Editorial Board/Aims & Scope
(Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - August 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

Low level laser therapy reduces oral leukoplakia lesion size: Results from a preliminary study
Dear Editor, (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Bhagyashree Jagtap, D.Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Kalyani Bhate, S.N. Santhoshkumar Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Flavored tobacco to E-cigarette ’s: How the tobacco industry sustains its product flow
Manufacture of tobacco products remains to be a thriving industry, despite evidence indicating significant health hazards posed by tobacco use. The major reason for their enormous success is lobbying by which they influence the tobacco regulatory bodies to waive restrictions and prevent implementation of any additional sanctions [1]. In addition, the tobacco industry has regularly marketed new tobacco products with fresh designs bearing misleading advertisements. E-cigarettes are a prime example of how the tobacco industry has sustained its product flow by marketing it as a safe alternative to conventional cigarettes [2,3]...
Source: Oral Oncology - August 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: A. Thirumal Raj, Shankargouda Patil, Archana A. Gupta, G. Suveetha Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Clinical outcomes with therapies for previously treated recurrent/metastatic head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (R/M HNSCC): A systematic literature review
Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) ranks sixth among the cancers diagnosed worldwide, and is the eighth most common cause of cancer-related death [1]. A substantial proportion (20 –40%) of patients with HNSCC will suffer local and/or regional disease recurrence and distant metastases [2–4]. Treatment efficacy is modest for patients with locally recurrent (or unresectable) and/or metastatic (R/M) HNSCC, and treatment goals are palliative [5]. For a limited number of patien ts with locoregional recurrent disease, salvage surgery and re-irradiation are considered [2]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - August 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Mallika Lala, Diana Chirovsky, Jonathan D. Cheng, Kapil Mayawala Tags: Review Source Type: research

Reconstruction Special Edition, Issue 3
Re: (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - August 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Matthew Old Source Type: research

Editorial Board/Aims & Scope
(Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - August 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

Is there a place for FDG-PET-CT in early oral cancer patients?
With interest we read the article ‘Utility of PET-CT in detecting nodal metastasis in cN0 early stage oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma’ by Zhang et al. [1]. They reported on 96 patients diagnosed with cT1 or T2 oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), a palpably negative neck and treated by resection of the primary tumor and elec tive neck dissection. All patients underwent preoperative CT of the neck with 32 patients having undergone [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET-CT). (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - August 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Remco de Bree, Bart de Keizer Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Letter to the Editor in response to the article, “The epidemiology of oral human papillomavirus infection in healthy populations: A systematic review and meta-analysis”
Dear Editor, (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - August 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Rama Jayaraj, Chellan Kumarasamy, Shanthi Sabarimurugan, Siddhartha Baxi Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Age and adenoma size are independent risk factors for the development of carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma
The frequency of carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (CXAP) is largely varying in literature. Data for the risk of de novo malignant transformation vary between 1.1% and 6.2% [1 –4]. According to Valstar et al. [1] this variation may reflect referral bias. Moreover, there is some evidence for geographical differences in the prevalence of CXPA [4]. The progression of pleomorphic adenoma (PA) to CXPA is a multistep process. Genomic instability and successive mutations durin g tumor growth involving in particular loss of suppressor genes, as well as epigenetic alterations result in rise of a carcinoma [5,6]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - July 30, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: E.S. Egal, F.V. Mariano, A.M. Altemani, K. Metze Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Letter to the editor: “Sentinel node biopsy in early oral squamous cell carcinomas: Long-term follow-up and nodal failure analysis”
We would like to take the opportunity to comment on the recently published article by Moya-Plana [1] et al. “Sentinel node biopsy in early oral squamous cell carcinomas: Long-term follow-up and nodal failure analysis”. Survival benefits of sentinel node biopsy (SNB) were previously demonstrated over watchful waiting in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity (OCSCC) with clinically ne gative neck (cN0) [2–4]. We also know the END could benefit cN0 OCSCC patients compared with watchful waiting [5]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - July 30, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tao Wang, Longjiang Li Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Clarithromycin as the empiric antibiotic therapy for medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw in multiple myeloma patients
Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) is a devastating adverse effect of several medications. In vast majority of cases, the offenders are bisphosphonates and denosumab which are given in metabolic bone diseases, bone metastases, hypercalcemia of malignancy, and multiple myeloma (MM). Most patients diagnosed with MRONJ are treated using antibiotics (about 60%) [1,2] and the courses are frequently long-term (even for over a year) [3]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - July 28, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Yehuda Zadik Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

Self-reported oral morbidities in long-term oropharyngeal cancer survivors: A cross-sectional survey of 906 survivors
With the rise in incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer (OPC), increased treatment response and decreased recurrence rates, there is a growing population of OPC survivors who now go on to live years (often decades) with long-term effects of therapy [1 –3]. Oral morbidities such as mucositis, osteoradionecrosis and xerostomia are common side effects when oral tissues such as mucosa, bone, and salivary glands, are within the volume of tissue irradiated. Furthermore, salivary changes affect the oral flora and overall risk of dental caries further increasing risks of osteoradionecrosis and dental/oral complicatio...
Source: Oral Oncology - July 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: MD Anderson Head and Neck Cancer Symptom Working Group Source Type: research

ERK-TSC2 signalling in constitutively-active HRAS mutant HNSCC cells promotes resistance to PI3K inhibition
Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR signalling regulates critical tumor cell functions, including cellular metabolism, survival, angiogenesis, growth and migration [1]. Hyper-activation of PI3K signalling is frequently observed in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), with nearly 80% of tumors containing amplifications or mutations of PIK3CA and numerous additional tumors containing losses of tumor suppressor PTEN or amplifications of EGFR or AKT1/2/3 [2 –4]. Owing to the prevalence of PI3K-pathway aberrations in HNSCC and the dependency of tumor cells on PI3K signalling for survival and growth, targ...
Source: Oral Oncology - July 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Kara M. Ruicci, Nicole Pinto, Mohammed I. Khan, John Yoo, Kevin Fung, Danielle MacNeil, Joe S. Mymryk, John W. Barrett, Anthony C. Nichols Source Type: research

Staging HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer: Validation of AJCC-8 in a surgical cohort
Over the last two decades, human papillomavirus related (HPV+) oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has been recognized as a fundamentally different disease than tobacco and alcohol related (HPV −) OPSSC [1–3]. While both diseases are squamous cell carcinomas that arise in the oropharynx, HPV+ disease tends to affect a younger cohort of patients with a different set of risk factors [1–3], and has been shown to have different molecular biology than HPV negative disease [4]. Importantly , patients with HPV+ disease have a substantially improved prognosis [1–3,5]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - July 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Mathew Geltzeiler, Marnie Bertolet, William Albergotti, John Gleysteen, Brennan Olson, Michael Persky, Neil Gross, Ryan Li, Peter Andersen, Seungwon Kim, Robert L. Ferris, Umamaheswar Duvvuri, Daniel Clayburgh Source Type: research

Communication of prognosis in head and neck cancer patients; a descriptive qualitative analysis
During the last decade patient centered communication and patient involvement in treatment decisions has become an important approach in clinical care [1]. The shared decision making approach (SDM) is considered to be a central component of treatment decision consultations [2]. Patients need to be well-informed in order to be able to be actively involved in treatment decisions [3]. Prognostic information may be a valuable factor in considering treatment options [4]. Besides content, the communication style within the professional setting is also important, especially since patients tend to remember only 20 –60% of th...
Source: Oral Oncology - July 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Emilie A.C. Dronkers, Arta Hoesseini, Maarten F. de Boer, Marinella P.J. Offerman Source Type: research

Survival benefit of post-operative chemotherapy for intermediate-risk advanced stage head and neck cancer differs with patient age
The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines recommend that head and neck mucosal squamous cell carcinoma patients with extranodal extension (ENE) or positive margins should receive post-operative chemoradiation (POCRT) [1]. These guidelines are based on the results of two landmark randomized controlled trials that demonstrated that these high-risk patients have improved disease-free survival and progression-free survival when treated with POCRT compared with post-operative radiation therapy (PORT) alone [2 –5]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - July 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Michelle M. Chen, A. Dimitrios Colevas, Uchechukwu Megwalu, Vasu Divi Source Type: research

Accuracy of computer-assisted surgery in mandibular reconstruction: A systematic review
Mandibular defects after ablative tumor removal can lead to severe functional and aesthetic deficits, negatively affecting quality of life [1]. The gold standard for reconstruction of mandibular defects is osteocutaneous free tissue transfer with titanium plate fixation [2]. The fibula, iliac crest, and scapula are the three main donor sites for vascularized bone. Currently, the most common mandibular reconstruction approach is the fibular free flap (FFF) [2 –4], which was introduced by Hidalgo in 1989 [5]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - July 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Gustaaf J.C. van Baar, Tymour Forouzanfar, Niels P.T.J. Liberton, Henri A.H. Winters, Frank K.J. Leusink Tags: Review Source Type: research

Cellular-based immunotherapy in Epstein-Barr virus induced nasopharyngeal cancer
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) occurs worldwide with approximately 87,000 incident cases and 51,000 deaths annually, representing about 0.7% of the global cancer burden [1]. A distinct racial and geographical variation is evident with a higher incidence rate in both southern China and Southeast Asia. This geographic predisposition is suggestive of both genetic and environmental risk factors in its pathogenesis. For instance, several at risk HLA genes such as the HLA-A subtype; and exposure to nitrosamines and nitrosamine precursors in the diet have been reported as risk factors of developing NPC. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - July 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Andrea Zhe Ern Lee, Louise Soo Yee Tan, Chwee Ming Lim Tags: Review Source Type: research

Three-dimensional microarchitecture and local mineralization of human jaws affected by bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis
Recently, we showed that osteocyte lacunar volume and distribution, as well as mineralized bone mass density, are dependent on the specific region of the jaw in patients suffering from bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) [1]. Indeed, a significant heterogeneity was found in terms of osteocyte lacunar morphology, most likely due to the variety of mechanical loading in the different regions. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - July 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Alessandra Giuliani, Giovanna Iezzi, Marco Mozzati, Giorgia Gallesio, Serena Mazzoni, Giuliana Tromba, Franco Zanini, Adriano Piattelli, Carmen Mortellaro Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Induction chemotherapy with carboplatin, nab-paclitaxel and cetuximab for at least N2b nodal status or surgically unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck
Although induction studies of TPF in SCCHN have not improved outcomes compared to chemoradiotherapy alone, phase II studies of weekly carboplatin (CbP), paclitaxel and cetuximab (C225) have shown promising results. Nano-albumin-paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) based chemotherapy has demonstrated a higher response rate (RR) than solvent-based paclitaxel in squamous cell carcinoma of the lung with favorable toxicity. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - July 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Jared Weiss, Jill Gilbert, Allison Mary Deal, Mark Weissler, Chris Hilliard, Bhishamjit Chera, Barbara Murphy, Trevor Hackman, Jay Justin Liao, Juneko Grilley Olson, David Neil Hayes Source Type: research

Potential of web-resource on ‘oral dysplasia and precancer’!
We read the paper “Web-based information on oral dysplasia and precancer of the mouth–Quality and readability” by Alsoghier et al. with great interest and curiosity [1]. Herein, we discuss our views on the topic taking into account the challenges linked to excess information on internet, which can mislead many patients. Moreover, we suggest a web-resource that could also target the clinicians with new updates to help them improve their care for patients. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - July 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Prashanth Panta, Sachin C. Sarode, Gargi S. Sarode, Shankargouda Patil Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Salivary exosomes as potential biomarkers in cancer
The intercellular communication between cancer cells and surrounding stromal cells is crucial for modulating tumorigenesis as well as for the development and progression of tumour metastasis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in this cellular cross-talk provides new insights into the identification of valuable biomarkers as well as therapeutic targets that can stop tumour progression [1]. Cell to cell communication by extracellular vesicles is a burgeoning area of research and these are considered key players in mediating communication between tumour cells and healthy, normal cells [2]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - July 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Soumyalekshmi Nair, Kai Dun Tang, Liz Kenny, Chamindie Punyadeera Tags: Review Source Type: research

Low versus high activity radioiodine remnant ablation for differentiated thyroid carcinoma with gross extrathyroidal extension invading only strap muscles
In decades, radioiodine therapy has been a cornerstone in managing differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) [1]. Recent paradigms on the use of radioiodine therapy have changed, and selective use of radioiodine therapy as postoperative adjuvant therapy is being considered [2]. Although radioiodine therapy is considered reasonably safe compared to other cancer treatment modalities, potential complications cannot be completely eliminated. In addition to early onset adverse effects, there are increasing reports of late onset adverse effects in long term survivors previously treated with radioiodine therapy, including second pri...
Source: Oral Oncology - July 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: So Young Park, Hye In Kim, Joon Young Choi, Jun-Ho Choe, Jung-Han Kim, Jee Soo Kim, Young Lyun Oh, Soo Yeon Hahn, Jung Hee Shin, Soo Hyun Ahn, Kyunga Kim, Jong Gill Jeong, Sun Wook Kim, Jae Hoon Chung, Tae Hyuk Kim Source Type: research

Primary carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma of anterior commissure of the larynx
Carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma (CXPA) is a carcinoma originating from a primary or recurrent benign pleomorphic adenoma [1]. The most common sites of origin are major salivary gland where these represent approximately 3 –5% of all salivary gland neoplasms [1]. Due to the rarity of the disease, no level one evidence based treatment algorithm is present. The main evidence is available from retrospective institutional experiences. Surgery followed by post-operative radiotherapy is the mainstay of the treatment [1,2] . (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - July 4, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Josef Kovarik, Debra Milne, Max Robinson, Frank Stafford, Muhammad Shahid Iqbal Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Prospective evaluation of patient reported swallow function with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT), MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) and the Sydney Swallow Questionnaire (SSQ) in head and neck cancer patients
A number of patient reported outcome (PRO) measurement tools have been created to track both quality of life (QoL) and functional outcomes in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients before, during, and after oncologic treatment. Such instruments are vital for the rigorous comparison of various treatments and interventions across clinical studies of HNC and lend to its ease of use for longitudinal repeat assessments. Consistent utilization of PROs may be particularly critical in light of growing concerns that late treatment toxicity may confer a mortality risk with longer follow-up [1 –3]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - July 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Luke C. Peng, Xuan Hui, Zhi Cheng, Michael R. Bowers, Joseph Moore, Emilie Cecil, Amanda Choflet, Alex Thompson, Mariah Muse, Ana P. Kiess, Brandi R. Page, Christine G. Gourin, Carole Fakhry, Michal Szczesniak, Julia Maclean, Peter Wu, Ian Cook, Todd R. M Source Type: research

Oral tongue carcinoma among young patients: An analysis of risk factors and survival
Every ear, approximately 11 in 100,000 adults in the United States are diagnosed with oral cavity cancer [1]. Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is a common and often lethal form of this disease. OTSCC was traditionally thought to affect men in their 60s and older, after extensive tobacco and alcohol use [2 –5]. Over the past two decades OTSCC incidence has declined in this population due to improved awareness of tobacco-associated risks. However, studies have noted an alarming increase in OTSCC among of young patients, especially white women, over this same time period [6–10]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - July 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Douglas R. Farquhar, April M. Tanner, Maheer M. Masood, Sagar R. Patel, Trevor G. Hackman, Andrew F. Olshan, Angela L. Mazul, Jose P. Zevallos Source Type: research

Radiation-induced nasopharyngeal ulcers after intensity modulated radiotherapy in primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients: A dose-volume-outcome analysis
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a common malignancy in Southeast Asia and it is highly sensitive to radiotherapy (RT) [1]. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been widely applied in the field of radiation oncology over the last decade and is considered as a major breakthrough for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) due to its capability of delivering high radiation dose to the target while sparing the adjacent organs [2]. However, complications from radiation therapy can present in early and late phases. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - July 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Yujiao Li, Tingting Xu, Wei Qian, Xueguan Lu, Chaosu Hu Source Type: research

Clinical analysis of second primary gingival squamous cell carcinoma after radiotherapy
Oral cancer has become the sixth most common cancer in the world [1]. In 2015, approximately 45,780 new cases of cancer in the oral cavity and pharynx were reported in the United States. Of these, 8650 died due to cancer-related death [2]. Tobacco abuse and alcohol abuse have been identified as the most important risk factors for oral cancers, especially squamous cell carcinoma [3], as well as DNA oncogenic viruses and habits, such as chewing betel nut [4]. Among those patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma, a fraction was observed to have a history of radiotherapy in head and neck region. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - July 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Xiaoyan Fu, Shuwei Chen, Weichao Chen, Zhongyuan Yang, Ming Song, Hao Li, Huayong Zhang, Fan Yao, Xuan Su, Tianrun Liu, An-Kui Yang Source Type: research

Survival impact and toxicity of metformin in head and neck cancer: An analysis of the SEER-Medicare dataset
The past decade has witnessed both a growing prevalence of head and neck cancer (HNC) driven by the human papillomavirus (HPV) [1,2] and a series of innovations [3 –7] that have enhanced the therapeutic ratio in this disease; however, survival outcomes in the United States remain suboptimal. At a national level, 5-year relative survival rates from cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx remain at or below 66% [8], while even on recent prospective cli nical trials, patients with advanced HNC experience 3-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival rates that fail to exceed 76% and 62%, respectivel...
Source: Oral Oncology - July 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: William A. Stokes, Megan Eguchi, Arya Amini, Mohammad K. Hararah, Ding Ding, Jessica D. McDermott, Cathy J. Bradley, Sana D. Karam Source Type: research

Detection of AR-V7 transcript with RNA in situ hybridization in human salivary duct cancer
The androgen receptor (AR) is a nuclear steroid receptor that binds to testosterone and dihydrotestosterone and regulates the transcription of genes leading to cell growth, differentiation and survival. AR serves as an important oncogenic signal in prostate cancers and apocrine breast cancers. Salivary duct carcinoma (SDC) is a rare subtype of head and neck cancer that is defined by an apocrine phenotype, with AR positivity by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in up to 98% of cases [1]. A recent clinical trial with leuprorelin acetate and bicalutamide has shown promising activity with an overall response rate of 42% in AR-positiv...
Source: Oral Oncology - June 28, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Hyunseok Kang, Emmanuel S. Antonarakis, Jun Luo, Qizhi Zheng, Lisa Rooper, Angelo M. De Marzo, William H. Westra, Tamara L. Lotan Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Perioperative considerations in free flap surgery: A review of pressors and anticoagulation
The head and neck plays a critical role in multiple homeostatic processes. Many of these are noticeable in everyday social interaction. From a physiologic perspective: eating, drinking, articulation, swallowing, and the ability to maintain weight are dependent on intact anatomy and function of the head and neck structures. Any procedure that interferes with the anatomy and thus the physiologic processes will have a debilitating effect on the patient. Whether it is psychological, a cosmetic deformity or a physiological dysfunction, these issues need to be addressed. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 27, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Mark K. Wax, James Azzi Source Type: research

Oropharyngeal cancer is no longer a disease of younger patients and the prognostic advantage of Human Papillomavirus is attenuated among older patients: Analysis of the National Cancer Database
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for a unique and growing subset of oropharyngeal cancers (OPCs) in the United States (U.S.) [1]. These HPV-positive OPCs (HPV-OPCs) arise primarily from the immunologically specialized reticulated stratified squamous lymphoepithelium investing the lymphoid tissues of the palatine and lingual tonsils, rather than the continuous stratified squamous epithelium of the soft palate and posterior pharyngeal walls that more often harbors HPV-negative OPCs [2,3]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Eleni M. Rettig, Munfarid Zaidi, Farhoud Faraji, David W. Eisele, Margueritta El Asmar, Nicholas Fung, Gypsyamber D'Souza, Carole Fakhry Source Type: research

Gastro-omental free flap for reconstruction of tongue defects
Surgery is an integral part of the management of oral tongue carcinoma either alone or in combination with adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy [1]. Resection of carcinoma of tongue usually entails a wide resection of the tumor with adequate margins, which can amount to a partial, sub -total or a total glossectomy. Microvascular reconstructive surgery has made a profound impact on improving the outcomes in the management of tongue cancer [2]. Adjuvant radiotherapy in advanced carcinoma of tongue can lead to xerostomia and fibrosis that seriously affects the patient ’s quality of life by directly interfering wit...
Source: Oral Oncology - June 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Sivakumar Vidhyadharan, Krishnakumar Thankappan, Ramu Janarthanan, Deepak Balasubramanian, Mohit Sharma, Jimmy Mathew, Othiyil Vayoth Sudheer, Subramania Iyer Source Type: research

Validation and assessment of discordance of the 8th edition AJCC (American Joint Committee on Cancer) clinical and pathologic staging systems in patients with p16+ oropharyngeal cancer treated with surgery and adjuvant radiation at a single institution
Major updates have been made in the latest (8th) edition of the American Joint Commission on Cancer (AJCC) manual for staging of oropharynx squamous cell cancer (OPSCC) [1,2] which are based on changes in epidemiology of OPSCC related to the emergence of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) as the major cause for OPSCC [3,4]. It is now recognized that patients with HPV positive oropharyngeal cancer (HPV+OPSCC) have superior survival compared to patients with HPV negative oropharynx cancer (HPV −OPSCC) [5]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Piyush Gupta, Jocelyn C. Migliacci, Ashley Hay, Matthew Rosenthal, Ximena Mimica, Nancy Lee, Richard J. Wong, Jatin Shah, Snehal Patel, Ian Ganly Source Type: research

Pattern of and survival following loco-regional and distant recurrence in patients with HPV+ and HPV − oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: A population-based study
The incidence of patients diagnosed with human papillomavirus positive (HPV+) oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is increasing. Nevertheless, this OPSCC group has a markedly better prognosis compared with the tobacco-related (HPV −) OPSCCs [1–3]. Regardless, up to 25% of patients with HPV+ OPSCC encounter disease recurrence within three years of completed treatment [4–6]. The risk of short-term loco-regional failure is reported low for patients with HPV+ or p16+ (a surrogate marker for HPV) tumors compared to patients with HPV or p16 negative tumors. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Christian Gr ønhøj, Kathrine Kronberg Jakobsen, David H. Jensen, Jacob Rasmussen, Elo Andersen, Jeppe Friborg, Christian von Buchwald Source Type: research

The course of sexual interest and enjoyment in head and neck cancer patients treated with primary (chemo)radiotherapy
Sexual issues are often reported in patients with cancer [1] and include changes in sexual function (e.g., decreased sexual desire and arousal, vaginal dryness, erectile and orgasm dysfunctions) and changes in sexual activity. Sexual issues can lead to significant distress and have a negative effect on well-being [2,3] and health-related quality of life [4,5] of cancer patients. So far, most research on cancer and sexuality has been performed in patients with breast, prostate, or gynecological cancer, who, given the tumor site, are at high risk for developing sexual issues during and/or after treatment. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: H.C. Melissant, F. Jansen, L.E.R. Schutte, B.I. Lissenberg-Witte, J. Buter, C.R. Leemans, M.A. Sprangers, M.R. Vergeer, E.T.M. Laan, I.M. Verdonck-de Leeuw Source Type: research

The possible contemporary presence of BRONJ and oral squamous cell carcinoma
Dear Editor, (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Valentina Terenzi, Andrea Cassoni, Edoardo Coiante, Davide Spadoni, Carlo Della Rocca, Angelina Pernazza, Valentino Valentini Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Letter to the editor: “Utility of PET-CT in detecting nodal metastasis in cN0 early stage oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma”
To the editor: (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Yubin Cao, Chunjie Li, Longjiang Li Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

A prospective analysis of prevalence of metastasis in levels IIB and V neck nodes in patients with operable oral squamous cell carcinoma
Oral cavity cancers are one of the leading causes of cancers in India, where chewing of betel, pan and areca is a common habit. The cancers of the oral cavity have highest risk of spread to levels I to III neck nodes. The skip metastasis to level IV or V in the absence of disease in level I to III is exceedingly rare. While surgically managing the neck, the type of neck dissection depends on the clinical status of the neck nodes and consists of selective neck dissection (SND) for clinically node negative patients and modified neck dissection (MND) for clinically involved neck. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Sriharsha Haranadh, Rukmangadha Nandyala, Vijayalakshmidevi Bodagala, Narendra Hulikal Source Type: research

Emergency department visits and unplanned hospitalizations in the treatment period for head and neck cancer patients treated with curative intent: A population-based analysis
With the epidemic rise in the incidence of head and neck cancers, particularly HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma [1,2], and a growing elderly population which is more susceptible to head and neck cancers [2], more patients will require treatment in an already strained healthcare environment. Since the Institute of Medicine ‘Quality Chiasm’ report in 2001 many health care systems are dedicated to a process of ongoing quality improvement and to close the performance gap in areas where current state and ideal care are wide [3–5]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: A. Eskander, M.K. Krzyzanowska, H.D. Fischer, N. Liu, P.C. Austin, J.C. Irish, D.J. Enepekides, J. Lee, E. Gutierrez, E. Lockhart, M. Raphael, S. Singh Source Type: research

Prognostic and clinicopathological significance of cyclin D1 expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Oral cancer has a worldwide incidence of 300,400 cases and is responsible for 145,400 deaths a year (GLOBOCAN, IARC, WHO) [1]. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents around 90% of malignant oral neoplasms [2] and has a 5-year survival rate of 50 –60% [2,3]. Prediction of the prognosis is of major importance and is usually based on the Tumor Node Metastasis (TNM) staging system, with N+ status and the presence of extracapsular spread predicting a worse prognosis [4,5]. The prognostic value of molecular biomarkers has attracted considerable research interest [6,7], and evidence has accumulated on a key role for...
Source: Oral Oncology - June 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Pablo Ramos-Garc ía, Miguel Ángel González-Moles, Lucía González-Ruiz, Isabel Ruiz-Ávila, Ángela Ayén, José Antonio Gil-Montoya Tags: Review Source Type: research

Editorial Board/Aims & Scope
(Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

Oncogenic drivers in 11q13 associated with prognosis and response to therapy in advanced oropharyngeal carcinomas
In the last decades, several epidemiological studies have revealed decreased incidence of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) in oral cavity and larynx as a consequence of lower exposure to the tobacco products. Nevertheless, an increasing incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) mainly associated with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) has been reported [1 –6]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: M.C. Barros-Filho, L.A. Reis-Rosa, M. Hatakeyama, F.A. Marchi, T. Chulam, C. Scapulatempo-Neto, U.R. Nicolau, A.L. Carvalho, C.A.L. Pinto, S.A. Drigo, L.P. Kowalski, S.R. Rogatto Source Type: research

Risk of plate removal in free flap reconstruction of the mandible
Osteocutaneous free flap surgery is the gold standard for mandibular reconstruction following major head and neck oncologic resections [1]. While a variety of flaps exist for reconstruction of the mandible, osteocutaneous free flap reconstruction is most commonly employed given the need for bony reconstruction for both functional and aesthetic purposes [2]. The three most commonly used osteocutaneous flaps are the osteocutaneous radial forearm flap (OCRFF), the fibular flap, and the osteocutaneous scapular flap (OCSF). (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: C. Burton Wood, Justin R. Shinn, Shaunak N. Amin, Sarah L. Rohde, Robert J. Sinard Source Type: research

Nomogram for preoperative prediction of nodal extracapsular extension or positive surgical margins in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma
The management of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has undergone a significant transformation over the last two decades, reflecting the increasing incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) that some experts have called an epidemic [1]. Patients with HPV-associated OPSCC are primarily younger, healthier individuals with little or no tobacco exposure [2]. They tend to have increased response to treatment compared to patients with OPSCC associated with tobacco and alcohol use and thus have much better oncologic outcomes [2,3]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Mohammad K. Hararah, William A. Stokes, Bernard L. Jones, Ayman Oweida, Ding Ding, Jessica McDermott, Julie Goddard, Sana D. Karam Source Type: research

MicroRNA-based classifiers for diagnosis of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma in tissue and plasma
The worldwide annual incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is estimated to be over 300,000 [1]. Over the last 20  years, the prognosis of patients with OSCC has improved; however, 5-year overall survival is still only around 50% when including all stages and anatomic sub-sites [2]. In early-stage OSCC (clinical T1-T2N0M0), the strongest prognostic risk factor for survival is the presence of occult lymph node metastases, which are detectable by histopathological examination in up to 30–40% of these patients [3–5]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Nicklas Juel Pedersen, David Hebbelstrup Jensen, Giedrius Lelkaitis, Katalin Kiss, Birgitte Wittenborg Charabi, Henrik Ullum, Lena Specht, Ane Yde Schmidt, Finn Cilius Nielsen, Christian von Buchwald Source Type: research

Adverse effects of chemotherapy on the teeth and surrounding tissues of children with cancer: A systematic review with meta-analysis
Considerable improvements have been seen during the last decades in the development of effective treatment protocols for childhood cancer, which usually consist of multiagent chemotherapy (CH), radiotherapy, or a combination of both. For example, the cure rate for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL), which is the most common childhood malignancy [1], has increased from less than 30% during the 1960s to an 80 –86% 5-year overall survival [2]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dan Mike Busenhart, Juliane Erb, Georgios Rigakos, Theodore Eliades, Spyridon N. Papageorgiou Tags: Review Source Type: research

Risk and survival of patients with medullary thyroid cancer: National perspective
Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare neuroendocrine tumor that accounts for 1% –2% of thyroid cancers in the United States [1]. MTC derives from the neuroendocrine parafollicular calcitonin-producing (C) cells of the thyroid [2]. Sporadic MTC accounts for the majority of MTC, approximately 80%, while the remaining presents as part of inherited tumor syndromes, such as multip le endocrine neoplasia type 2A and 2B, or familial MTC [2]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Zaid Al-Qurayshi, Helmi Khadra, Kristi Chang, Nitin Pagedar, Gregory W. Randolph, Emad Kandil Source Type: research

Swallowing beyond six years post (chemo)radiotherapy for head and neck cancer; a cohort study
Dysphagia is a common and serious side effect of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). A small number of longitudinal studies describe swallowing outcomes with follow up periods ranging from six to 24  months. These report on patients following Intensity Modulated CRT [1,2], or accelerated radiotherapy for pharyngeal cancer [3], or a combination of post-radiotherapy and post-CRT patients [4,5]. All identify a significant deterioration in swallowing from pre- to post-treatment. There is disagree ment about the subsequent trajectory, three reporting little recovery up to two years following treatment [1,3...
Source: Oral Oncology - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: J.M. Patterson, E. McColl, P.N. Carding, J.A. Wilson Source Type: research

The impact of unplanned reoperations in head and neck cancer surgery on survival
The head and neck area is comprised of complex anatomical structure in close association with respiration, swallowing, speaking and appearance. Thus, head and neck cancer (HNC) surgery is frequently combined with reconstructive surgery. Surgical ablation of tumors is still one of the main treatment options for HNC. It plays an independent role in early stage HNC [1]. Along with non-surgical treatment modalities, surgical ablation has been used for advanced stage HNC [1]. Most HNCs are diagnosed in the elderly and they are associated with habitual smoking, alcohol drinking and malnutrition [2 –4]. (Source: Oral Oncology)
Source: Oral Oncology - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Nayeon Choi, Song I Park, Hyeseung Kim, Insuk Sohn, Han-Sin Jeong Source Type: research