The influence of the built environment on transport and health
Publication date: December 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 3, Issue 4 Author(s): Lawrence Frank, Billie Giles-Corti, Reid Ewing (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - December 9, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Prevalence and correlates of walkable short car trips: A cross-sectional multilevel analysis
Publication date: Available online 5 December 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Rachel Cole, Gavin Turrell, Mohammad Javad Koohsari, Neville Owen, Takemi Sugiyama Many short trips are made by car, and replacing them with walking is a potential strategy to increase physical activity at the population level. The prevalence and correlates of walkable short car trips were examined among adults aged 18–84 years living in the state of Queensland, Australia. Participants (N=14,481) reported their travel behaviors using a 24-h travel diary in the 2009 South East Queensland Travel Survey (SEQTS). A...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - December 6, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The meaning of livable streets to schoolchildren: An image mapping study of the effects of traffic on children's cognitive development of spatial knowledge
Publication date: Available online 3 December 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Bruce Appleyard While much focus has been placed on the physical activity and environmental benefits of providing safe and livable streets for children, few studies look at the mental health and cognitive development benefits from lowering children׳s exposure to threats from traffic. In response, this study uses innovative cognitive mapping methods through a series of focus-group interviews with nine and ten-year schoolchildren to uncover important ways traffic exposure limits children׳s cognitive development of th...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - December 4, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Diversifying and normalising cycling in London, UK: An exploratory study on the influence of infrastructure
This article examines the extent to which protected infrastructure is associated with greater diversity and normalisation of cycling. In the UK, cyclists are predominantly male and often wear distinctive cycle clothing rather than everyday clothes. This is not the case in higher-cycling countries such as the Netherlands and Germany. It has been argued that the UK's demographic skewing may be partly due to poor quality infrastructure which can be off-putting for many, but particularly for women, children and older people. Route choice studies tend to confirm that women are more likely than men to choose routes with greater ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - December 1, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Understanding parents' school travel choices: A qualitative study using the Theoretical Domains Framework
Publication date: Available online 22 November 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Sara M. Ahern, Bronia Arnott, Tim Chatterton, Audrey de Nazelle, Ian Kellar, Rosemary R.C. McEachan Traffic related air pollution is detrimental to health and creates a substantial attributable mortality burden. It is suggested that a shift from motorised transport to active forms of travel will therefore have significant health benefits. Currently 46% of school journeys for primary aged children are made by car and this figure has risen steadily. Understanding barriers to active school travel (AST) is an important ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 22, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Neighborhood-based differences in walkability, physical activity, and weight status in India
Conclusions An understanding of BE correlates of domain-specific PA can support the development of contextually tailored interventions to promote physical activity and reverse the determinants of inactivity occurring through patterns of urbanization and sedentary behaviors in India. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 20, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Prevalence of Complete Streets policies in U.S. municipalities
Publication date: Available online 17 November 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Susan A. Carlson, Prabasaj Paul, Gayathri Kumar, Kathleen B. Watson, Emiko Atherton, Janet E. Fulton Communities can adopt Complete Streets policies to support physical activity through the routine design and operation of streets and communities that are safe for all people, regardless of age, ability, or mode of transport. Our aim was two-fold: (1) to estimate the prevalence of Complete Streets policies in the United States overall and by select municipality characteristics using data from the National Survey of Co...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 18, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Where the rubber meets the road: Walking, riding,  and driving, or walking, walking, walking for our health
Publication date: Available online 5 November 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Carlos J.L. Balsas (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 6, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Determinants of mode and route change following the opening of a new cycleway in Sydney, Australia
Conclusions Government agencies that want to give non-regular riders and more women the option to travel by bicycle should consider building separated cycleways. People will take a longer route to use separated cycleways, but to a lesser extent if they are commuting to work or study. Cycleway routes intended for commuting purposes should be as direct as possible. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 5, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Promotion of active transportation among state departments of transportation in the U.S
Conclusions Change within state DOTs to incorporate bicycle and pedestrian modes is a slow process, influenced by both management and engineering staff. Education at several levels and through different mechanisms could play an important role in changing DOT culture, though funding for projects is also a major barrier. Effective advocacy groups may also play a positive role. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 4, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Adolescents' perceptions of cycling versus walking to school: Understanding the New Zealand context
Conclusions Compared to walking, cycling to school among Dunedin adolescents was less common, perceived as less safe and had less social and infrastructure support. Future interventions should focus on creating supportive physical and social environments, and improving road safety for cyclists in New Zealand. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 3, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Epidemiology of injuries sustained by rear-seat passengers in frontal motor vehicle crashes
Conclusions Findings of the study conclude that while rear-seat travel in the U.S. is still very low and improving belt usage is a primary concern among rear-seat passengers; however, the epidemiology supports the need for adapting rear-seat restraint performance for effective protection for all groups of rear-seat passengers. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 2, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Potential pollution exposure reductions from small-distance bicycle lane separations
In this study, we employ the use of three bicycles travelling in unison to sample concentrations of ultrafine particles (UFPs), carbon monoxide (CO) and fine particulate matter (PM1.0) at three different distances from the traffic flow, in a central city park area of Christchurch, New Zealand. Similar research has been done using stationary equipment, but this may not accurately represent exposure differences while moving with a stream of vehicles. Three cyclists were equipped with a set of identical instruments and rode continuously along a road, the road׳s sidewalk (7m away) and an off-road path (19m away), for a total ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 29, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Adolescent school travel: Is online mapping a practical alternative to GPS-assessed travel routes?
Conclusions Online mapping surveys are a feasible method for route assessment in adolescents, particularly for active travel routes. With the integration of survey questions, there is considerable potential for understanding the intricacies of travel behaviours. However, the self-reporting error seems more pronounced for longer routes, and when multiple travel modes are used. Researchers should consider the advantages (e.g., ease of collection) and disadvantages (e.g., lack of temporal information) when deciding if the data obtainable are sufficient to answer their research questions. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 29, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Self-assessment of older drivers with brain pathologies: reported habits and self-regulation of driving
The objective of this paper is to analyze the self-reported driving behaviour of older drivers with and without brain pathologies affecting cognition, in order to explore possible differences in self-perception of driving behaviour, through an extensive questionnaire assessment. The diagnostic categories examined include Alzheimer׳s disease, Parkinson׳s disease, and Mild Cognitive Impairment. The questionnaire was answered by 137 drivers with similar demographic characteristics, out of which 44 were healthy individuals and 93 had a brain pathology. It included questions about their driving routines, possible avoidance of...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 29, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Walking behavior across genders in school trips, a case study of Rasht, Iran
In this study, different distance intervals (increasing by 0.25 miles) were defined. Results show that both boys and girls are sensitive to trips longer than 0.25 miles in choosing walking. However, the decrease in likelihood of walking is greater among boys than girls. For example, if the distance is between 0.25 to 0.5 miles, the probability of walking to school decreases by 14.8% points for boys and 10.5% points for girls with respect to trips less than 0.25 miles. Altogether, our findings suggest that gender differences need to be addressed if policy makers hope to increase rates of walking in children׳s trips to scho...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 12, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

A new assessment model to evaluate the microscale sidewalk design factors at the neighbourhood level
Publication date: Available online 10 October 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Mahdi Aghaabbasi, Mehdi Moeinaddini, Muhammad Zaly Shah, Zohreh Asadi-Shekari To date, several assessment tools have been developed to evaluate the pedestrian environments and sidewalks at the street and neighbourhood level. While the existing tools that assess sidewalks at the street level consider the microscale sidewalk factors, the assessment tools at the neighbourhood level neglected the importance of microlevel factors for the assessment purpose. In addition, the important role of residents in neighbourhoods in...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 11, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

There ׳s an app for that: development of a smartphone app to promote active travel to a college campus
Conclusion: The formative research process allowed for a better understanding of the AT behavior for campus members. Feedback from the formative research allowed the developers and research team to build an app addressing the preferences of the community. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Identifying, creating, and testing urban planning measures for transport walking: Findings from the australian national liveability study
Publication date: Available online 16 September 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Hannah Badland, Suzanne Mavoa, Claire Boulangé, Serryn Eagleson, Lucy Gunn, Joshua Stewart, Stephanie David, Billie Giles-Corti A vast body of research demonstrates that living in ׳more walkable׳ neighbourhoods is associated with increased walking, and in turn, positively impacts selected health behaviours and outcomes. Yet, walkable neighbourhoods are not always delivered. The aims of this study were to identify Australian urban planning policies designed to foster ׳walkability׳, and to test measures ba...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 18, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Changes in walking, body mass index, and cardiometabolic risk factors following residential relocation: Longitudinal results from the CARDIA study
Conclusions Greater walkability was associated with lower blood pressure and higher C-reactive protein in FE models, potentially reflecting competing health risks and benefits in dense, walkable environments. RE models tended to overstate or otherwise misrepresent the relationship between walkability and health. Approaches that base estimates on variation between individuals may be subject to bias from unmeasured confounding, such as residential self-selection. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 14, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Identifying destination distances that support walking trips in local neighborhoods
Publication date: Available online 8 September 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Lucy Dubrelle Gunn, Tania L. King, Suzanne Mavoa, Karen E. Lamb, Billie Giles-Corti, Anne Kavanagh When examining associations between local destinations and walking it is common to count local destinations using street network buffers measured at various distances to mitigate spatial data aggregation issues caused by scale and the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem. However, it remains unclear whether a particular buffer size is preferred since large buffers may mask important effects whilst small buffers may not accura...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 9, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Long-term problems influencing health-related quality of life after road traffic injury – Differences between bicyclists and car occupants
Publication date: Available online 25 August 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Maria Ohlin, Hans-Yngve Berg, Anders Lie, Beatrix Algurén The aim of this study was to describe and compare road traffic injuries leading to long-term problems in Health related quality of life (HRQoL), with regards to road user group, injury severity and injured body region, which is important when considering injury preventive strategies. From the Swedish Traffic Accident Data Acquisition (STRADA), a randomized sample of people injured in a road traffic crash and seeking emergency hospital care in connection ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 26, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Effects of the built environment on automobile-involved pedestrian crash frequency and risk
Publication date: Available online 25 August 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Peng Chen, Jiangping Zhou This area-based study explores the relationship between automobile-involved pedestrian crash frequency versus risk and various built environment factors such as road network and land use. The methodology involves the use of Bayesian hierarchical intrinsic conditional autoregressive model, which accounts for unobserved heterogeneities and spatial autocorrelations. The city of Seattle is selected for this empirical study, and the geospatial unit of analysis is traffic analysis zone. The primary...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 26, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

“Transit makes you short”: On health impact assessment of transportation and the built environment
This study conducts an in-depth analysis to alert policymakers and practitioners to erroneous results in the positive impacts of transit use on health measures. We explore the correlation of transit use and accessibility by transit and walking with self-reported general health, Body Mass Index (BMI), and height. We develop a series of linear regression and binary logit models. We also depict the coefficient-p-value-sample-size chart, and conduct the effect size analysis to scrutinize the practically significant impacts of transit use and accessibility on health measures. The results indicate transit use and accessibility b...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 21, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The science and art of intersectoral collaboration on transport and health
Publication date: Available online 9 August 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Susan L. Handy, Adrian Davis (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 18, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Methods, theory, and behaviour change
Publication date: Available online 17 August 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Jennifer S. Mindell (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 18, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Commute well-being differences by mode: Evidence from Portland, Oregon, USA
This article examines commute well-being, a multi-item measure of how one feels about the commute to work, and its associated factors. The measure was adapted from the Satisfaction with Travel Scale originated by Ettema et al. (2010). Data were collected from a web-based survey of workers (n=828) in Portland, Oregon, U.S.A. with four modal groups: walk, bicycle, transit and car users. With some modifications from previous research, this research confirms that the commute well-being scale reliably measures commute satisfaction. A multiple linear regression model shows that along with travel mode, traffic congestion, travel ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 17, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Potential versus revealed access to care during a dengue fever outbreak
Publication date: Available online 16 August 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Irene Casas, Eric Delmelle, Elizabeth C. Delmelle Dengue fever is a vector-borne disease which spreads quickly under suitable conditions and puts certain segments of the population at higher risk, especially in developing countries. Prompt diagnosis of the disease is critical to (1) substantially reduce risks of morbidity and mortality and (2) prevent further expansion of an existing outbreak. Suitable geographic access to medical care and effective prevention campaigns can help achieve these two objectives. This pape...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 17, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Vehicular exhaust emissions under current and alternative future policy measures for megacity Delhi, India
This study analyses the impact of integrated mass rapid transit system (IMRTS) and other policy measures on air emissions from vehicular sources in Delhi region. The impacts have been studied for the passenger and goods vehicles separately. For this purpose three alternative scenarios for the passenger vehicles and two alternative scenarios for the goods vehicles have been analysed for the year 2021. The interventions include stringent source emission norms, modal shift resulting from introduction of effective public transport alternatives, speed regulation measures and hiking of parking fee of private vehicles. These scen...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Associations of socioeconomic status with transport-related physical activity: combining a household travel survey and accelerometer data using random forests
Conclusions This study developed a methodology exporting precise sensor-based knowledge to a large survey sample to shed light on population-level socioeconomic disparities in transport-related physical activity. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

What walking means to moms: Insights from a national sample to frame walking in compelling ways to low-income urban mothers
This study identified salient beliefs, barriers, and life concerns that should be addressed when framing and branding walking to low-income urban mothers. Communications emphasizing dose-based recommendations (e.g., time, intensity) are irrelevant to mothers’ lives and also appear to be confusing as well as ineffective motivators. While some participants desired experiential benefits from walking, such as time with family, others sought instrumental benefits, such as losing weight. Regardless of the benefits desired, however, there was a general consensus that walking was a low daily priority. Thus, for messages to s...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

What distance do university students walk and bike daily to class in Spain
Conclusion Public health decisions at university should consider the distance that students actually walk and cycle. Locating university accommodation facilities within a walkable or cyclable distance from university might increase the AC rates among the university population. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Evaluation of the Veloway 1: A natural experiment of new bicycle infrastructure in Brisbane, Australia
This study examined the behavioural impact of a new segment of a dedicated bikeway (Veloway 1 [V1] Stage C) that links southern suburbs with Brisbane city centre. The V1 Stage C opened in June, 2013. Cyclists who used a pre-existing shared path that links southern suburbs with the city centre completed an intercept survey pre- and post-V1 Stage C opening. Cyclists who used the V1 Stage C after it opened completed the same survey at the same time post-V1 Stage C opening. Survey data were complemented by GPS bicycle count data from cyclists riding on the main cycle routes into the city centre from southern suburbs: the V1 St...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Pedestrian crossing in urban Ghana: Safety implications
This study examines the state of pedestrian crossing facilities (crosswalks) and behaviour on urban roads in Ghana, and its consequences on pedestrian safety, using New Juaben Municipality as a case study area. A 5-year road traffic collision data, information on the condition and utilisation of crosswalks and pedestrians’ perceptions of crosswalks located at different land uses were collected and analysed. Findings show that 98% of pedestrian collisions occurred in locations further away from crosswalks. In addition, accessibility of the crosswalks was a challenge to many urban residents, particularly the disabled, ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The health impacts of traffic-related exposures in urban areas: Understanding real effects, underlying driving forces and co-producing future directions
Publication date: Available online 22 July 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Haneen Khreis, Karyn M. Warsow, Ersilia Verlinghieri, Alvaro Guzman, Luc Pellecuer, Antonio Ferreira, Ian Jones, Eva Heinen, David Rojas-Rueda, Natalie Mueller, Paul Schepers, Karen Lucas, Mark Nieuwenhuijsen The world is currently witnessing its largest surge of urban growth in human history; a trend that draws attention to the need to understand and address health impacts of urban living. Whilst transport is instrumental in this urbanisation wave, it also has significant positive and negative impacts on population hea...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The integrated transport and health impact modeling tool in Nashville, Tennessee, USA: Implementation steps and lessons learned
Publication date: Available online 22 July 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Geoffrey P Whitfield, Leslie A Meehan, Neil Maizlish, Arthur M Wendel The Integrated Transport and Health Impact Model (ITHIM) is a comprehensive tool that estimates the hypothetical health effects of transportation mode shifts through changes to physical activity, air pollution, and injuries. The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation of ITHIM in greater Nashville, Tennessee (USA), describe important lessons learned, and serve as an implementation guide for other practitioners and researchers intereste...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

‘The program was the solution to the problem’: Process evaluation of a multi-site driver licensing program in remote communities
Discussion DriveSafe NT Remote is a Government delivered program providing licensing services to Aboriginal clients in remote Northern Territory communities, and is increasing driver licensing rates. The flexible delivery and culturally responsive approach should lead to further positive licensing outcomes. Addressing barriers to licence participation faced by Aboriginal people is an innovative approach to reducing transport disadvantage and positively impacting health and well-being in remote communities. This evaluation demonstrates a pragmatic approach to assessing program implementation of a multi-site community-based ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

‘Daily Drags’ and ‘Wannabe Walkers’ – Identifying dissatisfied public transport users who might travel more actively and sustainably
Publication date: Available online 28 July 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Gustav Bösehans, Ian Walker This paper sought better to understand the motives and experiences of bus users, with a view to identifying subgroups who might be persuaded to use healthier and more sustainable modes. Student and staff bus users of a middle-sized university in the UK participated in an online survey, indicating their agreement with a series of statements about local bus services. These statements were combined into independent factors using principal component analysis. Then, using cluster analysis, re...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in commercial truck drivers: A review
Conclusions Abdominal obesity is the most prevalent MetSyn component and risk factor for CVD among commercial truck drivers. Additional, research is necessary to evaluate large, representative groups of drivers and to collect measured indices of MetSyn to more accurately predict MetSyn prevalence among this group. Future health intervention studies for commercial truck drivers should focus on obesity prevention, management and treatment. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Transit system design and vulnerability of riders to heat
Publication date: Available online 29 July 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Andrew M. Fraser, Mikhail V. Chester In the United States public transit utilization has increased significantly in the last decade and is considered a critical component in reducing energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in urban areas. Despite public transit׳s climate change mitigation potential, the use of transit necessitates environmental exposure which may be a health hazard during periods of extreme heat. Transit system design, which includes stop location and schedules, is shown to contribute to environmental ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Travel behaviour and health: A conceptual model and research agenda
Publication date: Available online 29 July 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Bert van Wee, Dick Ettema Objectives This paper proposes a conceptual model of the complex relationships between travel behaviour and health. In addition it gives a research agenda providing an overview of challenges for future research. Methods We review the relevant literature in the areas of public health, land use and transportation that address issues related to health and travel and their underlying mechanisms. We do not aim to give a full review of the literature but to underpin the conceptual model. Results and ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

E-bike safety: Individual-level factors and incident characteristics
Publication date: Available online 29 July 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Sonja Haustein, Mette Møller As electrically assisted bicycles (e-bikes) become more widespread, the number of crashes in which they are involved is also growing. We used data from a survey of 685 e-bike users in Denmark to examine the factors which contribute to perceived e-bike safety and involvement in safety critical incidents. Using regression analyses, we demonstrated that riding style and e-bike attitude played a crucial role in both perceived safety and involvement in safety critical incidents. Age and fe...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The demand for ‘active travel’: An unobserved components approach
This study informs the interface of travel demand analysis and health policy. There is a demand for cycling, walking or taking non-motorized modes together – a demand for ‘active travel’ – a term describing modes of transport which incur significant cardiovascular effort or metabolic costs. It is possible to establish a meaningful and policy relevant view of active travel demand by controlling for partially unobservable (not simply unobserved) generalized cost effects – where generalized cost can be considered the sum of all individual cost-components. Using monthly aggregated data from the UK...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

“I’d rather bike to school!”: Profiling children who would prefer to cycle to school
Conclusion Many children in Toronto would prefer to cycle rather than being driven to/from school. Exploring how to harness such preferences in future advocacy and intervention work is needed. Future studies should examine the potential mediating role of parents between children׳s preference/intention to cycle and cycling behavior. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Urban transport and community severance: Linking research and policy to link people and places
The objective of this paper is to build bridges between these different approaches and provide a basis for the integration of the issue into public policy. A framework for cross-disciplinary research on community severance is developed, built on the results of two workshops attended by researchers from different disciplines. This framework takes into consideration the chain of direct and indirect effects of transport infrastructure and motorised traffic on local communities and the complexity in the methods used for analysing and formulating solutions to the problem. The framework is then compared with the views of practit...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Note from the Editor-in-chief: Changes to reviewing manuscripts and the submission system for Journal of Transport and Health
Publication date: Available online 10 August 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Jennifer S. Mindell (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

A13 ⁎ Latent Profiles of an Urban Corridor and Pedestrian Safety
Publication date: June 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 3, Issue 2, Supplement Author(s): Kara MacLeod, Rebecca Sanders, Ashleigh Griffin, Jill Cooper, David Ragland (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 18, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

A04 The S ão Paulo We Want? Health Impact Modelling of Different Travel Scenarios for São Paulo, Brazil
Publication date: June 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 3, Issue 2, Supplement Author(s): James Woodcock, Anna Goodman, Marko Tainio, Thiago Hérick de Sa (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 18, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

A03 ⁎ Health Impact Assessment of Minnesota's Statewide Multimodal Transportation Plan
Publication date: June 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 3, Issue 2, Supplement Author(s): Eamon Flynn (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 18, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

A01 ⁎ Ciclavia: A Magnet for Health in Los Angeles
Publication date: June 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 3, Issue 2, Supplement Author(s): Christina Batteate, Shi Shu, Deborah Cohen, Madeline Brozen, Yifang Zhu, Brian Cole (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 18, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research