providing patients with sufficient information that allows them to make a voluntary and informed decision whether to undergo or forego a procedure, provided that the information given is capable of being understood by the patient [1]. They need to be w ell informed to be able to participate in decision making as patients who are actively involved in their own health care experience better health outcomes while incurring lower healthcare costs [2–4]. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Claudia Villanueva, Arpit Talwar, Mathew Doyle Tags: Review article Source Type: research

Affective communication during bad news consultation: effect on analogue patients' heart rate variability and recall
The communication of an incurable cancer diagnosis has many implications for patients. While experiencing an intense emotional involvement related to their future perspective, patients are often asked to take quick decisions about their health. As a consequence feelings of anxiety, apprehension and nervousness are frequently reported [1 –2]. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Olivia Purnima Danzi, Cinzia Perlini, Federico Tedeschi, Mimma Nardelli, Alberto Greco, Enzo Pasquale Scilingo, Gaetano Valenza, Lidia Del Piccolo Source Type: research

A path model linking health literacy, medication self-efficacy, medication adherence, and glycemic control
Diabetes was the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S in 2014, affecting at least 29.1 million people [1]. Diabetes care is so costly that approximately every $1 in $5 health care dollars in the U.S was spent on caring for patients with diagnosed diabetes [2]. Individuals with diabetes spend 2.3 times more in terms of health care expenditures than those without diabetes in the U.S[2]. Though the US Department of Health and Human Services has made much effort in preventing diabetes incidence and improving the prognosis of patients with diabetes, the cost of diabetes care has steadily risen over the past ten years[3]. (Sour...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Yen-Ming Huang, Olayinka O. Shiyanbola, Hsun-Yu Chan Source Type: research

Shared decision-making in older patients with colorectal or pancreatic cancer: determinants of patients ’ and observers’ perceptions
The number of older patients qualifying for oncologic treatment is rising. Due to concomitant co-morbidity and frailty among many of these patients, physicians are faced with increasingly complex treatment decision-making processes [1 –3]. Major surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy in (frail) older cancer patients result in significant risks of complications that may jeopardize patients’ quality of life (QOL) and functioning. Colorectal (CRC) and pancreatic cancer (PC) resections in older patients are illustrative examples of high-risk procedures where treatment decision-making should be balanced on individu...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Noralie H Geessink, Eirik H. Ofstad, Marcel G.M. Olde Rikkert, Harry van Goor, J ürgen Kasper, Yvonne Schoon Source Type: research

Cystic fibrosis-related education: Are we meeting patient and caregiver expectations?
Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a complex disease state which requires education related to a variety of topics including lung health, nutrition, treatment, and genetics. Proper management of the CF patient requires thoughtful provision of patient education to both patients and their caregivers. New therapies and improved management have greatly increased life expectancy with the latest reported median survival age reported at 47.7 years [1]. It is therefore imperative that CF education is provided not only to the parents and caregivers of these patients but to the patients themselves. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Kevin P. Lonabaugh, Katherine S. O ’Neal, Heather McIntosh, Michelle Condren Source Type: research

How Female and Male Physicians ’ Communication Is Perceived Differently
When people hear the word “doctor”, they are more likely to think about a male than a female physician [1]. This is the result of gender stereotypes which affect what we expect from others, how we perceive and evaluate them, and how we behave towards them [2]. In the present article, we discuss how gender stereotypes aff ect physicians. This paper is based on a 2017 Baltimore International Conference on Communication in Healthcare (ICCH) plenary presentation by the first author. We provide a review of existing empirical findings and demonstrate how female and male physicians are perceived differently, even if t...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Marianne Schmid Mast, Keou Kadji Source Type: research

Surgeons ’ perspective on shared decision making in trauma surgery. A national survey
Originated in non-surgical disciplines, shared decision making (SDM) has become an accepted way of decision making in many medical fields and is particularly appropriate for decisions with more than one reasonable treatment option (i.e., preference-sensitive decisions). SDM is thought to improve patients ’ commitment to and satisfaction with their treatment, and to reduce their decisional conflict and anxiety [1–3]. In light of the increasing importance of patient autonomy in contemporary health care and the role that physicians have in supporting that autonomy, it is ethically imperative to mak e decisions tha...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Sarah Woltz, Pieta Krijnen, Arwen H. Pieterse, Inger B. Schipper Source Type: research

Development and Initial Validation of the Appropriate Antibiotic Use Self-Efficacy Scale
Antibiotic resistance refers to genetic changes in bacteria that reduce or even eliminate an antibiotic ’s ability to destroy the bacteria [1]. Each year in the United States, over 2 million people contract serious antibiotic resistant infections, and over 23,000 people die due to these infections [2]. While antibiotic resistance is a natural adaptation in bacteria, inappropriate antibiotic use by h umans intensifies the issue of antibiotic resistance [1]. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that as much as half of all antibiotic use is unnecessary, thus exacerbating antibiotic resistance [2...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Erin M. Hill, Kaitlin Watkins Source Type: research

Prevalence and correlates of patient-centred preparatory information provision to Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging outpatients: A cross-sectional study
A key pillar of high-quality patient-centred care is responsiveness to patient needs, values and preferences [1 –3]. This includes delivery of patients’ preferred format, amount and timing of health-related information [1–3]. Patient-centred communication styles are typically associated with higher rates of patient satisfaction than more paternalistic, provider-centred approaches [4,5], and may lead to improved health outcomes, including enhanced medical decision-making, and improved physical and emotional health [6,7]. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Lisa Hyde, Lisa Mackenzie, Allison W. Boyes, Tiffany-Jane Evans, Michael Symonds, Rob Sanson-Fisher Source Type: research

COPD Patient Education and Support – Achieving Patient-Centredness
Medicine is undergoing a revolution that will transform the traditional, prescriptive, reactive practice of healthcare into a proactive, personalised discipline [1], which in turn promotes patient behaviour change through more interactive coaching that targets individual problem areas. Moreover, this is leading to creation of new types of strategic partnerships between patients, physicians, large clinical centres, consortia of clinical centres and patient-advocate groups [1]. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ana Stoilkova-Hartmann, Frits M.E. Franssen, Ingrid M.L. Augustin, Emiel F.M. Wouters, Katharine D. Barnard Tags: Discussion Source Type: research

A Rigorous Evaluation of an Institutionally-Based Communication Skills Program for Post-Graduate Oncology Trainees
Physician-patient communication is an essential component of medical education because of its impact on patient and physician outcomes [1 –3]. Particular emphasis has been given to improving cancer communication due to the complex, challenging nature of cancer care [4]. Such programs have been developed, implemented, and evaluated internationally (e.g., [5–8]). (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Carma L. Bylund, Smita C. Banerjee, Philip A. Bialer, Ruth Manna, Tomer T. Levin, Patricia A. Parker, Elizabeth Schofield, Yuelin Li, Abraham Bartell, Alexander Chou, Shira A. Hichenberg, Maura Dickler, David W. Kissane Source Type: research

Empathy can make the difference. How?
In this issue of Patient Education and Counseling Lelorain et al. [1] and Visser et al. [2] present two different research papers on how empathy is perceived and its effects during oncological consultations. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Lidia Del Piccolo Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Shared decision-making and parental experiences with health services to meet their child ’s special health care needs: Racial and ethnic disparities
Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) are a priority for the national health agenda given their need for timely and coordinated care that can improve health service experiences and outcomes. CSHCN are defined as those who are at increased risk for chronic physical, developmental, behavioral, and/or emotional conditions and who require physical, behavioral health, and related services (e.g., social services) of a type or amount beyond that required by children in the general population [1]. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: M ónica Pérez Jolles, Pey-Jiuan Lee, Joyce Javier Source Type: research

Which patient and doctor behaviours make a medical consultation more effective from a patient point of view. Results from a European multicentre study in 31 countries
Primary care consultation deserves to be considered a “meeting between experts” [1], where the doctor’s and patient’s perspectives should be synergistically balanced and integrated [2]. In this view, the effectiveness of the medical encounter relies on the shared responsibility that both parties assume for making the communication fruitful. Pat ients, who were asked to express their opinion on reciprocal duties in the consultation, indicated that it was equally important for doctors as well as patients to communicate honestly, to be open about treatment and information, and to manage time effectivel...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - May 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Maria Angela Mazzi, Michela Rimondini, Egbert van der Zee, Wienke Boerma, Christa Zimmermann, Jozien Bensing Source Type: research

Health literacy and surgery expectations in total hip and knee arthroplasty patients
Health literacy influences the ability to obtain, comprehend, and act on health information [1]. Nutbeam [2] describes “interactive health literacy” as a patient’s capacity to derive meaning from different forms of communication and to apply it for individual benefit. Low health literacy affects about 90 million Americans [1] and is a barrier to self-care; patients and their caregivers may lack the skills to u nderstand complicated instructions that deal with medications, wound care, self-monitoring, follow up schedules, and prevention behaviors. (Source: Patient Education and Counseling)
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - May 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Kristie B. Hadden, Latrina Y. Prince, Marty K. Bushmiaer, Jamie C. Watson, C. Lowry Barnes Source Type: research

The relationship between role preferences in decision-making and level of psychological distress in patients with head and neck cancer
Head and neck cancer (HNC) represents more than ten different primary tumour sites, with many possible types of cancer (pathology) within each. The treatment decisions are often complex because of the functional morbidity associated with radical surgery and high-dose radiotherapy, the main forms of HNC treatment. These decisions have a significant impact on a patient ’s body image, psychological wellbeing, productivity, and lifestyle [1–4]. Whilst the importance of these decisions is undisputed, at present, there is little to guide clinicians regarding how active patients want to be in the decision-making proce...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - May 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Joe Jabbour, Haryana M. Dhillon, Heather L. Shepherd, Puma Sundaresan, Chris Milross, Jonathan R. Clark Source Type: research

An N of One
Unless you are a visiting nurse or oncologist you might not have seen a breast that has been decimated by a cancer that ulcerates with relentless aggression through the skin. I am neither of those things, and I hadn ’t. I have worked in health care all of my life, as a physical therapist, then a developmental specialist, and now as a mental health professional. It was in none of those roles that I encountered this image, an image so graphic that it was too disturbing to include in this article. In June 2016, I received a call from my brother in London telling me that his wife’s triple negative breast cancer had...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - May 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Elizabeth A. O ’Donnell Tags: Discussion Source Type: research

Improving Medication Adherence in the Pediatric Population using Integrated Care of Companion Animals
Medication non-adherence occurs in more than half of children with chronic conditions. Unfortunately, most strategies for improving adherence have had limited success in the pediatric population highlighting the need for novel interventions that establish healthy self-management habits for children and adolescents. In this paper we discuss innovative strategies to improve adherence by embedding a medical regimen within a pet care routine, thereby capitalizing on the benefits of a structured habit while providing opportunities for development of autonomy in children and fostering collaborative parent interactions. (Source: ...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - May 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Olga T. Gupta, Deborah J. Wiebe, Elizabeth A. Pyatak, Alan M. Beck Tags: Discussion Source Type: research

Evaluation of a structured pharmacist-led Inhalation Technique Assessment Service for patients with asthma and COPD in Norwegian pharmacies
Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients rely on inhaled medications for disease management. Many patients risk sub-optimal effect of their medication due to incorrect use [1 –7]. Previous studies have shown that inhaler technique education leads to improved inhalation technique, and that community pharmacists are in a particularly good position to provide such education since they are easily accessible primary health care professionals [8–10]. Studies so far have ge nerally evaluated interventions conducted exclusively for specific studies or in limited geographical areas. (Source: Pati...
Source: Patient Education and Counseling - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Karine Wab ø Ruud, Stine Wang Rønningen, Per Kristian Faksvåg, Hilde Ariansen, Ragnar Hovland Source Type: research