Do Australian drivers give female cyclists more room when passing?
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9Author(s): Narelle Haworth, Kristiann C. Heesch, Amy Schramm, Ashim Kumar DebnathAbstractCycling has demonstrated health benefits, but the fear of collisions with motor vehicles discourages many people from riding on the road, particularly women. Previous studies have reported mixed results about the factors influencing the distances left by drivers when passing cyclists. The present research aimed to control for other rider, roadway and traffic factors to understand whether cyclist gender influences passing distances. Video recordings of 1113 pa...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The effect of an italian nationwide mandatory visibility aids law for cyclists
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9Author(s): Gabriele PratiAbstractThe role of conspicuity in preventing bicycle–motorized vehicle collisions has been the subject of investigation. To date, no study has evaluated the impact on bicycle safety of legislation imposing bicycling visibility aids. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether a legislation imposing high-visibility clothing for cyclist affects bicycle safety. Data on the monthly number of vehicles (including bicycles) involved in road crashes during the period 2001–2015 were obtained from the Italia...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Trends in cycling and cycle related injuries and a calculation of prevented morbidity and mortality
In conclusion, in Denmark, the number of cycling trips have steadily increased over the past 17 years while cycling related injuries show a concomitant decline. Intuitively one might expect cycle related injuries to increase with increased cycling, but a decrease was observed in injuries. Health benefits of cycling calculated from cohort studies were 21 times higher than risk of injuries and for mortality alone the ratio was 238. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Using crowdsourced data to monitor change in spatial patterns of bicycle ridership
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9Author(s): Darren Boss, Trisalyn Nelson, Meghan Winters, Colin J. FersterAbstractCycling is a sustainable mode of transportation with numerous health, environmental and social benefits. Investments in cycling specific infrastructure are being made with the goal of increasing ridership and population health benefits. New infrastructure has the potential to impact the upgraded corridor as well as nearby street segments and cycling patterns across the city. Evaluation of the impact of new infrastructure is often limited to manual or automated counts...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Best practices for promoting cycling amongst university students and employees
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9Author(s): Oliver Wilson, Nicole Vairo, Melissa Bopp, Dangaia Sims, Katherine Dutt, Brooke PinkosAbstractThe benefits of active commuting (walking and biking to work) are well documented, though rates of participation remain low in the United States. University policies, programs and environments significantly influence student and employee's travel mode choice, though relatively little is known about appropriate strategies. Therefore, this study's purpose was to examine the best practices universities could implement in order to increase student...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Bicycle choice modeling: A study of university trips in a small Colombian city
This article shows results of the application of a stated preferences survey in the city of Ocaña, Colombia, to identify factors that influence the modal choice, introducing the bicycle as an alternative for the trips to and from the University Francisco de Paula Santander Ocaña, using discrete choice models. These results show that the infrastructure availability is a key variable for modal shift and that giving incentives such as meals do not influence modal choice. These results were shared with the local authorities as an argument towards cycle lanes investment and public transportation grants for student...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

European cyclists' travel behavior: Differences and similarities between seven European (PASTA) cities
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9Author(s): Elisabeth Raser, Mailin Gaupp-Berghausen, Evi Dons, Esther Anaya-Boig, Ione Avila-Palencia, Christian Brand, Alberto Castro, Anna Clark, Ulf Eriksson, Thomas Götschi, Luc Int Panis, Sonja Kahlmeier, Michelle Laeremans, Natalie Mueller, Mark Nieuwenhuijsen, Juan Pablo Orjuela, David Rojas-Rueda, Arnout Standaert, Erik Stigell, Regine GerikeAbstractWhile the annual number of trips of the average urban inhabitant has grown steadily in recent years, people are becoming less active while doing so. This lack of physical activity causes ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Effects of cycle skills training on cycling-related knowledge, confidence and behaviour in adolescent girls
This study examined and compared the effects of short-term CST (1–10 weeks) with or without on-road training on cycling-related knowledge, confidence and behaviours in adolescent girls.MethodsGirls (n = 117; age: 13.9 ± 0.7 years) participated in either playground-based CST only (Traffic-Free CST; n = 43) or combined playground-based and on-road CST (Traffic-Free+OnRoad CST; n = 74). Participants completed pre-training and post-training surveys about cycling-related knowledge, confidence and behaviour, and practical cycling skills assessment (fundamental and advanced skills). Data were analysed using paired t-...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Duration of sickness absence following a bicycle crash, by injury type and injured body region: A nationwide register-based study
In conclusion, the duration of SA varied with type of injury and injured body region. Among the very long SA spells, common injuries were injuries to the lower leg, to the shoulder and upper arm, and traumatic brain injuries. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Evaluation of a community wayfinding signage project in Hawai‘i: Perspectives of pedestrians and bicyclists
Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 11Author(s): L. Brooke Keliikoa, Michael Y. Packard, Heidi Hansen Smith, Inji N. Kim, Kelly A. Akasaki, David A. StupplebeenAbstractWayfinding signs can support active transportation by guiding pedestrians and bicyclists onto safer routes to community destinations. The purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions of pedestrians and bicyclists related to a community-wide wayfinding signage project implemented in Kailua, a suburban community in Hawai‘i and an increasingly popular tourist destination. Wayfinding signs consisted of st...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Ethnic group differences in impacts of free bus passes in England: A national study
ConclusionsThese findings suggest that the free bus pass scheme in England is associated with higher levels of active travel and that these may be greater among minority ethnic groups. Removing financial barriers to active travel could produce important health benefits particularly among ethnic minority groups, who have low levels of leisure-based physical activity. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Investigation of life satisfaction, travel, built environment and attitudes
This study explores the relationships subjective well-being has with travel behaviour, the built environment and attitudes toward transportation. With data from a survey of residents of Nova Scotia, Canada, it develops a random-parameters ordered probit model with life satisfaction as the dependent variable. The approach extends current research by including built environment and attitudinal variables in the model along with daily travel behaviour, and by observing heterogeneous effects of variables at the individual level. The study results reinforce the evidence that daily out-of-home travel has a positive impact on life...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Investigating the effects of multiple exposure measures to traffic-related air pollution on the risk of breast and prostate cancer
This study investigates the effects of various NO2 surfaces on the risk estimates of postmenopausal breast cancer (BC) and prostate cancer (PC), both of which have already been associated with traffic-related air pollution. We derived exposures for individuals in two case control studies in Montreal, Canada using four different surfaces for NO2. Two of the surfaces were developed using LUR but employed different data collection protocols (LUR-1 and LUR-2), and the other two surfaces were generated using dispersion modelling; one with a regional model (dispersion-1) and another with a street canyon model (dispersion-2). Als...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Is the popularity of social networking services beneficial for public health? Focusing on active travel and BMI
In this study, we examine how the frequency of SNS use is associated with active travel (i.e., walking and cycling) and body mass index (BMI) in the Glasgow and Clyde Valley Planning area, Scotland. We employ both a self-reported measure of active travel from a travel diary (N = 1684) and an objective measure of average walking hours from Global Positioning System (GPS) data (N = 282) collected in 2015. These are analysed with statistical models (i.e., binomial logistic regression, multinomial logistic regression and linear regression models). We find that there is no significant association between the frequency o...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 20, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The role of personal air pollution sensors and smartphone technology in changing travel behaviour
Publication date: Available online 18 September 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Hebba Haddad, Audrey de NazelleAbstractExposure to air pollution is affected by human behaviour, and has consequences for individual and collective health. One way to lessen the health effects of air pollution is to change personal travel behaviour with the help of new information, communication and sensing technologies. Our social research tracked the experiences of participants, air quality and technology enthusiasts, based in London who financially contributed to participate in an early-stage technical trial of a new ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 20, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Cycling and walking for transport and their associations with diabetes and risk factors for cardiovascular disease
ConclusionIn the current multi-ethnic low SES population, those engaged in active travel and cycling for travel in particular had lower odds of diabetes and lower risk factors for cardiovascular disease compared to those not engaged in active travel. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 19, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Pedestrians perceptions of community walking with anti-slip devices – An explorative case study
Publication date: Available online 14 September 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Gunvor Gard, Glenn Berggård, Peter Rosander, Agneta LarssonAbstractThe risk of falls on slippery surfaces during wintertime is a public safety problem in the Nordic region in the Arctic. The aim of this case study was to explore pedestrians perceptions of walking safety, balance, slipping risk, priority for own use and subjective criteria for a well functioning anti-slip device. An experimental set-up was utilised in which nine pedestrians tested 19 anti-slip devices by simulating walking in realistic traffic situa...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 16, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Te Ara Mua - Future Streets suburban street retrofit: A researcher-community-government co-design process and intervention outcomes
Publication date: Available online 13 September 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Hamish Mackie, Alex Macmillan, Karen Witten, Peter Baas, Adrian Field, Melody Smith, Jamie Hosking, Kathryn King, Lydia Sosene, Alistair WoodwardAbstractTe Ara Mua - Future Streets is a controlled before-after study of neighbourhood infrastructure changes that aim to make walking and cycling safer and easier and reflect cultural identity in Māngere, Auckland, New Zealand. The project intervention was delivered through an innovative and challenging partnership between the research team and funding/delivery agencies. The ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 14, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Every breath we take, every move we make
Publication date: Available online 7 September 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Jennifer S. Mindell (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 8, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Seasonal variations and changes in school travel mode from childhood to late adolescence: A prospective study in New Brunswick, Canada
We examined seasonal variations and changes in AST (polynomial logistic regression) and in number of days per week accumulating ≥ 60 min of MVPA (linear regression) using generalized linear mixed models accounting for sex, age at baseline, type of urbanization, school, and the repeated measures design.ResultsOdds of engaging in AST were lower in the winter (OR = 0.48; 95% CI = 0.38, 0.61) compared to the fall, increased over time (OR = 1.08; 1.05, 1.12), and were greater among boys versus girls (OR = 3.41; 2.18, 5.35) and participants living in urban versus rural areas (OR = 2.90; 1.37, 6.14). Boys reported more MVPA ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 6, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Factors associated with musculoskeletal pain and discomfort among Canadian truck drivers: A cross-sectional study of worker perspectives
ConclusionFindings reveal that most factors are largely modifiable, suggesting the need to develop or tailor organizational guidelines to the needs of workers at multiple levels. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 5, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Special Issue on the theory, design and evaluation of behaviour change interventions in transport
Publication date: Available online 31 August 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Kiron Chatterjee, Rachel N. Carey (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 1, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Impact of information about health and academic benefits on parent perception of the feasibility of active transportation to school
Publication date: Available online 31 August 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Emma Lucken, Jason Soria, Mary-Ann Niktas, Tonia Wang, Matt Stewart, Ramin NikouiAbstractThe percentage of students walking or biking to school in the United States has fallen drastically over the past decades. This decline has important implications for children’s health, as walking and biking to school result in health benefits, including more physical activity and lower risk of obesity. Influencing parents to consider active transportation to school (ATS) is a necessary step in behavior change. Our research examine...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 1, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Smooth associations between the emergency medical services response time and the risk of death in road traffic crashes
ConclusionTwo critical values (5.5 minutes and 17 minutes respectively) of the EMS response time were found. The former represents the fastest decline in the chance of survival and the latter is just the “gold time” for operating rescues. Overestimation of the urgency level of certain types of crashes at the very early stages of rescues could be the main reason for observing a negative influential pattern of the EMS response time on the odds of death. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 31, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Cycling: Increasing diversity in users, contexts and modalities
Publication date: Available online 29 August 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Takemi Sugiyama (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 30, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Building it in and keeping it going: The struggle for physically active lives in car dominant societies
Publication date: Available online 23 August 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Adrian L. Davis (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 24, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Are people who already cycle and walk more responsive to an active travel intervention?
ConclusionsTo convey maximum benefit to population health, interventions need to consider physically inactive people in particular and encourage active travel amongst this group. The Model Communities programme does not appear to have achieved this, despite important increases in population average active travel levels overall. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 24, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Associations of socio-demographic, perceived environmental, social and psychological factors with active travel in Hong Kong adolescents: The iHealt(H) cross-sectional study
In conclusion, Hong Kong adolescents appear to have high frequencies of ATS and AT to other destinations than reported elsewhere. Social support from peers, parental AT and having schools and other destinations within walking distance from home may independently contribute to adolescents’ AT. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 24, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Deprivation and road traffic injury comparisons for 4–10 and 11–15 year-olds
Publication date: Available online 20 August 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Sarah E. O’Toole, Nicola ChristieAbstractChildren from disadvantaged backgrounds are at an increased risk of being killed or seriously injured (KSI) in a road collision compared to their peers from less disadvantaged areas. However, understanding of the risk of being KSI in a road collision across childhood, gender, level of deprivation, exposure, and mode of transport is not routinely investigated. The present research therefore compared the number of 4–10 year-olds and 11–15 year-olds KSI road casualties...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 20, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Factors associated with graduated return to work following injury in a road traffic crash
This study sought to identify those likely to follow a GRTW pathway, and identify factors associated with successful GRTW. Administrative claims data from a state-based compulsory third party transport injury insurer were used. Individuals whose crash occurred from 2003–2012 were included if aged 15–70 years at time of crash, sustained a non-catastrophic injury, had complete data for all variables and attempted a RTW in the three years follow-up. A matrix was created using income payments data, which were used as a proxy for RTW, to map their RTW pattern for up to three years post-crash. Individuals were flagge...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

On the way to good health? Rural roads and morbidity in Upland Orissa
Publication date: Available online 6 August 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Clive Bell, Susanne van DillenAbstractThis paper investigates the effects of India's rural roads programme (PMGSY) on morbidity, using data on 279 households drawn from 30 villages in upland Orissa. The households were surveyed in 2010 and 2013, yielding an unbalanced panel of 1580 individuals, 1076 of whom were present in both years. Ten of the villages had received a direct all-weather road connection between 2004 and 2013. To estimate the programme's effects, the villages were treated as units within the whole network of ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 7, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Why don’t more women cycle? An analysis of female and male commuter cycling mode-share in England and Wales
Publication date: Available online 6 August 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Nick Grudgings, Alex Hagen-Zanker, Susan Hughes, Birgitta Gatersleben, Marc Woodall, Will BryansAbstractWomen are under-represented in commuter cycling in England and Wales. Consequently, women miss out on the health benefits of active commuting over distances where walking is less practical. Similarly, where cycling could replace motorised forms of transport, society is missing out on the wider health benefits associated with reductions in air pollution, road noise and social severance. This paper uses aggregate (ecological...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 6, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The public bicycle-sharing scheme in Brisbane, Australia: Evaluating the influence of its introduction on changes in time spent cycling amongst a middle- and older-age population
ConclusionResidential proximity to a bicycle-sharing station was not found to be associated with the use of the bicycle-sharing scheme nor did its introduction significantly predict an increase in time spent cycling. Other interventions may be more supportive of increasing cycling in the baby boomer cohort, and, thereby, improving their overall health. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 4, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Use of 3D scanning technology to determine bus access for people using powered mobility aids
Publication date: Available online 25 July 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Carolyn A. Unsworth, Julian Chua, Anjum Naweed, Prasad Gudimetla, Toan D. Nguyen, David G. BarnesAbstractPublic transport is designed to move people efficiently and affordably around their communities. Millions of people internationally with disabilities rely on public transport every day to connect them to services, work, educational and social events. Many of these people attempt to board public transport using a powered mobility aid (such as an electric wheelchair, mobility scooter, or gopher) and this number is expected t...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 25, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Use of alternative sources of transportation among older adult drivers
Publication date: Available online 18 July 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Vanya C. Jones, Renee M. Johnson, George W. Rebok, Kimberly B. Roth, Andrea Gielen, Lisa J. Molnar, Samantha Pitts, Carolyn DiGuiseppi, Linda Hill, David Strogatz, Thelma Mielenz, David W. Eby, Guohua LiAbstractDriving is the preferred source of personal transportation for older adults. However, personal transportation is not limited to owning and operating a car and can be conceptualized as utilization of different modes of transportation to meet personal mobility needs. The aims of this study are to describe the types and n...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 19, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Bringing health into transportation and land use scenario planning: Creating a National Public Health Assessment Model (N-PHAM)
Publication date: Available online 12 July 2018Source: Journal of Transport & HealthAuthor(s): Jessica Schoner, Jim Chapman, Allen Brookes, Kara E. MacLeod, Eric H. Fox, Nicole Iroz-Elardo, Lawrence D. FrankAbstractThere is mounting evidence linking land development and transportation investments to physical activity with resulting implications for chronic disease prevention. Links between the physical environment and health have traditionally focused on harmful exposures such as air pollution, noise, and traffic injury. Given limited funds and competition for how and where investments are made, there is a need to prio...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 12, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2343 - How Risky Are ADHD Teen Drivers? Analysis of ADHD Teen Drivers Using Naturalistic Driving Data
This study has collected driving data for 305,185 trips totaling over 35,000 hours of driving. Preliminary coding efforts identified 82 crashes and 114 near-crashes. Analyses indicated that the ADHD teens had higher rates of CNC than their non-ADHD peers (22.6 vs. 11.5; p
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2344 - Two Way Street – Public Health and Transportation Working Together on Active Transportation
The objective of this review was to better define various challenges and opportunities to strengthen public health and transportation collaboration, with a detailed focus on the perspectives of transportation professionals on perceived barriers to improving infrastructure towards better promoting active transportation. The review involved a scan of documents, stakeholder mapping, and in-depth semi-structured interviews with transportation professionals. The resulting themes identified key areas in which public health and transportation could support each other. Chief among these was defining public health's support - role ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2345 - Developing Conflict Analysis as a Surrogate Safety Measure Using an Expert Survey
ConclusionsCoupled with crash data, understanding the conflict patterns and their possible causes can help transportation agencies make strategic decisions about active transportation investments. Moreover, conflict measures can act as a sketch planning level performance measure to understand potential safety issues related to transportation facilities. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2349 - Effects of Ambient Noise on Sleep in New York City
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9, SupplementAuthor(s): Tricia Teoh Carolyn OlsonHighest Scoring Abstract: Undergraduate/MastersBackgroundNoise can be harmful to health. One effect of noise is disrupted sleep and poorer daytime cognitive performance. New York City (NYC) adults were surveyed to examine the frequency and sources of ambient noise that cause sleep disturbance, physical (e.g., wearing earplugs) or medical (e.g., using sleep medications) measures taken to reduce noise exposure, and effect on concentration due to poor sleep.MethodsThe data were obtained from a 2017 aut...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2350 - Field Testing a Low-Cost Sensor for Long-Term Measurement of Traffic-Related PM2.5
ConclusionsPreliminary qualitative results suggest that the novel low-cost UNC sensor can be easily deployed at the community scale, with the potential to achieve broader engagement of the civil society and develop tools to enable our stakeholders to carry out health-based air quality assessments at relevant community scales. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2359 - Pareto Optimality for Assessing Multimodal Transportation Accessibility: Balancing Equity and Efficiency When Sitting Interventions
ConclusionsImproving spatial access to health facilities is important in reducing the prevalence of disease. Therefore, multimodal accessibility should be emphasized in future intervention placement research. The analysis of individual's travel time from distinct households to facility locations helps to address the inherent mismatch between current statistical methods that require detection of significant densities and the reality of individuals located on a street network or constrained by a particular transportation modality. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2366 - Perception of Bus Drivers on Sexually Transmitted Diseases in Kaduna, Nigeria
ConclusionsBus drivers have a high risk of acquiring Sexually Transmitted Diseases. It is therefore important that health officers be drafted to motor parks to create more awareness on what STD is all about and how to prevent it especially among the drivers as they play a major role in the transmission. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2368 - Ideas for Improving Health Impacts of Urban Transport in Vietnamese Cities
ConclusionsThe ongoing work in Vietnam shows strong indications that health-oriented design and use of transport systems has significant impacts on human health and can contribute to the fulfillment of other traffic and transport related goals at the same time. While the awareness of planners and users of transport systems to improve the own health or the health of others is still low, fieldwork indicated that small shifts in awareness, guidance or general transport planning practice can have very significant impacts. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2369 - Active Cities could be Good Business: An Economic Evaluation of a Complete Street Project in Santiago, Chile
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9, SupplementAuthor(s): Rodrigo Mora, Victor RoccoSince the nineties, many cities in developed countries, especially in North America and Australia, have initiated strategies aimed at tackling their acute obesity problem. Promoting more active lifestyles has become a central part of contemporary urban policies in American, Canadian, Australian, and, to a lesser extent, European cities.One of the strategies to achieve this goal has been to transform auto-centered streets into safe, inclusive and vibrant places. That strategy has been known as the C...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2373 - Traceability Mechanism in Perishable Food Transportation and Food Safety: Costs and Benefits
ConclusionsFrom our analysis and results, we recommend that the public and food industry stakeholders, in particular, should be educated on the cost-effectiveness of the modern traceability implementation method (RFID) over the traditional methods of food traceability. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2377 - What Contributes to High Rates of Active School Travel? Perspectives of Exemplar Schools in New Zealand
ConclusionsFindings suggest that in addition to developing safer active travel routes to schools, a thorough understanding of local culture and values, and school policies and priorities are needed. This will enable the design of a context-specific mix of interventions to increase active school travel. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2378 - Bikes in Schools and Biking to School: Can One Support the Other?
ConclusionsBikes in Schools creates a safe, social space for students and families to be active on bikes. In the short-term, Bikes in Schools results in students biking more; however, it does not appear to translate to increases in biking to school in most contexts – although longer-term changes may occur. The combination of safe routes to school, Bikes in Schools, and improving access to bikes at home, is worthy of further investigation as a multi-faceted intervention to increase biking to school. Acknowledgements: Bike On NZ Charitable Trust (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2379 - Optimal Commuting Conditions for Experienced Well-Being
ConclusionsOur study shows that enjoyment of commuting varies as a function of commute type and job characteristics of a commuter. These results offer first steps towards a better understanding of the psychological and socio-economic factors that may underlie the relationship between commuting and well-being. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2380 - Emissions from US-Mexico Border Crossings: Assessing Affected Populations in El Paso, Texas
ConclusionsThe study approach provides a systematic GIS-based approach for the screening of affected populations in a unique context (border crossings). The findings are relevant to address emissions exposure, health impacts, and environmental justice issues in border regions. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research