[Perspectives] Resistance to injustice
Some of the most compelling films at this year's Human Rights Watch Film Festival in London, UK, show women battling the established political, social, or moral order. “We have not just women directors this year, we have a group of films that show central female characters very strongly pushing back against society in one way or another”, said John Biaggi, the festival's creative director. Half of the 14 award-winning international documentary and feature film s in the festival, which Biaggi and his team selected from more than 500 entries, are directed by women. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Mark Tran Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Peter Sands: charting a new course for The Global Fund
Peter Sands had a stormy start before taking up his new position as Executive Director of The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria on March 5, 2018. He was plunged into controversy last month after the decision by The Global Fund's senior management team to partner with Heineken, among other multinationals, and the implications for global health. The organisation, which invests and raises almost US$4 billion each year, is the world's largest public –private partnership set up to finance programmes to treat and prevent these three diseases and strengthen national health systems in the long term. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Pamela Das Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[World Report] Rheumatic heart disease in the Pacific island nations
A pending motion from WHO might seek to eradicate rheumatic heart disease, which is still prevalent in Pacific island nations where progress is lagging. Chris McCall reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Chris McCall Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] Canada's federal budget under review
Canada champions science, women, and Indigenous health, while sidestepping pharmacare. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Paul Webster Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] Access to family planning in Senegal
In a jail in Senegal, a woman is imprisoned, convicted with infanticide. Access to family planning could help to prevent this societal woe. Amy Yee reports from Dakar. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Amy Yee Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[Comment] Offline: The health of our societies is in peril
A single “s” makes all the difference. In 1969, it was Civilisation: the view of one man, Kenneth Clark, who took his television audience through a personal grand tour of the history of art—the only history of consequence then being western art. In 2018, the pluralism of human creativity was acknowledg ed in the BBC's new venture, Civilisations. In place of the perspective of one (white) man, the audience today can enjoy the less linear (and certainly more global) narratives offered by Simon Schama, Mary Beard, and David Olusoga. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard Horton Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Mitral meets mortality
Cardiologists and collaborating medical device and pharmaceutical companies have had much success in identifying new and profitable fields of engagement. The mitral valve space is one of those areas, following the previous successful occupation by cardiologists and the medical device industry of specialties such as coronary heart disease, arrhythmias, and the aortic valve. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Georg Nickenig, Robert Schueler Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Editorial] Suicide in prisons: NICE fights fires
In February, 2018, NICE released draft guidelines addressing suicide in custodial and detention settings, looking at methods of reducing death by suicide, and offering help to those affected by suicide. In 2016, the likelihood of self-inflicted death of offenders in custody was 8 ·6 times greater than the likelihood of suicide in the general population. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] The Global Fund under Peter Sands
Within the space of a few short weeks, the reputation of Peter Sands, incoming Executive Director of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, has gone from respected to reckless according to some critics. In an Offline column last November, The Lancet's Editor offered an unreserved welcome to Sands, praising his “credibility” and “refreshing new vision”. Sands had assiduously built a compelling argument for governments to take the economic costs of infectious diseases more seriously. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a unique medical emergency
In 1891, Friedrich Maass performed the first chest compressions on a human being. 80 years later, the first mass citizen training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was held in Seattle; over 100  000 members of the public were taught CPR. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) describes the loss of mechanical cardiac function and the absence of systemic circulation. Time is crucial, with a lack of perfusion leading to continual cell death; with each second that passes the possibility of a good outcome decreases. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Female physicians nominated for the Nobel Prize 1901 –50
Recent contributions in The Lancet have discussed the under-representation of women at senior levels in medicine and the life sciences.1 This trend mirrors the gender gap in the number of Nobel Prize nominees and laureates in physiology or medicine. Drawing on sources from the archive of the Nobel committee in Sweden, we have found that the lion's share of both nominators and nominees were men during the first half of the 20th century (archival material for the last 50 years is not yet available). (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Nils Hansson, Heiner Fangerau Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Comment] Report card shows gender is missing in global health
Gender equality benefits everyone —from contributing more representative and effective organisations, to ensuring better health outcomes. Yet, even in 2018, it remains remarkably hard to achieve. The World Economic Forum's Global Gender Gap Report 20171 estimates that it will now take 217 years to close the global workplace gender gap; indeed, the gap widened last year for the first time since the report was launched in 2006. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Helen Clark Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Seminar] Migraine
Migraine is a chronic paroxysmal neurological disorder characterised by multiphase attacks of head pain and a myriad of neurological symptoms. The underlying genetic and biological underpinnings and neural networks involved are coming sharply into focus. This progress in the fundamental understanding of migraine has led to novel, mechanism-based and disease-specific therapeutics. In this Seminar, the clinical features and neurobiology of migraine are reviewed, evidence to support available treatment options is provided, and emerging drug, device, and biological therapies are discussed. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: David W Dodick Tags: Seminar Source Type: research

[Articles] NGM282 for treatment of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis: a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial
NGM282 produced rapid and significant reductions in liver fat content with an acceptable safety profile in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Further study of NGM282 is warranted in this patient population. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Stephen A Harrison, Mary E Rinella, Manal F Abdelmalek, James F Trotter, Angelo H Paredes, Hays L Arnold, Marcelo Kugelmas, Mustafa R Bashir, Mark J Jaros, Lei Ling, Stephen J Rossi, Alex M DePaoli, Rohit Loomba Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Comment] FGF-19 agonism for NASH: a short study of a long disease
Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has emerged as the most common cause of liver disease worldwide and is on a trajectory to become the most common indication for liver transplantation.1,2 Interest in developing effective therapies for NASH has been proportional. Since its original scientific description, NASH has been a histologically defined disease, characterised by hepatic steatosis and inflammation with variable presence and severity of Mallory's hyaline, balloon degeneration, and, most important clinically, fibrosis. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Michael Charlton Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Foley catheterisation versus oral misoprostol to induce labour – Author's reply
I thank Ben Mol for his thoughtful comments about our research.1 He is concerned that 24 h is too short a cutoff time for vaginal birth, and that we should have continued the induction process with the Foley catheter before resorting to caesarean section. We would usually agree with him, but our study was done in a very different setting to his Dutch study.2 In Europe, outcomes of induced labour are so good that the procedure is often performed for weak indications to prevent adverse outcomes; hence, the proportion of Dutch pregnancies that are induced is around 15%. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Andrew D Weeks Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Foley catheterisation versus oral misoprostol to induce labour
The INFORM study (Aug 12, 2017, p 669)1 investigated Foley catheterisation versus oral misoprostol in women with hypertension who were scheduled for induction of labour. The authors report a statistically significant lower rate of vaginal delivery within 24 h among women induced via Foley catheterisation, and conclude that oral misoprostol is more effective than Foley catheterisation. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Ben W Mol Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Ensuring value in health-related research
Funders of health-related research agree that although considerable research of high value exists, loss of any research because it asks the wrong questions, is poorly designed, is not published, or the reports are unusable is unacceptable. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Fay Chinnery, Kelly M Dunham, Barbara van der Linden, Matthew Westmore, Evelyn Whitlock Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Issues with measuring hepatitis prevalence in resource-limited settings
We read with interest the Correspondence from Noemi Garc ía-Tardón and colleagues (Sept 23, 2017, p 1485) 1 describing the prevalence of HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among blood donors in Sierra Leone. Considering there are few data on viral hepatitis from the region, the authors should be congratulated for their efforts. However, we fear that some of their results and messages might be misleading. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Gilles Wandeler, Patrick A Coffie, Mark H Kuniholm, Ponsiano Ocama, Matthias Egger Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Tackling hepatitis C —Pakistan's road to success
In November, 2017, the annual World Hepatitis Summit in S ão Paulo, Brazil, assessed WHO's global health sector strategy on viral hepatitis 2016–20, and called for prompt, innovative, and coherent interventions, along with evidence-based research.1 The viral hepatitis pandemic caused an estimated 1·4 million deaths in 2015, and yet has received inadequ ate attention from donors and policy makers until recently, as outlined in an Editorial in The Lancet (Nov 11, 2017, p 2121).2 New data indicate that action has been fragmented and insufficient, with only 82 countries, including Pakistan, adopting strateg...
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Ariba Moin, Huda Fatima, Tooba F Qadir Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Putting Ireland's health spending into perspective
The Irish Taoiseach (Prime Minister) Leo Varadkar recently stated that Ireland spends the fifth highest amount on health in the world, therefore citizens should expect the fifth best health system in the world.1 Meanwhile, the European Commission has expressed concerns about the cost-effectiveness and sustainability of the Irish health system.2 However, these observations fail to take into account the fact that the Irish health system is only now recovering from historic long-term underfunding, the effects of which are still being felt. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Brian Turner Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Obituary] Jeffrey Lima Hayes O'Riordan
Pioneer researcher in the hormonal control of bone metabolism. Born in Newport, UK, on March 27, 1931, he died in London, UK, of a bowel obstruction on Oct 9, 2017, aged 86 years. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Geoff Watts Tags: Obituary Source Type: research

[Perspectives] A day in the life of a surgical intern: women in surgery
I wake up moderately rested for another day of work as a surgical intern, a first year resident doctor learning to care for patients. I mentally prepare myself for the day ahead. Morning rounds, ward management, clinic appointments, and perhaps I'll be able to squeeze into an operating room. Despite my planning for the day, I dwell mostly on my apprehensions about my abilities. Are my patients stable enough? Is my prioritisation of tasks safe and efficient? Am I learning enough? Am I good enough? (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Han Yan Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Edna Adan Ismail: midwife and champion of women's health
“I have an incurable disease; I suffer from I've-got-to-fix-that”, says Edna Adan Ismail, midwife and founder of the non-profit Edna Adan Hospital in Somaliland. At the age of 80 years, she has no intention of slowing down. “There's so much to be done and why should I miss all the fun”, she says. “But I am trying to delegate more and I'm finding people who can do things very well. I don't want the hospital to die with me.” (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Sharmila Devi Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Human arrogance and epidemics
There was a time not so long ago, in the early 1990s, when warnings about emerging epidemics and infectious diseases were derided, the Cassandras were mocked, and the power of human ingenuity and countermeasures were hailed. Globalisation of HIV/AIDS, of course, curbed such hubris, but medical and public health leaders, including the top tiers of WHO, viewed HIV as an exception to the rule. And as Michael Merson and Stephen Inrig detail in their agonising account The AIDS Pandemic: Searching for a Global Response, that notion of AIDS exceptionalism spawned an international non-response that allowed the virus to sweep acros...
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Laurie Garrett Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[World Report] Negotiations lagging for science and technology in the UK
A summit held by the Science and Technology parliamentary Committee on Feb 22 highlights how much still needs to be determined to safeguard UK research before Brexit. Talha Burki reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Talha Burki Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] Libya: war and migration strain a broken health system
Libya is struggling to cope with a migrant crisis as widespread suffering and armed violence continue in the war-torn nation. John Zarocostas reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: John Zarocostas Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[Comment] Offline: Canada and global health —iconic or ironic?
Canada occupies iconic status in the history of medicine and global health. Midwife to UN peacekeeping. 0 ·7%. The Lalonde Report. The Ottawa Charter. Evidence-based medicine. Muskoka. Canada can be proud of its iconic leaders too. Emily Howard Jennings Stowe, the first woman doctor to practise medicine in Canada. Jennie Robertson, the country's first female surgeon. Brock Chisholm, WHO's first Directo r-General. John Evans, who rewrote the World Bank's mission to include health. Canada possesses internationally influential health research funders, such as the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Internati...
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard Horton Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Editorial] Wellcome seeks Brexit carve-out for UK research
Last week, The Wellcome Trust released a report on the future relationship for scientific research between the UK and the European Union (EU) following Brexit. Drawing on the views of 200 organisations and individuals, the report recommends maintaining a close partnership through the establishment of an EU –UK research and innovation agreement that covers funding, regulation and research policy, and the movement of researchers. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] Stem cells, regenerative medicine, and Prometheus
The possibility of regeneration fascinates us as much today as it did the ancient Greeks. In the story of Prometheus, an eagle was sent to peck his liver each day as punishment, while at night it regrew. Stem cells have a similar mythical character —part fact, part fantasy—that captures the imagination but also blurs reality. In today's issue, we publish the Lancet Commission: Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine (published online Oct 4, 2017) to assess advances in the field, including gene therapy, since our last Series on the topic in 20 13, and how to plan future developments in a way that both promotes scie...
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] The burden of traumatic brain injury in children
On Feb 21, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health, published the Report to Congress: The Management of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in Children, to review the public health burden and to make recommendations for the future management and treatment of this population. In a field with such a lack of scientific research and evidence, the report has drawn on all existing resources and studies to comprehensively present the US experience. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Addressing paediatric surgical care on World Birth Defects Day
As we pause to reflect on the burden of disease caused by birth defects during World Birth Defects Day on March 3, 2018, we highlight the importance of developing surgical systems for children, to decrease the morbidity and mortality of birth defects. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Naomi J Wright, Jamie E Anderson, Doruk Ozgediz, Diana L Farmer, Tahmina Banu Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Articles] Mapping the burden of cholera in sub-Saharan Africa and implications for control: an analysis of data across geographical scales
Although cholera occurs throughout sub-Saharan Africa, its highest incidence is concentrated in a small proportion of the continent. Prioritising high-risk areas could substantially increase the efficiency of cholera control programmes. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 1, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Justin Lessler, Sean M Moore, Francisco J Luquero, Heather S McKay, Rebecca Grais, Myriam Henkens, Martin Mengel, Jessica Dunoyer, Maurice M'bangombe, Elizabeth C Lee, Mamoudou Harouna Djingarey, Bertrand Sudre, Didier Bompangue, Robert S M Fraser, Abdina Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Comment] Taking aim at cholera
In 1854, John Snow's work on cholera in London immortalised the power of mapping as a tool for disease prevention and control.1 Over 160 years later, a more ambitious effort to map cholera has been reported in The Lancet.2 Forgoing so-called shoe leather epidemiology in favour of big data, Justin Lessler and colleagues2 used 279 cholera datasets covering 2283 locations in 37 countries, and cluster-level maps of access to improved water and sanitation in 41 countries, to map cholera incidence across sub-Saharan Africa at a 20 km  × 20 km grid scale. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 1, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Eric Mintz Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Nursing Now campaign: raising the status of nurses
There have been enormous developments in nursing over the past decades, with extended roles, nurse practitioners, and degree level education spreading globally and with, for example, prescribing by nurses now established in countries as different as Botswana and the UK.1 Nursing and midwifery make up almost half the global health workforce, are at the centre of most health teams, and have a massive impact on health.2 However, nurses and midwives will assume an even more extensive and influential role in the future for at least six powerful reasons. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 28, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Nigel Crisp, Elizabeth Iro Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Articles] Efficacy of self-monitored blood pressure, with or without telemonitoring, for titration of antihypertensive medication (TASMINH4): an unmasked randomised controlled trial
Self-monitoring, with or without telemonitoring, when used by general practitioners to titrate antihypertensive medication in individuals with poorly controlled blood pressure, leads to significantly lower blood pressure than titration guided by clinic readings. With most general practitioners and many patients using self-monitoring, it could become the cornerstone of hypertension management in primary care. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 27, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard J McManus, Jonathan Mant, Marloes Franssen, Alecia Nickless, Claire Schwartz, James Hodgkinson, Peter Bradburn, Andrew Farmer, Sabrina Grant, Sheila M Greenfield, Carl Heneghan, Susan Jowett, Una Martin, Siobhan Milner, Mark Monahan, Sam Mort, Emm Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Comment] Hypertension: time for doctors to switch the driver's seat?
In The Lancet, Richard McManus and colleagues1 in the TASMINH4 trial address a timely and clinically relevant question, as to whether self-monitoring of blood pressure, with or without telemonitoring, when used by general practitioners (GPs) to titrate antihypertensive therapy in individuals with poorly controlled blood pressure, leads to significantly lower blood pressure than titration guided by clinic readings alone. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 27, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Ernst R Rietzschel, Marc L De Buyzere Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Department of Error] Department of Error
Papi A, Vestbo J, Fabbri L, et al. Extrafine inhaled triple therapy versus dual bronchodilator therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (TRIBUTE): a double-blind, parallel group, randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2018; 391: 1076 –84—In figure 3B of this Article (published online first on Feb 8, 2018), the y-axis title and the “Adjusted mean difference between treatments” heading have been corrected. This correction has been made to the online version as of Feb 26, 2018, and the printed Article is correct. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Department of Error Source Type: research

[Comment] Death and suffering in Eastern Ghouta, Syria: a call for action to protect civilians and health care
Since Feb 4, 2018, Syrian forces with Russian support have bombarded Eastern Ghouta, an enclave out of government control near Damascus. This military action has killed hundreds of civilians and injured more than 1550 people as of Feb 21, 2018,1 in an area where about 390  000 people, most of whom are civilians, have lived under siege since October, 2013. The recent escalation is reportedly part of a Syrian Government offensive supported by its Russian and Iranian allies to retake Ghouta. In just 1 day, on Feb 20, 2018, PAX, an international peace movement, documen ted 110 civilians killed and hundreds injured in 131 air...
Source: LANCET - February 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Samer Jabbour, Fouad M Fouad, Jennifer Leaning, Donna McKay, Rabie Nasser, Leonard S Rubenstein, Annie Sparrow, Paul Spiegel, Ahmad Tarakji, Ronald Waldman, Rola Hallam, Denis Mukwege, Ghanem Tayara Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Series] Canada's global health role: supporting equity and global citizenship as a middle power
Canada's history of nation building, combined with its status as a so-called middle power in international affairs, has been translated into an approach to global health that is focused on equity and global citizenship. Canada has often aspired to be a socially progressive force abroad, using alliance building and collective action to exert influence beyond that expected from a country with moderate financial and military resources. Conversely, when Canada has primarily used economic self-interest to define its global role, the country's perceived leadership in global health has diminished. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Stephanie A Nixon, Kelley Lee, Zulfiqar A Bhutta, James Blanchard, Slim Haddad, Steven J Hoffman, Peter Tugwell Tags: Series Source Type: research

[Series] Canada's universal health-care system: achieving its potential
Access to health care based on need rather than ability to pay was the founding principle of the Canadian health-care system. Medicare was born in one province in 1947. It spread across the country through federal cost sharing, and eventually was harmonised through standards in a federal law, the Canada Health Act of 1984. The health-care system is less a true national system than a decentralised collection of provincial and territorial insurance plans covering a narrow basket of services, which are free at the point of care. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Danielle Martin, Ashley P Miller, Am élie Quesnel-Vallée, Nadine R Caron, Bilkis Vissandjée, Gregory P Marchildon Tags: Series Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Picturing health: health advocates for Indigenous communities in British Columbia, Canada
Photographer Philomena Hughes, working with Nadine Caron and Indigenous communities in northern British Columbia, Canada, has taken this series of photographs of people involved in supporting the health and wellbeing of Indigenous communities in this region. All the pictures were taken around Prince George, BC. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Joanna Palmer Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Cindy Blackstock: advocate for First Nations children
She has been called “Canada's Martin Luther King”, the “conscience of the nation”, and a “national hero”, but Cindy Blackstock bristles at the accolades. “The only reason my job exists is because racism against First Nations children has been used as a cost-saving measure. I don't want that job to exist— now or ever.” Blackstock is the Executive Director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada, a charity that, for 20 years, has lobbied for First Nations children to have equitable access to health and social welfare services. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Andr é Picard Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Monique B égin: Canadian health icon
When, in 1976, Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau offered Monique B égin a post in his Cabinet, which would make her one of the first female ministers in the country's history, she turned him down. The offer was for a junior ministry in charge of a newly independent status of women portfolio—a post that nevertheless came with no budget, no staff, and no departmen t, and “made no sense” for advancing women's status, she recalls. “Trudeau told me I am the only person on earth who refused to be a minister”, she says. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Jocalyn Clark Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Comment] Canada's vision for global health and gender equality
A global shift is happening. I see it wherever I go —coffee shops to cabinet meetings to international conferences. We have achieved a critical mass of activists and allies around the world who are fighting for women's rights. The message is clear: the world is ready to make real progress on gender equality, and improve the lives of women and girls . (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Right Honourable Justin Trudeau Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Canada's efforts to ensure the health and wellbeing of Indigenous peoples
In September, 2017, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau stood before the UN General Assembly and acknowledged that the “failure of successive Canadian governments to respect the rights of Indigenous peoples in Canada is our great shame.”1 For generations, First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples in Canada were denied the right to self-determination and subjected to laws, policies, and practices based on dominati on and assimilation. Indigenous peoples lost control over their own lives. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Jane Philpott Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Canada and global health: accelerate leadership now
Canada's celebration in 2017 of 150 years as a nation is a ripe time for reflection on both its own universal health system and the country's global commitments towards universal health coverage (UHC) as articulated in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).1,2 The recognition in the prairie province of Saskatchewan that farmers should not have to sell the farm to pay for their family's health care was the principled pivot point that triggered Canada's march towards UHC in the 1960s. Although it took nearly a century for the Canadian confederation, established in 1867, to achieve UHC, over these past 50 years, from a glo...
Source: LANCET - February 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Timothy G Evans Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Challenges in health equity for Indigenous peoples in Canada
Canada's health-care system, like the country itself, is a complex entity. As the two papers in The Lancet's Series on Canada1,2 make clear, the country's health-care landscape is made up of multiple people, places, and policies with often overlapping —and sometimes conflicting—jurisdictions, priorities, paradigms, and practices. These complexities are rooted in Canada's fairly young colonial history that resulted in a nation comprised of a majority of settler and recent immigrants and their descendants, alongside a steady resurgence of Indig enous populations of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples t...
Source: LANCET - February 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Margo Greenwood, Sarah de Leeuw, Nicole Lindsay Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Canada's time to act
Beavers, ice hockey, maple syrup, Mounted Police, peace-keeping. These things conjure Canada in the minds of many. Others will add health to the list, for Canada's public health-care system is one of the oldest and most celebrated in the world and because Canada has ministered to global humanitarian, migration, and medical crises for decades. While Canadian values of solidarity, inclusivity, and diplomacy have found much expression in matters of health, there are clear signs that all of the world now “needs more Canada”. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - February 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Jocalyn Clark, Richard Horton Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Oxfam: sex scandal or governance failure?
The apparent failure of Oxfam to take appropriate actions against ongoing sexual predation by its aid workers is tragic, infuriating, and concerning. It is also ironic, given that Oxfam is considered a bastion of good governance, ethics, and human rights.1 Indeed, Oxfam's policy and practice arm has no less than 577 publications on promoting good governance and a further 455 on human rights.2 As a health policy and systems researcher who studies the dynamics between international agencies and domestic policy makers in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), I believe it is critical to reflect on what the “Oxf...
Source: LANCET - February 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Mishal S Khan Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research