[Comment] The Lancet Commission on malaria eradication
20 years ago, infectious diseases dominated the global health agenda. Policy makers, researchers, implementers, and donors united in the fight against infectious diseases, creating the Millennium Development Goals, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, the US President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the Roll Back Malaria Partnership, the Multilateral Initiative on Malaria (MIM),1 and more. Tremendous progress was made. Malaria benefited spectacularly and there has been a 47% reduction in global deaths from the disease since 2000. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Ingrid Chen, Rebecca Cooney, Richard G A Feachem, Altaf Lal, Winnie Mpanju-Shumbusho Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Articles] Risk thresholds for alcohol consumption: combined analysis of individual-participant data for 599  912 current drinkers in 83 prospective studies
In current drinkers of alcohol in high-income countries, the threshold for lowest risk of all-cause mortality was about 100 g/week. For cardiovascular disease subtypes other than myocardial infarction, there were no clear risk thresholds below which lower alcohol consumption stopped being associated with lower disease risk. These data support limits for alcohol consumption that are lower than those recommended in most current guidelines. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Angela M Wood, Stephen Kaptoge, Adam S Butterworth, Peter Willeit, Samantha Warnakula, Thomas Bolton, Ellie Paige, Dirk S Paul, Michael Sweeting, Stephen Burgess, Steven Bell, William Astle, David Stevens, Albert Koulman, Randi M Selmer, W M Monique Versc Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Clinical disease activity in the CALM study – Authors' reply
The Correspondence from Hans Herfarth and colleagues raised clinically relevant questions about our study1 of patients with Crohn's disease, whose treatment was adjusted based on stringent criteria for clinical symptoms and biomarkers (tight control) or less stringent clinical criteria alone. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Jean-Fr édéric Colombel, Remo Panaccione, Joel Petersson, Anne M Robinson, Geert D'Haens Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Clinical disease activity in the CALM study
Jean-Frederic Colombel and colleagues' CALM study (Dec 23, 2017, p 2779),1 which investigated the effect of tight control management on Crohn's disease, reported significantly better outcomes with tight control than with clinical medical management. Tight control consisted of prespecified therapy escalation if a patient's Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) was at least 150, or if they had elevated C-reactive protein or calprotectin, and resulted in significantly better mucosal healing (and clinical remission) than did therapy escalation based on clinical symptoms alone. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Hans Herfarth, Millie D Long, Kim L Isaacs Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Compulsory admissions in Greece: multifaceted action is required
It was with great concern that we read the Editorial in The Lancet (Jan 27, p 282)1 regarding institutional and coercive mental health treatment in Europe, in which Greece was among the countries with substantial shortfalls in mental health services and violations of patients' human rights. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Marina Economou, Helen Lazaratou, Dimitris Ploumpidis Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Mapping and understanding exclusion
On behalf of Mental Health Europe I would like to respond to the Lancet's Editorial (Jan 27, p 282)1 written about our Mapping and Understanding Exclusion report.2 Although we welcome the coverage of our report, we were disappointed to see a reference to the need to uphold the status quo on coercive measures, which might lead to confusion regarding the conclusions of our report. The Lancet's Editorial stated that: “Involuntary treatment and detention are a necessary part of mental health care”.1 This statement is contrary to the core message in our report, which recommended that to reduce coercion in mental hea...
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Nigel Henderson Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Beware the medicalisation of loneliness
Loneliness was recently described in The Lancet as a public health problem that needs to be solved by the medical community (Feb 3, p 426).1 We believe that the medicalisation of loneliness in this way is damaging, especially at a time when the issue is making its way into public understanding. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Amy K McLennan, Stanley J Ulijaszek Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] mHealth and the legacy of John Snow
On Jan 14, 2018, during a tense final touchdown in a US National Football League playoff game, numerous Apple Watch users received an alert from their device telling them that they were having potentially harmful arrhythmias.1 Smartphones and wearable technology are increasingly used as public health tools because billions of people worldwide are digital users. In 2020, more than 6 billion people will have smartphone subscriptions.2 Clinicians and researchers can use these devices to effortlessly monitor patients' health and behaviour indicators in real time. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Alejandro Santos-Lozano, Carlos Baladr ón, Juan Martín-Hernández, Javier S Morales, Luis Ruilope, Alejandro Lucia Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Post-trial responsibilities beyond post-trial access
What happens at the end of a trial when a patient responds to an investigational medication and benefits considerably? Many people believe that this patient should continue to receive the beneficial drug. This belief underlies the idea of post-trial access —providing investigational interventions post-trial to participants who benefited from them—and was formally introduced by the Declaration of Helsinki in 2000. But even if this patient did not benefit from the investigational medication, doing nothing for them at the end of the trial seems ethic ally problematic. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Hae Lin Cho, Marion Danis, Christine Grady Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Protecting health care in armed conflict: action towards accountability
Driven by a deplorable trend of unlawful attacks on health-care facilities and workers in armed conflicts throughout the world, on May 3, 2016, the UN Security Council (UNSC) adopted Resolution 2286 calling for an end to such attacks.1 The Secretary-General followed with recommendations of concrete measures for implementation.2 However, unlawful attacks on health care have continued or intensified in many conflicts, notably in Syria. We, academic institutions, civil society, and co-sponsoring Member States, convened a side event during the 72nd UN General Assembly to focus global attention on this issue and the imperative ...
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Ginette Petitpas Taylor, Ildefonso Castro, Christiaan Rebergen, Matthew Rycroft, Iman Nuwayhid, Leonard Rubenstein, Ahmad Tarakji, Naz Modirzadeh, Homer Venters, Samer Jabbour Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Obituary] Robert Day
Public health expert who directed the US Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Born in Framingham, MA, USA, on Oct 22, 1930, he died from lung cancer on Jan 6, 2018, in Seattle, WA, USA, aged 87 years. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Alison Snyder Tags: Obituary Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Do doctors die better than philosophers?
Death has become quite modish, and being constantly aware of one's mortality is now regarded as an essential component of spiritual and psychological health. My book The Way We Die Now was published in 2016, and since then I have given many talks and written several articles on the subject of death. I am often asked whether all of this talking and writing about death has prepared me any better for my own demise. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Seamus O'Mahony Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Guo-Qiang Chen: haematologist who risked all for research success
If determination is a predictor of future achievements in medical research, the likelihood that Professor Guo-Qiang Chen would have a flourishing career should have become apparent when he was still a very junior doctor. To leave the provincial medical school to which he was then contracted and relocate himself to a distant and more research-oriented institution, he had to find the money to take on a major debt. It was, as he himself admits, “a gamble”. Now, some 25 years later, Chen is a member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chancellor of Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, and Director of i...
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Geoff Watts Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] The teenage brain: under construction
There have been times when I've said that if I ended up meeting my teenage self, due to some bizarre time-travel mishap, I'd probably end up trying to strangle the arrogant, bungling, self-absorbed waste of space that he was. I've heard other people echo similar sentiments. It's weird how so many think so little of their adolescent selves, from their older, more mature perspective. How can we change so much and yet remain the same person? And why were we like that, consumed with all the neuroses and priorities that as adolescents were so vital but now just seem ridiculous, or baffling, or even a little sad? (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Dean Burnett Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Syphilis
For early modern physicians syphilis was “the great imitator”, a disease that mystified with the sheer range of its symptoms and the length of time it might take to show itself. Syphilis was first recorded in Europe in the mid-1490s, and the coincidence with Christopher Columbus' first voyage to the New World led contemporary physician s (along with more recent archaeologists and historians) to conclude that his sailors had brought the disease back with them. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard Barnett Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[World Report] Charles Perkins Centre
Obesity and the diseases that are related to it are at the core field of Sydney's Charles Perkins Centre, led by a man whose first area of research was locust behaviour. Stephen Simpson says his own varied background shows why this research body is different. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Chris McCall Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] Mediators help migrants access health services in Italy
Cultural mediators can help migrants, asylum seekers, and refugees to face what can seem an insurmountable wall of cultural difference. Amanda Sperber reports from Polistena. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Amanda Sperber Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] Ireland to vote on a referendum to repeal the Eighth
Ireland has set a date for a referendum that could be decisive in women's access to abortion. Anita Makri reports on the arguments on both sides of the debate. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Anita Makri Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[Comment] Offline: “A sea of suffering”
How did it happen that palliative care lost the dignity debate? Palliative care is a discipline dedicated to improving quality of life by preventing and alleviating suffering. There can be few higher callings in medicine. Yet those who advocate “dignity in dying” have successfully claimed that the idea of dignity lies not in palliative care but in assisted dying for the terminally ill. A large majority of the public seems to agree. Those in favour of assisted dying have portrayed palliative care as somehow antithetical to patient auton omy. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard Horton Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] The social sciences, humanities, and health
Humanities and social sciences have had many positive influences on health experiences, care, and expenditure. These include on self-management for diabetes, provision of psychological therapy, handwashing, hospital checklists, the Scottish Government's stroke guidelines, England's tobacco control strategy, the response to the Ebola outbreak in west Africa and Zika virus in Brazil, and many more.1 Researchers have shown time and time again the political, practical, economic, and civic value of education and research in disciplines like anthropology, history, and philosophy. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Martyn Pickersgill, Sarah Chan, Gill Haddow, Graeme Laurie, Devi Sridhar, Steve Sturdy, Sarah Cunningham-Burley Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Thresholds for safer alcohol use might need lowering
Guidelines for levels of alcohol use that pose a low risk to drinkers' health are provided by many countries, usually based on meta-analyses of epidemiological studies.1 –3 However, to devise such guidelines is challenging because alcohol is linked to poor health in various and complex ways. Injury, suicide, and assault, for example, are associated with drinking to intoxication, whereas regular alcohol consumption increases the risks of liver cirrhosis, gastrointe stinal diseases, cardiovascular disease, dementia, and some types of cancer. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Jason Connor, Wayne Hall Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Editorial] South Africa sliding backwards
After nearly two decades of progress following the abolishment of apartheid, South Africa's societal gains are now deteriorating. These are the conclusions of a report published on March 28 by The World Bank that analysed the country's progress in reducing poverty and inequality from 1994 to 2015. While overall the country's poverty levels have fallen since 1994, at least 2 ·5 million more South Africans since then have become poor. Over half the population lives under the poverty line, many of whom are black or South Africans of mixed race. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] The General Medical Council has lost its way
On March 28, the tragic case of Jack Adcock —a 6-year-old boy with Down's syndrome who died of sepsis in Leicester Royal Infirmary in 2011—and Dr Hadiza Bawa-Garba took another turn. Bawa-Garba, the paediatric trainee convicted of gross negligence manslaughter by a jury in 2015, was given permission to appeal a January High Court ruling t o permanently strike her off the medical register. The General Medical Council (GMC), the UK's licensing body for doctors, had successfully appealed its own but independent Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service's decision from last July to suspend the doctor for 12 months but...
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] Closing the gender pay gap: when and how?
The most recent estimates by the World Economic Forum indicate that the global economic gender gap will take 217 years to close, and that this gap widened in 2017. That pay inequality is pervasive in the UK is therefore unsurprising. The UK median gender pay gap —the difference in average hourly earnings between men and women—is 18%. To address this disparity, the UK became the first country to mandate individual employers to release their gender pay gap data. All public and private sector employers with at least 250 employees had to report by April 4, 2018. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Articles] Effectiveness of a long-lasting piperonyl butoxide-treated insecticidal net and indoor residual spray interventions, separately and together, against malaria transmitted by pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes: a cluster, randomised controlled, two-by-two factorial design trial
The PBO long-lasting insecticidal net and non-pyrethroid indoor residual spraying interventions showed improved control of malaria transmission compared with standard long-lasting insecticidal nets where pyrethroid resistance is prevalent and either intervention could be deployed to good effect. As a result, WHO has since recommended to increase coverage of PBO long-lasting insecticidal nets. Combining indoor residual spraying with pirimiphos-methyl and PBO long-lasting insecticidal nets provided no additional benefit compared with PBO long-lasting insecticidal nets alone or standard long-lasting insecticidal nets plus ind...
Source: LANCET - April 11, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Natacha Protopopoff, Jacklin F Mosha, Eliud Lukole, Jacques D Charlwood, Alexandra Wright, Charles D Mwalimu, Alphaxard Manjurano, Franklin W Mosha, William Kisinza, Immo Kleinschmidt, Mark Rowland Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Comment] Insecticide-resistant malaria vectors must be tackled
Vector control with long-lasting insecticidal nets and indoor residual spraying accounts for most of the 1 ·3 billion fewer malaria cases and 6·8 million fewer malaria-related deaths attributable to declining transmission between 2000 and 2015.1–3 However, because resistance to pyrethroid insecticides has spread through African malaria vector populations, concerns over maintaining these gains have be en widely voiced—but these are frequently disputed.4 The findings presented by Natacha Protopopoff and colleagues5 in The Lancet provide rigorous, long overdue, new evidence for those working in the f...
Source: LANCET - April 11, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Gerry F Killeen, Hilary Ranson Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Department of Error] Department of Error
Das P, Horton R. Pollution, health, and the planet: time for decisive action. Lancet 2018; 391: 407 –08—In the acknowledgments section of this Comment (published online first on Oct 19, 2017), the Governments of Germany, Norway, and Sweden should have been thanked for their “funding of the report, input, or both”. This correction has been made to the online version as of April 10, 2018. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 10, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Department of Error Source Type: research

[Articles] Prevalence and risk factors of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in China (the China Pulmonary Health [CPH] study): a national cross-sectional study
Spirometry-defined COPD is highly prevalent in the Chinese adult population. Cigarette smoking, ambient air pollution, underweight, childhood chronic cough, parental history of respiratory diseases, and low education are major risk factors for COPD. Prevention and early detection of COPD using spirometry should be a public health priority in China to reduce COPD-related morbidity and mortality. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Chen Wang, Jianying Xu, Lan Yang, Yongjian Xu, Xiangyan Zhang, Chunxue Bai, Jian Kang, Pixin Ran, Huahao Shen, Fuqiang Wen, Kewu Huang, Wanzhen Yao, Tieying Sun, Guangliang Shan, Ting Yang, Yingxiang Lin, Sinan Wu, Jianguo Zhu, Ruiying Wang, Zhihong Shi, Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Comment] The emerging Chinese COPD epidemic
Few people today question the global burden of chronic respiratory diseases, of which chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the most prominent cause of disability-adjusted life-years.1 Tobacco smoking, poverty, and exposure to biomass fuel are the most important risk factors for COPD globally, and which are unevenly spread.2 (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: J ørgen Vestbo, Alexander G Mathioudakis Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Public Health Science Conference: a call for abstracts
We are delighted to invite abstract submissions for Public Health Science: A National Conference Dedicated to New Research in UK Public Health, to be held in Belfast, UK, on Nov 23, 2018. This is our seventh annual conference to showcase the creativity of the public health research community in the UK and Ireland. The conference provides a forum for academics, practitioners, and policy makers to discuss important public health issues, and learn about the latest public health science and its role in advancing and supporting public health practice, policy, and health services. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: May C I van Schalkwyk, Robert W Aldridge, Public Health Science Conference Group Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Department of Error] Department of Error
Khanna D, Denton CP, Angelika Jahreis A, et al. Safety and efficacy of subcutaneous tocilizumab in adults with systemic sclerosis (faSScinate): a phase 2, randomised, controlled trial. Lancet 2016; 387: 2630 –40—In table 3 of this Article (published online first on May 5, 2016), the p value (placebo vs tocilizumab) for a decrease of 4·7 units or more at 48 weeks should have been 0·25. The interpretation of these data remains unchanged. This correction has been made online as of April 5, 2018. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Department of Error Source Type: research

[Correspondence] C1 esterase inhibitor concentrates and attenuated androgens – Authors' reply
We thank Yannick D Muller and colleagues for their interest in our Article1 describing results from a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with the use of recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor for prophylaxis of hereditary angio-oedema. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Marc A Riedl, Anurag Relan, Joseph R Harper, Marco Cicardi Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] C1 esterase inhibitor concentrates and attenuated androgens
Marc A Riedl and colleagues (July 25, 2017, p 1595)1 conducted a phase 2, multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial in 32 patients to test the prophylactic efficacy of recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor for hereditary angio-oedema. Once or twice weekly administration of recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor (50 IU/kg) reached the primary endpoint (reduced number of attacks) in an intention-to-treat analysis. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Yannick D Muller, Thomas Harr, Eric Dayer, J örg D Seebach Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] On the misuses of medical history
A surprising amount of bad history passes peer review in the sciences and medicine. What do we mean by bad history? One example would be the misuse of historical images. Many images of so-called plague used in scientific publications depict patients suffering from leprosy.1 Another example is when commonly repeated claims about historical people or events are lifted from earlier scientific or medical writings, without checking whether professional historical scholarship has revised earlier interpretations. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Helen King, Monica H Green Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Polio transition: overlooked challenges
The reduction in the number of poliomyelitis cases by more than 99% is an extraordinary success of the global community. In their Comment, Michel Zaffran and colleagues (Jan 6, p 11)1 assume that eradication will be achieved soon and focus on strategies to ensure that poliovirus will not be reintroduced into a polio-free world.2 (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Oliver Razum, Maike Voss Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Obituary] John Sulston
Nobel Prize winner for work on Caenorhabditis elegans and a leader in human genome research. Born in Fulmer, UK, on March 27, 1942, he died on March 6, 2018, from complications of stomach cancer, aged 75 years. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Ivan Oransky, Adam Marcus Tags: Obituary Source Type: research

[Perspectives] WHOse health agenda? 70 years of struggle over WHO's mandate
Like any milestone, WHO's 70th anniversary offers an opportunity to reflect on its past trajectory and chart the challenges ahead. WHO's promising mandate for health cooperation, forged amid a short-lived post-war optimism, mapped out a world of possibilities. Yet its realisation has been limited across distinct eras by complex geopolitical, economic, and institutional pressures, ranging from the Cold War rivalry between US and Soviet blocs to contemporary assaults on WHO's independence by powerful private actors. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Anne-Emanuelle Birn Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Getting back in touch
Clinicians and patients are getting out of touch with one another. When I was a medical student, I spent hours with patients, examining them on the ward, taking blood, and assisting at operations. At first I felt clumsy, inept, and embarrassed at the prospect of physical contact, for touch is surrounded by social conventions and taboos that are difficult to break through. But gradually, through practice, I became more confident. Touching people stopped feeling strange. Ostensibly, the purpose of these examinations was to gather diagnostic information that I would relay to senior clinicians. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Roger Kneebone Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] A neurologist's detective stories
Western medicine is organised into silos. Faced with a patient requiring specialist advice, a general practitioner or emergency doctor has to make a call about where to direct them. Sometimes, the right clinical destination is obvious: a compound thigh fracture will always need an orthopaedic surgeon. But many patients fall foul of this rigid system. An individual complaining of dizziness might get bounced from ENT, to cardiology, to neurology, to psychiatry before achieving a diagnosis. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Gabriel Weston Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[World Report] Progress in influenza surveillance in Africa
Influenza could be an overlooked cause of death in Africa. Although rapid progress has been made, there is still limited surveillance capacity to assess the risk of epidemic. Andrew Green reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Andrew Green Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] Violence rife in Mexico, affecting medical community
The medical community is caught in the middle of omnipresent violence in Mexico, where homicide rates reached record levels in 2017. David Agren reports from Villahermosa. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: David Agren Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[Comment] Offline: UHC —one promise and two misunderstandings
On April 7, 2018, World Health Day, WHO launches a new campaign —Universal Health Coverage: Everyone, Everywhere. This is a noble cause. As the agency notes: half the world's population is unable to access essential health services; 100 million people are pushed into extreme poverty each year because of out-of-pocket expenditures on health; and catastrophic sp ending on illness and disease is a truly global problem. Therefore, “our next historic achievement is right in front of us: health for all humankind…Together, we can make universal health coverage happen in our lifetime.” The campaign will ru...
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard Horton Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Measuring Humanity: hip-hop as evidence for health inequalities
Dear Human (video), a hip-hop video was developed as part of the project Measuring Humanity.1 Working with marginalised groups, the participant-led research programme uses bottom-up creative community engagement to challenge policy makers and academics to reassess what counts as evidence when developing policies, practices, and recommendations. The video features rapping written using co-produced data from marginalised community members, health and voluntary sector practitioners, and researchers. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Marisa de Andrade Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Clinical Pictures in The Lancet: a good eye for detail
A key part of medical training is developing the ability to recognise physical signs of illness in a patient and associate them with the causative pathology. The acquisition of this skill, through training and experience, marks the transition of student to clinician. In recent years, the required repertoire has changed, expanding to include recognition of pathological and radiological signs. But the passing of this diagnostic expertise from one generation to the next remains remarkably unchanged across the globe. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Jonathan Pimm, Jessamy Bagenal, Naomi Lee Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Editorial] Health-care system transition in China
On March 27, the National Health Commission replaced China's National Health and Family Planning Commission (NHFPC) as the ministry responsible for health. The new commission is now headed by Ma Xiaowei, who was the former deputy head of the dismantled NHFPC. Chinese media have described Xiaowei as the person who understands China's health and hospital situation best, owing to his strong background in medicine. Since his graduation from the medical treatment department of China Medical University in 1982, Xiaowei has served many key roles in various health sectors such as the president of the First Affiliated Hospital of C...
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] Privatising versus prioritising veterans' health
On March 28, President Donald Trump relayed on Twitter that Ronny L Jackson, personal physician to the president and a rear admiral in the US Navy, but with no prior experience in administration, would replace Veterans Affairs (VA) Secretary David Shulkin. The announcement was met with shock and dismay as Shulkin, who had been at the VA since 2015 and who was the sole holdover from the Obama years, was well regarded by Republicans and Democrats alike. Trump himself had even referred to Shulkin as “our David”, an unusual term of endearment for anyone from the previous administration. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] The collapse of the Venezuelan health system
When Hugo Chavez became Venezuela's new president in 1998, he promised to provide free health care to all and enshrined this right within Venezuela's new constitution, rewritten in 1999. Progress was rapid and initial results were promising: according to the World Bank, life expectancy at birth rose from 71 ·8 to 74·1 years for both genders and infant mortality fell from 26·7 to 14·6 deaths per 1000 live births between 1998 and 2013, the period of Chavez's rule. Success was recognised on the international stage and Venezuela achieved most of the UN's Millennium Development Goals set for 2010. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Seminar] Malaria
Following unsuccessful eradication attempts there was a resurgence of malaria towards the end of the 20th century. Renewed control efforts using a range of improved tools, such as long-lasting insecticide-treated bednets and artemisinin-based combination therapies, have more than halved the global burden of disease, but it remains high with 445  000 deaths and more than 200 million cases in 2016. Pitfalls in individual patient management are delayed diagnosis and overzealous fluid resuscitation in severe malaria. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Elizabeth A Ashley, Aung Pyae Phyo, Charles J Woodrow Tags: Seminar Source Type: research

[Department of Error] Department of Error
The Lancet. Dementia in the UK: preparing the NHS for new treatments. Lancet 2018; 391: 1237 — In the second sentence of this Editorial, the cost of dementia to the National Health Service in the UK should have been £26 billion. This correction has been made to the online version as of April 5, 2018. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - April 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Department of Error Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Type 2 diabetes – Authors' reply
We thank A Rosemary Tate for her insightful comments on our Seminar.1 Tate indicates that there is no evidence to support the rise in global incidence of type 2 diabetes mentioned in the summary by citing a number of references published between 2014 and 2017 in the USA and UK. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - March 30, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Sudesna Chatterjee, Kamlesh Khunti, Melanie J Davies Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research