Constructional variation with two near-synonymous verbs: the case of schicken and senden in present-day German
Publication date: January 2021Source: Language Sciences, Volume 83Author(s): Hilde De Vaere, Ludovic De Cuypere, Klaas Willems (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - August 4, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Languages/languaging as world-making: the ontological bases of language
Publication date: January 2021Source: Language Sciences, Volume 83Author(s): E. Demuro, L. Gurney (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - August 3, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Parental speech to typical and atypical populations: a study on linguistic partial repetition
Publication date: January 2021Source: Language Sciences, Volume 83Author(s): Luca Onnis, Gianluca Esposito, Paola Venuti, Shimon Edelman (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - July 30, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Ad hoc categorization and languaging: the online construction of categories in discourse
Publication date: Available online 23 July 2020Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Caterina Mauri, Andrea Sansò (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - July 25, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The place of ad hoc categories within the typology of plural expressions
Publication date: Available online 20 July 2020Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Edith Moravcsik (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - July 22, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Ditransitive constructions in Caucasian Urum–The effect of givenness on the linearization of objects
Publication date: Available online 19 July 2020Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Stefanie Schröter (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - July 20, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

How cute do I sound to you?: gender and age effects in the use and evaluation of Korean baby-talk register, Aegyo
Publication date: Available online 26 June 2020Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Hayeun Jang (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - June 28, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: July 2020Source: Language Sciences, Volume 80Author(s): (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - June 13, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Language, labor and reification
Publication date: Available online 6 June 2020Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Kenneth McGill (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - June 7, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: May 2020Source: Language Sciences, Volume 79Author(s): (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - May 17, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The diachrony of stance constructions with ‘no’ chance and ‘no’ wonder
Publication date: Available online 14 April 2020Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): An Van linden (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - April 15, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Spoken word recognition of L2 using probabilistic phonotactics in L1: evidence from Cantonese-English bilinguals
Publication date: July 2020Source: Language Sciences, Volume 80Author(s): Michael C.W. Yip (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - April 2, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Postcolonial translation theories and the language myth: an integrationist perspective
Publication date: July 2020Source: Language Sciences, Volume 80Author(s): Sinead Kwok (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - March 27, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Democratization of Englishes: synchronic and diachronic approaches
Publication date: Available online 13 March 2020Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Turo Hiltunen, Lucía Loureiro-Porto (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - March 14, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Voice and viewpoint in journalistic narratives
Publication date: July 2020Source: Language Sciences, Volume 80Author(s): Adam Głaz, Anastazja Trofymczuk (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - March 14, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Rethinking ecolinguistics from a distributed language perspective
Publication date: July 2020Source: Language Sciences, Volume 80Author(s): Jia Li, Sune Vork Steffensen, Guowen Huang (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - March 14, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Passives as unmarked voice: a case of “warning” Passives in Okinawan
Publication date: Available online 6 March 2020Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Rumiko Shinzato (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - March 8, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: March 2020Source: Language Sciences, Volume 78Author(s): (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - February 27, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Modelling stance adverbs in grammatical theory: tackling heterogeneity with Functional Discourse Grammar
Publication date: Available online 14 February 2020Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Evelien KeizerAbstractIn many linguistic approaches and theories, a distinction is made between adverbs that are propositional (representational, ideational, referential), and adverbs that are non-propositional (interpersonal, (inter)subjective, evaluative, parenthetical); i.e. between what is said (the proposition expressed) and a speaker’s stance on what is said (e.g. the speaker’s attitude towards, evaluation of, or commitment to the message conveyed). As is well-known, however, the latter group, including such diverse adv...
Source: Language Sciences - February 15, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Frequency changes and stylistic levelling of though in diachronic and synchronic varieties of English – linguistic democratisation?
Publication date: Available online 10 February 2020Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Ole SchützlerAbstractBased on diachronic and synchronic corpus data, this paper empirically explores two symptoms of linguistic democratisation in English: (i) a general frequency increase of a linguistic feature traditionally associated with spoken language, which may be interpreted as colloqualisation, and (ii) a development towards similar rates of occurrence of the phenomenon in different genres, i.e. its more general availability irrespective of stylistic context. For the latter process, the term ‘stylistic levelling&rsqu...
Source: Language Sciences - February 11, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Investigating colloquialization in the British parliamentary record in the late 19th and early 20th century
Publication date: Available online 6 February 2020Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Turo Hiltunen, Jenni Räikkönen, Jukka TyrkköAbstractIn this paper, we explore how sociocultural changes were reflected in the parliamentary record, a genre that combines elements of spoken, written and written-to-be-spoken discourses. Our main interests are in the processes of linguistic colloquialization and democratization, understood broadly as tendencies towards greater informality and equality in language use. Previous diachronic studies have established that written language has increasingly adopted features associate...
Source: Language Sciences - February 6, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The influence of linguistic and social attitudes on grammaticality judgments of singular ‘they’
Publication date: March 2020Source: Language Sciences, Volume 78Author(s): Evan D. BradleyAbstractThe lack of consensus on a true gender-neutral singular personal pronoun for the third person in standard English has led to many continuing attempts to reform the language to be more gender-neutral and to accurately refer to nonbinary persons. Singular they has a long history of use, but continues to draw criticism from prescriptivist commentators. Recent research has found that those who endorse more binary gender ideology tend to reject singular they more often than those who hold more egalitarian gender views. The present ...
Source: Language Sciences - February 2, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Changes in the modal domain in different varieties of English as potential effects of democratization
Publication date: Available online 29 January 2020Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Svenja Kranich, Elisabeth Hampel, Hanna BrunsAbstractOne well-investigated recent change in English that has been linked to democratization is the ongoing change in the modal domain, which is characterized by a decline of some of the core modals (such as may, might, must) and a rise of the so-called semi-modals (such as be able to, have to, have got to) (cf. Leech, 2003; Mair and Leech, 2006; Leech, 2013). This process is advanced to different degrees in different varieties of English (cf. Collins, 2009a/b). Although a correlation between...
Source: Language Sciences - January 30, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Conversationalization and democratization in a radio chat show: a grammar-led investigation
Publication date: Available online 25 January 2020Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Nicholas SmithAbstractThis paper investigates the closely-related concepts of conversationalization and democratization in a specialized register, the biographical radio chat show, represented by BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs (DID). To explore these concepts in the show we first undertake a data-driven stylistic analysis of ‘key’ parts-of-speech (POS) tags, i.e. statistically significant grammatical categories that distinguish a corpus of DID talk from a corpus of conversation. We then track these grammatical features over...
Source: Language Sciences - January 26, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Democratisation in the South African parliamentary Hansard? A study of change in modal auxiliaries
Publication date: Available online 22 January 2020Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Haidee Kotze, Bertus Van RooyAbstractParliaments are a primary site where political and social democratisation can be seen in action, making parliamentary discourse, as represented in the Hansard of Commonwealth countries, a particularly relevant source of linguistic evidence for the effects of democratisation on language change. South Africa offers an exemplary case of social change which may influence language use. This paper first outlines the historical trajectory of democratisation in the South African parliament. It subsequently set...
Source: Language Sciences - January 24, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Person reference and democratization in British English
This article explores the interrelatedness of societal changes and changes in language practices. By using a combination of corpus linguistic and socio-pragmatic methods, we track diachronic changes in word patterns and interpret findings in the framework of democratization. The data comes from a small and representative corpus of British English (ARCHER-3.1) and from three “big data” sets (Google Books, British Library Newspapers and The Economist). We suggest that data triangulation, including sociohistorical contextualization, allows us to conclude that especially from the mid-nineteenth century onwards word...
Source: Language Sciences - January 24, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Bottom-up probabilistic information in visual word recognition: interactions with phonological and morphological functions
This study investigates the role of probabilistic phonotactics in the processing of consonant clusters (as opposed to consonant-vowel sequences) and of complex words (as opposed to monomorphemic words) in two experiments of visual word recognition with masked fragment priming. Target words are more efficiently recognized when the transition probabilities between an initial fragment and the following segment in the target are high, but this effect is not equally distributed across all areas of the phonology. It was found that speakers rely more heavily on transition probabilities between segments of a consonant cluster than...
Source: Language Sciences - January 14, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Twitter trolls: a linguistic profile of anti-democratic discourse
This article focuses on anti-democratic discourse and investigates the linguistic profile of Twitter trolls. The troll data consist of some 3.5 million messages in English obtained through Twitter in late 2018. These data originate from potentially state-backed information operations aimed at sowing discord in Western societies. The baseline data, against which the troll data are compared, contain circa 4.4 million messages in English drawn from the Nordic Tweet Stream corpus. A machine learning application that enables us to select genuine personal messages in this corpus is used to prune the data. The empirical part inve...
Source: Language Sciences - January 14, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Methods of data collection in English empirical linguistics research: Results of a recent survey
Publication date: March 2020Source: Language Sciences, Volume 78Author(s): Ignacio M. Palacios MartínezAbstractMost handbooks on research in English Linguistics state that in conducting any kind of research-based study, the method of data collection should be in agreement with the purpose of the research itself. However, the reality is that many studies into language pay very little attention to this central element of research. In this paper, which can be regarded as a partial replication of Krug and Schlüter (2013) study, I will reflect on this issue, basing my observations primarily on a survey carried out t...
Source: Language Sciences - December 28, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Associative plural as indexical category
Publication date: Available online 18 December 2019Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Michael DanielAbstractThe Animacy Hierarchy was introduced as a cross-grammatical factor which governs, in different languages, widespread splits of nominal categories, including case or number marking. Among othser phenomena, the Animacy Hierarchy has been invoked to describe the lexical distribution of associative plurals. In this paper I argue that associative plurals as an interpretation of nominal plurality is not licensed by the high position the respective noun holds on the Animacy Hierarchy but is a combined effect of coercion by...
Source: Language Sciences - December 18, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

A micro-typological perspective on resultative secondary predicates: the case of nomination verb constructions
Publication date: March 2020Source: Language Sciences, Volume 78Author(s): Justine Métairy, Peter Lauwers, Renata Enghels, Miriam Taverniers, Marleen Van PeteghemAbstractThe present paper investigates a subtype of (analytical) resultative constructions1, viz. Nomination Verb Constructions (e.g. Henry was proclaimed King of England), within a comparative Germanic – Romance perspective. Resultative constructions are a priori atypical of Romance languages, which belong to the so-called class of ‘verb-framing’ languages (cf. Talmy 1985, 1991) and hence are not expected to encode the result of an event ...
Source: Language Sciences - December 7, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: January 2020Source: Language Sciences, Volume 77Author(s): (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - December 7, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

More lexically-specific knowledge and individual differences in adult native speakers' processing of the English passive
This study complements these corpus-based studies by providing evidence from an on-line processing task that tests whether native speakers are sensitive to the observed distributions. The results support a usage-based functional account of processing and interpreting English be and get passive constructions. Participants' performance was influenced by frequency and lexical specificity. The study also provides evidence of education-related differences in language attainment – the higher educated participants were significantly better at interpreting be and get full passive constructions than the lower educated pa...
Source: Language Sciences - December 7, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Do Speaker's emotions influence their language production? Studying the influence of disgust and amusement on alignment in interactive reference
Publication date: March 2020Source: Language Sciences, Volume 78Author(s): Charlotte Out, Martijn Goudbeek, Emiel KrahmerAbstractThe influence of emotion on the early stages of spoken language production such as content selection has received little scholarly attention. During content selection in dialogue, speakers often take the utterances of their dialogue partners into account. For example, while speakers generally prefer to use color in their descriptions, they start to use dispreferred attributes such as orientation and size more when they are primed by a prerecorded partner using these dispreferred attributes (Goudb...
Source: Language Sciences - December 4, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Are ableist insults secretly slurs?
Publication date: January 2020Source: Language Sciences, Volume 77Author(s): Chris CousensAbstractPhilosophers often treat racist and sexist slurs as a special sort of puzzle. What is the difference between a slur and its correlates? In attempting to answer this question, a second distinction has been overlooked: that between slurs and insults. What makes a term count as a slur? This is not an unnecessary taxonomical question as long as ableist terms such as ‘moron’ are dismissed as mere insults. Attempts to resolve the insult/slur distinction by considering the communicative content of slurs are not promising....
Source: Language Sciences - November 7, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Issues with molecules in Natural Semantic Metalanguage
Publication date: Available online 11 October 2019Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Kamil LemanekAbstractThe paper examines the theoretical merit of “semantic molecules” in Natural Semantic Metalanguage (NSM). Although semantic molecules are said to trace semantic dependence and necessity, compress complexity, and to account for what I call its productivity, that doesn't appear to be the case. This can be illustrated on the basis of a comparison of two explications for the same complex meaning—one containing a molecule and the other its decomposed elements. Counterfactual considerations suggest that the...
Source: Language Sciences - October 13, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

English plurals in Construction Morphology
This article demonstrates how the theory of Construction Morphology can account for both the regular and irregular plural forms of English nouns, while avoiding the problems Halle and Marantz have identified in the Extended Word-and-Paradigm Theory. The fact that Construction Morphology (CxM) allows representations ‘at varying degrees of abstraction’ (Goldberg 2013) enables it to account for the morphological structure of forms like oxen. The fact that it is non-derivational precludes incorrect forms like *oxens, while allowing correct forms like wives. (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - October 13, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: September 2019Source: Language Sciences, Volume 75Author(s): (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - September 27, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

An empirical study of honorific mismatches in Korean
Publication date: September 2019Source: Language Sciences, Volume 75Author(s): Sanghoun Song, Jae-Woong Choe, Eunjeong OhAbstractWhile numerous studies have approached honorification mainly focusing on how honorific forms and features agree with each other in syntactic derivation, the present study focuses on mismatches between a referent and the verb that the referent depends on with respect to honorification. If Korean honorification is a syntactic phenomenon, the mismatches in honorification must be fully accounted for as syntactic agreement cannot be disobeyed in principle. However, either theoretical or empirical inqu...
Source: Language Sciences - September 20, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Systemic functional grammar as a tool for experimental stimulus design: new appliable horizons in psycholinguistics and neurolinguistics
Publication date: September 2019Source: Language Sciences, Volume 75Author(s): Piergiorgio Trevisan, Adolfo M. GarcíaAbstractSince their onset more than 50 years ago, both psycholinguistics and neurolinguistics have provided crucial breakthroughs for understanding the cognitive bases of language. Despite their major contributions, however, both fields have been undermined by a tradeoff between ecological validity (i.e., the degree to which tasks reflect the conditions of everyday communication) and experimental control (the manipulation of fine-grained variables, which is typically achieved by matching lists of...
Source: Language Sciences - September 14, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Publisher’s Note
Publication date: November 2019Source: Language Sciences, Volume 76Author(s): Rachel Conway (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - September 13, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: November 2019Source: Language Sciences, Volume 76Author(s): (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - September 13, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Disjunctive/conjunctive/whatever: the development of Italian barra (‘slash’) as a non-exhaustive connective
Publication date: Available online 14 August 2019Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Ilaria Fiorentini, Emanuele MiolaAbstractThe paper investigates the use and functions of barra in Italian. Barra, the lexical realization of the punctuation mark , has recently come to be used also in online settings and in everyday speech. In written, formal contexts, this punctuation mark is mainly used for the expression of alternatives (also with an adjunctive sense). In contemporary Italian, however, it is developing a new function as a non-exhaustive connective. After describing the incipient grammaticalization of barra, the morpholo...
Source: Language Sciences - August 16, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Exemplar-based compounds: The case of Chinese
Publication date: Available online 3 August 2019Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Giorgio Francesco Arcodia, Caterina MauriAbstractThe aim of this paper is to investigate a specific naming strategy, which is based on compounding and exemplification, examining data from Chinese. We will focus on what we will label ‘exemplar-based compounds’, i.e. compounds consisting of at least one lexeme denoting an exemplar of the category referred to by the whole compound. We propose that ‘exemplar-based’ compounds in Chinese be divided into two macro-types: (1) [exemplar1-exemplar2]category, in which the exemp...
Source: Language Sciences - August 3, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The rise of right periphery either in English
Publication date: September 2019Source: Language Sciences, Volume 75Author(s): Debra Ziegeler, Eric Mélac, Volker GastAbstractThe history of either as a clause-final, right-periphery marker has seen little intensive research, apart from a few isolated studies such as Rullmann (2002) and Gast (2013). This is surprising, given the recent interest in parenthetical discourse items and the controversies surrounding their development (grammaticalization vs. pragmaticalization, and other debates). In the present study, it is first questioned whether right-periphery either (RP-either) could be categorized as a bona fide exa...
Source: Language Sciences - August 3, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The discursive construction of categories. Categorisation as a dynamic and co-operative process
Publication date: Available online 31 July 2019Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Eugenio GoriaAbstractIn this paper, I provide an account of categorisation intended as an action that participants carry out in conversation. As opposed to cognitive theories, which are mainly interested in how language structure can be explained with reference to the human conceptual system, discourse-based theories are interested in studying how linguistic resources are used to create categories on a locally relevant basis. Based on recent contributions within the latter framework, I provide in this article a preliminary overview of a corp...
Source: Language Sciences - August 1, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Ironic intentions in action and interaction
This article also offers a theoretical conceptualisation of a few non-prototypical interactional workings of irony and aspects of interlocutors' negotiating (non)ironic intentions in interactions. The problems addressed include misunderstandings, overtly pretended misunderstandings, and deception based on (non)ironic intentions. (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - July 31, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Integrating the (dialogical) sign: or who's an integrationist?
Publication date: Available online 17 July 2019Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Adrian PabléAbstractThe present contribution is intended as a general reflection on what it might mean to be a ‘Harrisian integrationist’ (Harris 1996, 1998). This reflection is prompted by two recent articles by the dialogue scholars Edda Weigand (2018a) and Per Linell (2018), who both argue against what they perceive as a ‘hardline’ integrationist position. Linell, in turn, claims that his extended dialogism is an integrationism of a ‘moderate’ kind. Against this background I will contend that Lin...
Source: Language Sciences - July 19, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The Written Language Bias (WLB) in linguistics 40 years after
Publication date: Available online 21 June 2019Source: Language SciencesAuthor(s): Per LinellAbstractIn 2005 I published a comprehensive version of my monograph The Written Language in Linguistics: Its Nature, Origins and Transformations (London: Routledge), which made some scholars in linguistics to modify their basic approaches and meta-theories of language. In the present paper I make a few remarks on the trends. In particular I emphasise a few points that I did not mean to say in my prior work. Another section of this paper is devoted to Simon Borchmann's paper in this journal issue. Borchmann raises the important poin...
Source: Language Sciences - June 22, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: July 2019Source: Language Sciences, Volume 74Author(s): (Source: Language Sciences)
Source: Language Sciences - June 12, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research