Hysterectomy, Uterine Fibroids, Endometriosis and Hypertension: A Multiple-Choice Equation
Dear Editor, (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - July 26, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Inci Oz, Kenan Yalta, Ertan Yetkin Tags: Letter to the Editors Source Type: research

Serum uric acid is associated with incident hip fractures in women and men
The population-based cohort study conducted by Preyer et al published in Maturitas disclosed that increased serum uric acid per levels were associated with a higher risk of hip fracture (adjusted hazard ratio=1.06 and 95%confidence interval=1.01-1.10).[1] Some points are discussed here. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - July 22, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Shih-Wei Lai, Yu-Hung Kuo, Kuan-Fu Liao Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Mucormycosis – an opportunistic infection in the aged immunocompromised individual: A reason for concern in COVID-19
In the case of hospitalized COVID-19 patients, especially aging people and those with severe symptoms who require a ventilator, corticosteroids are given in an attempt to alleviate some of the symptoms. However, steroids are known to lower immunity and raise blood sugar levels, and they tend to increase clotting factors and fibrinogen concentrations in patients. This situation provides an opportunity for pathogens to evade the human immune system and infect the host. According to a recent study, the number of cases of mucormycosis (also known as zygomycosis, black fungus) have increased in COVID-19 patients who are either ...
Source: Maturitas - July 21, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Vivek P Chavda, Vasso Apostolopoulos Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Age at menopause and risk of lung cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to cancer among men and the second leading cause among women after breast cancer, contributing to 13.8% of total cancer deaths in women in 2018 [1]. Over the past two decades, the historically higher lung cancer incidence among men than among women have reversed, and this is not fully explained by gender differences in smoking behaviours [2, 3]. Given the same level of lifelong exposure to cigarettes, females smokers appear to have increased susceptibility to develop lung cancer compared with male smokers [3, 4], and women who have never smoked are twice as likely to develop lu...
Source: Maturitas - July 20, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Hsin-Fang Chung, Dereje G. Gete, Gita D. Mishra Source Type: research

Response to comments on the paper “Serum uric acid is associated with incident hip fractures in women and men”
In a commentary on our previously published findings that elevated levels of serum uric acid (SUA) are associated with increased risk of hip fracture, Lai et al. [1] argue that many studies have shown a positive association of SUA levels with increased bone mineral density (BMD) that should therefore confer reduced fracture risk, and that the association between SUA and hip fracture risk reported in our study might have disappeared upon adjustment for the occurrence of falls. We highly appreciate their comments and interest in our work. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - July 20, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Wolfgang Brozek, Oliver Preyer, Hans Concin, Gabriele Nagel, Hanno Ulmer, Emanuel Zitt Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Effect of frailty on initiation of statins following incident acute coronary syndromes in patients aged ≥75 years
Decreasing mortality and increasing longevity in Australia and many countries have led to the clinical challenge of treating and caring for increasing numbers of frail older people with cardiovascular disease. Statin treatment, where tolerated, is an essential part of secondary prevention after an admission for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) [1]. A recent meta-analysis found that statins significantly reduced major vascular events and cardiovascular mortality independent of age together with a low risk of adverse effects [2]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - July 17, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Derrick Lopez, Lee Nedkoff, Tom Briffa, David B. Preen, Christopher Etherton-Beer, Leon Flicker, Frank M Sanfilippo Source Type: research

Reprint of: The Dark Side of the Moon: Global challenges in the distribution of vaccines and implementation of vaccination plans against COVID-19
Concomitantly with the start of the pandemic, the pursuit of effective vaccines began and developed with great success, and mass vaccination campaigns commenced by the end of 2020. The first quarter of 2021 saw countries such as Israel, the United Kingdom and the United States advancing at great pace in the vaccination programs, while other countries, mainly in the southern hemisphere, were just starting. By the beginning of April, 30 countries had not received a single dose and only 0.57% of the African population was vaccinated [1]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - July 15, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Cristina Mesa-Vieira, Felipe Botero-Rodr íguez, Andrea Padilla-Muñoz, Oscar H. Franco, Carlos Gómez-Restrepo Source Type: research

Editorial board
(Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - July 15, 2021 Category: Primary Care Source Type: research

Global consensus recommendations on menopause in the workplace: A European Menopause and Andropause Society (EMAS) position statement
The menopause, or the cessation of menstruation, is a normal stage of life. The average age of the menopause is 51 years. However, it can occur much earlier, either naturally, with no identifiable underlying cause [1], or as a consequence of disease, surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy. In 2020, globally 657 million women were aged 45 –59 [2] (Fig. 1). Overall, 47% of these women worldwide contributed to the labor force, but the figures varied both regionally, ranging from 22% to 63%, as well as by age: 64%, 59%, 51%, at age 45–49, 50–54, and 55–59 respectively [3]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - July 14, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Rees, Johannes Bitzer, Antonio Cano, Iuliana Ceausu, Peter Chedraui, Fatih Durmusoglu, Risto Erkkola, Marije Geukes, Alan Godfrey, Dimitrios G. Goulis, Amanda Griffiths, Claire Hardy, Martha Hickey, Angelica Lind én Hirschberg, Myra Hunter, Ludw Source Type: research

Menopause in the Workplace: Building Evidence, Changing Workplaces, Supporting Women
The welcome release of the Global Consensus Statement on Menopause in the Workplace from the European Menopause and Andropause Society (EMAS) marks a watershed in the study of this field. It provides a clear statement on the current state of scientific knowledge and an actionable roadmap for researchers and practitioners to advance the field into the future. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - July 14, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Gavin Jack, Kathleen Riach, Martha Hickey, Amanda Griffiths, Claire Hardy, Myra Hunter Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Frailty in Ethnic Minority Women
In contemporary Australia, the life expectancy of women is approximately four years longer than that of men [1]. This sex-longevity gap is not unexpected. European historical records indicate that women have lived longer than men since at least the 18th century [2] and modern datasets demonstrate this female-male mortality gap globally [3]. This survival advantage, however, has not been accompanied by health advantages. Data indicate that women are burdened by chronic disease and disability to a greater extent than their male contemporaries [4]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - July 13, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Natasha Reid, Shavini Weerasekera, Ruth E Hubbard, Emily H Gordon Source Type: research

Variants in clock genes could be associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes in an elderly Greek population
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a chronic disorder of glucose metabolism, related to impaired quality of life, severe complications, and significant burden for health care systems, that tends to be a global epidemic [1]. The International Diabetes Federation estimates that the number of people living with the disease globally is expected to reach 700 million by 2045 [2]. T2D confers a four-fold greater risk for the development of cardiovascular (CV) disease compared to the non-diabetic status [3] and is expected to be the seventh most common cause of death by the year 2030 around the world [4]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - July 11, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Xanthippi Tsekmekidou, Fotis Tsetsos, Theocharis Koufakis, Marianthi Georgitsi, Nikolaos Papanas, Dimitrios Papazoglou, Athanasios Roumeliotis, Stylianos Panagoutsos, Elias Thodis, Marios Theodoridis, Ploumis Passadakis, Efstratios Maltezos, Peristera Pas Source Type: research

Menopause in women with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder
The transition to menopause or perimenopause is a period of hormonal and menstrual irregularity which a woman experiences before her final menstrual period. Menopause is a physiological phenomenon defined retrospectively by 12 months of amenorrhea and loss of ovarian follicular function, typically occurring in women between the ages of 40 and 55 years. The mean duration of perimenopause is 5 years, with women often finding themselves symptomatic for much longer1. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - July 10, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Anna Szeliga, Bogdan Stefanowski, Blazej Meczekalski, Milena Snopek, Anna Kostrzak, Roman Smolarczyk, Gregory Bala, Anna Duszewska, Katarzyna Smolarczyk, Marzena Maciejewska-Jeske Source Type: research

Sexual inactivity and sexual dysfunction in midlife Singaporean women: A prospective cross-sectional study of prevalence and risk factors
Sexual function, a key element of well-being in seniors, is affected by biological, psychological, socio-economic, cultural, and religious factors[1-3]. Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) comprise symptoms related to the sexual response cycle (desire/arousal/orgasm), lubrication and pain. Epidemiological studies have described largely adverse effects of menopause on female sexual function [4]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - July 8, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Susan Logan, Win Pa Pa Thu, Kylie Ho, Jane A. Cauley, Michael S. Kramer, Eu-Leong Yong Source Type: research

Effect of social participation on the development of physical frailty: Do type, frequency and diversity matter?
Physical frailty is an age-related syndrome characterized by a state of increased vulnerability and decreased physiological reserve capacity across multiple systems [1, 2]. As the population aging globally, physical frailty has emerged as a public health challenge to healthcare systems worldwide. In a recent meta-analysis, researchers reported that 19.1% of community-dwelling older adults aged 70 years or older were physically frail and 51.6% were pre-frail [3]. Furthermore, physical frailty has been linked to increased risks for disability, injurious falls, hospitalization, institutionalization and mortality [1, 4]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - July 3, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Boqin Xie, Chenjuan Ma Source Type: research

Hyperprolactinemia after menopause: diagnosis and management
Among hormone-secreting pituitary tumors, prolactinomas are the most common histotype and represent approximately 50% of all pituitary adenomas (1,2). In clinical setting infertility, galactorrhea, gonadal and sexual dysfunction are usually the most relevant clinical features in both sexes (1,2), independently on tumor size at diagnosis, generally microprolactinomas in women and macroprolactinomas in men (1-3). However, in women signs and symptoms of hypogonadism are naturally reported at presentation in fertile age, whereas after menopause these features cannot rate clinical significance taking into account that patients ...
Source: Maturitas - July 3, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Renata S. Auriemma, Rosa Pirchio, Rosario Pivonello, Annamaria Colao Source Type: research

Menopause and cardiometabolic diseases: What we (don't) know and why it matters
Cardiometabolic diseases (CMD), including type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and their associated factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and obesity are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both sexes.[1] However, men and women experience different trajectories of cardiometabolic risk throughout the life course. At a young age, CMD prevalence is higher in men than women, but this female advantage gradually disappears with aging, particularly after menopause, when cardiometabolic risk factors accumulate.[2, 3] However, the underlying biological pathways remain ...
Source: Maturitas - July 2, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Zayne M. Roa-D íaz, Peter Francis Raguindin, Arjola Bano, Jessica Laine Carmeli, Taulant Muka, Marija Glisic Source Type: research

Cross-sectional and longitudinal interaction effects of physical activity and APOE- ε4 on white matter integrity in older adults: the MAPT study
Brain white matter (WM) deterioration is a well-known marker of cerebral aging [1] which can be assessed through diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), the most widely used technique for measuring the microstructural integrity of WM fiber tracts [2,3]. DTI metrics include fractional anisotropy (FA), as well as axial (AxD), radial (RD) and mean diffusivity (MD). FA and MD are overall indicators of WM tract integrity, with high FA and low MD values indicating high WM integrity [4] . AxD and RD respectively reflect the diffusivity along and perpendicular to the main axis of the WM tracts [4]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - June 29, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: J érémy Raffin, Yves Rolland, Lingxiao He, Lisa Perus, Jean-François Mangin, Audrey Gabelle, Kelly Virecoulon Giudici, Bruno Vellas, Philipe de Souto Barreto, For the MAPT/DSA Group Source Type: research

The interplay between metabolic dysregulations and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in women after menopause
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, varying from simple hepatic steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis and NASH-related hepatocellular carcinoma [1]. The diagnostic criteria for NAFLD include the presence of increased hepatic fat accumulation defined as steatosis in more than 5% of hepatocytes in the absence of secondary causes for hepatic disturbances or significant alcohol consumption [1,2]. The proper diagnosis of NAFLD is difficult, because it can be proven only by liver biopsy. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - June 29, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Ralitsa Robeva, Dusan Mladenovic, Milena Veskovic, Dragan Hrncic, Jelica Bjekic-Macut, Olivera Stanojlovic, Sarantis Livadas, Bulent O. Yildiz, Djuro Macut Source Type: research

The association of glucocorticoid receptor polymorphism with metabolic outcomes in menopausal women with adrenal incidentalomas
Adrenal incidentalomas (AIs) are tumors accidentally detected by various imaging methods applied without suspecting adrenal pathology, indicating that most of them are nonfunctional. The most common subclinical functional activity is subclinical hypercortisolism (SH), a condition of altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, established on the biochemical parameters of increased autonomous cortisol production, without phenotype expression of hypercortisolism [1, 2]. Depending on the applied diagnostic criteria, the prevalence of SH in patients with AIs is estimated at 5-30% [3, 4]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - June 29, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Sanja Ognjanovic, Jadranka Antic, Tatjana Pekmezovic, Bojana Popovic, Tatjana Isailovic, Ivana Bozic Anti ć, Tamara Bogavac, Valentina Elezovic Kovacević, Dusan Ilic, Milica Opalić, Djuro Macut Source Type: research

Multimodal biometric monitoring technologies drive the development of clinical assessments in the home environment
Quote: “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts” – Aristotle (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - June 24, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Benjamin Vandendriessche, Alan Godfrey, Elena S. Izmailova Source Type: research

Spatiotemporal gait characteristics and risk of mortality in community-dwelling older adults
Gait function is one of the most important correlates of mobility and daily physical activity among older adults. Whereas retention of robust gait function is associated with better health status, deterioration in gait function is associated with several adverse health outcomes, such as falls [1] disability, [2], and even dementia [3]. Gait speed is one of the main gait variables and is commonly used to assess physical function in older adults. In fact, slow gait is often used as a criterion for physical frailty [4] and sarcopenia [5]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - June 24, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Takehiko Doi, Sho Nakakubo, Kota Tsutsumimoto, Satoshi Kurita, Hideaki Ishii, Hiroyuki Shimada Source Type: research

Motivational strategies to improve adherence to physical activity in breast cancer survivors: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Breast cancer was the leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality in women across the world in 2018 with 2.1 million females diagnosed and 626,679 deaths [1]. In 2017, the disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) was 17.7 million [2]. The significant health impacts of breast cancer make a strong argument to develop interventions which reduce the burden on both patients and healthcare systems. Breast cancer survivors are also vulnerable to significant mental distress [3]. There are a number of factors which can cause psychological stress, including their cancer related illness, fear of cancer recurrence, difficult work-li...
Source: Maturitas - June 24, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Supa Pudkasam, Jack Feehan, Jason Talevski, Kristina Vingrys, Remco Polman, Nanthaphan Chinlumprasert, Lily Stojanovska, Vasso Apostolopoulos Source Type: research

Vaginal Laser Therapy for Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause – Systematic Review
Genitourinary Syndrome of Menopause (GSM) is defined as a collection of symptoms and signs in the genitourinary apparatus associated with decreased estrogen (naturally or iatrogenic), that comprises from genital symptoms of dryness, burning, and irritation, to sexual and urinary symptoms. These symptoms can have a great impact on the quality of life (QOL) of the affected women, affecting up to 48% of premenopausal women and between 53.8% and 90% of postmenopausal women [1,2]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - June 20, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Eduard Mension, Inmaculada Alonso, Marta Tortajada, Isabel Matas, S ílvia Gómez, Laura Ribera, Sònia Anglès, Camil Castelo-Branco Source Type: research

Anticholinergics and clinical outcomes among people with pre-existing dementia: A systematic review
Anticholinergic medications are commonly used for symptomatic management of a variety of conditions such as Parkinson's Disease, respiratory disorders and urinary incontinence [1]. Additionally, a large variety of prescribed medications such as antipsychotics or antidepressants and over-the-counter medications such as first generation antihistamines have anticholinergic properties that are unnecessary to the primary therapeutic activity [2]. Medications with anticholinergic properties are associated with adverse health outcomes, including blurred vision, urinary retention, tachycardia, hallucinations and delirium [3]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - June 19, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Kate Wang, Janine Alan, Amy T Page, Evelyn Dimopoulos, Christopher Etherton-Beer Source Type: research

Editorial board
(Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - June 14, 2021 Category: Primary Care Source Type: research

Hysterectomy, non-malignant gynecological diseases, and the risk of incident hypertension: The E3N prospective cohort
Hypertension is the main risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD), which are the primary cause of death in women [1]. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that the proportion of deaths attributable to CVD is higher in women (49%) than in men (40%) [1]. An increase in the incidence of CVD has been observed in younger women (under 60 years old) due to the modernization of lifestyle over the past decades [1, 2]. Better knowledge is therefore needed to fill the gender gap and improve cardiovascular health in women [3]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - June 12, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Anne-Laure Madika, Conor James MacDonald, Amandine Gelot, Sixtine Hitier, Claire Mounier-Vehier, Guillaume B éraud, Marina Kvaskoff, Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Fabrice Bonnet Source Type: research

Age- and sex-specific risk of urogenital infections in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors: a population-based self-controlled case-series study
Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are antidiabetic drugs that increase urinary glucose excretion by blocking sodium-glucose exchange of SGLT2 [1,2]. The use of this new class of antidiabetic agents is expected to expand due to the beneficial cardiovascular and renal outcomes shown in recent clinical trials and observational studies. In a recent trial, dapagliflozin significantly reduced hospitalization for heart failure and cardiac death in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who had or were at risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and showed a renal composite outcome [3,4]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - June 12, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Minkyong Kang, Kyu-Nam Heo, Young-Mi Ah, Bo Ram Yang, Ju-Yeun Lee, Lee Source Type: research

Handgrip strength as a predictor of incident hypertension in the middle-aged and older population: The TCLSIH cohort study
Hypertension remains one of the most important and modifiable risk factors for disease and death worldwide [1]. Hypertension is related to multiple cardiovascular and renal outcomes, including coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, cognitive impairment, renal impairment, and visual impairment [2-4]. Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are responsible for almost 17 million deaths worldwide, with hypertension accounting for 55% [5]. The global prevalence of hypertension is rapidly increasing due to an ageing population, urbanization and associated lifestyle changes. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - June 10, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Yeqing Gu, Jun Dong, Ge Meng, Qing Zhang, Li Liu, Hongmei Wu, Shunming Zhang, Yawen Wang, Tingjing Zhang, Xuena Wang, Shaomei Sun, Xing Wang, Qiyu Jia, Kun Song, Qiang Liu, Kaijun Niu Source Type: research

Screening for intrinsic capacity impairments as markers of increased risk of frailty and disability in the context of integrated care for older people: Secondary analysis of MAPT
The Integrated Care for Older People (ICOPE) approach, launched by the World Health Organisation (WHO), provides a function and person-centered model to adapt health systems for population aging. The main goal of the ICOPE strategy is to maintain optimal functional levels in older adults and avoid or delay care dependency as much as possible [1]. Intrinsic capacity (IC), a crucial element to promote healthy aging, is the composite of an individual's physical and mental capacities. To identify people at risk for care dependency, the ICOPE health care pathway starts by screening for impairments in five IC domains (ICOPE Step...
Source: Maturitas - June 2, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Emmanuel Gonz ález-Bautista, Philipe de Souto Barreto, Sandrine Andrieu, Yves Rolland, Bruno Vellas, for the MAPT/DSA group (members are listed under ‘Contributors’) Source Type: research

Non-use of information and communication technology as a predictor of frailty in postmenopausal midlife and older women
Frailty is a clinically recognizable state in which the ability to cope with stressors is compromised by increased vulnerability brought on by decline in physiological reserve and function [1]. Attributes of this condition include increased risk of hospital admissions, falls, disability, institutionalization and mortality [2,3]. Ageing is a main determinant of frailty, although younger people may be frail as a result of the accumulation of specific deficits in organs or systems [4]. Frailty, therefore, has become a crucial variable in every strategy addressing healthy ageing. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - May 31, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Alicia Garc ía-Vigara, Antonio Cano, Julio Fernández-Garrido, JA Carbonell-Asíns, Juan J Tarín, M. Luz Sánchez-Sánchez Source Type: research

Menopausal symptoms and work: a narrative review of women's experiences in casual, informal, or precarious jobs
Governments, employers, and trade unions are increasingly developing “menopause at work” policies for female staff. Many of the world's most marginalised women work, however, in more informal or insecure jobs, beyond the scope of such employment protections. This narrative review focuses upon the health impact of such casual work upon menopausal women, and specif ically upon the menopausal symptoms they experience. Casual work, even in less-then-ideal conditions, is not inherently detrimental to the wellbeing of menopausal women; for many, work helps manage the social and emotional challenges of the menopause t...
Source: Maturitas - May 31, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Heather Yoeli, Jane Macnaughton, Sarah McLusky Source Type: research

Symptomatic Menopause: Additional Challenges for Incarcerated Women
The global prison population, especially for incarcerated women, has been rapidly increasing over the past four decades [1]. In 1980 there were 26,378 US women incarcerated. By 2019, this number increased to 222,455 [2]. The menopausal and postmenopausal women's incarceration rates also are increasing [3, 4]. However, despite these increasing numbers, there are limited data on the medical services currently offered to these women, and accessing data are available is difficult, especially in lower-income countries. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - May 31, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Eliana Schach, Jaineel Kothari, Evan Perkiss, Juana Hutchinson-Colas, Heather Turock, James McGreevey, NJ Commission on Women's Reentry Health Committee Source Type: research

Non-use of information and communication technologies as a predictor of frailty in postmenopausal midlife and older women
. Frailty is a clinically discernible state in which decreased physiological reserve and function result in a reduced ability to cope with stressors. Information and communication technology (ICT) has been proposed as an aid against frailty, yet use of ICT among older people, particularly women, is an understudied area. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - May 31, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Alicia Garc ía-Vigara, Antonio Cano, Julio Fernandez-Garrido, JA Carbonell-Asíns, Juan J Tarín, M.Luz Sánchez-Sánchez Source Type: research

Challenges in menopausal care of immigrant women
The menopausal transition is a normal life phase and occurs on average between 45 to 55 years of age [1]. There are a number of physical and psychological symptoms that can accompany the menopausal transition especially vasomotor and urogenital symptoms, and mood changes. The menopausal transition and postmenopausal life have been linked to increased risks of chronic non-communicable conditions which can be mitigated by following a healthy lifestyle including regular exercise and a balanced diet [2]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - May 29, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Dr Karin A. Stanzel, Dr Karin Hammarberg, Professor Jane Fisher Source Type: research

Carbohydrate quality index: its relationship to menopausal symptoms in postmenopausal women
The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between carbohydrate quality intake and menopausal symptoms. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - May 28, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Saman Mohsenian, Sakineh Shabbidar, Fereydoun Siassi, Mostafa Qorbani, Shahla Khosravi, Maryam Abshirini, Zahra Aslani, Gity Sotoudeh Source Type: research

The Dark Side of the Moon: Global challenges in the distribution of vaccines and implementation of vaccination plans against COVID-19
Concomitantly with the start of the pandemic, the pursuit of effective vaccines began and developed with great success, and mass vaccination campaigns had commenced by the end of 2020. The first quarter of 2021 saw countries such as Israel, the United Kingdom and the United States advancing at great pace in the vaccination programs, while other countries, mainly in the southern hemisphere, were just starting. By the beginning of April, 30 countries had not received a single dose and only 0.57% of the African population was vaccinated [1]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - May 26, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Cristina Mesa-Vieira, Felipe Botero-Rodr íguez, Andrea Padilla-Muñoz, Oscar H. Franco, Carlos Gómez-Restrepo Source Type: research

Are vitamin D deficiency and VDR gene polymorphisms associated with high blood pressure as defined by the ACC/AHA 2017 criteria in postmenopausal women?
The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) have issued a new guideline for the diagnosis and management of high blood pressure/systemic arterial hypertension that proposes more stringent cutoffs for high blood pressure, thus leading to a substantial increase in the prevalence of systemic hypertension [1]. Postmenopausal women may present an unfavorable phenotype tied to aging, decreased estrogen secretion by the ovaries, or both. This phenotype is expressed by an adverse lipid profile, insulin resistance, and elevated blood pressure, which collectively contribute to an increased risk of c...
Source: Maturitas - May 23, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Bet ânia Rodrigues dos Santos, Gislaine Casanova, Thais Rasia da Silva, Lucas Bandeira Marchesan, Karen Oppermann, Poli Mara Spritzer Source Type: research

The effect of exercise training on blood pressure in menopause and postmenopausal women: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials
The prevalence of hypertension is higher in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women. Regular exercise training has been shown to be effective in addressing hypertension. The aim of this systematic review was to synthesize the effect of exercise training on systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) in menopausal and postmenopausal women.This review was reported according to the PRISMA statement and registered in PROSPERO. The literature search was done in MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL and ClinicalTrials. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - May 23, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Andr és F. Loaiza-Betancur, Iván Chulvi-Medrano, Víctor A. Diaz-López, Cinta Gómez-Tomás Source Type: research

At the heart of the matter: cardiovascular health challenges among incarcerated women
According to Eurostat, in 2018, half a million people were incarcerated in the European Union (EU) [1]. Between the years 2008 and 2018, 1 in 20 adult incarcerated individuals in the EU were women, with a stable increase and a constant rate across Europe [1,2]. On the other hand, in the USA, the respective proportion of female detainees is rising, with 9.8% of the total incarcerated population during 2016, being women [3]. It appears that in the EU, women imprisonment rates are lower and more stable as compared to the US [1,3], due to the collateral results of the U.S. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - May 22, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Maria G. Grammatikopoulou, Maria Α. Lampropoulou, Maria Milapidou, Dimitrios G. Goulis Source Type: research

Editorial board
(Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - May 21, 2021 Category: Primary Care Source Type: research

Lessons learnt from a nosocomial COVID-19 outbreak in a geriatric acute care ward with a high attack rate
We report a SARS-CoV-2 epidemic in a hospital geriatric acute care unit (GACU). We aim i) to describe the characteristics of the spread to both patients and HCWs, and ii) to provide guidance regarding prevention. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - May 20, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: H élène Cormier, Antoine Brangier, Caroline Lefeuvre, Marine Asfar, Cédric Annweiler, Clément Legeay Source Type: research

Association Between Sleep Duration and Augmentation Index in Post-menopausal Women: A Moderating Role of Depressive Symptoms
Sleep has been recognized as a public health issue since the discovery of its impact on cardiovascular health [1]. While the need for proper sleep has garnered greater importance, approximately 35% of individuals in the United States reportedly sleep for less than 7 h, which is insufficient, according to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [2]. Moreover, the prevalence of reported sleep disturbance has increased, owing largely to high levels of insomnia in middle-aged women [3]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - May 1, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Lee Ga Bin, Kim Hyeon Chang, Jung Sun Jae Source Type: research

Joint association of physical activity and sleep difficulties with the incidence of hypertension in mid-age Australian women
The prevalence of hypertension and the accompanying burden of disease increases with age [1]. Modification of lifestyle behaviours to lower hypertension risk is a priority for the primary prevention and management of hypertension. Two behaviours associated with hypertension risk are physical inactivity and poor sleep [2, 3]. It is well established that higher levels of physical activity are associated with reduced risk of hypertension [3]. Healthy sleep (i.e., duration, quality and timing of sleep that leaves a person feeling refreshed and alert throughout the day [4]), and indicators of good quality sleep (i.e., absence o...
Source: Maturitas - April 17, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Mitch J DUNCAN, Elizabeth G HOLLIDAY, Stina OFTEDAL, Matthew BUMAN, Wendy J BROWN Source Type: research

Decline in anti-M üllerian hormone concentrations following radioactive iodine treatment in women with differentiated thyroid cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, accounting for 1 –2% of all cancers [1]. Its incidence has increased during the last two decades (from 7.1 cases per 100,000 in 2000 to 17.6 cases per 100,000 in 2013 in the United States) [2], probably due to the increased use of ultrasonography and other imaging modalities for screening [3]. Concerning females, thyroid cancer incidence for the period 1975–2009 increased from 6.5 to 14.9 cases per 100,000 women [4], ranking it as the third most common type of female malignancy [4,5]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - April 14, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Panagiotis Anagnostis, Panagiota Florou, Julia K. Bosdou, Grigorios F. Grimbizis, Ioannis Iakovou, Efstratios M. Kolibianakis, Dimitrios G. Goulis Tags: Review article Source Type: research

Metabolic Profile of Women with Premature Ovarian Insufficiency Compared with that of Age-Matched Healthy Controls
Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) is an enigmatic gynecological, endocrine syndrome described as amenorrhea due to the loss of ovarian function under the age of 40 years [1-3], and is characterized by elevated levels of gonadotrophins and decreased levels of estradiol [4]. The incidence of POI has been estimated to be approximately 1% by the age of 40 [5], and 0.01% by the age of 20 [6]. The clinical presentation of POI is highly heterogeneous and can be associated with delayed puberty, primary amenorrhea, or secondary amenorrhea before the age of 40 [7]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - April 14, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Yizhou Huang, Yifei Lv, Tongyun Qi, Zhou Luo, Xingjun Meng, Qian Ying, Die Li, Chunming Li, Yibing Lan, Ketan Chu, Dongxia Fu, Peiqiong Chen, Wenxian Xu, Yingxian Jia, Saisai Li, Xiaoping Cen, Li Li, Ling Xu, Linjuan Ma, Jianhong Zhou Source Type: research

Decline in concentrations of anti-Mullerian hormone following radioactive iodine treatment in women with differentiated thyroid cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, accounting for 1 –2% of all cancers [1]. Its incidence has increased during the last two decades (from 7.1 cases per 100,000 in 2000 to 17.6 cases per 100,000 in 2013 in the United States) [2], probably due to the increased use of ultrasonography and other imaging modalities for screening [3]. Concerning females, thyroid cancer incidence for the period 1975–2009 increased from 6.5 to 14.9 cases per 100,000 women [4], ranking it as the third most common type of female malignancy [4, 5]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - April 14, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Panagiotis Anagnostis, Panagiota Florou, Julia K. Bosdou, Grigorios F. Grimbizis, Ioannis Iakovou, Efstratios M. Kolibianakis, Dimitrios G. Goulis Source Type: research

Effect of menopause on cerebral artery blood flow velocity and cerebrovascular reactivity: Systematic review and meta-analysis
Healthy ageing is associated with an increased risk of chronic disease including cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease [1, 2]. For females, this coincides with the onset of menopause and the decline in female reproductive hormones [3, 4]. Oestrogen plays an important role in regulating vascular function, acting directly on the vascular endothelium via the production of nitric oxide [5, 6]. Indeed, a recent systematic review and meta-analysis reported that the variations in oestrogen during the menstrual cycle exerts a small cyclic effect on peripheral conduit artery endothelial function [7]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - April 14, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Stefanie L Ruediger, Jodie L Koep, Shelley E Keating, Faith K Pizzey, Jeff S Coombes, Tom G Bailey Source Type: research

Topical estrogens and non-hormonal preparations for postmenopausal vulvovaginal atrophy: An EMAS clinical guide
Vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA), a component of genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM), is caused by estrogen deficiency. It is characterized by symptoms of dryness, burning, itching and dyspareunia [1]. It is well established that it has a negative impact on a woman's general and sexual quality of life as well as the quality of her personal relationships [2]. VVA is also associated with urinary tract problems, such as frequent urination, urge incontinence and recurrent urinary tract infections. GSM includes both genital and urinary symptoms [1]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - April 13, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Angelica Lind én Hirschberg, Johannes Bitzer, Antonio Cano, Iuliana Ceausu, Peter Chedraui, Fatih Durmusoglu, Risto Erkkola, Dimitrios G. Goulis, Ludwig Kiesel, Patrice Lopes, Amos Pines, Mick van Trotsenburg, Margaret Rees, Irene Lambrinoudaki Source Type: research

The diagnosis of endometrial cancer in women with asymptomatic endometrial polyp does not increase survival rates: an israel gynecologic oncology group study
Endometrial polyps are one of the most common gynecologic conditions. The prevalence of endometrial polyps ranges between 7.8%-34.9%, depending on the study population [1]. Most polyps are asymptomatic. Due to the extensive use of transvaginal ultrasound as a part of the gynecologic assessment, the diagnosis of asymptomatic women with endometrial polyps is increasing [2]. The incidental diagnosis in asymptomatic cases could lead to overtreatment and unnecessary invasive procedures. In a retrospective cohort of 1070 women who underwent office hysteroscopy, Scrimin et al. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - April 9, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Ahmet Namazov, Limor Helpman, Ram Eitan, Zvi Vaknin, Ofer Lavie, Alon Ben-Arie, Amnon Amit, Tally Levy, Michael Volodarsky, Ilan Atlas, Ilan Bruchim, Ofer Gemer Source Type: research