[World Report] Health under austerity in Greece
As Greece nears its exit from the bailout programme initiated 8 years ago, health in Greece has suffered from the severe austerity measures. Talha Burki reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Talha Burki Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] National Health Protection Scheme revealed in India
A new health insurance scheme announced in the Union Budget 2018/19 draws praise and also concern about limits to implementation. Patralekha Chatterjee reports from Delhi. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Patralekha Chatterjee Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[Comment] Offline: Welcome to the new Age of Romanticism
Renaissance. Realism. Modernism. What age do we live in? It's too early to tell. And what does it matter to science anyway? Science is a product of Enlightenment. It is independent of ideology. Science is a set of principles that privileges observation and experiment. That is its great strength. We may say that we live in a certain geological period (the Anthropocene). Or an economic age of austerity. Or a psychological age of anxiety. But these epithets say little about how we do, report, or think about science. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard Horton Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Mentoring women in medicine: a personal perspective
About half of the medical students in the USA and European Union are women,1,2 but leadership in medicine globally does not reflect this gender balance. In a survey by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), women comprised half the instructors and assistant professors in 2015 –16, but only 20–33% of full professors and only 15% of chairs and deans were women.1 Women are also under-represented as journal authors, on editorial boards, and as speakers at medical meetings.3,4 However, in a large survey by the Canadian Rheumatology Association women were found to work few er hours and see fewer patient...
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Janet E Pope Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Editorial] Stroke —acting FAST at all ages
On Feb 1, Public Health England released new estimates for the incidence of first stroke in England and relaunched its Act FAST campaign. FAST is aimed at the public, encouraging them to call 999 —the UK's emergency number—if there are tell-tale signs of stroke in themselves or anyone they see. FAST stands for face, arms, speech, and time (to call). The new estimates showed that about 57 000 new strokes and 32 000 stroke-related deaths occur every year in England. Of those who have e xperienced a stroke, about a quarter leave hospital with moderate or severe disability. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] Turkish Medical Association —detained for peace
“We acted as we always do as doctors. We have focused on human life and health. We will continue to act as doctors in every setting we are in. We do not accept the charges”, said Turkish Medical Association (TTB) chairman Raşit Tükel, as cited by his lawyer. In a letter to The Lancet, Caghan K izil reports that Tükel and ten other senior members of the TTB were detained and accused of treason by President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan following a published statement in response to Turkey's military incursion in northern Syria. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] Year of reckoning for women in science
Gender equity in science is both a moral and necessary imperative. Although women make up more than half of graduates in the medical and life sciences and 70% of the global health workforce, they are vastly under-represented at senior levels: in the USA, for example, women comprise 45% of assistant professors in academic clinical sciences but only 35% of associate professors and just 22% of full professors. Numbers are similarly unbalanced for the basic medical sciences, demonstrating the “leaky pipeline” that wastes women's education and potential, prevents needed diversity in workplaces, and restricts women's...
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Articles] Lenvatinib versus sorafenib in first-line treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma: a randomised phase 3 non-inferiority trial
Lenvatinib was non-inferior to sorafenib in overall survival in untreated advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The safety and tolerability profiles of lenvatinib were consistent with those previously observed. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Masatoshi Kudo, Richard S Finn, Shukui Qin, Kwang-Hyub Han, Kenji Ikeda, Fabio Piscaglia, Ari Baron, Joong-Won Park, Guohong Han, Jacek Jassem, Jean Frederic Blanc, Arndt Vogel, Dmitry Komov, T R Jeffry Evans, Carlos Lopez, Corina Dutcus, Matthew Guo, Ken Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Comment] Lenvatinib: can a non-inferiority trial change clinical practice?
The study by Masatoshi Kudo and colleagues1 in The Lancet is the first multicentre, randomised, first-line phase 3 trial in hepatocellular carcinoma to be positive since the 2007 sorafenib success.2,3 This trial1 recruited 954 patients who were stratified according to region (Asia-Pacific [defined as China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, and Thailand] or western [defined as Belgium, the UK, Spain, Germany, Italy, Poland, France, the USA, Canada, Israel, and Russia]), macroscopic portal vein invasion, extrahepatic spread, or both (yes or no), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance...
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Mar ía Reig, Jordi Bruix Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Articles] Extrafine inhaled triple therapy versus dual bronchodilator therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (TRIBUTE): a double-blind, parallel group, randomised controlled trial
In patients with symptomatic COPD, severe or very severe airflow limitation, and an exacerbation history despite maintenance therapy, extrafine BDP/FF/G significantly reduced the rate of moderate-to-severe exacerbations compared with IND/GLY, without increasing the risk of pneumonia. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Alberto Papi, J ørgen Vestbo, Leonardo Fabbri, Massimo Corradi, Hélène Prunier, Géraldine Cohuet, Alessandro Guasconi, Isabella Montagna, Stefano Vezzoli, Stefano Petruzzelli, Mario Scuri, Nicolas Roche, Dave Singh Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Comment] Filling the gaps in COPD: the TRIBUTE study
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem because of its high prevalence (about 10% of the adult population), rising incidence (COPD is predicted to be the third global cause of death by 2020), and high associated personal, social, and economic costs.1 Regular physical activity, appropriate vaccination, and avoiding toxic exposures (eg, tobacco smoking) are important non-pharmacological approaches for the management of patients with COPD.1 Meanwhile, pharmacological treatment for COPD is fundamentally based on the use of inhaled drugs: long-acting bronchodilators (long-acting antimuscari...
Source: LANCET - February 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Alvar Agusti Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Department of Error] Department of Error
Castaigne S, Pautas C, Terr é C, et al. Effect of gemtuzumab ozogamicin on survival of adult patients with de-novo acute myeloid leukaemia (ALFA-0701): a randomised, open-label, phase 3 study. Lancet 2012; 379: 1508–16—In table 1 of this Article, the Intermediate row under the Cytogenetics heading has been updated. This c orrection has been made to the online version as of Feb 8, 2018. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Department of Error Source Type: research

[Articles] Re-emergence of yaws after single mass azithromycin treatment followed by targeted treatment: a longitudinal study
The implementation of the WHO strategy did not, in the long-term, achieve elimination in a high-endemic community mainly due to the individuals who were absent at the time of mass treatment in whom yaws reactivated; repeated mass treatment might be necessary to eliminate yaws. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the emergence of azithromycin-resistant T p pertenue and spread within one village. Communities' surveillance should be strengthened to detect any possible treatment failure and biological markers of resistance. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Oriol Mitj à, Charmie Godornes, Wendy Houinei, August Kapa, Raymond Paru, Haina Abel, Camila González-Beiras, Sibauk V Bieb, James Wangi, Alyssa E Barry, Sergi Sanz, Quique Bassat, Sheila A Lukehart Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Comment] Macrolide resistance in yaws
The study by Oriol Mitj à and colleagues in The Lancet1 shows that a single round of mass administration of azithromycin is insufficient to achieve yaws eradication. It also represents the first report of a mutation in both 23S rRNA genes of the yaws-causing spirochaete, Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue (T p pertenu e), causing macrolide resistance in five epidemiologically linked patients. The mutation, A2059G, was previously reported in a patient with syphilis (caused by T p pallidum) with spiramycin treatment failure;2 it is one of two macrolide-resistant mutations previously detected in T p pallidum (the o...
Source: LANCET - February 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: David Šmajs, Petra Pospíšilová Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Making sense of the latest evidence on electronic cigarettes
In the UK, 2 ·85 million people (5·7% of adults) regularly use electronic cigarettes (ECs), almost all of whom are smokers or ex-smokers.1 Prevalence of EC use is similar in the USA2 but is lower in other European Union (EU) countries (average 2%).1 ECs produce an estimated 18 000 additional long-term ex-smo kers in England each year;3 a recent update suggests that figure might be as high as 57 000.1 (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: John N Newton, Martin Dockrell, Tim Marczylo Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Department of Error] Department of Error
Howlett P, Walder A, Lisk D, et al. Neurological and psychiatric manifestations of post Ebola syndrome in Sierra Leone. Lancet 2017; 389 (suppl): S48 —In this Abstract, S Sevalie should have been listed as an author. This correction has been made to the online version as of Feb 1, 2018. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Department of Error Source Type: research

[Department of Error] Department of Error
Honigsbaum M. Flawed hero. Lancet 2017; 389: 1874 —In this Perspective, the third and fourth sentences in the penultimate paragraph should have read “However, it is in his justification for his action and what he did next that the story becomes fraught. Wadman allows the reader to draw their own conclusions about his fall from grace.” This co rrection has been made to the online version as of Feb 1, 2018. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Department of Error Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Trans people and the myth of homogeneous societies
In their Comment, Arjee Restar and Sari Reisner (Oct 28, 2017, p 1933)1 briefly hint at the diversity in health risk within the transgender (trans) community but then fail to take their recommendations further. For example, among the 60 million refugees worldwide, trans people are particularly at risk of violence and discrimination.2 Yet discrimination based on gender identity and migration status are usually treated separately, as the Comment's omission illustrates.1 Many trans people experience discrimination on multiple grounds, such as refugee status, socioeconomic position, age, and physical and cognative ability, in ...
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Oliver Razum, Yudit Namer Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Challenges of measuring the Healthcare Access and Quality Index – Authors' reply
Estimating national levels of personal health-care access and quality can inform the understanding of settings in which gains in health care can be achieved. Amenable mortality —deaths that should not occur in the presence of high-quality health care—has been used to approximate country-level personal health-care access and quality for decades.1 Drawing from this scientific approach, the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) collaboration developed the Healthcare Access and Q uality (HAQ) Index,2 which aimed to provide a stronger indication of personal health-care quality and access across 195 countries and territorie...
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Christopher J L Murray, Stephen S Lim, Theo Vos, Rafael Lozano, Mohsen Naghavi Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Challenges of measuring the Healthcare Access and Quality Index
We read with interest the article by the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) collaborators on the Healthcare Access and Quality (HAQ) Index.1 However, we believe the scaled indicator on measles amenable mortality should be interpreted with caution. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Cheng-Yi Lee, Jiunn-Shyan Wu, Ding-Ping Liu Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Challenges of measuring the Healthcare Access and Quality Index
We read with interest the GBD 2015 Healthcare Access and Quality study (July 15, 2017, p 231),1 which constructed the Healthcare Access and Quality (HAQ) Index on the basis of risk-standardised cause-specific death rates to facilitate comparisons of personal health-care access and quality for 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2015. However, we would like to contest some of the findings on the HAQ Index related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Chia-Chao Wu, Shang-Jyh Hwang, Chih-Cheng Hsu, Kuo-Cheng Lu, Taiwan Society of Nephrology Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Influenza vaccination and prevention of cardiovascular disease mortality – Authors' reply
We thank Daniel Caldeira, Joaquim J Ferreira, and Jo ão Costa for highlighting the effect of influenza infection on underlying cardiovascular disease and the role of influenza vaccination in potentially mitigating this risk. Although we briefly mentioned that influenza infection could exacerbate underlying cardiovascular disease in our Seminar,1 we w ere unable to fully expand on this point because of word-count restrictions. In this regard, an epidemiological link between influenza and excess deaths associated with cardiovascular disease was suggested as early as in the 1930s. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Catharine I Paules, Kanta Subbarao Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Influenza vaccination and prevention of cardiovascular disease mortality
Catharine Paules and Kanta Subbarao presented in their Seminar (Aug 12, 2017, p 697) the clinical features, therapeutic options, and controversies regarding treatment and prevention of seasonal influenza infection.1 Although they acknowledged that influenza can impair different organ systems, little attention was given to cardiovascular consequences. Ischaemic heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and influenza vaccination could reduce cardiovascular mortality, particularly in patients with coronary heart disease for whom cardiovascular mortality risk has been reported to be halved by influenza vaccination. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Daniel Caldeira, Joaquim J Ferreira, Jo ão Costa Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] The growing problem of loneliness
Imagine a condition that makes a person irritable, depressed, and self-centred, and is associated with a 26% increase in the risk of premature mortality. Imagine too that in industrialised countries around a third of people are affected by this condition, with one person in 12 affected severely, and that these proportions are increasing. Income, education, sex, and ethnicity are not protective, and the condition is contagious. The effects of the condition are not attributable to some peculiarity of the character of a subset of individuals, they are a result of the condition affecting ordinary people. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: John T Cacioppo, Stephanie Cacioppo Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Can the scientific world positively influence decision makers on planetary health?
The 2017 G7 Health Ministerial Meeting was on Nov 5 –6, in Milan, Italy, and for the first time the effect of climate and environmental factors on health was addressed in the agenda of the meeting. As reported in the final Health Ministers communiquè after the meeting (signed by all seven countries),1 the delegation agreed to identify and promote some fundamental adaptation actions. In addition to the novelty of these subjects being in the agenda and in the final meeting documents, we believe the process that led to these outcomes is innovative and interesting. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Stefano Campostrini, Ranieri Guerra Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Obituary] Fotis Kafatos
Biologist, science administrator, and founding President of the European Research Council. He was born in Heraklion, Crete, Greece, on April 16, 1940, and died there on Nov 18, 2017, aged 77 years. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Geoff Watts Tags: Obituary Source Type: research

[Perspectives] The burning light
“In our life there is a single colour, as on an artist's palette, which provides the meaning of life and art. It is the colour of love”, artist Marc Chagall wrote. While these words encapsulate the strong emotional undercurrent that characterises the work of the Belorussian artist, they also per fectly describe the profound love between Chagall and his first wife Bella, whom he portrayed in many of his canvasses, often flying with him above the roofs of their hometown. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Marco De Ambrogi Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] The medical suffragettes
In January, 1918, the women staff of Endell Street Military Hospital in central London, UK, forgot their ward duties for a few hours as they sang and danced in celebration. That evening the women doctors, nurses, and orderlies donned costumes for a fancy dress party, had a sumptuous dinner, and toasted the Queen before marching through the hospital in a grand procession. It was 10 months before the end of World War 1 —and victory for the Allies still hung in the balance—yet the women were intent on celebrating. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Wendy Moore Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Superbugs and us
These days you would have to be peculiarly immune to public health messaging not to know that the world is on the brink of an antibiotic apocalypse. From the back of pill packets to the panels on the back of buses, prompts urging us to “keep antibiotics working” are almost as ubiquitous as the drug-resistant microbes themselves. Although medical experts have been warning about the indiscriminate use of antibiotics since the 1940s, their consumption continues to grow. This is not only a problem in countries like South Africa an d India where antibiotics are widely available over the counter. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Mark Honigsbaum Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Virtual care for improved global health
Global access to health care is far from adequate, with health disparities widening; the rise of economic inequities and shortages in the health workforce are contributors. This is especially true for people who live in rural areas in low-income countries without access to essential health services. Yet digital infrastructure and technologies exist that could allow virtual and rapid provision of health care for many health conditions, for almost everyone, at any time, irrespective of their location. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Steven R Steinhubl, Kwang-il Kim, Toluwalase Ajayi, Eric J Topol Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[World Report] A new paradigm for the MRC Units in The Gambia and Uganda
Two major medical research institutions in sub-Saharan Africa came under the purview of the London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine (LSHTM). The Medical Research Council (MRC) Unit The Gambia and the MRC/Uganda Virus Research Institute (UVRI) Uganda Research Unit transferred to LSHTM from their current positions under the MRC at the beginning of February. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Andrew Green Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] Developing countries in the digital revolution
A multidisciplinary commission was launched to question what role developing countries can and should have in the rapidly changing technological landscape. Talha Burki reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Talha Burki Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] Prospects for dementia research
After Pfizer's withdrawal from the market, some predicted a mass exodus of pharmaceutical companies' interests in Alzheimer's disease drug research. Geoff Watts reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Geoff Watts Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] FGM in Sierra Leone
Three years after a 2014 ban against the practice of female genital mutilation in Sierra Leone, Sharmila Devi reports on the progress towards its eradication. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Sharmila Devi Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[Comment] Offline: Adolescent health —vulnerable and under threat
There is no other group in society more emblematic of the Anthropocene than the adolescent —defined as a person between the ages of 10 and 24 years. The irreversible harm we are inflicting on our planet today will hurt the lives of young people most of all. During the past decade, one of the most remarkable achievements in global health has been the emergence of a new movement for adole scent health. When Ban Ki-moon's signature Every Woman Every Child initiative was launched in 2010, the young person was absent. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard Horton Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] The global fight against cancer: challenges and opportunities
By 2030, the number of cancer cases is projected to increase to 24 ·6 million and the number of cancer deaths to 13 million.1 Worldwide, health systems, especially in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), are ill prepared to manage the increasing cancer burden.2 Globally, there is a shortfall in coverage of cancer services for prevention, screening, trea tment, and palliative care.3–5 If cost-effective interventions for cancer screening, prevention, and treatment were delivered through strengthened health systems, they could help largely avoid many premature deaths, unnecessary suffering, and unaccep...
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Rifat Atun, Franco Cavalli Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Should basic science matter to clinicians?
We have observed declining interest in discovery science by our medical colleagues. Across a range of top medical journals, the number of basic science articles decreased by 40 –60% from 1994 to 2013,1 while a major North American university recorded a 60% decrease in clinician-investigator trainees pursuing basic science training between 1987 and 2016.2 The decline of basic science research in the medical literature and a disregard for it in continuing education program mes3 are allowing mastery of science to be lost by practising clinicians. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Niall C Filewod, Jane Batt, Andras Kapus, Katalin Szaszi, Gregory D Fairn, Arthur S Slutsky, Warren L Lee Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Editorial] Editing the human genome: balancing safety and regulation
The international race to bring human genome editing into widespread use in clinical medicine is moving fast. On Jan 23, the National Institutes of Health Common Fund launched its Somatic Cell Genome Editing programme, committing approximately US$190 million of funding over the next 6 years to propel development of genome editing into medical practice. A worthy effort, but the USA and Europe still trail behind China. As many as 86 patients in China have already had their genes altered as part of clinical trials to treat a range of diseases, including solid cancers. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] Yellow fever: a major threat to public health
The world's largest fractional-dose vaccination campaign for yellow fever started on Jan 25 in Brazil, with the support of WHO. The campaign attempts to avoid the urban transmission cycle, not seen in the country since 1942. 33 people have died due to yellow fever between Jan 14 and 23, while the number of confirmed cases in the country has reached more than 130. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] Changing culture to end FGM
When Ellen Johnson Sirleaf retired last month after 12 years in office in Liberia, she signed an executive order banning female genital mutilation (FGM) in the country for girls younger than 18 years. Her profile as Africa's first female president and a recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize for efforts to advance women's rights and peace ensured her executive order got international media attention, thus shining needed light on a devastating practice. Globally, a staggering 200 million women and girls have undergone FGM, and UNICEF estimates that more than one in three girls between 15 and 19 years of age are currently affected. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Turkish Medical Association central council detained for demanding peace
On Jan 24, 2018, the central council of the Turkish Medical Association (TTB) issued a short statement to express its opinion against the ongoing military operations by the Turkish army in northern Syria and to call for an end to the war by demanding peace.1 In its short announcement, TTB underscored the validity of its professional oath and duty to defend human lives.1 (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Caghan Kizil Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Review] Health systems development in Thailand: a solid platform for successful implementation of universal health coverage
Thailand's health development since the 1970s has been focused on investment in the health delivery infrastructure at the district level and below and on training the health workforce. Deliberate policies increased domestic training capacities for all cadres of health personnel and distributed them to rural and underserved areas. Since 1975, targeted insurance schemes for different population groups have improved financial access to health care until universal health coverage was implemented in 2002. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 31, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Viroj Tangcharoensathien, Woranan Witthayapipopsakul, Warisa Panichkriangkrai, Walaiporn Patcharanarumol, Anne Mills Tags: Review Source Type: research

[Department of Error] Department of Error
Robinson L. Successful ageing. Lancet 2018; 391: 300. In this Perspectives, the surname of the patient in the second and fifth paragraphs should have been Shuler and the book title should have read Enlightened Aging in the third and fifth paragraphs. This correction has been made to the online version as of Feb 8, 2018. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 31, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Department of Error Source Type: research

[Review] Countdown to 2030: tracking progress towards universal coverage for reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health
Building upon the successes of Countdown to 2015, Countdown to 2030 aims to support the monitoring and measurement of women's, children's, and adolescents' health in the 81 countries that account for 95% of maternal and 90% of all child deaths worldwide. To achieve the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030, the rate of decline in prevalence of maternal and child mortality, stillbirths, and stunting among children younger than 5 years of age needs to accelerate considerably compared with progress since 2000. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 30, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Countdown to 2030 Collaboration Tags: Review Source Type: research

[Articles] Status and drivers of maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health in the Islamic world: a comparative analysis
The status and progress in reproductive, maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health is heterogeneous among MMCs, with little indication that religion and its practice affects outcomes systemically. Some Islamic countries such as Niger and Bangladesh have made great progress, despite poverty. Key findings from this study have policy and programmatic implications that could be prioritised by national heads of state and policy makers, development partners, funders, and the Organization of the Islamic Cooperation to scale up and improve these health outcomes in Muslim countries in the post-2015 era. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 30, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Nadia Akseer, Mahdis Kamali, Nour Bakhache, Maaz Mirza, Seema Mehta, Sara Al-Gashm, Zulfiqar A Bhutta Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Comment] A call to action: improving women's, children's, and adolescents' health in the Muslim world
This study has a special meaning to me, not only as Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations; but as a Muslim woman, a mother, and a grandmother. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 30, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Amina J Mohammed Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Articles] Global surveillance of trends in cancer survival 2000 –14 (CONCORD-3): analysis of individual records for 37 513 025 patients diagnosed with one of 18 cancers from 322 population-based registries in 71 countries
The CONCORD programme enables timely comparisons of the overall effectiveness of health systems in providing care for 18 cancers that collectively represent 75% of all cancers diagnosed worldwide every year. It contributes to the evidence base for global policy on cancer control. Since 2017, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development has used findings from the CONCORD programme as the official benchmark of cancer survival, among their indicators of the quality of health care in 48 countries worldwide. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 30, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Claudia Allemani, Tomohiro Matsuda, Veronica Di Carlo, Rhea Harewood, Melissa Matz, Maja Nik šić, Audrey Bonaventure, Mikhail Valkov, Christopher J Johnson, Jacques Estève, Olufemi J Ogunbiyi, Gulnar Azevedo e Silva, Wan-Qing Chen, Sultan Eser, Gerda E Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Comment] Achieving better cancer intelligence for global cancer control
Cancer control is one of the most complicated and complex global health challenges to the achievement of universal health coverage and the health targets of the Sustainable Development Goals.1 Population-based survival is one of four cardinal points2 —along with incidence, prevalence, and mortality—in judging the effectiveness of national strategies to address the social determinants and health systems germane to cancer control. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 30, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard Sullivan Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Department of Error] Department of Error
Sinharay R, Gong J, Barratt B, et al. Respiratory and cardiovascular responses to walking down a traffic-polluted road compared with walking in a traffic-free area in participants older than 60 years with chronic lung or heart disease and age-matched healthy controls: a randomised, crossover study. Lancet 2017; 391: 339 –49—In this Article (published online first on Dec 5, 2017), the corresponding author has been corrected, the middle initial for Frank Kelly has been added, the role of the funding source has been updated, and author initials have been updated throughout. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Department of Error Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Underestimation of the global burden of schistosomiasis – Authors’ reply
Charles King and Alison Galvani cite three specific concerns in their commentary regarding the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study1 2016 and we respond briefly to them. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Ellen M Goldberg, David Pigott, Shreya Shirude, Jeffrey Stanaway, Simon I Hay, Theo Vos Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research