Metabolic Profile of Women with Premature Ovarian Insufficiency Compared with that of Age-Matched Healthy Controls
Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) is an enigmatic gynecological, endocrine syndrome described as amenorrhea due to the loss of ovarian function under the age of 40 years [1-3], and is characterized by elevated levels of gonadotrophins and decreased levels of estradiol [4]. The incidence of POI has been estimated to be approximately 1% by the age of 40 [5], and 0.01% by the age of 20 [6]. The clinical presentation of POI is highly heterogeneous and can be associated with delayed puberty, primary amenorrhea, or secondary amenorrhea before the age of 40 [7]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - April 14, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Yizhou Huang, Yifei Lv, Tongyun Qi, Zhou Luo, Xingjun Meng, Qian Ying, Die Li, Chunming Li, Yibing Lan, Ketan Chu, Dongxia Fu, Peiqiong Chen, Wenxian Xu, Yingxian Jia, Saisai Li, Xiaoping Cen, Li Li, Ling Xu, Linjuan Ma, Jianhong Zhou Source Type: research

Decline in concentrations of anti-Mullerian hormone following radioactive iodine treatment in women with differentiated thyroid cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, accounting for 1 –2% of all cancers [1]. Its incidence has increased during the last two decades (from 7.1 cases per 100,000 in 2000 to 17.6 cases per 100,000 in 2013 in the United States) [2], probably due to the increased use of ultrasonography and other imaging modalities for screening [3]. Concerning females, thyroid cancer incidence for the period 1975–2009 increased from 6.5 to 14.9 cases per 100,000 women [4], ranking it as the third most common type of female malignancy [4, 5]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - April 14, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Panagiotis Anagnostis, Panagiota Florou, Julia K. Bosdou, Grigorios F. Grimbizis, Ioannis Iakovou, Efstratios M. Kolibianakis, Dimitrios G. Goulis Source Type: research

Effect of menopause on cerebral artery blood flow velocity and cerebrovascular reactivity: Systematic review and meta-analysis
Healthy ageing is associated with an increased risk of chronic disease including cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease [1, 2]. For females, this coincides with the onset of menopause and the decline in female reproductive hormones [3, 4]. Oestrogen plays an important role in regulating vascular function, acting directly on the vascular endothelium via the production of nitric oxide [5, 6]. Indeed, a recent systematic review and meta-analysis reported that the variations in oestrogen during the menstrual cycle exerts a small cyclic effect on peripheral conduit artery endothelial function [7]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - April 14, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Stefanie L Ruediger, Jodie L Koep, Shelley E Keating, Faith K Pizzey, Jeff S Coombes, Tom G Bailey Source Type: research

Topical estrogens and non-hormonal preparations for postmenopausal vulvovaginal atrophy: An EMAS clinical guide
Vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA), a component of genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM), is caused by estrogen deficiency. It is characterized by symptoms of dryness, burning, itching and dyspareunia [1]. It is well established that it has a negative impact on a woman's general and sexual quality of life as well as the quality of her personal relationships [2]. VVA is also associated with urinary tract problems, such as frequent urination, urge incontinence and recurrent urinary tract infections. GSM includes both genital and urinary symptoms [1]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - April 13, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Angelica Lind én Hirschberg, Johannes Bitzer, Antonio Cano, Iuliana Ceausu, Peter Chedraui, Fatih Durmusoglu, Risto Erkkola, Dimitrios G. Goulis, Ludwig Kiesel, Patrice Lopes, Amos Pines, Mick van Trotsenburg, Margaret Rees, Irene Lambrinoudaki Source Type: research

The diagnosis of endometrial cancer in women with asymptomatic endometrial polyp does not increase survival rates: an israel gynecologic oncology group study
Endometrial polyps are one of the most common gynecologic conditions. The prevalence of endometrial polyps ranges between 7.8%-34.9%, depending on the study population [1]. Most polyps are asymptomatic. Due to the extensive use of transvaginal ultrasound as a part of the gynecologic assessment, the diagnosis of asymptomatic women with endometrial polyps is increasing [2]. The incidental diagnosis in asymptomatic cases could lead to overtreatment and unnecessary invasive procedures. In a retrospective cohort of 1070 women who underwent office hysteroscopy, Scrimin et al. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - April 9, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Ahmet Namazov, Limor Helpman, Ram Eitan, Zvi Vaknin, Ofer Lavie, Alon Ben-Arie, Amnon Amit, Tally Levy, Michael Volodarsky, Ilan Atlas, Ilan Bruchim, Ofer Gemer Source Type: research

Editorial board
(Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - April 6, 2021 Category: Primary Care Source Type: research

Eligibility criteria for menopausal hormone therapy (MHT): a consortium of scientific societies for the use of MHT in women with medical conditions. Research protocol
The data collected during the last two decades on the effects of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) provide solid information for effective long term-treatment. This may be helpful in the management of menopause symptoms, possible menopause-associated complications, such as osteoporotic fractures, cognitive impairment or cardiovascular conditions, as well as improvement of the quality of life [1-4]. Based on all this information, international societies have concluded that the benefits of MHT exceed the risks in healthy asymptomatic postmenopausal women when MHT is initiated within 10 years of the menopause or when they are ...
Source: Maturitas - April 3, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Nicolas Mendoza, Isabel Ram írez, Ester De la Viuda, Juan Carlos Vázquez, Ivan Solá, Antonio Cano Source Type: research

Leisure activities and psychological wellbeing reduce the risk of cognitive impairment among older adults with hearing difficulty: a longitudinal study in China
Aging has become a global public health concern because of the rapidly increasing number of older adults. As estimated by World Population Prospects, the proportion of people sixty years or more 60 years will double by 2050 [1]. Neurologic problems are linked to aging, with cognitive impairment and hearing loss being the prominent conditions [2]. Currently, the aforesaid issues are highly prevalent among the elderly population [3]. Worldwide, approximately 50 million people suffer from dementia, and this number is likely to increase three-fold by 2050 [4]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - April 2, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Lele Chen Source Type: research

The atherogenic index of plasma is related to a degraded bone microarchitecture assessed by the trabecular bone score in postmenopausal women: The Camargo Cohort Study
The interplay between lipid and bone metabolism is an active field of research, due to the growing evidence for a biological linkage between two of the leading public health problems; osteoporosis and atherosclerosis [1]. Several studies have mainly addressed the relationship between some conventional lipid parameters and bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover markers, although results have been inconsistent and even contradictory [2]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - March 25, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Jos é L. Hernandez, José M. Olmos, Emilio Pariente, Carmen Ramos, Josefina Martínez, Daniel Nan Source Type: research

Response to the Retraction of Papers by Yoshihiro Sato - A Review of Vitamin D and Parkinson's Disease
In light of the recent retraction of Yoshihiro Sato's publications due to findings of fraudulent data, I and the editors of Maturitas felt it appropriate to reassess the review I authored (then under the name Peterson) published in 2014 entitled ‘A review of vitamin D and Parkinson's disease’, in which Sato's publications played a prominent role. [1] Not all Sato's papers have been retracted at this time, but we feel it necessary to point out which assessments of the evidence contained in the review may have been affected had the public ations from Sato not been included. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - March 24, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Amie (Peterson) Hiller Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Role of vitamin D supplementation in aging patients with COVID-19
Good nutrition and a healthy lifestyle strengthen the immune system. Currently, the world is facing the COVID-19 pandemic and this has once again highlighted the importance of nutrition, particularly vitamin D. Vitamin D is a unique micronutrient which plays a critical role in a host of physiologies, including proper functioning of the immune system and modulation of inflammatory responses. Evidence has shown that low vitamin D levels have associations with increased risk of COVID-19 infection; in fact, individuals deficient in vitamin D are reported to have a 54% greater SARS-CoV-2 positivity rate [1]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - March 16, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Hira Shakoor, Jack Feehan, Ayesha S. Al Dhaheri, Leila Cheikh Ismail, Habiba I. Ali, Salma Hashem Alhebsi, Vasso Apostolopoulos, Lily Stojanovska Source Type: research

What women think about menopause: an Italian survey
Menopause is the end of female reproductive function corresponding to the disappearance of menses for 12 months or amenorrhea ≥ 6 months with biochemical confirmation (FSH > 40 UI/l and Estradiol (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - March 15, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Concetta Maria Vaccaro, Anna Capozzi, Giuseppe Ettore, Roberto Bernorio, Angelo Cagnacci, Marco Gambacciani, Vittoria Coletta, Silvia Maffei, Rossella Elena Nappi, Giovanni Scambia, Elsa Viora, Stefano Lello Source Type: research

Editorial board
(Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - March 13, 2021 Category: Primary Care Source Type: research

Serum uric acid is associated with incident hip fractures in women and men – results from a large Austrian population-based cohort study
Hip fractures, the vast majority of which occur after the age of 50 as low-trauma fragility fractures, are amongst the most severe implications of osteoporosis [1]. Serum markers that predict hip fracture risk are scarce. Several parameters like osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, procollagen type 1 aminoterminal propeptide (PINP), and C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) reflect current metabolic activity of bone and are routinely used to monitor efficacy of anti-osteoporotic treatment [2], but their utility for predicting hip fractures is controversial [3,4]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - March 8, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Oliver Preyer, Hans Concin, Gabriele Nagel, Emanuel Zitt, Hanno Ulmer, Wolfgang Brozek Source Type: research

Positive association of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with lumbar and femoral neck bone mineral density in postmenopausal women
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and musculoskeletal disorders, including osteoporosis, are responsible for a considerable proportion of the morbidity and mortality burden associated with ageing [1]. Epidemiological and clinical studies have found a relationship between them [2,3], which is further supported by shared risk factors such as sedentariness, smoking and in women, hypoestrogenism [4 –6]. Moreover, both diseases share an inflammatory mechanism in their respective pathogeneses [7–10]. Attention has also centered the potential involvement of lipids, which play a critical role in the development of atheroscl...
Source: Maturitas - March 7, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Irene Zolfaroli, Ester Ortiz, Miguel- Ángel García-Pérez, J.J. Hidalgo-Mora, Juan J. Tarín, Antonio Cano Source Type: research

Lowered progesterone metabolite excretion and a variable LH excretion pattern are associated with vasomotor symptoms but not negative mood in the early perimenopausal transition: Study of Women ’s Health Across the Nation
The menopausal transition (MT) is characterized by changes in ovarian function and increasing circulating gonadotropin levels [1 –4] with almost 90% of women experiencing regular menstrual cycles up to the last five years before their final menstrual period (FMP) and over 20% retaining normal ovarian function within one year prior to their FMP [5]. Some women have a form of irregular menstrual cycles well before their FMP, indicating a progressive breakdown of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis with increased symptoms. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - March 5, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Daniel S. McConnell, Sybil L. Crawford, Nancy A Gee, Joyce T. Bromberger, Rasa Kazlauskaite, Nancy E. Avis, Carolyn J. Crandall, Hadine Joffe, Howard M. Kravitz, Carol A. Derby, Ellen B. Gold, Samar R. El Khoudary, Sioban Harlow, Gail A. Greendale, Bill L Source Type: research

Efficacy and safety of a new vaginal gel for the treatment of symptoms associated with vulvovaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women: A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study
Among the multitude of complaints related to the lowering of estrogen in the menopause, those affecting the genitourinary tract are reported by at least 50% of menopausal women [1 –4]. The most common signs and symptoms of vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) are dryness, dyspareunia, redness, itching, with occasional discharge and/or bleeding [5]. Recently, genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) is a new definition to encompass even other sexual and urinary symptoms associated wi th VVA[6]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - March 4, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Francesco De Seta, Salvatore Caruso, Giovanni Di Lorenzo, Federico Romano, Mariateresa Mirandola, Rossella E. Nappi Source Type: research

Sex and Gender Gap in Spinal Cord Injury Research: Focus on Cardiometabolic Diseases. A mini review
Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that renders a person with a lifelong disability and leads to overall health impairment. SCI occurs in approximately 485 cases per million inhabitants and causes a significant burden to the healthcare system because of its chronicity. Men tend to be injured at an earlier age in comparison to women and present around 80% of the overall cases [1]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - March 4, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Peter Francis Raguindin, Taulant Muka, Marija Glisic Tags: Review article Source Type: research

Postmenopausal osteoporosis coexisting with other metabolic diseases: Treatment considerations
Osteoporosis is the most common metabolic bone disease. An imbalance in bone turnover lies at the root of its pathogenesis, i.e. a relatively higher bone resorption than bone formation rate, leading to bone mass loss and low-energy fractures [1]. Postmenopausal osteoporosis is the most common type of osteoporosis, characterized by an increasing incidence with aging [2]. Given the high life expectancy in Western countries, the number of postmenopausal women at risk of osteoporotic fractures is expected to rise in the next decades, thus compromising the quality of life of the affected women and further expanding the direct a...
Source: Maturitas - March 1, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Stergios A. Polyzos, Athanasios D. Anastasilakis, Zoe A. Efstathiadou, Maria P. Yavropoulou, Polyzois Makras Source Type: research

The twilight of the immune system: The impact of immunosenescence in aging
The continuing advance of life expectancy worldwide is a triumph of medical research and health policy, and is associated with enormous benefits to the global community. With this, however, comes an imperative to better understand and manage conditions that disproportionately affect older adults. A key part of this is understanding the many and varied impacts of aging on human physiology, and how they translate into clinically relevant diseases, or health outcomes. The modern geroscience paradigm seeks to explore the processes underpinning aging, and identifies a number of key pillars of age-related physiological changes, ...
Source: Maturitas - February 25, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Jack Feehan, Nicholas Tripodi, Vasso Apostolopoulos Source Type: research

Boon or Bane? Using Antidepressants After Stroke
Depression affects 1 in every 3 adults within the first six months after a stroke [1]. In addition to being common, it increases the burden of illness and hinders recovery from stroke [2], so that adequate measures to treat and prevent depression in this population are needed. The results of the fluoxetine in motor recovery of patients with acute ischaemic stroke (FLAME) trial (n  = 118) showed that stroke survivors treated with fluoxetine had better motor function than their counterparts treated with placebo for 3 months [3]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - February 24, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Osvaldo P. Almeida, Joshua Jones, Graeme J. Hankey, Maree Hackett Source Type: research

A ‘case-mix’ approach to understand adherence trajectories for a falls prevention exercise intervention: A longitudinal cohort study
Falls are a substantial public health problem in terms of costs and consequences. Falls can be reduced by exercise [1], yet adherence rates to falls prevention exercise interventions are often low [2]. Greater adherence to exercise programmes is linked to improvements in intervention outcomes [3]. Most studies report 50 % adherence levels or lower [4 –6]. In the US alone (2015), the medical costs of non-fatal and fatal falls was estimated at $50 billion USD ($754 million of these costs were attributable to fatal falls) [7]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - February 21, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Jennifer C. Davis, Karim Khan, Mohammad Ali Mansournia, Ahmad Khosravi, Ryan E. Rhodes, Patrick Chan, Mary Zhao, Deborah A. Jehu, Naaz Parmar, Teresa Liu-Ambrose Source Type: research

Is COVID-19 the worst pandemic?
Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19), the clinical disease caused by infection with the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, has swept through countries around the world. With a few exceptions (mostly small island nations), every nation has been impacted by SARS-CoV-2 virus, making it a true pandemic disease. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - February 6, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Jack Feehan, Vasso Apostolopoulos Source Type: research

Dual trajectories of physical activity and blood lipids in midlife women: The Study of Women ’s Health Across the Nation
Midlife women experience increases in low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels [1,2], creating a lipid profile associated with high cardiovascular disease risk [3,4]. Additionally, the quality of HDL molecules in midlife women seems to be compromised, further raising their risk for cardiovascular disease [1,5,6]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - February 6, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Sylvia E. Badon, Kelley Pettee Gabriel, Carrie Karvonen-Gutierrez, Barbara Sternfeld, Ellen B. Gold, L. Elaine Waetjen, Catherine Lee, Lyndsay A. Avalos, Samar R. El Khoudary, Monique M. Hedderson Source Type: research

Evaluation of menopausal hormone therapy use in Korea (2002 –2013): A nationwide cohort study
Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), also called hormone replacement therapy (HRT), is the most effective treatment for menopause-related symptoms and preventing bone loss and fracture [1]. Most women experience natural menopause before the age of 55 years [2,3]. In addition, it is known that 50% –80% of climacteric women experience vasomotor symptoms (VMS) such as hot flushes and night sweats, and the average duration of VMS is 7 years or more [4,5]. The use of MHT may be appropriate for treating women with VMS, GSM, long-term estrogen deficiency, and a variety of chronic diseases such as osteoporosis [1,4–12]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - February 6, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Chan Young Park, Joong-Yeon Lim, Won-Ho Kim, So Young Kim, Hyun-Young Park Source Type: research

Effects of unsupervised behavioral and pelvic floor muscle training programs on nocturia, urinary urgency, and urinary frequency in postmenopausal women: secondary analysis of a randomized, two-arm, parallel design, superiority trial (TULIP study)
Nocturia, urinary urgency, and urinary frequency are prevalent and bothersome storage-type lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) among women. In 2018, the number of women aged 20 years and over with any storage-type LUTS was estimated to be 1.7 billion globally [1]. Specifically, the estimated number of nocturia (frequency ≥1), urinary urgency and frequency among women were 1.3 billion, 297 million, and 186 million, respectively [1]. Nocturia and urinary urgency are among the most bothersome LUTS both at individual and population levels [2]; women aged 25 to 84 years reported that an average inter-void interval shor ter t...
Source: Maturitas - February 4, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Chen Wu, Diane Newman, Todd A. Schwartz, Baiming Zou, Janis Miller, Mary H. Palmer Source Type: research

Editorial board
(Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - February 2, 2021 Category: Primary Care Source Type: research

Healthy ageing in the time of COVID-19: A wake-up call for action
Since 2020, COVID-19 has been ravaging the globe, infecting and killing millions. People aged 60 years and over and those suffering from chronic illnesses are at particularly increased risk of severe infection and mortality [1,2]. Marginalization and discrimination based on age have surfaced in the current situation with the need to establish a triage system in prioritizing the delivery of healthcare to those with better chances of survival, which implies that, often, those of older age might not receive optimal care amidst shortages of resources [3]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - January 30, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Marilyne Menassa, Esther M.C. Vriend, Oscar H. Franco Source Type: research

Population-based norms for the Cervantes-SF short-form questionnaire assessing health-related quality of life in menopause
Menopause results from the loss of ovarian follicular activity. It is defined as the permanent cessation of menstruation, confirmed after 12 consecutive months of amenorrhea and generally occurs around the age of 50-52 years [1]. During the transition to menopause and postmenopause, women experience significant physical and psychological changes as a result of the variability in estrogen levels [2,3]. The impact of these symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is closely related to personal and socio-cultural characteristics which, in turn, have a decisive influence on how each woman perceives many of these chan...
Source: Maturitas - January 30, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Pluvio J. Coronado, Manuel Monroy, Mar ía Fasero, Rafael Sánchez-Borrego, Santiago Palacios, Javier Rejas, Miguel A. Ruiz, the AEEM collaborative group for the study of psychometric validation of the Cervantes Short-Form Source Type: research

SARS-CoV-2: To be or not to be vaccinated?
To be or not to be vaccinated? Since the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine is available, this question is on the minds of many. Presently, such vaccine hesitancy may be viewed as “abnormal”. Routine vaccinations are widely recognized as effective preventive interventions to reduce or eradicate viral illnesses, saving millions of lives throughout the world [1]. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine has been presented as the solution to exit th e worldwide health, socio-political, and economic crises [2,3]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - January 30, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Olivier Beauchet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Healthy ageing in the time of Covid19: a wake-up call for action
Since 2020, Covid19 has been ravaging the globe, infecting and killing millions. People aged 60 years and over and those suffering from chronic illnesses are at particularly increased risk of severe infection and mortality[1,2]. Marginalization and discrimination based on age have surfaced in the current situation with the need to establish a triage system in prioritizing the delivery of healthcare to those with better chances of survival, which implies that, often, those of older age might not receive optimal care amidst shortages of resources[3]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - January 30, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Marilyne Menassa, Esther M.C. Vriend, Oscar H. Franco Source Type: research

Prevalence and association of continuous polypharmacy and frailty among older women: A longitudinal analysis over 15 years
Medications are important in maintaining quality of life for many older people. As people age, they tend to develop multiple comorbidities and often require several medications. The concomitant use of many medications- polypharmacy, is a common geriatric syndrome [1]. Although there does not seem to be any consensus regarding its definition, polypharmacy is commonly referred to as the use of five or more medications [2], with 10 or more medications sometimes referred to as hyperpolypharmacy [2]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - January 27, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Kaeshaelya Thiruchelvam, Julie Byles, Syed Shahzad Hasan, Nicholas Egan, Therese Kairuz Source Type: research

Physical performance and risk of hip fracture in community-dwelling elderly people in China: A 4-year longitudinal cohort study
Hip fracture in the elderly is a major public health problem. The number of hip fractures is predicted to increase to 7.3 - 21.3 million globally and 5.9 million in China by 2050 [1,2]. Hip fractures cause morbidity, disability, and loss of independence worldwide [3,4], and a rising rate of fractures will markedly increase the associated economic burden in the coming decades [5]. Most hip fractures are a direct result of a fall [6], and poor neuromuscular function increases the risk of a fall in older adults [7,8]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - January 21, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Bi-Xia Zhong, Hai-Li Zhong, Guan-Qun Zhou, Wen-Qi Xu, Ying Lu, Qian Zhao Source Type: research

Bilateral oophorectomy and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in women with hepatitis C: a population-based study
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection typically causes chronic hepatitis. Based on the natural history of chronic hepatitis C, it is estimated that 10%-20% of patients will develop liver cirrhosis and 1%-5% will develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) within 20-30 years [1,2]. Patients with chronic HCV infection have been reported to have a 15-20-fold increased risk of HCC compared to uninfected patients [3]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - January 14, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Chao-Yu Chen, Ting-Yao Wang, Wei-Ming Chen, Kai-Hua Chen, Yao-Hsu Yang, Pau-Chung Chen, Vincent Chin-Hung Chen Source Type: research

Authors ’ response to Atee et al
We thank you for the opportunity to respond to the comments raised in Atee et al. ’s letter to the editor [1] and thank Mr Atee and his colleagues for their interest in our paper [2]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - January 13, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Lihui Pu, Wendy Moyle, Cindy Jones, Michael Todorovic Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Premature ovarian insufficiency: A toolkit for the primary care physician
Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) or hypergonadotropic hypogonadism refers to loss of ovarian activity, which leads to hypoestrogenism and amenorrhoea, before the age of 40 years. In women with spontaneous POI there may be intermittent resumption of ovarian activity in approximately 25% of women. The diagnosis of POI in a young woman has potentially life-changing physical and emotional consequences for the sufferer and her family. It is therefore important that the diagnosis is correct and that it is made in a timely manner. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - January 11, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Irene Lambrinoudaki, Stavroula A. Paschou, Mary Ann Lumsden, Stephanie Faubion, Evangelos Makrakis, Sophia Kalantaridou, Nick Panay Source Type: research

The effect of vitamin D plus protein supplementation on sarcopenia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
(Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - January 11, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Nifon K. Gkekas, Panagiotis Anagnostis, Vasileios Paraschou, Dimitrios Stamiris, Spilios Dellis, Eustathios Kenanidis, Michael Potoupnis, Eleftherios Tsiridis, Dimitrios G. Goulis Source Type: research

Timing and dosage of and adherence to hormone replacement therapy and fracture risk in women with menopausal syndrome in Taiwan: a nested case-control study
Osteoporosis is one of the menopause-related complications [1]. Approximately 40% of menopausal women experience osteoporotic fractures [2]. Osteoporosis is a multifactorial systemic skeletal disease, characterized by low bone mineral density and bone architectural deterioration, and results in bone fragility and, consequently, increased fracture risks [1,2]. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is an FDA-approved drug treatment that contains estrogen and/or progestogen. HRT is used in order to supplement menopausal women with exogenous hormones [3,4]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - January 8, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Cherry Yin-Yi Chang, Fuu-Jen Tsai, Jian-Shiun Chiou, Mu-Lin Chiu, Ting-Hsu Lin, Chiu-Chu Liao, Shao-Mei Huang, Wen-Miin Liang, Ying-Ju Lin Source Type: research

Comments on Pu et al. (2021), “The effect of a social robot intervention on sleep and motor activity of people living with dementia and chronic pain: A pilot randomized controlled trial”
We thank Pu and colleagues for their published study evaluating the effectiveness of PARO on sleep and motor activity in people living with dementia (PLWD) and chronic pain [1]. Such studies generate evidence on novel non-pharmacological/psychosocial interventions for behaviours and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) - a significant area of research for optimising the quality of dementia care. While we commend the authors ’ efforts in conducting this research, the findings of the study should be interpreted with caution for the following reasons: (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - January 6, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Mustafa Atee, Thomas Morris, Stephen Macfarlane, Colm Cunningham Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Differential diagnoses of endometrial thickness: a case report
Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease defined by the World Health Organization as a global priority. (1) Its main focus is pulmonary, affecting 10 million people in 2018. (1) There are also extrapulmonary forms such as lymph nodal, pleural and urogenital disease (FGTB) (2) that affects patients between 20 and 40 years of age, being rare in postmenopausal women (3). The real incidence is unknown due to its nonspecific clinical presentation and difficult diagnosis (2). (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - January 6, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Bruna Fernanda Bottura, Vanessa Alvarenga Bezerra, Rafael Salim, Mariano Tamura, Renato Moretti Marques Source Type: research

Comments on Pu et al. (2020), “The effect of a social robot intervention on sleep and motor activity of people living with dementia and chronic pain: A pilot randomized controlled trial”
We thank Pu and colleagues for their published study evaluating the effectiveness of PARO on sleep and motor activity in people living with dementia (PLWD) and chronic pain [1]. Such studies generate evidence on novel non-pharmacological/psychosocial interventions for behaviours and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) - a significant area of research for optimising the quality of dementia care. While we commend the authors ’ efforts in conducting this research, the findings of the study should be interpreted with caution for the following reasons: (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - January 6, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Mustafa Atee, Thomas Morris, Stephen Macfarlane, Colm Cunningham Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Changing levels of sex hormones and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) during a woman ’s life: implications for the efficacy and safety of novel antimigraine medications
Migraine is a highly prevalent, primary headache disorder. It is estimated that 15% of the world population suffers from migraine, representing a large socioeconomic burden [1]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - January 6, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Simone de Vries Lentsch, Elo ísa Rubio-Beltrán, Antoinette MaassenVanDenBrink Tags: Review article Source Type: research

Ultraviolet radiation as a predictor of sex hormone levels in postmenopausal women: A European multi-center study (ECRHS)
(Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - January 2, 2021 Category: Primary Care Authors: Kai Triebner, Ersilia Bifulco, Jose Barrera-G ómez, Xavier Basagaña, Bryndís Benediktsdóttir, Bertil Forsberg, Karl A Franklin, Vanessa Garcia-Larsen, Bénédicte Leynaert, Eva Lindberg, Jesús Martínez-Moratalla, Nerea Muniozguren-Agirre, Isabelle P Source Type: research

Exercise, Nutrition, and Combined Exercise and Nutrition in Older Adults with Sarcopenia: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis
Aging contributes to decreases in skeletal muscle mass and physical function, which increases the risk of sarcopenia [1]. Although different diagnosis criteria and cutoff points, the methods to measure muscle mass, and other factors may influence the prevalence of sarcopenia, the global prevalence of sarcopenia was nearly 10% for both male and female older adults according to a meta-analysis reported in 2017 [2]. Sarcopenia is associated with greater risk of falls, disability, hospitalization, and mortality in older adults [3]. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - December 31, 2020 Category: Primary Care Authors: Pei-Yu Wu, Kun-Siang Huang, Kuei-Min Chen, Chia-Pei Chou, Yu-Kang Tu Tags: Review Source Type: research

Editorial board
(Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - December 25, 2020 Category: Primary Care Source Type: research

What do we learn from the clinical and biological evaluation of the oral cavity in centenarians?
The increase of life expectancy, due to the progress in public health, medicine, economic and social development, leads to an increase in the world ’s population aging and, at the same time, in age-related disorders [1,2,3]. Dementia is the main cause of disability in elderly people and its prevalence increases with age with enormous economic costs of social and health spending [4]. Etiopathogenetic complexity of dementia, due to both environ mental and genetic mechanisms and the lack of availability of effective therapies, encourages to shed light on how to prevent cognitive pathologies in elderly. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - December 22, 2020 Category: Primary Care Authors: Katia Rupel, Mauro Tettamanti, Filomena Vella, Giulia Fontanel, Roberto Di Lenarda, Matteo Biasotto, Gabriella Marcon Source Type: research

Depression and the Risk of Fractures in Later Life: the Health In Men Cohort Study
Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide that affects people of all ages [1]. Its presence hinders recovery from other health conditions [2] and has been associated with increased risk of hazardous health events. Several studies have reported that a greater proportion of people with depression than without depression will have a bone fracture [3,4], although there is marked heterogeneity among published studies [4] and the possible role of confounding remains unclear. For example, people with depression are more likely to use antidepressant medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), w...
Source: Maturitas - December 21, 2020 Category: Primary Care Authors: Osvaldo P. Almeida, Graeme J. Hankey, Jonathan Golledge, Bu B. Yeap, Leon Flicker Source Type: research

Gender differences in the presentation, course and outcomes of primary hyperparathyroidism
Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is characterized by hypercalcemia and inappropriate elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) level. It is the third most common endocrine disorder after diabetes and thyroid disease, with an estimated prevalence of 1 to 7 cases per 1000 adults [1]. PHPT is more prevalent in women than in men, and its incidence increases with age in both sexes. In women, a significant increase occurs after menopause [1 –3]. Classically, PHPT targets the kidney and the skeleton. Surgery is the only potentially curable option for patients with PHPT. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - December 14, 2020 Category: Primary Care Authors: Tal Dadon, Gloria Tsvetov, Sigal Levi, Alexander Gorshtein, Ilana Slutzky-Shraga, Dania Hirsch Source Type: research

Assessment of the validity and acceptability of the online FRAIL scale in identifying frailty among older people in community settings
Frailty is a geriatric syndrome characterized by decreases in the functional reserve that places older persons at risk of falls, disability, hospitalization, and death [1]. It also durably reduces quality of life and put a high burden on the healthcare system, not only in terms of health but also in terms of healthcare costs [2]. However, frailty is easily overlooked because its manifestations can be subtle and slowly progressive, and this dismissed as normal ageing. (Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - December 14, 2020 Category: Primary Care Authors: Ruby Yu, Cecilia Tong, Grace Leung, Jean Woo Source Type: research

Editorial board
(Source: Maturitas)
Source: Maturitas - December 10, 2020 Category: Primary Care Source Type: research