Density-dependent decline of early horn growth in European mouflon
In this study, we investigated the effects of population density, environmental covariates and trophy hunting on horn development in a population of European mouflon Ovis aries musimon introduced to the Mediterranean region of Croatia in the early 1980s. The study population was subject to commercial trophy hunting on males since the mid-1980s. This allowed to analyse the temporal trend in early horn growth in 341 rams legally culled. Cohort-based linear model and analysis of deviance (ANODEV) revealed a significant negative trend in early horn growth, with a decline of ca. 10% over only 14 cohorts (1993 – 2007). The...
Source: Mammalian Biology - October 16, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships in feral pig populations from Argentina
The objective of this study is to genetically characterize the oldest feral pig populations in Argentina, making use of the mitochondrial control region (CR) and the amelogenin gene (AmelY), in order to determine their phylogenetic origin and corroborate its consistency with the historic information. The obtained results indicate that most of the feral pigs in Corrientes and Buenos Aires populations are positioned in the European subclades, E1-A and E1-C for CR, and HY1 and HY2 for AmelY. Despite this fact, a low frequency of individuals of Asian origin was found in populations from Buenos Aires, whereas none of them discl...
Source: Mammalian Biology - October 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

State of knowledge and potential distribution of the Colombian endemic brown hairy dwarf porcupine Coendou vestitus (Rodentia)
Publication date: Available online 1 October 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Héctor E. Ramírez-Chaves, María M. Torres-Martínez, Elkin A. Noguera-Urbano, Fernando C. Passos, Javier E. Colmenares-PinzónAbstractThe brown hairy dwarf porcupine Coendou vestitus is a small-sized endemic species, poorly studied since its description more than 110 years ago. It is known from only five localities in the Andes of Colombia. Here, we update the state of knowledge, and provide information on the known and potential distribution of this rare species. We reviewed the literature and examined bot...
Source: Mammalian Biology - October 3, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Mapping an elusive arboreal rodent: combining nocturnal acoustic surveys and citizen science data extends the known distribution of the edible dormouse (Glis glis) in the Czech Republic
Publication date: Available online 28 September 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Adamík Peter, Poledník Lukáš, Poledníková Kateřina, Romportl DušanAbstractSurveying mammals is always a challenge for field biologists. When those mammals are nocturnal and mostly arboreal, as in the case of the dormice (Gliridae), the task proves even more difficult. During the summers of 2015 and 2016 we carried out a national survey of edible dormouse (Glis glis) distribution in the Czech Republic. Twenty-one trained surveyors conducted acoustic nocturnal surveys in 640 mapping square...
Source: Mammalian Biology - September 29, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Implications of an agricultural mosaic in small mammal communities
Publication date: Available online 27 September 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Marina Falcão, Maria Adélia B. de Oliveira, Martín Alejandro MontesAbstractThe ideas that larger fragments have greater species richness and abundance, when compared to smaller fragments and altered environments, and that assemblage composition is different, was tested in an agricultural mosaic using data on small mammals. To achieve this, we sampled ten forest fragments of different sizes, small and large, as well as five areas in a sugarcane matrix, through the capture-mark-recapture method. The study was conducte...
Source: Mammalian Biology - September 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Jaguar density in a mosaic of disturbed/preserved areas in southeastern Mexico
Publication date: Available online 22 September 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Mircea G. Hidalgo-Mihart, Alejandro Jesús-de la Cruz, Fernando M. Contreras-Moreno, Rugieri Juárez-López, Yaribeth Bravata-de la Cruz, Diana Friedeberg, Pedro Bautista-RamírezAbstractJaguar populations in Mexico have been extensively reduced to the point where the species is considered Endangered. In south-eastern Mexico, jaguar density estimations have focused in the largest Jaguar Conservation Units (JCUs) but are lacking for the small, isolated JCUs where natural habitats are usually combined with farming ...
Source: Mammalian Biology - September 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Phylogeny and genetic structure of the Yellow ground squirrel, Spermophilus fulvus (Lichtenstein, 1823), in Iran
Publication date: September 2019Source: Mammalian Biology, Volume 98Author(s): Afsaneh Asgharzadeh, Mohammad Kaboli, Hassan Rajabi-Maham, Morteza NaderiAbstractOld world ground squirrels (genus Spermophilus) are distributed throughout the Holarctic and Palearctic regions, of which two Iranian species, the Yellow ground squirrel S. fulvus and the Asia Minor ground squirrel S. xanthoprymnus, comprise the southernmost distribution of the genus in the Palearctic. The two species are found in fragmented populations from northeastern to northwestern Iran, with S. fulvus being more common and widespread in the country. The enormo...
Source: Mammalian Biology - September 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

The relative influence of abiotic and biotic factors on suitable habitat of Old World fruit bats under current and future climate scenarios
Publication date: Available online 16 September 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): N. Arumoogum, M.C. Schoeman, S. RamdhaniAbstractThere is growing evidence that biotic factors such as predator-prey interactions play significant roles in driving species distribution across large spatial scales. The relative influence of abiotic and biotic factors on species distribution, however, may change under climate change. We investigated the relative influence of abiotic and biotic variables on the potential current and future distributions of three fruit bat species, Epomophorus angolensis (Gray, 1870), E. wahlbergi (Sundevall...
Source: Mammalian Biology - September 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Prevalence of zoonotic parasites in an endangered Iberian wolf (Canis lupus signatus) population in Portugal
Publication date: Available online 16 September 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Ana M. Figueiredo, Tânia Barros, Ana M. Valente, Carlos Fonseca, Luís Madeira de Carvalho, Rita Tinoco TorresAbstractAs a top predator, the Iberian wolf (Canis lupus signatus) plays a major role shaping interactions within food webs. Due to its conservation status in Portugal, i.e. endangered, it is important to understand the role of parasites in this population, since they can be a limiting factor for the population fitness and trophic interactions and, ultimately, their survival. From November 2017 to August 2018, 33 fre...
Source: Mammalian Biology - September 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Potential distribution and areas for conservation of four wild felid species in Mexico: conservation planning
Publication date: Available online 12 September 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): O. Monroy-Vilchis, Z. Zarco-González, M.M. Zarco-GonzálezAbstractKnowing the potential distribution of species helps to focus conservation efforts more effectively, mainly when dealing with endangered species. The aim of this study was to generate potential distribution models for four species of small wild felids in Mexico (Leopardus pardalis, Leopardus wiedii, Lynx rufus and Puma yagouaroundi). The models were generated based on felids presence records, and topographic, anthropic and vegetation drivers. We used 473 recor...
Source: Mammalian Biology - September 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Phylogeny and genetic structure of the Yellow ground squirrel (Spermophilus fulvus, Lichtenstein, 1823) in Iran
Publication date: Available online 13 September 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Afsaneh Asgharzadeh, Mohammad Kaboli, Hassan Rajabi-Maham, Morteza NaderiAbstractOld world ground squirrels (genus Spermophilus) are distributed throughout the Holarctic and Palearctic regions, of which two Iranian species, the Yellow ground squirrel S. fulvus and the Asia Minor ground squirrel S. xanthoprymnus, comprise the southernmost distribution of the genus in the Palearctic. The two species are found in fragmented populations from northeastern to northwestern Iran, with S. fulvus being more common and widespread in the country. T...
Source: Mammalian Biology - September 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

White-nose syndrome dramatically altered the summer bat assemblage in a temperate Southern Appalachian forest
Publication date: Available online 10 September 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Joy M. O’Keefe, Joseph L. Pettit, Susan C. Loeb, William H. StiverAbstractWhite-nose syndrome (WNS), an epizootic disease caused by an invasive fungus, threatens bat populations across North America. WNS-induced changes in summer bat populations could impact functional diversity. We assessed the shift in relative abundance within an assemblage of bats in a temperate southern Appalachian forest in North Carolina and Tennessee from 2009 through 2016. We used mixed linear effects models to identify bat species significantly impacted ...
Source: Mammalian Biology - September 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Coexistence and habitat use of the South American coati and the mountain coati along an elevational gradient
Publication date: Available online 10 September 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): José Luis Mena, Hiromi YaguiAbstractThe South American coati Nasua nasua is a relatively common species throughout the Neotropical region. Despite this, ecological information on the species, including its biological interactions and habitat use, is scarce, especially for the Andes. In some regions, Nasua nasua is sympatric with other closely related species of the Procyonidae family, including the mountain coati Nasuella olivacea. Here, we assess the influence of environmental and anthropogenic factors on the occupancy of these ...
Source: Mammalian Biology - September 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Research trends on bats in China: a twenty-first century review
Publication date: Available online 9 September 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Anderson Feijó, Yanqun Wang, Jian Sun, Feihong Li, Zhixin Wen, Deyan Ge, Lin Xia, Qisen YangAbstractIn this century, China has sustained unparalleled economic development, leading to exponentially growing investments in scientific research. Yet, the demand for research-funding is large and tracing the current knowledge is a key step to define priority research topics. In this same span, studies on bats in China have uncovered an overlooked diversity and revealed novelties in bats’ evolutionary history and life-history aspect...
Source: Mammalian Biology - September 10, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Riparian vegetation provides crucial shelter for resting otters in a human-dominated landscape
Publication date: Available online 7 September 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Irene C. Weinberger, Stefanie Muff, Andreas Kranz, Fabio BontadinaAbstractThe riparian vegetation belt is one of the few remaining structures that provide coverage for wildlife in many anthropogenic landscapes. It provides shelter for many species and functions as corridors for dispersal. However, this landscape is increasingly utilised by humans for leisure activities. The loss of riparian vegetation with a concurrent increase of human disturbance in these habitats can pose a serious threat to wildlife.One of the species potentially aff...
Source: Mammalian Biology - September 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Habitat selection of Cape porcupines in a farmland-suburban context in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Publication date: Available online 29 August 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Samukelisiwe P. Ngcobo, Amy-Leigh Wilson, Colleen T. DownsAbstractCape porcupines (Hystrix africaeaustralis) have a wide geographic distribution throughout southern Africa and have a wide ecological tolerance of many terrestrial habitats, including those within human-altered landscapes. Due to their adaptability within anthropogenic landscapes, knowledge of their spatial behaviour will provide fundamental information about this species. With the aid of telemetry data (July 2016- January 2017) from 11 Cape porcupines, we investigated their ...
Source: Mammalian Biology - August 31, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Context-specific tool use by Sus cebifrons
Publication date: Available online 21 August 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Meredith Root-Bernstein, Trupthi Narayan, Lucile Cornier, Aude BourgeoisAbstractTool use has been reported in a wide range of vertebrates, but so far not in Suidae (the pigs). Suidae are widely considered to be “intelligent” and have many traits associated with tool use, so this is surprising. Here, we report the first structured observations of umprompted instrumental object manipulation in a pig, the Visayan warty pig Sus cebrifrons, which we argue qualifies as tool use. Three individuals were observed using bark or sticks to...
Source: Mammalian Biology - August 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Climate change and its potential impact on the conservation of the Hoary Fox, Lycalopex vetulus (Mammalia: Canidae)
Publication date: Available online 20 August 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Eliécer E. Gutiérrez, Neander M. Heming, Gabriel Penido, Julio C. Dalponte, Ana Cristyna Reis Lacerda, Ricardo Moratelli, Jamile de Moura Bubadué, Leonardo Henrique da Silva, Mariana M. Wolf, Jader Marinho-FilhoAbstractWe aimed to assess the potential impact of climate change on the geographic distribution of areas holding suitable climatic conditions for the presence of Lycalopex vetulus, and to discuss the implications of such distribution for the conservation of the species. We employed correlative modeling analyses...
Source: Mammalian Biology - August 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Dietary habits of wild Javan lutungs (Trachypithecus auratus) in a secondary-plantation mixed forest: Effects of vegetation composition and phenology
This study investigated the seasonal dietary habits of wild Javan lutungs (Trachypithecus auratus) inhabiting the secondary-plantation mixed forest of Pangandaran Nature Reserve, West Java, Indonesia, in relation to vegetation composition and phenology. We conducted behavioral observations of a habituated group for 16 non-consecutive months. The lutungs fed on 164 items (leaf, fruit, flower, etc.) from 85 different plant species. Number of main plant species (>1% usage) was 20, and accumulated percentage of feeding (all plant parts combined) for the top five, 10, and 20 plant species was 43.4%, 63.8%, and 81.2%, respect...
Source: Mammalian Biology - August 10, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Whole Genome Comparative Analysis of CpG Islands in Camelid and other Mammalian Genomes
Publication date: Available online 2 August 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Arsalan Barazandeh, Mohammadreza Mohammadabadi, Mostafa Ghaderi-Zefrehei, Farjad Rafeie, Ikhide G. ImumorinAbstractCamels bear unique genotypes and phenotypes for adaptation in their environment, and as such could be very useful in the weather extremes accelerated by global climate change. Published sequences of Camelidae genomes provide an opportunity to elucidate the genomic architecture of these animals. CpG islands (CGIs) sequence patterns in complex genomes play important roles in gene regulation via epigenetic change. Comparative larg...
Source: Mammalian Biology - August 3, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Plasticity and specialisation in the isotopic niche of African clawless otters foraging in marine and freshwater habitats
Publication date: Available online 25 July 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Rowan K. Jordaan, Michael J. Somers, Grant Hall, Trevor McIntyreAbstractIndividual-level behavioural plasticity resulting from differences in environmental conditions is prevalent in many organisms and may result in phenomena such as dietary- or habitat specialisation. The isotopic niche of African clawless otters, Aonyx capensis, occupying different habitats was investigated with the use of stable isotope techniques. Stable isotope analyses revealed that African clawless otter isotopic niche varied between, as well as within, individuals an...
Source: Mammalian Biology - July 27, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: July 2019Source: Mammalian Biology, Volume 97Author(s): (Source: Mammalian Biology)
Source: Mammalian Biology - July 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

The use of Spatially Explicit Capture-Recapture models for estimating Iberian lynx abundance in a newly reintroduced population
Publication date: Available online 15 July 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Pedro Sarmento, Carlos CarrapatoAbstractFrom 2015 till 2018, 33 lynxes were released in southeast Portugal (Guadiana valley) as a result of an Iberian reintroduction project. Since then, at least 45 lynxes were born in the wild during 3 breeding seasons. In 2018, a combination of sign search and camera trapping was applied to estimate lynx abundance in the Guadiana reintroduction area, using spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR) models with the incorporation of sex-specific parameters. A total effort of 7210 trap-days led to 218 indepe...
Source: Mammalian Biology - July 16, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Baiting improves wild boar population size estimates by camera trapping
Publication date: Available online 15 July 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Albert Peris, Francesc Closa-Sebastià, Ignasi Marco, Emmanuel Serrano, Encarna Casas-DíazABSTRACTIn the last decade, camera trapping has become a widespread technique for wildlife monitoring. Although baits or attractants are commonly used to increase the likelihood of encounter, this practice has been criticised because of the potential biases in the population estimations based on these records obtained by mark-recapture or mark-resight methods, and especially in relative abundance indices (RAI). For two consecutive years, we...
Source: Mammalian Biology - July 16, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

The effects of aridity on land use, biodiversity and dietary breadth in leopards
Publication date: Available online 15 July 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Gareth Mann (Source: Mammalian Biology)
Source: Mammalian Biology - July 16, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Schultz’s rule in domesticated mammals
Publication date: Available online 6 July 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Madeleine Geiger, Robert J. AsherAbstractSchultz’s rule predicts early eruption of replacement teeth (incisors, canines, and premolars) relative to molars as growth slows and life history events take place over a greater span of time. Here, we investigate if the opposite trend might occur during the domestication process as a consequence of an accelerated life-history and driven by increased energetic needs. We provide new data on tooth eruption in four mammalian species and their domesticated forms: wolf and dog, polecat and ferret, be...
Source: Mammalian Biology - July 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Genetic structure of populations of the Pampean grassland mouse, Akodon azarae, in an agroecosystem under intensive management
Publication date: Available online 2 July 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): N.S. Vera, M.B. Chiappero, J.W. Priotto, L.V Sommaro, A.R. Steinmann, C.N. GardenalAbstractAgroecosystems in central Argentina are a good example of landscape modification by human activities. We used the Pampean grassland mouse (Akodon azarae) as a biological model to assess the effects of landscape fragmentation on the genetic structure of natural populations present in the region. The species is a habitat specialist that is numerically dominant in relatively stable environments, such as remnant areas of native vegetation, stream borders, r...
Source: Mammalian Biology - July 3, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Biodiversity lost: The phylogenetic relationships of a complete mitochondrial DNA genome sequenced from the extinct wolf population of Sicily
Publication date: Available online 18 June 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Stefano Reale, Ettore Randi, Valentina Cumbo, Ignazio Sammarco, Floriana Bonanno, Antonio Spinnato, Salvatore SeminaraAbstractUsing next-generation sequencing, we obtained for the first time a complete mitochondrial DNA genome from a museum specimen of the extinct wolf (Canis lupus) population of the island of Sicily (Italy). Phylogenetic analyses indicated that this genome, which was aligned with a number of historical and extant wolf and dog mitogenomes sampled worldwide, was closely related to an Italian wolf mtDNA genome (the observed pr...
Source: Mammalian Biology - June 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

The rumen washes off abrasives before heavy-duty chewing in ruminants
Publication date: Available online 12 June 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Jean-Michel Hatt, Daryl Codron, Dennis W.H. Müller, Nicole L. Ackermans, Louise F. Martin, Patrick R. Kircher, Jürgen Hummel, Marcus ClaussAbstractBased on comparative mandibular anatomy, observations of chewing behaviour, chewing forces and dental microwear, it has been suggested that an additional effect of the ruminant digestive strategy could be a reduction of both the required chewing load and tooth wear ruminants are exposed to. This effect is hypothesized to be the result of digestion, mixing, and digesta sorting prior to re...
Source: Mammalian Biology - June 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Diet of a semiaquatic invasive mammal in northern Italy: Could it be an alarming threat to the endemic water vole?
Publication date: July 2019Source: Mammalian Biology, Volume 97Author(s): Emiliano Mori, Giuseppe MazzaAbstractThe American mink Neovison vison has been introduced to Italy for fur farms in the 1950s. Since the 1970s, free-ranging individuals are present in north-eastern Italy, where an expanding population still occurs. In our work, we aimed at assessing the seasonal diet of invasive American mink introduced to north-eastern Italy. Thus, a total of 195 mink scats (N = 73, June 2007; N = 57, September 2007; N = 65, February 2008) were collected. Scats were washed and food remains isolated and classified throu...
Source: Mammalian Biology - June 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Comparative post-weaning ontogeny of the mandible in fossorial and semi-aquatic water voles
Publication date: Available online 31 May 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Ana Filipa Durão, Jacint Ventura, Francesc Muñoz-MuñozAbstractComparison of post-weaning ontogenetic changes in bone structures between phylogenetically close species with different ecology and types of locomotion can provide a broader picture of the role that function can play in growth patterns. Since the skulls of water voles of genus Arvicola exhibit an important morphological variation associated with underground or semi-aquatic habitats, we compare postnatal ontogenetic changes in the mandible of A. sapidus (semi-aq...
Source: Mammalian Biology - June 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

The summer diet of fish-eating killer whales in the Avacha Gulf of Kamchatka: Are there any preferences?
In this study we investigated the diet of fish-eating killer whales in the Northwest Pacific Ocean (Avacha Gulf, Kamchatka) and compared it to the published data on Northeast Pacific fish-eating killer whales. We collected prey fragments (N = 141) after hunting events in the summer seasons of 2011–2016 and determined the species of prey. Killer whales fed mainly on various species of Pacific salmon in Avacha Gulf. Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) (56% of samples) and chum salmon (O. keta) (31% of samples) predominated in the diet. The results are comparable to the peculiarities of the fish-eating killer whale d...
Source: Mammalian Biology - May 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Diet of a semiaquatic invasive mammal in northern Italy: may it be an alarming threat to the endemic water vole?
Publication date: Available online 27 May 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Emiliano Mori, Giuseppe MazzaAbstractThe American mink Neovison vison has been introduced to Italy for fur farms in the 1950s. Since the 1970s, free-ranging individuals are present in north-eastern Italy, where an expanding population still occurs. In our work, we aimed at assessing the seasonal diet of invasive American mink introduced to north-eastern Italy. Thus, a total of 195 min. scats (N = 73, June 2007; N = 57, September 2007; N = 65, February 2008) were collected. Scats were washed and...
Source: Mammalian Biology - May 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: May 2019Source: Mammalian Biology, Volume 96Author(s): (Source: Mammalian Biology)
Source: Mammalian Biology - May 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

The summer diet of fish-eating killer whales in Avacha Gulf of Kamchatka: are there any preferences?
In this study we investigated the diet of fish-eating killer whales in the Northwest Pacific Ocean (Avacha Gulf, Kamchatka) and compared it to the published data on Northeast Pacific fish-eating killer whales. We collected prey fragments (N = 141) after hunting events in the summer seasons of 2011-2016 and determined the species of prey. Killer whales fed mainly on various species of Pacific salmon in Avacha Gulf. Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) (56% of samples) and chum salmon (O. keta) (31% of samples) predominated in the diet. The results are comparable to the peculiarities of the fish-eating killer wha...
Source: Mammalian Biology - May 15, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Comparative spatial genetic structure of two rodent species in an agro-ecological landscape in southern Africa
Publication date: Available online 9 May 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Viviana Rojas Bonzi, Celine M. Carneiro, Samantha M. Wisely, Ara Monadjem, Robert A. McCleery, Bonginkosi Gumbi, James D. AustinAbstractDetermining the scale of genetic variation informs studies of dispersal, connectivity, and population dynamics particularly in heterogeneous landscapes. Mastomys natalensis and Mus minutoides are generalist rodents that utilize multiple habitat types within the agro-ecological landscapes of southern African savannas. To study the comparative spatial genetic structure of these species we developed 9 new microsa...
Source: Mammalian Biology - May 10, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Impact of wild boars on the feeding behavior of smaller frugivorous mammals
We examined the interspecific relationships among wild boars, raccoon dogs, and badgers with regard to the consumption of fallen fruits to assess how the presence of the largest mammal, the boar, affects the frugivory behavior of the two smaller species. In our 2-year survey, automatic cameras were set under the crown of wild cherry trees to observe frugivory; all mammals had access to the trees in the first year, but only wild boars were blocked access with a fence in the second year. The survey was conducted in a temperate broad-leaved forest in central Japan. All three species frequently visited those trees with abundan...
Source: Mammalian Biology - May 10, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Discovery of the rare Handley’s short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis handleyi, in the threatened southern Amazonian savanna of Brazil
We report a new locality for Monodelphis handleyi, a rare short-tailed opossum species, previously known only from its type locality, in Loreto, northeastern Peru. One adult male was collected using pitfall trap disposed in Humaitá Amazonian savanna of southern Amazonas state, Brazil. Voucher specimen had their identification confirmed by molecular data (mitochondrial gene Cytochrome b) and morphological comparison. We provide external and cranial measurements of this specimen and comment on its morphology. The specimen reported here represents the first record of M. handleyi in Brazil and is the second known locali...
Source: Mammalian Biology - May 10, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Canine distemper virus may affect European wild cat populations in Central Spain
Publication date: July 2019Source: Mammalian Biology, Volume 97Author(s): Mónica G. Candela, Xosé Pardavila, Nieves Ortega, Adrián Lamosa, Julián G. Mangas, Carlos Martínez-CarrascoAbstractThe main objective of this brief communication is to inform about the exposure to certain pathogens of interest for mesocarnivores in wildcats (Felis silvestris silvestris) that inhabit a human-domestic-wild ecotone located in a Natural Park (Serranía de Cuenca, Central Spain). Blood and mucosal swabs (nasal, conjunctival and rectal) samples were collected from nine alive animals to detect canine...
Source: Mammalian Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

No evidence for recent introgressive hybridization between the European and Siberian roe deer in Poland
In this study, we investigated the population genetic structure of the European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in Poland, affected by widespread ancient mtDNA introgression from Siberian roe deer (C. pygargus), for signs of recent human-mediated admixture. We analysed two nuclear gene sequences (FPGT and LRRIQ3) and 10 microsatellite loci in 258 European roe deer and 78 introgressed individuals (C. capreolus with mtDNA of C. pygargus) collected from 16 populations from Poland. Eighteen Siberian roe deer from Russia were also genotyped. Population genetic structure, assessed using Bayesian analysis and Principal Coordinate ...
Source: Mammalian Biology - May 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Functional morphology and ventilatory implications of the intracoelomic organization of three-toed sloths
We examined the visceral anatomy in the brown-throated three-toed sloth (Bradypus variegatus) and compared our results to a number of historical anatomical references, almost all of which were published in languages other than English. In agreement with the majority of these earlier studies, we come to the conclusion that the reported adhesions represent sloth-specific modifications of ordinary mesenteric structures present in all mammals, and that sloths in fact possess no unique visceral suspension structures. However, we agree in principal with the hypothesized influence of these structures on ventilator mechanics in in...
Source: Mammalian Biology - May 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Genetic diversity of Oecomys (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae) from the Tapajós River basin and the role of rivers as barriers for the genus in the region
Publication date: Available online 28 April 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Juliane Saldanha, Daniela Cristina Ferreira, Victor Fonsêca da Silva, Manoel Santos-Filho, Ana Cristina Mendes-Oliveira, Rogério Vieira RossiAbstractThe genus Oecomys is one of the most speciose within the subfamily Sigmodontinae, with most species found in the Amazon region. Recent studies have shown that the diversity, recognition of specific boundaries and geographical distribution is still imprecise for the genus. Herein, we investigate the genetic diversity of Oecomys in the Tapajós River basin and determine whether...
Source: Mammalian Biology - April 29, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Discovery of the rare Handley´s short tailed opossum, Monodelphis handleyi, in the threatened southern Amazonian savanna of Brazil
We report a new locality for Monodelphis handleyi, a rare short-tailed opossum species, previously known only from its type locality, in Loreto, northeastern Peru. One adult male was collected using pitfall trap disposed in Humaitá Amazonian savanna of southern Amazonas state, Brazil. Voucher specimen had their identification confirmed by molecular data (mitochondrial gene Cytochrome b) and morphological comparison. We provide external and cranial measurements of this specimen and comment on its morphology. The specimen reported here represents the first record of M. handleyi in Brazil and is the second known locali...
Source: Mammalian Biology - April 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Spatiotemporal pattern in the autumn invasion behaviour of the common pipistrelle, Pipistrellus pipistrellus: review with a case study
Publication date: Available online 27 April 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Gréta Nusová, Miroslav Fulín, Marcel Uhrin, Dalibor Uhrovič, Peter KaňuchAbstractCommon pipistrelle bats are known for their autumn or late-summer invasions, when temporary groups of individuals fly into inhabited buildings in urban areas. This specific display has been reported since 1862. In this review, we collected all available records and analysed their spatiotemporal pattern within the species range with regard to the numbers and structure of individuals involved in such invasions (in total 1,025 invasions from...
Source: Mammalian Biology - April 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: March 2019Source: Mammalian Biology, Volume 95Author(s): (Source: Mammalian Biology)
Source: Mammalian Biology - April 27, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Geographic variation in skull shape and size of the Pampas fox Lycalopex gymnocercus (Carnivora: Canidae) in Argentina
Publication date: Available online 26 April 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Mauro Ignacio Schiaffini, Valentina Segura, Francisco Juan PrevostiAbstractSouth American foxes are included in the monophyletic genus Lycalopex, with several recent species. Here, the influence of environment about cranial size and shape variations of Lycalopex gymnocercus was explicitly addressed. 3D landmark-based methodology was used to acquire morphometric data. Each record locality was georeferenced and assigned both environmental variables and ecoregion membership. Size and shape changes were analyzed with regression and redundancy a...
Source: Mammalian Biology - April 27, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

How integrative taxonomy can save a species from extinction: The supposedly extinct mouse opossum Cryptonanus ignitus (Diaz, Flores and Barquez, 2000) is a synonym of the living C. chacoensis (Tate, 1931)
Publication date: Available online 25 April 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): Pablo Teta, Juan F. Díaz-NietoAbstractWe reviewed the taxonomic status of the “extinct” mouse opossum Cryptonanus ignitus (Diaz, Flores and Barquez, 2000). This species is only known from the type, an adult male collected in the province of Jujuy, northwestern Argentina, in 1962. Based on both qualitative and quantitative external and cranial traits and the analysis of DNA sequences extracted from the 57-year-old type skin, we confirm the suggestion of previous researchers that C. ignitus is an elderly example of the livi...
Source: Mammalian Biology - April 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

The price of being bold? Relationship between personality and endoparasitic infection in a tree squirrel
We examined two parameters of parasite infection: infection status and intensity of infection. Individual personality of 207 grey squirrels was assessed by capture-mark-recapture (CMR), calculating the trappability and trap diversity indices as estimates of boldness and exploration, respectively. Since both indices were strongly correlated, we used PCA to derive a single score (first component) which had a high value for bold, exploring animals. At the end of the study, 77 individuals were euthanized and gastro-intestinal helminths were identified and counted. Overall 73% of grey squirrels were infected by Strongyloides ro...
Source: Mammalian Biology - April 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Characteristics of banded mongoose (Mungos mungo) den sites across the human-wildlife interface in Northern Botswana
Publication date: Available online 23 April 2019Source: Mammalian BiologyAuthor(s): C.A. Nichols, K.A. AlexanderAbstractDenning behavior is a critical life history attribute for many mammalian species and can be impacted by urbanization, affecting species’ reproductive success and survival in these landscapes. One significant factor that is influenced by this behavior is the spread of disease. Banded mongooses (Mungos mungo) in Northern Botswana are often infected with a novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex pathogen, M. mungi, that is transmitted through olfactory communication networks that allow the pathogen to...
Source: Mammalian Biology - April 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Impact of wild boars on the feeding behaviors of smaller frugivorous mammals
We examined the interspecific relationships among wild boars, raccoon dogs, and badgers with regard to the consumption of fallen fruits to assess how the presence of the largest mammal, the boar, affects the frugivory behavior of the two smaller species. In our 2-year survey, automatic cameras were set under the crown of wild cherry trees to observe frugivory; all mammals had access to the trees in the first year, but only wild boars were blocked access with a fence in the second year. The survey was conducted in a temperate broad-leaved forest in central Japan. All three species frequently visited those trees with abundan...
Source: Mammalian Biology - April 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: research