An intervention encouraging planned self-regulation and goal setting in drivers across the lifespan: Testing an extended theory of planned behaviour
Publication date: Available online 4 May 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Holly Gwyther , Carol Holland Previous work has demonstrated that planning behaviours may be more adaptive than avoidance strategies in driving self-regulation, but ways of encouraging planning have not been investigated. The efficacy of an extended theory of planned behaviour (TPB) plus implementation intention based intervention to promote planning self-regulation in drivers across the lifespan was tested. An age stratified group of participants (N=81, aged 18–83 years) was randomly assigned to an experimental or...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 6, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Travel behavior of low income older adults and implementation of an accessibility calculator
Publication date: Available online 26 March 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Md Moniruzzaman , Anna Chudyk , Antonio Páez , Meghan Winters , Joanie Sims-Gould , Heather McKay Given the aging demographic landscape, the concept of walkable neighborhoods has emerged as a topic of interest, especially during the last decade. However, we know very little about whether walkable neighborhoods promote walking among older adults, particularly those with lower incomes. Therefore in this paper we: (i) examine the relation between trip distance and socio-demographic attributes and accessibility fea...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 2, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Associations between the objective and perceived built environment and bicycling for transportation
Publication date: Available online 31 March 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Liang Ma , Jennifer Dill This paper investigates the relative associations between the objectively-measured built environment versus stated perceptions of the built environment and bicycling. Data are from a random phone survey conducted in the Portland, Oregon, region. Binary logit and linear regression models, using objective measures, perceived measures, and both sets of measures, were estimated to predict propensity of bicycling and frequency of bicycling separately. Results showed that the perceived environment a...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 2, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Rural–urban differences in health care provider child passenger safety anticipatory guidance provision
This study sought to determine rural–urban differences in frequency and accuracy of anticipatory guidance related to child passenger safety (CPS) provided by HCPs, in addition to rural–urban differences in HCP confidence in providing this counseling. HCPs from rural and urban areas in several upper Midwest states were surveyed about frequency and confidence of advice provided to parents related to CPS and their knowledge level on this subject. Urban HCPs were significantly more likely than rural HCPs to consistently provide advice to parents related to CPS across all age groups for children aged 12 years or you...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 2, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Changes in travel to school patterns among children and adolescents in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area, Brazil, 1997–2007
Publication date: Available online 29 April 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Thiago Hérick de Sá , Leandro Martin Totaro Garcia , Grégore Iven Mielke , Fabiana Maluf Rabacow , Leandro Fórnias Machado de Rezende This paper describes the changes in how children and adolescents travel to school in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA), Brazil. Data were from children (6–11 year) and adolescents (12–17 year) who reported at least one trip to school at the SPMA Household Travel Survey for the years 1997 (15,491 people; 31,909 trips) and 2007 (11,992 p...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 2, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Bus use in a developing world city: Implications for the health and well-being of older passengers
Publication date: Available online 29 April 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Carlos Aceves-González , Sharon Cook , Andrew May The aim of this article is to investigate the implications of bus use on the health and well-being of older passengers in a developing world city. Two complementary methods were used. Twenty-six participants aged 60 and over in Guadalajara, Mexico took part in four focus groups to identify the door-to-door elements of the bus service that impose difficulty in terms of accessing and using it, and their impact on the perceived or actual safety, usability and comfo...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 2, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Air pollution and health – The views of policy makers, planners, public and private sector on barriers and incentives for change
Conclusion A lack of progress in reducing air pollution may be related to the invisibility of the problem both in health and economic terms. There is a disconnect between planning and development priorities at a national and local level which means vehicular transport is still the most efficient and cost effective option for personal and business transport. What is needed is political commitment to align policies and use both hard (punitive) measures and soft (behaviour choice) measures to reduce traffic-related air pollution in urban areas and protect and improve health. To address this real time, linked air pollution and...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 2, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The impact of mobility scooters on their users. Does their usage help or hinder?: A state of the art review
Publication date: Available online 20 April 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Roselle Thoreau As older people start to have difficulty in walking many choose to use a mobility scooter to help them move around. Benefitting from improved design, mobility scooters are becoming an increasingly popular mobility device and are a common sight on many streets. However, very little is known about their usage or their impact in terms of either quality of life or functional health. Whilst mobility scooters may help to improve the quality of life of their users, it is also possible that the sedentary natur...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - April 22, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Choice of commuting mode among employees: Do home neighborhood environment, worksite neighborhood environment, and worksite policy and supports matter?
Conclusion Both environment features and worksite supports and policies are associated with the choice of commuting mode. Future studies should use longitudinal designs to investigate the potential of promoting alternative commuting modes through worksite efforts that support sustainable commuting behaviors as well as the potential of built environment improvements. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 18, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Age-friendly mobilities: A transdisciplinary and intergenerational perspective
This article reviews current literature on ageing and mobility and suggests that work emerging in ‘mobilities’ studies offers a transdisciplinary and intergenerational approach to mobility and ageing that reveals aspects of mobility experiences that are otherwise hidden. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 18, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

How actively do children travel to their pre-school setting?
Conclusion This preliminary study identified factors associated with active travel amongst pre-school aged children and issues warranting further research. Addressing these could assist in developing effective strategies to promote active travel in the early years of life. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 16, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

General practitioner attitudes and practices in medical fitness to drive in Ireland
Conclusion Although Irish GPs report high levels of confidence in assessing MFTD, as a group they express ambivalence about who should be primarily responsible for such assessments. This would indicate that some would consider deferring to a consultant opinion or at least recognize limitations of their skill set in this area. Further exploration is needed to determine which aspects of MFTD should be included in information and training for GPs, and to help address concerns regarding liability and patient/family communication issues. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 10, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The role of transport and mobility in the health of older people
Publication date: Available online 7 March 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Charles Musselwhite , Carol Holland , Ian Walker The world׳s population is ageing. Older people are healthier and more active than previous generations. Living in a hypermobile world, people want to stay connected to dispersed communities as they age. Staying connected to communities and social networks enables older people to contribute and connect with society and is associated with positive mental and physical health, facilitating independence and physical activity while reducing social isolation. Changes in physio...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 7, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Children׳s experiences: Enjoyment and fun as additional encouragement for walking to school
Publication date: Available online 7 February 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Vivian Romero This paper argues that highlighting the enjoyment or fun aspects of children׳s experiences can also encourage walking to school. It seeks to identify and understand the neighbourhood attributes contributing to an enjoyable walk to school from the perspectives of children. A group of 178 children (9–11 years old) was drawn from eight government primary schools situated in Sydney metropolitan neighbourhoods. A combination of a written questionnaire, a drawing activity and focus group discussions w...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - February 8, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Where does bicycling for health happen? Analysing volunteered geographic information through place and plexus
Publication date: Available online 7 February 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Greg P. Griffin , Junfeng Jiao Research on the role of bicycling for health through physical activity has been limited by the lack of information on where bicyclists ride. New big data sources available through smartphone-based applications provide a rich source to provide bicycle volume data more comparable to the scale of information available for automotive and public transit modes. In the case of smartphone apps for fitness tracking, results of this data can be used similar to the growing application of global p...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - February 8, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Risk factors for cycling accident related injury: The UK Cycling for Health Survey
Publication date: Available online 28 January 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Milo A. Hollingworth , Alice J.L. Harper , Mark Hamer Cycling has become increasingly common in the United Kingdom (UK) but so too have injuries related to cycling accidents. There is presently little data on the health of people cycling in the UK. Data were collected using an online questionnaire from 4961 cyclists (mean age 47.9 yrs, 79.2% men) contacted through large UK cycling organisation networks. The questionnaire collected information on participant demographics, self-reported cycling behaviour and cycling a...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - January 29, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Sociospatial patterning of the use of new transport infrastructure: Walking, cycling and bus travel on the Cambridgeshire guided busway
Conclusion New high-quality transport infrastructure attracts users, determined by geographical exposure and spatial contextual factors such as settlement size and availability of parking at work. Future longitudinal analyses will determine effects on overall travel and physical activity behaviour change. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - December 25, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Social inequalities in transport: Going beyond the evidence
Publication date: Available online 20 December 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Carme Borrell (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - December 20, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Interactions between psychological and environmental characteristics and their impacts on walking
Publication date: Available online 18 December 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Yong Yang Due to walking׳s benefits to physical and mental health as well as to environmental and economic sustainability, numerous studies have examined psychological and environmental characteristics on their impacts on walking. However, understanding of how the interactions between psychological and environmental characteristics influence walking remains limited. Recently, both competitive mechanism and synergetic mechanism have been proposed, and a number of empirical studies have examined the interactions bet...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - December 19, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Different types of out-of-home activities and well-being amongst urban residing old persons with mobility impediments
Publication date: Available online 17 December 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Anu Siren , Randi Hjorthol , Lena Levin Independent mobility has been proposed to be a precondition for leading an independent, non-institutionalized life. Supporting independent mobility for the growing senior segment thus has societal importance. The question of how to maintain well-being through mobility in older age is, however, a complex one. The present study explicates this by focusing on how utilitarian and discretionary activities—representing different types out-of-home activities—contribute t...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - December 17, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Stress, adrenaline, and fatigue contributing to at-fault collision risk: Quantitative and qualitative measures of driving after gambling
Publication date: Available online 15 December 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Alissa M. Greer , Scott Macdonald , Robert E. Mann This paper is one of the first to address the important topic of problem gambling and risk of collisions. Two hundred and twenty-six (226) problem gamblers completed a self-administered questionnaire that included questions on their lifetime “at fault” collisions, several psychosocial characteristics and open-ended questions on how their gambling may have been related to these collisions. A scale specifically designed for this study, the Gambling Effect...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - December 16, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Active transport: Why and where do people (not) walk or cycle?
Publication date: December 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 1, Issue 4 Author(s): Seraphim Alvanides (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - December 7, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Understanding travel patterns to support safe active transport for older adults
Publication date: Available online 11 November 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Steve O׳Hern , Jennifer Oxley Transport and mobility needs for all aged road users are diverse and may change with increasing age. With an increasing ageing population throughout much of the developed world combined with increasing life expectancies, there is a growing need to understand the transportation requirements of older adults. Moreover, while car use is still the most popular form of transport for older adults, alternative transport modes are offered and promoted, and their use is increasing. This paper e...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 17, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Variations in active transport behavior among different neighborhoods and across adult life stages
Conclusion This study supports the hypothesis that some variation in transport behavior can be explained by life stages and self-selection, but the association between living in a more walkable neighborhood and active transport is still significant after adjusting for these factors. Life stage significantly moderated the association between neighborhood walkability and cycling for transport, and household income significantly moderated the association between neighborhood walkability and walking for transport. Getting around easily by bicycle and on foot was the highest rated self-selection factor second only to perceived ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 17, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Commentary on an evaluation of distance estimation accuracy and its relationship to transportation mode for the home-to-school journey by adolescents
Publication date: Available online 11 November 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Cody R. Evers , Deb Johnson-Shelton The paper provides a commentary on Woods and Nelson׳s article “An evaluation of distance estimation and accuracy and its relationship to transportation Mode for the home-to-school journey by adolescents.” We elaborate on two points related to the main finding of the article: the importance of understanding perceived barriers within the neighborhood environment, and the role of cognitive and skills development in encouraging active transport amongst children and adole...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 17, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Improving accessibility for older people – Investing in a valuable asset
Publication date: Available online 13 November 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Roger Mackett This paper explores the contribution of older people to society, the role of mobility in the quality of life of older people, and whether making it easier for older people to travel would enable them to increase their contribution. The paper commences by considering evidence on the economic value of older people to society. This shows that older people make a net contribution through expenditure in shops, employment, voluntary work, childcare and taxation which exceeds their cost to the taxpayer. The ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 17, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Future mobility in an ageing society – Where are we heading?
Publication date: Available online 13 November 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Ian Shergold , Glenn Lyons , Christa Hubers The demographic profile of UK society is changing as people live longer. Maintaining the wellbeing and quality of life of an ageing society is set to be extremely challenging. To what extent can the state afford to meet a potentially burgeoning demand for social care? What expectations will be placed upon informal carers to enable the system to cope? In what ways and to what extent might assistive technologies have a part to play in supporting people both in terms of acti...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 14, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Modelling the potential impact on CO2 emissions of an increased uptake of active travel for the home to school commute using individual level data
Publication date: Available online 11 November 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Nick Bearman , Alex D. Singleton Active travel for the home to school commute is an ideal opportunity to improve pupil׳s physical activity levels. Many studies have looked at how pupils travel to school and the motivating factors behind these decisions. This paper applies an innovative methodology to model each pupil’s individual route to school and then evaluates how different policy changes could increase the uptake of active travel. The changes are quantified in terms of the proportion using active travel...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 11, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Independent mobility on the journey to school: A joint cross-sectional and prospective exploration of social and physical environmental influences
Conclusions Interventions should develop parents′ skills to teach their children to be independently mobile and to build confidence regarding venturing out without parental accompaniment. Urban planners should consider designing neighborhoods in which residences, business/retail outlets and sports facilities are co-located to promote active transport. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 10, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

History, risk, infrastructure: perspectives on bicycling in the Netherlands and the UK
Publication date: Available online 4 November 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Malcolm J. Wardlaw Cycling has consistently been safer in the Netherlands than the UK. Nevertheless, safety has improved in both countries over time. Between 1980 and 2011, the cyclists’ fatality rate declined by 67% in the Netherlands and 57% in the UK. Per capita bicycle use was sustained in the Netherlands throughout the post-World War Two era, peaking in the early 1960s and only declining for a decade before recovering. UK bicycle use peaked in 1952 and declined permanently. The survival of popular bicycli...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 6, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Are GIS-modelled routes a useful proxy for the actual routes followed by commuters?
In conclusion, GIS routes may be acceptable for distance estimation and to explore potential routes, particularly active commuting. However, GPS should be used to obtain accurate estimates of environmental contexts in which commuting behaviour actually occurs. Public health researchers should bear these considerations in mind when studying the geographical determinants and health implications of commuting behaviour, and when recommending policy changes to encourage active travel. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 4, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Changes in outdoor mobility when becoming alone in the household in old age
Publication date: March 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 1, Issue 1 Author(s): Vanessa Stjernborg , Ulla Melin Emilsson , Agneta Ståhl The aim of this article is to analyze reported changes in outdoor mobility, increased/unchanged/decreased, for a sample of older people (>62 years) in two regions in Sweden, who have transitioned from a two-person to a single-person household during the two years since the study was conducted. The target group (N=162) consists of all people who had transitioned to a single-person household in a random sample of 2033 people. The predominant results rev...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The role of bicycle sharing systems in normalising the image of cycling: An observational study of London cyclists
Publication date: March 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 1, Issue 1 Author(s): Anna Goodman , Judith Green , James Woodcock Bicycle sharing systems are increasingly popular around the world and have the potential to increase the visibility of people cycling in everyday clothing. This may in turn help normalise the image of cycling, and reduce perceptions that cycling is ‘risky’ or ‘only for sporty people’. This paper sought to compare the use of specialist cycling clothing between users of the London bicycle sharing system (LBSS) and cyclists using personal bicycles. To do...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The Transport and Health Study Group
Publication date: March 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 1, Issue 1 Author(s): Stephen J. Watkins (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Health on the Move 2. Policies for health-promoting transport
Publication date: March 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 1, Issue 1 Author(s): J.S. Mindell (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Welcome to the Journal of Transport and Health
Publication date: March 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 1, Issue 1 Author(s): Jennifer S. Mindell (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Active transport, independent mobility and territorial range among children residing in disadvantaged areas
This study aimed to examine active transport and independent mobility (i.e. walking/cycling without adult accompaniment) on journeys to school and other local destinations, and their associations with children׳s physical activity in disadvantaged urban and rural areas of Victoria, Australia. In addition, associations were examined between children׳s perceived accessibility of local destinations by walking/cycling and their territorial range (i.e. how far they were allowed to roam without adult accompaniment). Survey-reported active transport, independent mobility, territorial range, and objectively-measured physical acti...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Estimating the health economic benefits of cycling
Publication date: June 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 1, Issue 2 Author(s): Gerard Deenihan , Brian Caulfield This paper examines the health and economic benefits from the construction of a new segregated cycleway in Ireland. The health economic benefits were estimated using the World Health Organisation’s (WHO) Health Economic Assessment Tool (HEAT). This tool can be used to calculate the health economic benefits from an intervention (such as construction of a new cycling facility). The HEAT tool also offers research a transparent, coherent and standardized method of evaluating the healt...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Impact on cycling behavior and weight loss of a national cycling skills program (AustCycle) in Australia 2010–2013
Publication date: June 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 1, Issue 2 Author(s): C. Rissel , G. Watkins From 2010 to 2013 AustCycle implemented a community-based national adult cycle training program across Australia funded by federal, state and local governments, workplaces and individuals. A primary aim for Commonwealth Health Department funding was reduction of risk factors for chronic disease. Participants provided their demographic, cycling behavior data along with height and weight when registering with the program (n=4145), and provided feedback on the program immediately afterwards (n=2250)....
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Gender and used/preferred differences of bicycle routes, parking, intersection signals, and bicycle type: Professional middle class preferences in Hangzhou, China
Conclusions Cities could test other city׳s innovations including parking sheds, bicycle signals, public bicycles, and wide-landscaped cycle tracks with trees between the cycle track and the road. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Crossing guard presence: Impact on active transportation and injury prevention
Publication date: June 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 1, Issue 2 Author(s): Carolina Marinovic Gutierrez , Derek Slagle , Kristian Figueras , Anabel Anon , Anne Corinne Huggins , Gillian Hotz Evaluation of increased crossing guard presence on the likelihood children using safe active transportation (AT) was conducted during the simultaneous hiring of multiple crossing guards. The primary study aim was to determine if increased crossing guard presence was associated with (1) an increased number of children walking/biking to school, (2) diminished parental safety concerns, (3) an increased likeli...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Parent safety perceptions of child walking routes
In this study, parent volunteers conducted an audit of streets and intersections leading to seven elementary schools in a suburban school district. Parents were most likely to feel concern about streets that lacked sidewalks or had sidewalks with obstructions. Wheelchair-accessible routes were seen as appropriate for walking children. Parents expressed concern over safety at intersections, particularly those involving large streets; traffic controls did not mollify their concern. These results support the use of appropriate behavior models for assessing walking choices, highlight the importance of well-maintained sidewalks...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Shifting short motorized trips to walking: The potential of active transportation for physical activity in Montreal
Conclusions Shifting short motorized trips to walking offers a valuable opportunity for increasing daily physical activity and might also help reduce weight gain at a population level. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The need for consistency and equity in driver education and assessment post-stroke
Publication date: June 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 1, Issue 2 Author(s): Annabel McNamara , Annie McCluskey , Jennifer White , Stacey George People who are unable to resume driving after a stroke often experience reduced participation. Return to driving is made difficult by inconsistencies in knowledge regarding legislation, the occupational therapy driving assessment process and access to services. As a result, inequities exist between and within states and territories of Australia. Some drivers miss out on, or bypass formal assessment, while other drivers experience rigorous assessment whi...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The impact of health problems on driving status among older adults
This study assessed the impact of health problems on driving status (current driver vs. ex-driver) among older adults to identify which of those health problems have the greatest individual and population impact on driving cessation. Methods Data were from baseline and a 5 year follow-up wave of a longitudinal survey of adults aged 55 years and older (N=1279). The impact of several health problems on driving status was assessed using a relative risk ratio and a population attributable risk percent. Analyses controlled for age, gender, and the presence of additional baseline health problems. Results Many health conditions...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

TRB Health and Transportation Subcommittee
Publication date: June 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 1, Issue 2 Author(s): Eloisa Tigre Raynault , Ed Christopher (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Editorial for JTH Volume 1, Issue 2
Publication date: June 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 1, Issue 2 Author(s): Jennifer S. Mindell (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

“I grew up on a bike”: Cycling and older adults
Publication date: Available online 16 July 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Meghan Winters , Joanie Sims-Gould , Thea Franke , Heather McKay A large proportion of the growing population of older adults have low levels of physical activity and face ensuing health and mobility problems. Cycling is a health-promoting and widely accessible transportation option. However, throughout North America cycling rates amongst older adults are extremely low. Evidence from European countries suggests that cycling for older adults is possible and can be a popular travel choice. Therefore, we aimed to assess f...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Community design, street networks, and public health
Publication date: Available online 8 August 2014 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Wesley E. Marshall , Daniel P. Piatkowski , Norman W. Garrick What is the influence of street network design on public health? While the literature linking the built environment to health outcomes is vast, it glosses over the role that specific street network characteristics play. The three fundamental elements of street networks are: street network density, connectivity, and configuration. Without sufficient attention being paid to these individual elements of street network design, building a community for health re...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

An evaluation of distance estimation accuracy and its relationship to transport mode for the home-to-school journey by adolescents
This study tested the accuracy of participant׳s perceived distance in comparison to actual distance travelled to school, by mode of commuting, active or passive. Adolescents completed a questionnaire reporting mode and estimating distance and time taken for their usual trip to school. Subsequently, each participant drew the actual route travelled on a detailed street level map. Only those who lived within a criterion home-to-school distance (2.4km; N=199, mean age 15.9±0.56, range 15–17 years) were included in the analysis. Passive commuters erroneously thought they travelled significantly further to school t...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research