[Articles] Mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting versus percutaneous coronary intervention with stenting for coronary artery disease: a pooled analysis of individual patient data
CABG had a mortality benefit over PCI in patients with multivessel disease, particularly those with diabetes and higher coronary complexity. No benefit for CABG over PCI was seen in patients with left main disease. Longer follow-up is needed to better define mortality differences between the revascularisation strategies. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Stuart J Head, Milan Milojevic, Joost Daemen, Jung-Min Ahn, Eric Boersma, Evald H Christiansen, Michael J Domanski, Michael E Farkouh, Marcus Flather, Valentin Fuster, Mark A Hlatky, Niels R Holm, Whady A Hueb, Masoor Kamalesh, Young-Hak Kim, Timo M äkik Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Comment] CABG the clear choice for patients with diabetes and multivessel disease
Whether coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is the preferred revascularisation method in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease, particularly in those with diabetes, has been highly debated in the cardiovascular community for more than 20 years.1 –4 CABG has been consistently superior to PCI for the endpoint of repeat revascularisation. Each advancement in PCI5,6—from balloon angioplasty to bare-metal stents and drug-eluting stents—has re-challenged CABG's primacy for multivessel disease. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Deepak L Bhatt Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Seminar] Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia
Important advances in understanding the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia in the past two decades have led to the development of new prognostic tools and novel targeted therapies that have improved clinical outcome. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia is the most common type of leukaemia in developed countries, and the median age at diagnosis is 72 years. The criteria for initiating treatment rely on the Rai and Binet staging systems and on the presence of disease-related symptoms. For many patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, treatment with chemotherapy and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies is the standard of ...
Source: LANCET - February 21, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Michael Hallek, Tait D Shanafelt, Barbara Eichhorst Tags: Seminar Source Type: research

[Articles] Comparative efficacy and acceptability of 21 antidepressant drugs for the acute treatment of adults with major depressive disorder: a systematic review and network meta-analysis
All antidepressants were more efficacious than placebo in adults with major depressive disorder. Smaller differences between active drugs were found when placebo-controlled trials were included in the analysis, whereas there was more variability in efficacy and acceptability in head-to-head trials. These results should serve evidence-based practice and inform patients, physicians, guideline developers, and policy makers on the relative merits of the different antidepressants. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 21, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Andrea Cipriani, Toshi A Furukawa, Georgia Salanti, Anna Chaimani, Lauren Z Atkinson, Yusuke Ogawa, Stefan Leucht, Henricus G Ruhe, Erick H Turner, Julian P T Higgins, Matthias Egger, Nozomi Takeshima, Yu Hayasaka, Hissei Imai, Kiyomi Shinohara, Aran Taji Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Comment] More data, more answers: picking the optimal antidepressant
In an era of increasingly large datasets for health and emphasis on so-called big data analyses, key clinical questions remain unpretentiously simple. For example, do some antidepressants work better than others for depression? And are some more tolerable than others, at least as measured in dropout rates? A quick PubMed search of antidepressant meta-analyses yields more than 2000 hits, but the complexity of understanding which antidepressants are better or more tolerable than others is made particularly daunting by the fact that more than 40 antidepressants are available. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 21, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Sagar V Parikh, Sidney H Kennedy Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Germany's expanding role in global health – Authors' reply
Germany's role in global health is expanding, as we outlined in our contribution to the recent Series on Germany and health.1 Manfred Wildner and colleagues rightly argue that this expansion requires a strong domestic public health sector, yet Germany's public health infrastructure is fragmented2 and in need of domestic investment.1 The kind of investment required remains an issue of debate. Wildner and colleagues call for a reconciliation of public health services focusing on infectious disease control, and revived academic public health focusing inter alia on health promotion. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Oliver Razum, Christian Franz, Anna Holzscheiter, Ilona Kickbusch, Carsten K öhler, Jean-Olivier Schmidt, Albrecht Jahn Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Germany's expanding role in global health
In their Series paper, Ilona Kickbusch and colleagues1 criticise Germany's higher education sector preparedness for global health, citing Kaffes and colleagues.2 We agree with Kickbusch and colleagues' view but want to stress that progress has been made. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Ralf Weigel, Carsten Kr üger, Stefan Wirth Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Germany's expanding role in global health
In their Series paper on Germany's expanding role in global health (July 3, 2017, p 898),1 Ilona Kickbusch and colleagues draw attention to the country's fragmented public health infrastructure. The authors call for an enabling network or platform to build synergies between the major German institutions —eg, through a global health institute or think tank. Although this approach is consistent with an analysis of Germany's scientific academies,2 the success of a specialised global health institute with an international programme would ultimately also depend on a domestic public health knowledge ba se of high competenc...
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Manfred Wildner, Lothar H Wieler, Hajo Zeeb, standing committee of the Future Forum Public Health Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Germany must invest in its global health academic workforce
At the launch of The Lancet's Germany and health Series in Berlin, passionate calls were heard for Germany to assume a leadership role in global health. Unfortunately, we are faced with a large gap in Germany's global health education and research capacity1 after a long period of global health “infancy”,2 and “low prioritisation of global health in its universities' curricula”.1 Less than a third of health-related degree programmes in Germany offer any global health education,3 and most medical faculties score low for global health research and education, according to the Global H ealth University R...
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Sabine Gabrysch, Philipp Jaehn Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Germany needs to catch up in global health research
It is encouraging to read about Germany's engagement with the wider world and that Germany is taking responsibility for global health issues on a level that has not been seen before. However, key issues are missing in the description of the German health system (the Bismarck model) and the expanding role in global health,1 which have to be addressed to allow a successful move into the new role. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Gerd Antes Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Germany's contribution to global health
4 years after the adoption of Germany's first global health strategy,1 an expansion of Germany's role in global health is being observed and praised.2 Despite being a “latecomer” in this field,2 a lot of achievements have been made over the past few years. The German Government's multilateral approach and its efforts to strengthen the global health architecture in general are highly appreciated, as are the efforts of WHO in particular. Germany's official deve lopment assistance for health has increased substantially between 2013 and 2015, but this increase was mainly due to the inclusion of costs for asylum see...
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Mathias B Bonk, Ole D öring, Timo Ulrichs Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Dengue vaccination: a more balanced approach is needed
Media reports have cast doubt on the safety of dengue vaccination, resulting in the suspension of school-based immunisation programmes in the Philippines.1 The main concern about the vaccine is the risk of severe disease in children naive to dengue virus. Although these concerns are justified, it is important to consider this risk in the context of the wider population and to consider the public health value of dengue vaccination for the prevention of a disease that affects 400 million people annually, mostly in developing countries. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Tikki Pang, Duane Gubler, Daniel Yam Thiam Goh, Zulkifli Ismail, Asia Dengue Vaccine Advocacy Group Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Obituary] Anna Mae Hays
US Army nurse and first female general in US Armed Forces. She was born in Buffalo, NY, USA, on Feb 16, 1920, and died following a heart attack in Washington, DC, USA, on Jan 7, 2018, aged 97 years. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Geoff Watts Tags: Obituary Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Medical 3D printing and the physician-artist
It was psychologically impossible to prepare for the first patient I met who had catastrophic facial deformity. Medical training helped me respond to his sensory defects: sight, sound, smell, and taste. However, when one person meets another, we connect via, and then later recognise, one another's face. When I met that first patient —one of many wounded soldiers with severe facial injuries—I was challenged to help artfully repair the damage. Had the injury occurred in the mid-20th century, surgery would have been greatly limited by the paucity of options in plastic surgery. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Frank J Rybicki Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Gabriel Leung: working for a healthier Hong Kong
In 2008, when he was a professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Hong Kong (HKU), Gabriel Leung was invited to join government service as Hong Kong's Under Secretary for Food and Health. As an academic, he was accustomed to offering policy advice: to being, as he puts it, an armchair critic. “If you're given the opportunity to practise what you preach and you turn it down”, he points out, “you have very little credibility in remaining an armchair critic”. He took the job. “As a public health physician”, he adds, “your form of clinical practice is doing public he...
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Geoff Watts Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Life behind bars
There's something of a shock in store for anyone who researches the infamous Newgate Prison in London, UK. In place of its reputation for cruelty and Gothic gloom, eyewitness reports and statistics suggest that life inside could be more wholesome than outside, for an ordinary, poor Londoner, with three meals a day, ale, clean bedding, the chance to exercise, and unlimited visits from friends and relations. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Sarah Wise Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Schizophrenia
Dementia praecox, dementia paranoides, catatonia, hebephrenia, stupefaction —just the terms historically associated with schizophrenia could fill up a short essay on the subject. The contentious and surprisingly short history of this diagnosis draws out some of the most difficult questions in psychiatry. Is schizophrenia a natural entity, awaiting objective description, o r does it emerge from a shifting intersection of contexts? Is good practice a matter of grouping disorders into broad categories based on underlying resemblances, or does accurate diagnosis depend on breaking these generalisations down into lists of...
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard Barnett Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[World Report] End of a cholera epidemic in South Sudan declared
An announcement on Feb 7 declared the end of a cholera epidemic in South Sudan. Talha Burki reports on controlling an epidemic in a country in the midst of civil war. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Talha Burki Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] Yemeni health under relentless pressure
Renewed calls for funding, reports of increasing conflict, and the ongoing blockade of the Red Sea ports draw the picture of a worsening humanitarian situation in Yemen. Sharmila Devi reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Sharmila Devi Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] CDC faces leadership changes, potential spending cuts
The CDC has indicated it will reduce its foreign presence, and proposed budget cuts make some fear its core functions are threatened. Susan Jaffe, The Lancet's Washington correspondent, reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Susan Jaffe Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[Comment] Offline: Apostasy against the public health elites
“Epidemiology is built on a history of convincing experiments…We need to get better at using randomised controlled trials as knowledge translation in the public health field”, wrote Anne Cockcroft last year. Who could disagree? The centrality of randomised evidence is firmly established for ev aluating interventions and their application in clinical medicine. The same is true in public health. But any clinician or public health practitioner knows that there is more to evidence than the results of a precious randomised trial. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard Horton Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Primary care research: a call for papers
To mark the 40th anniversary of the Alma-Ata Declaration, The Lancet will dedicate the issue of Oct 20, 2018, to primary care and related themes. While we welcome submissions on all aspects of primary care at all times, and across all Lancet titles, this call for papers is particularly aimed at researchers in primary care settings. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Astrid James, William Summerskill, Richard Horton Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Amending the EU Withdrawal Bill: a safeguard for health
Detailed analyses of the health consequences of Brexit have focused on its negative effects on the UK's National Health Service, food security, international cooperation to combat threats to health, medicines regulation, and medical research.1 Faced with this depressing picture, it is natural to seek any glimmer of hope. Could there be any opportunities to improve health? The answer, invariably, is that leaving the European Union (EU) could allow the UK to go beyond existing European policies to strengthen protection in public health —eg, by introducing traffic light labelling on food or implementing stricter environ...
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Martin McKee, Tamara Hervey Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Editorial] Asthma in US children
Around 6 million children in the USA are affected by asthma, making it the most common chronic lung disease in childhood. Last week, the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published their monthly Vital Signs report, which analyses asthma data from the 2001 –16 National Health Interview Survey for children aged 0–17 years. Asthma diagnosis was limited to adult proxy responses to two questions: “Has a doctor or health professional ever told you that [your child] had asthma?”, and “Does [your child] still have asthma?” (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] What's next for Indigenous health in Australia?
Last week, the independent Close the Gap Campaign Steering Committee released a 10 year review of the government's Closing the Gap Strategy, ahead of the annual report. The 2008 Council of Australian Governments' Closing the Gap Strategy was developed following their signing of the Close the Gap Statement of Intent. This statement was meant to holistically tackle the social determinants of health inequality with targets in health, education, and employment, and represented a watershed moment, aspiring to secure health equity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders by 2030. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] Examining humanitarian principles in changing warfare
Violence in war must have a limit. Those who are not participating in the hostilities should be protected to prevent war from sinking into barbarity. Today, this is safeguarded by international humanitarian law (IHL), of which the cornerstones are the four Geneva Conventions of 1949 and its Additional Protocols. IHL provides for the wounded and sick to be collected and cared for by the warring faction that has them in their power, and for them to receive timely medical care. Traditionally, those entering into conflict could be expected to uphold these laws. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Articles] Real-time continuous glucose monitoring in adults with type 1 diabetes and impaired hypoglycaemia awareness or severe hypoglycaemia treated with multiple daily insulin injections (HypoDE): a multicentre, randomised controlled trial
Usage of rtCGM reduced the number of hypoglycaemic events in individuals with type 1 diabetes treated by MDI and with impaired hypoglycaemia awareness or severe hypoglycaemia. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Lutz Heinemann, Guido Freckmann, Dominic Ehrmann, Gabriele Faber-Heinemann, Stefania Guerra, Delia Waldenmaier, Norbert Hermanns Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Comment] Continuous glucose monitoring: transforming diabetes management step by step
The introduction and evolution of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has transformed how glucose control is defined and approached. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) remains the key surrogate for the risk of microvascular complications and a good comparator of average glycaemic control in different populations. But use of HbA1c alone to guide diabetes management can be misleading.1 With the high clinical burden and cost associated with substantial hypoglycaemia,2 a better approach to optimal glycaemic management might be HbA1c combined with a measure of hypoglycaemia. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard M Bergenstal Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Articles] Mesh versus suture repair of umbilical hernia in adults: a randomised, double-blind, controlled, multicentre trial
This is the first study showing high level evidence for mesh repair in patients with small hernias of diameter 1 –4 cm. Hence we suggest mesh repair should be used for operations on all patients with an umbilical hernia of this size. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Ruth Kaufmann, Jens A Halm, Hasan H Eker, Pieter J Klitsie, Jeroen Nieuwenhuizen, Dick van Geldere, Maarten P Simons, Erwin van der Harst, Martijne van 't Riet, Bronno van der Holt, Gert Jan Kleinrensink, Johannes Jeekel, Johan F Lange Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Comment] Time for use of mesh repair for all umbilical hernias?
The indication for open umbilical hernia repair is based predominantly on a surgeon's preference rather than solid evidence, and whether to suture or reinforce the repair with mesh has been heavily debated.1 –3 Annually, millions of patients undergo repair for an umbilical hernia,4 and despite 90% of these defects being less than 2 cm in diameter, 5–10% of patients are reoperated for recurrence, and many more have a clinically detectable recurrence and therefore risk chronic pain.5,6 (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Frederik Helgstrand, Thue Bisgaard Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Department of Error] Department of Error
Agusti A. Filling the gaps in COPD: the TRIBUTE study. Lancet 2018; 391: 1002 –03—In this Comment (published online first on Feb 8, 2018), the first sentence of the fourth paragraph has been corrected to read “First, the incidence of COPD exacerbations was low in both groups of the study.” This correction has been made to the online version as of Feb 14, 2018, and the printed Comment is correct. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 14, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Department of Error Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Deaths of children and women in Gaza hostilities – Authors' reply
Iain Chalmers commented on the absence of specific numbers relating to Israeli and Palestinian casualties in our paper on maternal and child health in Israel.1 Given the clearly defined parameters of our work within the Series on Health in Israel, we find his comments perplexing. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Lisa Rubin, Ilana Belmaker, Eli Somekh, Mary Rudolf, Zachi Grossman Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Deaths of children and women in Gaza hostilities
In their paper on maternal and child health in Israel, Lisa Rubin and colleagues (June 24, 2017, p 2514)1 observed that “Israeli children, from both Arab and Jewish backgrounds, and Palestinian children are unusually at-risk because of their exposure to violence from intermittent armed hostilities, including indiscriminate rocket fire and terror attacks”. However, they provided no data to illustrate these tragedi es. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Iain Chalmers Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Medical ethics in Israel – Author's reply
I thank Zohar Lederman for taking the time to read our Essay1 but am slightly confused by his comments. He mentions the importance of transparency and public scrutiny in bioethical debates but challenges us for alluding to the public debate in Israel on the force feeding of prisoners. Furthermore, in our paper, we did not praise or condemn the practice but simply noted that the ethics committee of the Israel Medical Association is opposed to force-feeding a hunger-striker because they regard it an affront to autonomy and human freedom. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Alan B Jotkowitz Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Medical ethics in Israel
I am soon to become a medical resident and a bioethics scholar in Israel. I thus wish to respond to an Essay recently published in The Lancet by Alan B Jotkowitz and colleagues (June 24, p 2584)1 that seeks to “explore how a multicultural, modern society steeped in monotheistic tradition has navigated through most of these conflicts to create a mostly satisfactory and pragmatic consensus on contemporary bioethical dilemmas.” If the claims made by the authors do represent a consensus, then it is a pain fully unsatisfactory one. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Zohar Lederman Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Women's health in Israel
We congratulate The Lancet for its Health in Israel Series, which takes a broad and unprecedented look at Israeli health and health care, and applaud the effort to focus on women's health. We read with interest the Viewpoint by Leeat Granek and colleagues (June 24, 2017, p 2575),1 in which the authors state that the health of women in Israel is affected by the political situation in Israel. Although it might be true, this statement needs more support. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Ronit Calderon-Margalit, Ora Paltiel Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Shared values cannot redress the occupier –occupied imbalance
In their Series paper, Karl Skorecki and Richard Horton (June 24, 2017, p 2551)1 seem to be suggesting that peace through health, or the so-called health as a bridge for peace approach, are “beacons that can illuminate a way forward”. They describe the direct interactions of Gazan and Israeli physicians as a telling example of “the values shared in the inherent fellowship of health practitioners, values that supersede political, religious, and ideological barriers” and state th at these shared values are “the most powerful mediators human beings have to foster new but natural relationships bet...
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Angelo Stefanini Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Inequalities in non-communicable diseases in Israel – Authors' reply
We thank John Yudkin for his comments on our Series paper1 discussing the inequalities in non-communicable diseases between the major population groups in Israel. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Khitam Muhsen, Manfred S Green, Varda Soskolne, Yehuda Neumark Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Inequalities in non-communicable diseases in Israel
In their analyses of the inequality of prevalence of non-communicable disease, Khitam Muhsen and colleagues (June 24, 2017, p 2531)1 discuss the discrepancy in life expectancy between Arabs and Jews in Israel, which has been increasing over the past 25 years. Although the paper reviews differences in cause-specific mortality and in several risk factors for non-communicable diseases, Muhsen and colleagues did not explore the contribution of the major differences in socioeconomic status between these two groups. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: John S Yudkin Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Health equity in Israel – Authors' reply
We thank the correspondents for their thoughtful comments. All respondents were critical of the fact that our Series paper1 did not address Palestinian health or give adequate expression to the problem of health disparities. As we mentioned, the purpose of the Series was to assess the Israeli health-care system that offers comprehensive, publicly funded, and administered care to all legal residents, including Israeli Jews and Israeli Arabs. Our introductory paper to this ten-paper Series was meant to offer an overview of the relevant subjects and we could not be expected to cover each in depth. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: A Mark Clarfield, Fuad Basis, Avi Israeli, Orly Manor, Shifra Shvarts Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Health equity in Israel
Although The Lancet is to be commended for publishing an important letter on the Gaza assault,1 the Health in Israel Series omits key aspects and viewpoints. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Hatim Kanaaneh, Maxine Fookson, Alan Meyers, Alice Rothchild, Rachel Rubin, Peter Sporn, Health Advisory Council of Jewish Voice for Peace Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Health equity in Israel
In the first paper in The Lancet's Series on Health in Israel, A Mark Clarfield and colleagues1 praised the development of health-care services before the establishment of Israel, highlighting health-care needs among Jewish immigrants while ignoring the substantial health consequences2 of the 1948 Nakba (The Palestinian Catastrophe), when nearly 1 million Palestinians were expelled from their lands. Some were internally displaced; others became refugees who were denied basic rights. Israel missed the opportunity to create an egalitarian health-care system when the activities of Medical Services for Minorities —previo...
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Nihaya Daoud Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Health equity in Israel
In their Series paper, A Mark Clarfield and colleagues (June 24, 2017, p 2503)1 stated that, during six decades of progress, Israel has developed a solid public health system with reasonable health indices over the lifespan of the Israeli population. This introduction explicitly refuses to address the roots of one of Israel's most urgent health issues: the preventable premature morbidity and mortality of Palestinians, whether citizens of Israel or residents of the occupied Palestinian territory. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Michelle Morse, Bram Wispelwey Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Reducing health disparities: Bar Ilan Medical School's care transition service
We applaud The Lancet's Health in Israel Series documenting the young nation's remarkable progress towards improving its citizens' health1 and challenges regarding health disparities2 in Israel's periphery and among key subpopulations, including ultra-orthodox Jews and Muslim Arabs. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Marc Rivo, Mary Rudolf, Sivan Spitzer-Shohat, Micky Weingarten, Barbara Schuster, Robert Schwartz, David Nash, Mina Silberberg Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Protecting Rohingya: lives, minds, and the future
The Lancet Editorial (Dec 23, 2017, p 2740)1 highlights the urgent need to protect the Rohingya from atrocities. The UN Security Council and member states have been called on to investigate these apparent crimes against humanity and impose appropriate sanctions against military forces, but the mental health status of the Rohinga also requires urgent attention. The outbreak of diseases such as diphtheria, cholera, and measles represents only a small part of the problem. The greater and more concerning challenge is protecting the mental health of individuals exposed to genocide and humanitarian crises. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Md Mahbub Hossain, Neetu Purohit Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Obituary] Jimmie Coker Holland
Psychiatrist and founder of psycho-oncology. She was born in Nevada, TX, USA, on April 9, 1928, and died of cardiovascular disease in Scarsdale, NY, USA, on Dec 24, 2017, aged 89 years. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Geoff Watts Tags: Obituary Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Art and oncology: one life
When I decided to become a doctor, art and science were regarded as separate entities. I was already immersed in the arts and in the first years after qualifying I had doubts about continuing with medicine, not helped by having to spend 2 years in the army in the last batch of conscripts before military service ended. Paradoxically, being removed from the conventional career ladder was liberating. I was on my own as a medical officer to an infantry battalion and I had time to think about what I wanted to do in medicine and art. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Michael Peckham Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Robin West breaks gender barriers in US football and baseball
Most 10-year-olds who break their arm focus on how many people they can get to sign their cast. But when Robin West broke her arm at that age, she focused on her x-rays. West studied the images of her fracture and then went home and looked up “surgical neck of the humerus” in her treasured paperback copy of Gray's Anatomy, the 1976 edition. She'd asked her parents for it when she was in kindergarten, after spying her anaesthesiologist uncle's copy. “I thought it was kind of cool”, she explains. About 40 years after she received h er first copy of Gray's Anatomy, West has what many people would consi...
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Rita Rubin Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[In brief] Bright life
For some, there is little joy in reading a story once the ending has been revealed. In The Bright Hour, poet Nina Riggs proves just the opposite. At age 37, Riggs, a mother of two young boys, was diagnosed with terminal breast cancer. Although readers know where this story will end, there is much to learn by joining her on the journey towards the end of her life. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Noren Zakiya Khamis Tags: In brief Source Type: research

[Perspectives] A global girl gang
If there is one time of life when emotional ups and downs are particularly steep —with roller-coaster highs and lows, risky behaviour, and attention seeking at an all-time high—it's adolescence. It is an exciting, scary, and vulnerable time. Many cultures around the world recognise this liminal and transformative time with initiation rites to mark the passage from childhood to adulthood. Heads are shaved, genitals cut, tests of courage and strength performed, and ceremonies held to mark sexual maturity, reproduction, and changing roles in family and society. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Heidi J Larson Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research