Daily feelings of US workers and commuting time
ConclusionsOur results indicated that longer commutes may be related to higher levels of stress and fatigue of workers, which may in turn affect the quality of the time parents devote to caring for their children. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 30, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Willingness of people with mental health disabilities to travel in driverless vehicles
ConclusionThe results of the study offer a template for government agencies and vehicle manufacturers to apply when formulating public information campaigns promoting the acceptance of driverless vehicles by intellectually disabled people. Public information campaigns targeted at this important segment of the population should incorporate messages based on factors known to affect mentally disabled people's attitudes towards autonomous vehicles. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 29, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Effects of high-speed rail on health-care service utilization
ConclusionsThe development of public transportation appeared to help facilitate the utilization of outpatient services for higher income patients diagnosed with cancer in Korea. This research can inform both transportation and Healthcare service planning for rural communities. Additional efforts need to be considered for low income populations. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 29, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

A look at electric bike casualties: Do they differ from the mechanical bicycle?
ConclusionDuring the last five years in Israel there is a dramatic increase in E-bike related hospitalized casualties corresponding to a substantial increase in E-bike usage. In comparison to M-bikers, there is a lower casualty rate but these casualties are more severely injured and utilize more hospital resources. It is of utmost importance to identify these high risk groups in an effort to develop culturally appropriate interventions for these road users, including training, awareness and helmet enforcement. Policy change recommendations are discussed. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 21, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

School active transportation planning and implementation: Exploring the perspectives of champions across Alberta, Canada
ConclusionsFindings demonstrate significant interest exists in school AT across Alberta. Champions are actively pursuing AT planning, but are experiencing a number of barriers in achieving successful implementation. Future directions include lobbying for greater financial support, educating champions and stakeholders on how to implement AT in their unique school setting, and finding ways to generate interest and enthusiasm for AT within school communities. The unique challenges of AT implementation in rural schools also need to be addressed. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 19, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The experiences of everyday travel for older people in rural areas: A systematic review of UK qualitative studies
Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 11Author(s): Hilary Graham, Siân de Bell, Kate Flemming, Amanda Sowden, Piran White, Kath WrightAbstractOlder people make up a larger proportion of the rural than urban population and rely more heavily on its transport system than younger age groups. We undertook a systematic review of qualitative studies to understand more about their experiences of everyday travel. As transport patterns, including car ownership and public transport, vary between countries; we focused our review on studies undertaken in the UK. We searched for...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 18, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Another mHealth? Examining motorcycles as a distance demolishing determinant of health care access in South and Southeast Asia
In this study, I examine motorcycles as a heretofore under recognized mode of transportation in LMICs that may function as a distance demolishing determinant of health care access. Results suggest that motorcycles substantially reduce the rural penalty in which both geographic distance and household finances are perceived as a major problems for accessing health care in these regions. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 18, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Five years of the Journal of Transport and Health
Publication date: Available online 16 November 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Jennifer S. Mindell (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 17, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Encountering bikelash: Experiences and lessons from New Zealand communities
Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 11Author(s): Adrian Field, Kirsty Wild, Alistair Woodward, Alexandra Macmillan, Hamish MackieAbstractThe construction of bike lanes in communities is widely seen as an enabler of cycling, which in turn supports positive outcomes for population health, transport systems and the environment. Yet despite the evidence for their benefits, proposals to change roads to include space for cyclists frequently encounter ‘bikelash’, the organised opposition to bike lanes. This has had the effect of delaying, preventing and in some cases removi...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 17, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Transport and health expertise can help meet the World Health Organization's goals for global climate change and noncommunicable disease prevention
Publication date: Available online 15 November 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Jennifer S. Mindell (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 16, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The experiences of parents with children with disabilities travelling on planes: An exploratory study
Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 11Author(s): Andrew Davies, Nicola ChristieAbstractResearch into air travel for people with disabilities and complex care issues has seldom been investigated, with no research data that focusses solely on children. Qualitative interviews of a semi structured nature were carried out with seven parents of children with disabilities, who discussed their experiences as a parent and primary caregiver. There were multiple issues identified that are related to the design of the aircraft or the processes involved in the service. These included physica...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 15, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Modelling the association between health indicators and commute mode choice: a cross-sectional study in southern Sweden
Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 11Author(s): Kristoffer Mattisson, Ahmed Osman Idris, Ellen Cromley, Carita Håkansson, Per-Olof Östergren, Kristina JakobssonAbstractThe impact of commuting on health depends, in part, on the mode of travel. A sizeable body of literature addresses associations between mode choice and health status, but little is known about how a person's health affects commuting mode choice. Stress, exhaustion and obesity are threats to public health that increase in modern societies. Understanding how these concerns impact mode choice is important...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 14, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: September 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 10Author(s): (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 11, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Influence of functioning and contextual factors on activity-related travel behaviour in Multiple Sclerosis
ConclusionsBoth health condition (mostly physical functioning) and contextual factors are predictive for activity-related travel behaviour in MS. Multi-disciplinary teams should include counselling on living situation and on advice regarding environmental factors. Policy makers should be recommended to integrate medical and other services in the community. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 7, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

An investigation into the factors influencing travel needs during later life
Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 11Author(s): Carlo Luiu, Miles Tight, Michael BurrowAbstractAs the population in Western countries becomes older, providing transportation able to meet travel needs during later life will become more challenging, especially due to the heterogeneity and differences in background, health and travel patterns of that population. Given the importance of the link between the ability to be mobile and use transportation with individuals’ wellbeing, this study investigates the factors which influence the fulfilment of travel needs amongst the old...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 6, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Towards happy and healthy travellers: A research agenda
Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 11Author(s): Jonas De VosAbstractWell-being and health are two important elements contributing to people's quality of life. Although well-being and health have been analysed for many decades, an increased attention since the beginning of this century can be noticed, partly due to new ways of measuring people's subjective well-being and the rapid growth of obesity and obesity-related diseases. Over the past ten years studies have started analysing the link between travel and well-being, mainly focussing on aspects explaining people's satisfacti...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 2, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Can neighborhood design support walking? Cross-sectional and prospective findings from Japan
ConclusionLiving in high-density neighborhoods with well-connected streets and convenient public transportation systems, and having a higher awareness of destinations are supportive of the long-term engagement in walking for various purposes. Further studies using a prospective design with longer follow-up period to confirm these results are warranted. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 1, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Would New Zealand adolescents cycle to school more if allowed to cycle without a helmet?
This study examined these correlates in a sample of New Zealand adolescents.MethodsAdolescents (n = 774; age: 13–18 years) from all 12 secondary schools in Dunedin, New Zealand, completed an online questionnaire about their cycling to school and cycling in general behaviours and perceptions and opinions about bicycle helmet use as a barrier to cycling to school. Data were examined using multivariate linear regression.ResultsOverall, 22.1% of adolescents stated that would cycle to school more often if helmet use was not mandatory. In the multivariate model, perception of the required helmet use as a barrier to cycling...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 27, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

A matched pairs approach to assessing parental perceptions and preferences for mode of travel to school
This study examined the relationship between parental perceptions and preferences with mode of travel to school among grade 5 and 6 students in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Environmental and distance effects were controlled for by matching children who travelled to school using different travel modes (walking or driving) while living in the same neighborhood and attending the same school. Survey data from the Built Environment and Active Transportation Research Project (BEAT) contained information on parental perceptions and preferences. A conditional logistic regression model tested the relationship between travel mode and t...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 23, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The effectiveness of a 20 mph speed limit intervention on vehicle speeds in Bristol, UK: A non-randomised stepped wedge design
Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 11Author(s): Anna Bornioli, Isabelle Bray, Paul Pilkington, Emma L. BirdAbstractTwenty mph (32.2 km/h) speed limits across urban areas are becoming a widespread tool for public health and road danger reduction globally. Determining the effectiveness of these interventions on motorised vehicle speeds is a crucial first step in any logic model that seeks to associate 20 mph speed limits to improved health and wellbeing outcomes. However, little is known about how the introduction of 20 mph limits affects speeds. This paper presents the fin...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 10, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Developing and refining a programme theory for understanding how twenty mile per hour speed limits impact health
This study first presents an early stage logic model (phase 1) of how the 20 mph speed limit is proposed to work. Qualitative data are then presented (phase 2), describing potential mechanisms as to how the scheme could influence health outcomes through changing i) driver behaviour; ii) casualties and casualty severity; iii) walking and cycling behaviour; iv) air quality; and v) street pleasantness. Participants identified a need for driver education and enforcement in order to reduce speeds, and the importance of improving perceptions of safety for achieving increased walking and cycling. A refined version of the logic ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 9, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Impacts of roundabouts on urban air quality: A case study of Keene, New Hampshire, USA
This study seeks to understand how local air quality may have changed in the time since converting to roundabouts. A before-and-after comparison was performed using data gathered by the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services from 1999–2014. In the time period following roundabout conversion, ozone levels stayed the same but PM2.5 levels were as much as 40% lower. As a related result, the proportion of the year that was classified as “Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups” or “Unhealthy” was 0.3–1.8% lower in the “after” time period as well. Installing roundabouts at both...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Decreased healthcare resource utilization associated with enhancement of a state graduated driver licensing law
ConclusionsThis study is the first to use linked data to evaluate the effects of GDL on healthcare resource utilization by teen drivers and their occupants. The post-GDL enhancement period was associated with reductions in MVC-related ED visits, inpatient hospitalizations, total hospital charges, and total days of hospitalization. Increases in mean inpatient hospital charges were noted and may indicate a reduction in minor injury crashes. Despite attempts to mitigate the confounding effects of the economy on teen driving, it is likely that economic influences are at least partially responsible for the observed decrease in ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Investigating the barriers in a typical journey by public transport users with disabilities
Publication date: Available online 21 May 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Jun Park, Subeh ChowdhuryAbstractAccessibility to public transport is increasingly recognized as a critical element in the livelihoods of people with disabilities. Although there have been advancements to better cater for the needs of people with disabilities, budgetary constraints mean that every issue cannot be addressed. There are still many barriers restricting independent travel for this group of people. Social exclusion is often a result of their inability to use or access a public transport system. The present study inv...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Predicting walking and cycling behaviour change using an extended Theory of Planned Behaviour
ConclusionsThis is one of the first known studies to examine psychological predictors of change in walking and cycling for transport and recreation using an extended TPB. Future interventions to promote walking and cycling through individually delivered approaches might consider fostering the development of positive attitudes, perceived behavioural control, intentions, and habits for these behaviours. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Choosing safe and suitable bicycle routes to integrate cycling and public transport systems
In this study, it was aimed to examine all these negative and positive effective parameters on safety and choice while integrating cycling with a public transport (bus link) system. To determine effective parameters on route choice, a Questionnaire Survey (QS) was carried out on 460 participants who are cycling for a long time in Isparta City/Turkey. It was obtained from the QS that Accident Prone Areas (APA) are the most important factor on cycling and public transport integration. The other parameters are determined as Bus Lane (BL), Road Side Car Park (RSCP), Bicycle Parks (BP), Road Grade (RG), Signalization (S), Traff...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Facilitators and barriers to winter cycling: Case study of a downtown university in Toronto, Canada
Publication date: Available online 24 May 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Tamara Nahal, Raktim MitraAbstractCycling rates in many North American cities and regions decline significantly in winter months, which is a major challenge in advancing active transportation-related policy and programs. This research investigates travel behavior of current cyclists who commute to Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada. By combining data from two transportation surveys, this research examines the correlates of self-reported propensity of cycling throughout the year (including winter months), in comparison to cy...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Investigation of associations between marijuana law changes and marijuana-involved fatal traffic crashes: A state-level analysis
In conclusion, no significant changes in the number of marijuana-related crashes were observed after medical legalization only. Nevertheless, an increased number of marijuana-related crashes were observed after all other types of the marijuana law changes. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

A conceptual framework to assess the unmet travel needs in later life
This study proposes a conceptual framework for improving the evaluation of unmet travel needs amongst the older population. Unmet travel needs can be defined as mobility needs that remain unfulfilled due to the inability of accomplishing needed or wished trips and activities. Gerontological and transport research are putting increasing focus on the role that mobility plays in later life. Analyses of studies investigating the relationship between ageing and mobility reveal that these are generally characterised by relying only on realised journeys and activities. However, very little has been investigated so far in terms of...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Impact of physical and social environments on the walking behaviour of Hong Kong's older adults
This study examined the associations between physical environment (facilitators and barriers), social environment, and walking among older adults in Hong Kong.MethodsBetween April and December 2016, a sample of 679 adults aged 65 years or above was recruited in Neighbourhood Elderly Centres from across the 18 council districts of Hong Kong. Participants were asked to complete validated questionnaires that were used to assess the above constructs; participants were asked to track their daily step counts over 7 days using an accelerometer. Structural Equation Modelling was performed to examine the studied relationships by us...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Active travel, public transportation use, and daily transport among older adults: The association of built environment
DiscussionExisting transportation facilities and policies need to be adjusted to meet the challenge. Our study has a potential to contribute to the design of effective interventions that enhance health and quality of life for the burgeoning aging population in the U.S. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Driving frequency associated with deficits in lower extremity function, dynamic vision, and physical activity in Japanese older adults
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9Author(s): Takumi Abe, Keisuke Fujii, Jaehoon Seol, Yuya Fujii, Kaya Joho, Ayane Sato, Mijin Kim, Tomohiro Okura (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Parental barriers to active commuting to school in children: does parental gender matter?
ConclusionsAlthough some barriers to ACS were similar for both parents (distance, convenience of driving and parental mode of commuting to work), other barriers were specific to mothers (children's extra-curricular activities organization and lack of children's interest in walking to school). Interventions strategies for promoting ACS in children focusing on parents should be gender-specific. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Particulate air pollution and noise: Assessing commuter exposure in Africa's most populous city
This study observed remarkably high particulate air pollution and noise exposures during commuting in the major African city. A major shift to modern mass transportation systems would limit commuter exposure. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Reversal of the road death trend in the U.S. in 2015–2016: An examination of the climate and economic hypotheses
This study examines the association of road deaths per population among the 48 contiguous U.S. states to average annual temperature, precipitation, unemployment, insurance cost, gasoline prices, registered vehicles per population, mix of types of vehicles and median age of the population using logistic regression. Least squares regression is used to examine the association of miles traveled per vehicle to average annual temperatures, unemployment, insurance costs and gasoline prices. The association of national unemployment trend and road death trend is examined using least squares regression.Per population, road deaths ar...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Cognitive ability as a predictor of task demand and self-rated driving performance in post-stroke drivers – Implications for self-regulation
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9Author(s): Alison Blane, Hoe Lee, Torbjörn Falkmer, Tania Dukic WillstrandAbstractDriving is a highly complex task requiring multiple cognitive processes that can be adversely affected post-stroke. It is unclear how much ability post-stroke adults have to self-evaluate their driving performance. Furthermore, the impact of cognitive decline on this evaluation has not been previously investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceived level of task demand involved in driving tasks, and to examine differences between perceived ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The effect of waterpipe smoking on psychomotor performance required for driving: A quasi-experimental trial
ConclusionThe performance-enhancing effects of WPS observed in this study do not justify the use considering the proved long-term health effects. Moreover, our study did not deal with the long term effects of WPS on road traffic injuries. Further studies are necessary to examine if WPS renders drivers to engage in other risk taking activities such as driving in a high speed due to altered cognitive functions. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The role of beliefs in the use of hands-free and handheld mobile phones while driving
ConclusionsDifferences in beliefs (particularly behavioural and control beliefs) were found between daily and less frequent users of handheld mobile phones, meaning that they may underlie the decision to engage in this risky behaviour. Likewise, several specific beliefs differed between daily and less frequent users of handheld and hands-free mobile phones (using their time effectively). These results may provide useful information for developing countermeasures aimed at curbing mobile phone use while driving. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Changes in participation, demographics and hazard associated with mandatory bicycle helmets in New South Wales, Australia
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9Author(s): Jim Lemon (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Do Australian drivers give female cyclists more room when passing?
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9Author(s): Narelle Haworth, Kristiann C. Heesch, Amy Schramm, Ashim Kumar DebnathAbstractCycling has demonstrated health benefits, but the fear of collisions with motor vehicles discourages many people from riding on the road, particularly women. Previous studies have reported mixed results about the factors influencing the distances left by drivers when passing cyclists. The present research aimed to control for other rider, roadway and traffic factors to understand whether cyclist gender influences passing distances. Video recordings of 1113 pa...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The effect of an italian nationwide mandatory visibility aids law for cyclists
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9Author(s): Gabriele PratiAbstractThe role of conspicuity in preventing bicycle–motorized vehicle collisions has been the subject of investigation. To date, no study has evaluated the impact on bicycle safety of legislation imposing bicycling visibility aids. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether a legislation imposing high-visibility clothing for cyclist affects bicycle safety. Data on the monthly number of vehicles (including bicycles) involved in road crashes during the period 2001–2015 were obtained from the Italia...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Trends in cycling and cycle related injuries and a calculation of prevented morbidity and mortality
In conclusion, in Denmark, the number of cycling trips have steadily increased over the past 17 years while cycling related injuries show a concomitant decline. Intuitively one might expect cycle related injuries to increase with increased cycling, but a decrease was observed in injuries. Health benefits of cycling calculated from cohort studies were 21 times higher than risk of injuries and for mortality alone the ratio was 238. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Using crowdsourced data to monitor change in spatial patterns of bicycle ridership
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9Author(s): Darren Boss, Trisalyn Nelson, Meghan Winters, Colin J. FersterAbstractCycling is a sustainable mode of transportation with numerous health, environmental and social benefits. Investments in cycling specific infrastructure are being made with the goal of increasing ridership and population health benefits. New infrastructure has the potential to impact the upgraded corridor as well as nearby street segments and cycling patterns across the city. Evaluation of the impact of new infrastructure is often limited to manual or automated counts...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Best practices for promoting cycling amongst university students and employees
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9Author(s): Oliver Wilson, Nicole Vairo, Melissa Bopp, Dangaia Sims, Katherine Dutt, Brooke PinkosAbstractThe benefits of active commuting (walking and biking to work) are well documented, though rates of participation remain low in the United States. University policies, programs and environments significantly influence student and employee's travel mode choice, though relatively little is known about appropriate strategies. Therefore, this study's purpose was to examine the best practices universities could implement in order to increase student...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Bicycle choice modeling: A study of university trips in a small Colombian city
This article shows results of the application of a stated preferences survey in the city of Ocaña, Colombia, to identify factors that influence the modal choice, introducing the bicycle as an alternative for the trips to and from the University Francisco de Paula Santander Ocaña, using discrete choice models. These results show that the infrastructure availability is a key variable for modal shift and that giving incentives such as meals do not influence modal choice. These results were shared with the local authorities as an argument towards cycle lanes investment and public transportation grants for student...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

European cyclists' travel behavior: Differences and similarities between seven European (PASTA) cities
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9Author(s): Elisabeth Raser, Mailin Gaupp-Berghausen, Evi Dons, Esther Anaya-Boig, Ione Avila-Palencia, Christian Brand, Alberto Castro, Anna Clark, Ulf Eriksson, Thomas Götschi, Luc Int Panis, Sonja Kahlmeier, Michelle Laeremans, Natalie Mueller, Mark Nieuwenhuijsen, Juan Pablo Orjuela, David Rojas-Rueda, Arnout Standaert, Erik Stigell, Regine GerikeAbstractWhile the annual number of trips of the average urban inhabitant has grown steadily in recent years, people are becoming less active while doing so. This lack of physical activity causes ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Effects of cycle skills training on cycling-related knowledge, confidence and behaviour in adolescent girls
This study examined and compared the effects of short-term CST (1–10 weeks) with or without on-road training on cycling-related knowledge, confidence and behaviours in adolescent girls.MethodsGirls (n = 117; age: 13.9 ± 0.7 years) participated in either playground-based CST only (Traffic-Free CST; n = 43) or combined playground-based and on-road CST (Traffic-Free+OnRoad CST; n = 74). Participants completed pre-training and post-training surveys about cycling-related knowledge, confidence and behaviour, and practical cycling skills assessment (fundamental and advanced skills). Data were analysed using paired t-...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Duration of sickness absence following a bicycle crash, by injury type and injured body region: A nationwide register-based study
In conclusion, the duration of SA varied with type of injury and injured body region. Among the very long SA spells, common injuries were injuries to the lower leg, to the shoulder and upper arm, and traumatic brain injuries. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Evaluation of a community wayfinding signage project in Hawai‘i: Perspectives of pedestrians and bicyclists
Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 11Author(s): L. Brooke Keliikoa, Michael Y. Packard, Heidi Hansen Smith, Inji N. Kim, Kelly A. Akasaki, David A. StupplebeenAbstractWayfinding signs can support active transportation by guiding pedestrians and bicyclists onto safer routes to community destinations. The purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions of pedestrians and bicyclists related to a community-wide wayfinding signage project implemented in Kailua, a suburban community in Hawai‘i and an increasingly popular tourist destination. Wayfinding signs consisted of st...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Ethnic group differences in impacts of free bus passes in England: A national study
ConclusionsThese findings suggest that the free bus pass scheme in England is associated with higher levels of active travel and that these may be greater among minority ethnic groups. Removing financial barriers to active travel could produce important health benefits particularly among ethnic minority groups, who have low levels of leisure-based physical activity. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research