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[World Report] Universal health coverage law approved in Egypt
A universal health coverage law expanding access to health care in Egypt was approved by parliament, ahead of presidential elections. Sharmila Devi reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Sharmila Devi Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] Bolivia backtracks on malpractice law
In the midst of a health-care reform, a malpractice law put forward by the government has triggered strikes from the medical community. Amy Booth reports from Cochabamba. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Amy Booth Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] Changes in the US tax system will also affect health care
The tax overhaul pushed by Republicans could jeopardise the ACA's health insurance marketplaces. Susan Jaffe, The Lancet's Washington correspondent, reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Susan Jaffe Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[Comment] Offline: The misuse of universal health coverage
Health workers are taught to see their purpose as imbued with special human importance. Possessed with the values of knowledge, judgment, respect, responsibility, integrity, compassion, altruism, excellence, continuous improvement, and partnership, medicine is often said to be endowed with particularly moral attributes. This vocational foundation gives ethical momentum to the case for universal health coverage, the big idea of the Sustainable Development Goals. The creation of national health services, we doctors may suggest, are critical humanitarian milestones in the histories of nations. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard Horton Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] A time to remember and thank The Lancet's reviewers of 2017
Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol provides an excellent opportunity to recalibrate what is important in life. An edgy adaptation by David Edgar is being performed by the Royal Shakespeare Company at Stratford-upon-Avon, UK, until February, 2018. The production emphasises that the social inequalities Dickens and his contemporary, Thomas Wakley —founder of The Lancet—railed at, remain uncomfortably present today. By contrast to the exploitative commercial and criminal relationships portrayed in this story, is the timeless theme of relationships that sustain, nurture, and redeem. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Editors of The Lancet Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] The Lancet –CAMS Health Summit 2018: a call for abstracts
The Lancet and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) have held three successful health summits in 2015 –17 in Beijing, China. We continue to support China's health science research communities and invite abstract submissions from China for the 2018 The Lancet–CAMS Health Summit, to be held on Oct 27–28 in Beijing. Submissions are invited from all aspects of health science, including, but not li mited to: translational medicine; clinical medicine; public health; global health; health policy; the environment and ecological systems; primary care; maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health, heal...
Source: LANCET - January 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Xuetao Cao, Helena Hui Wang, Limin Li, William Summerskill, Richard Horton Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Editorial] The peril and promise of traffic
Just after the new year, a bus in Peru plunged off a winding cliffside road following a collision, leading to over 50 deaths. The road lacked guardrails or other safety equipment. The incident dramatically underscores the conclusions from a World Bank Group report published last week, The High Toll of Traffic Injuries. Addressing the burden of road traffic injuries (RTIs) will not only save lives but can greatly increase the social welfare of people in low and middle income countries (LMICs). (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] Preparing for seasonal influenza
During the current northern hemisphere's winter, seasonal influenza activity has become worrisome. According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), influenza activity is affecting the entire continental USA for the first time in 13 years and this year's season might well be severe. In the UK, in the first week of 2018, GP consultation rates for influenza rose 78%, and influenza-confirmed hospitalisations increased by 50% from the previous week, according to Public Health England. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] A shared future for all: let's talk about homelessness
The World Economic Forum meeting in Davos is almost upon us again. From Jan 23 to 26, more than 2500 participants from over 100 countries will contemplate the state of the world in over 400 sessions (and many more side events and corridor conversations). This year's theme, Creating a Shared Future in a Fractured World, is certainly an apt motto in today's geopolitical context. The 48th annual meeting “aims to rededicate leaders from all walks of life to developing a shared narrative to improve the state of the world”—lofty goals in a lofty location. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Pitfalls of the healthy vaccinee effect – Authors' reply
In our Article,1 we presented findings from a case-control study that showed a protective effect of a meningococcal vaccine against gonorrhoea infection. In their Correspondence, Salaheddin Mahmud and Christiaan Righolt argue that the correct method to determine vaccine efficacy is a randomised controlled trial (RCT) and that our use of chlamydia as a control is problematic. We would like to clarify the points raised in their letter. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Helen Petousis-Harris, Janine Paynter, Jane Morgan, Peter Saxton, Felicity Goodyear-Smith, Steven Black Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Pitfalls of the healthy vaccinee effect
We read with interest the Article by Helen Petousis-Harris and colleagues (Sept 30, 2017, p 1603),1 which showed that the vaccine against outer membrane vesicle meningococcal B was 31% effective in reducing gonorrhoea among attendees of 11 clinics in New Zealand for patients with sexually transmitted infections. We disagree, however, with the authors' claims that their “findings provide experimental evidence that these vaccines could offer moderate cross-protection against [gonorrhoea]”. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Salaheddin M Mahmud, Christiaan H Righolt Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] GRECCAR2 trial: details worthy of more attention – Authors' reply
We thank Ji Zhu and colleagues, who made very appropriate and constructive comments on the French GRECCAR 2 trial.1 (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Eric Rullier, V éronique Vendrely, Quentin Denost, Julien Asselineau, Adélaïde Doussau Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] GRECCAR2 trial: details worthy of more attention
We read with great interest the GRECCAR 2 trial by Eric Rullier and colleagues (July 29, 2017, p 469),1 which reported that local excision showed no superiority over total mesorectal excision in rectal cancer patients with a good response after chemoradiotherapy. However, some aspects of the study warrant closer attention. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Huixun Jia, Yun Guan, Ji Zhu Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Translation of the link between cancer and obesity to patients
The report summarised in The Lancet (Oct 14, 2017, p 1716)1 reinforces findings from previous studies that have noted an association between increased body-mass index and some malignancies.2,3 Obesity is a major public health concern and the way in which the link is communicated to patients is paramount to solving this problem. Patients should be made aware that only an association has been observed —ie, increased body-mass index raises the likelihood of the development of some cancers. Several theories have been proposed to explain this link, implying that adipose tissue directly affects malignancy growth. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Dalia Abdulhussein, Elham Amin Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Questions regarding the CONCERN trial – Authors' reply
We thank Ricky Turgeon for his Correspondence regarding our CONCERN trial1 on the gastrointestinal safety of celecoxib plus esomeprazole versus naproxen and esomeprazole in patients with cardiothrombotic diseases and arthritis after upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Francis K L Chan, Jessica Y L Ching, Yee Kit Tse, Moe H Kyaw Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Questions regarding the CONCERN trial
Findings from Francis Chan and colleagues' study (June 17, 2017, p 2375)1 showed a 6 ·7% absolute risk reduction in recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding with celecoxib plus esomeprazole compared with naproxen and esomeprazole in patients who were on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and receiving concomitant aspirin following an upper gastrointestinal bleed. Additionally, the authors reported no significant difference between groups in serious cardiovascular events (4·4% [95% CI 2·4–7·7] for patients given celecoxib plus esomeprazole vs 5·5% [3·3–9·2] fo...
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Ricky D Turgeon Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Singapore should play a strong leadership role in global health
The regions of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations continue to face several health threats associated with infectious and chronic diseases, ageing populations, and inadequate clean water and sanitation. Collective action is needed among the Asian countries to deal with these threats, and Singapore has much to offer in terms of knowledge and innovations.1 In 2017, Singapore was ranked in the top position in progress towards the health-related UN Sustainable Development Goals2 and in the Global Innovation Index 2017 (a metric among Asian countries). (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Tikki Pang Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Treaty to prohibit nuclear weapons and Germany's global health responsibility
The adoption of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons by the UN1 and the immediate support by 50 nations is, as Andy Haines and Helfand2 note, “a victory for the public health perspective over the misguided national power and security considerations that have dominated nuclear policy” for decades. Strong support for the treaty by countries with a commitment to global health is needed to safeguard humanity. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Kayvan Bozorgmehr, Eva-Maria Schwienhorst-Stich Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Saving the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action: full of hope or just hopeless?
On July 14, 2015, Iran, the P5+1 countries (China, France, Russia, UK, USA, and Germany), and the European Union signed a landmark nuclear agreement that officially went into effect on Jan 16, 2016.1 Under the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA; also known as the Iran nuclear deal), Iran was to put severe limitations on its nuclear programme in exchange for the removal of international sanctions. After signing this agreement, Iranian scientists considered it an historic opportunity for the scientific community, and they became hopeful that lifting the sanctions could gradually help their scientific advancements in m...
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Masoud Mozafari Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Obituary] Shila Kaur
Malaysian public health expert and advocate for access to medicines. Born in George Town, Malaysia, on March 13, 1962, she died of breast cancer in Los Angeles, CA, USA, on Nov 21, 2017, aged 55 years. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Andrew Green Tags: Obituary Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Changing minds about changing behaviour
Most of us value our health highly yet act in ways that undermine it. If we ate and drank less, didn't smoke, and were physically more active, 40% of cancers and 75% of diabetes and cardiovascular disease would be avoided. Because these behaviours tend to cluster by deprivation, achieving these changes for everyone could also halve the gaps in life expectancy and years lived in good health between the rich and the poor. In the UK, around 16% of the population smokes, the lowest figure for many decades, although among those who are poorest this rate is doubled. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Theresa M Marteau Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Natalia Kanem: lifelong advocate for women's health and rights
”My big disappointment is that women's rights are still not at the centre”, says Natalia Kanem, echoing her lifelong “passion and hope” for women's health and rights. Her interest in these issues started in 1975 when, as an undergraduate at Harvard University, she attended the first UN World Conference on Women. Appointed as the Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) in October, 2017, Kanem hopes she “can really affect the fate of some of the poorest and most vulnerable women and girls in the world”. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: John Zarocostas Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Man-made disaster
In its last years, the Soviet Union was not meeting the needs of its citizens. One simple measure, life expectancy at age 15 years, showed the USSR to fall progressively further behind western Europe, all through the 1970s and 1980s. It was meeting material needs of its population —infant mortality was fairly low, and people had enough to eat—but not spiritual needs, to use the words of Mikhail Gorbachev, last General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. Deaths from heart disease were high, as were violent and other alcohol-related deaths. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Michael Marmot Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Truth and information
“I'm mad as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore”. This iconic rallying cry was originally made by actor Peter Finch, as news anchorman Howard Beale, in Paddy Chayefsky's 1976 film Network. The same cry is now echoing in the Lyttelton Theatre, at the UK's National Theatre in London, in a st age adaptation of the movie by Lee Hall. Under the direction of Belgian director Ivo van Hove, American actor Bryan Cranston makes his debut on the British stage in a pitch-perfect performance as Howard Beale. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Marco De Ambrogi Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] A literary pain scale
As an English professor, I often teach classes that examine how medical institutions, medical science, and medical practitioners appear in literature. Again and again, as students read plays, novels, non-fiction, and essays, they take note of the language gap between physicians and patients —the gap in how doctors discuss disease or disorder and how patients represent the experience of illness. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Ann Jurecic Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[World Report] Doctors disagree with proposed medical bill in India
A controversial bill to reform medical education in India, the National Medical Commission bill, prompted doctors to call for a nationwide strike. Patralekha Chatterjee reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Patralekha Chatterjee Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] Iranian protests and Rouhanicare
Iranians have risen up to protest economic and job instability. How is President Hassan Rouhani's once popular health-care project, the so-called Rouhanicare, fairing? Sharmila Devi reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Sharmila Devi Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] Malaysia: a refugee conundrum
Malaysia is home to hundreds of thousands of registered and unregistered refugees, most of whom are Rohingya, but it does not recognise the refugee status. Adam Bemma reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Adam Bemma Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[Comment] Offline: Time to act on minimum unit pricing of alcohol
On Jan 22, the UK's House of Commons Health Select Committee, together with the Home Affairs Committee, will hold one of the most important meetings in the recent domestic political history of public health —on minimum unit pricing of alcohol. Chaired by independent-minded Conservative Member of Parliament and former general practitioner, Sarah Wollaston, the committee will review evidence for and against minimum unit pricing at a moment when liver disease is on a trajectory to become the biggest cau se of death in England and Wales. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard Horton Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Chronic liver disease: scavenger hunt for novel therapies
Chronic liver disease (CLD) is a major cause of global mortality and morbidity. However, therapeutic breakthroughs have been made in the field of viral hepatitis, with the development of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) to treat hepatitis C virus infection.1 Despite this breakthrough, the incidence of liver disease continues to rise, driven in particular by the increase in obesity-related fatty-liver disease and the consequences of excess alcohol consumption.2 Patients with CLD are at an increased risk of developing progressive liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Daniel A Patten, Shishir Shetty Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Scaling up integration of health services
Almost 40 years after the Alma-Ata Declaration1 championed a comprehensive vision of health service delivery (panel), the movement towards universal health coverage (UHC) has seen the global health policy pendulum swing back towards the need for integrated people-centred health systems.2 –4 For UHC to be sustainable, resources cannot be wasted on services that are inaccessible, fragmented, and of poor quality. There is a growing need to increase the responsiveness and efficiency of service delivery and to put the needs of people and communities back at the centre of health systems . (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Erin K Ferenchick, Kumanan Rasanathan, Nuria Toro Polanco, Olga Bornemisza, Edward Kelley, Viviana Mangiaterra Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Oral fexinidazole for human African trypanosomiasis
Human African trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (g-HAT) is transmitted to human beings by tsetse flies in western and central Africa. Human beings are the only significant reservoir of the protozoan parasite, and disease control is focused on the detection and treatment of infected individuals, with or without vector control. Screening for cases can be passive (individuals are examined at fixed centres) or active (mobile teams travel to villages). The card agglutination test for trypanosomiasis and recently developed rapid diagnostic tests are the serological methods used for screening. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Fran çois Chappuis Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Editorial] Sanctioning the most vulnerable —a failed foreign policy
Over past months, US-led threats of, or implementation of, economic sanctions have multiplied. On Jan 4, the USA suspended assistance to Pakistan until it takes “decisive action” against Afghan Taliban and the Haqqani network militant groups. From Jan 2, President Donald Trump indicated he would pull funding for the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees saying Palestinians were “no longer willing to talk peace”. This followed the adoptio n by the UN security council, in December, 2017, of draconian US-drafted sanctions on North Korea in response to a ballistic missile test. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] A new vaccine for typhoid control
Last week, WHO announced prequalification of the first conjugate vaccine to prevent typhoid (Typbar TCV, manufactured by Bharat Biotech, India) after the publication of randomised controlled trials, including that by Celina Jin and colleagues in The Lancet on Sept 28, 2017. WHO has decided that Typbar TCV was successfully assessed for quality, safety, and efficacy, and it is now approved for distribution by UN agencies. Already in use in India and Nepal in babies older than 6 months, the vaccine is to be licensed for use in infants younger than 2 years. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] Children and social media
Social media is an increasingly common and integral part of people's lives, including those of children, despite a minimum access age of 13 years for some platforms. The reach of social media has outpaced research into potential benefits and harms for younger users. To address this gap, the Children's Commissioner for England, Anne Longfield, published Life in ‘likes’ on Jan 4, to explore the social media experience of children aged 8–12 years. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Department of Error] Department of Error
Discussion. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Department of Error Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Hypothyroidism and hypertension: fact or myth? – Authors' reply
We thank Louis Hofstetter and Franz H Messerli for their interest in our Seminar on hypothyroidism in The Lancet.1 We agree that hypothyroidism is rarely the sole underlying cause of hypertension in the general population and that hypertension should always be treated in the context of primary cardiovascular disease prevention. However, several observational studies have shown a difference in blood pressure between those with hypothyroidism (clinical or subclinical) and euthyroid individuals, even after adjusting for age. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Layal Chaker, Antonio C Bianco, Jacqueline Jonklaas, Robin P Peeters Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Hypothyroidism and hypertension: fact or myth?
We read with interest the thorough Seminar on hypothyroidism (Sept 23, 2017, p 1550),1 in which the authors implicate that hypothyroidism is a cause of hypertension. However, hypertension is not a typical sign of hypothyroidism. This misconception is more than 80 years old with Owen Thompson and colleagues2 reporting a high incidence of hypertension in myxoedema. Since then, many uncontrolled observational studies have shown that elevated blood pressure in patients with hypothyroidism returns to within normal range after thyroid hormone substitution. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Louis Hofstetter, Franz H Messerli Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] How does azithromycin improve asthma exacerbations? – Author's reply
Two key findings of the AMAZES trial1 are relevant to asthma management. First, the addition of low-dose azithromycin to a combination of inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting bronchodilators led to a clinically significant reduction in asthma exacerbations in adults with poorly controlled asthma. This finding provides an additional therapeutic option for these patients. Second, the effect occurred equally in both eosinophilic and non-eosinophilic asthma, by an as yet unidentified mechanism, but acting on pathways other than type 2 inflammation. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Peter G Gibson Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] How does azithromycin improve asthma exacerbations?
We read with interest the Article by Peter G Gibson and colleagues (July 4, 2017, p 659),1 which clearly showed the beneficial effects of macrolide therapy on the incidence of asthma exacerbations. Increasingly, asthma is recognised as a heterogeneous disease with multiple phenotypes and endotypes. By contrast with the effects of anti-inflammatory treatment with inhaled corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and biological therapies —for which therapeutic efficacy depends on the inflammatory profile—Gibson and colleagues showed no differential benefit in terms of eosinophilic inflammation over non-e...
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Michael G Crooks, Shoaib Faruqi, Alyn H Morice Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Targeted radiotherapy for early breast cancer – Authors' reply
We reject the inference of a survival benefit for patients receiving partial-breast irradiation within the IMPORT LOW trial and caution against any such interpretation when the number of events reported is so small.1 There is no suggestion of a difference in disease-free and overall survival across IMPORT LOW treatment groups.1 The TARGIT trialists' claim of survival benefit in their own trial relates to non-breast cancer deaths, and the data they cite are from a selected subset of patients. In IMPORT LOW, there were nine cardiac deaths occurring 6 –36 months following randomisation, four after left-sided and five af...
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Charlotte E Coles, Joanne S Haviland, Anna M Kirby, Jenny Titley, Maggie Wilcox, Judith M Bliss, John R Yarnold Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Targeted radiotherapy for early breast cancer
We congratulate Charlotte E Coles and colleagues (Sept 9, 2017, p 1048)1 on their randomised trial (IMPORT LOW) ratifying partial-breast irradiation and confirming the original hypothesis2 proposed in The Lancet 20 years ago.3 In 2010, the independent commentary accompanying the first results of the TARGIT-A trial4 of single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT-IORT), published in The Lancet by the authors of this letter, presented partial-breast irradiation as the new standard for suitable patients. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Jayant S Vaidya, Max Bulsara, Frederik Wenz, Jeffrey S Tobias, David Joseph, Michael Baum Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Reducing childhood obesity in the UK and France
The Lancet's Editorial (Aug 26, 2017, p 822)1 suggested that the UK's plan for reducing childhood obesity was inadequate as Public Health England announced it will be “working closely” with the food industry in seeking voluntary calorie reductions in high-energy food sources popular with children and young people. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Alain Braillon Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Reducing childhood obesity in the UK
The Lancet's Editorial (Aug 26, 2017, p 882)1 is right about childhood obesity remaining an urgent public health challenge. Unfortunately, there is a certain naivety to The Lancet's view of Public Health England's (PHE) role in policy development. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Duncan Selbie Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] WHO washes its hands of older people
Older people ( ≥60 years) constitute more than 12% of the world's population, which will rise to 16·5% by 2030.1 This age group will represent 10% of the population in less developed regions by 2030. Although older people account for a greater proportion of the global burden of disease and health-care needs tha n younger people, their positive societal contribution should not be overlooked. This age group often provide unpaid care for children or grandchildren, or other adults with disabilities. Improved health of older people is an essential goal to reduce health-care costs and maintain the societal suppo rt old...
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Peter Lloyd-Sherlock, Martin McKee, Shah Ebrahim Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Another perspective on the Foundation for a Smoke-Free World
Much has, and is, being said about the Foundation for a Smoke-Free World,1 an independent foundation funded by Philip Morris International, but one elemental point has been overlooked. A principal focus of the foundation, as stated on its website, is on treatment of addicted smokers to decrease mortality, including promoting the switch to reduced-risk products, such as e-cigarettes. Geoffrey Rose, in his masterful monograph The Strategy of Preventive Medicine, pointed to the so-called risk paradox, giving the example “whereby it was seen that many people exposed to a small risk may generate more disease than a few ex...
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Norbert Hirschhorn Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Obituary] Geoffrey Christopher Schild
Influenza virologist. He was born in Sheffield, UK, on Nov 28, 1935, and died in Bergen, Norway, on Aug 3, 2017, aged 81 years. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Geoff Watts Tags: Obituary Source Type: research

[Perspectives] In search of a teacher
“Written and Illustrated by…” These words were written on a blackboard in September, 1971, in crisp, authoritative chalk. We first graders at Colton Elementary School sat in awe as a young, energetic teacher took the stage in our lives. Ms Zive (and she was the first person we knew who ever us ed the term Ms) beguiled us with a dazzling smile, a secret store of Bugle corn snacks, plus the tantalising promise to let us in on the magic that adults possessed: reading. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Danielle Ofri Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Using comics to change lives
Comics are a popular source of entertainment, activism, education, and subversion. Within health care the use of comics has been steadily growing for the past 50 years, with comics used to reach all age groups but particularly younger readers. I recall in the early 1980s sending a coupon I had clipped from a comic off to the Health Education Council for a smoking prevention information pack. This followed my reading about the evil Nick O Tine —overpowered by Superman (who never said yes to a cigarette) in a powerful anti-smoking story created by DC Comics. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Petra Boynton Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[World Report] Zimbabwe post-Mugabe era: reconstructing a health system
A once-functioning health system was weakened by Robert Mugabe's antagonistic policies. Some hope the Mnangagwa administration will bring renewal. Andrew Green reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Andrew Green Tags: World Report Source Type: research