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Re: “Management of Incidental Pancreatic Cysts: A White Paper of the ACR Incidental Findings Committee”
We read with interest “Management of Incidental Pancreatic Cysts: A White Paper of the ACR Incidental Findings Committee” [1]. We appreciate the authors’ expertise and experience, note the inclusion of a gastroenterologist and pancreatic surgeon, and agree that a revision of the original recommendations is in order . (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 24, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Erik Karl Paulson, Darshan Kothari Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

The Utility of the Modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale for Predicting Success in Pediatric Patients Undergoing MRI Without the Use of Anesthesia
This study evaluates the use of the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (mYPAS) in effectively identifying patients who may benefit from simulation-based training. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 24, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Arlyne Thung, Dmitry Tumin, Joshua C. Uffman, Joseph D. Tobias, Tricia Buskirk, Whitney Garrett, Arleen Karczewski, Haleh Saadat Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Structured Reporting in the Academic Setting: What the Referring Clinician Wants
Both accurate interpretation and effective communication of imaging findings are key facets to the practice of radiology, and excellent patient care can only be realized when both aspects are achieved. There is a strict, standardized approach toward obtaining competency during residency, as set forth by the ACGME. However, this approach does not extend to quality communication of information, which is only as effective as the system that conveys it —the radiologist’s report. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 24, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Jason D. Lather, Zheng Che, Barbara Saltzman, Jacob Bieszczad Tags: Case studies in clinical practice management Source Type: research

Radiation Oncology Practice Accreditation: A Story of the Surveyor Experience
The breakfast bar in the hotel lobby surprises me with a colorful array of treats. At 6:30 am, I can choose any table I like. I make a small plate of the steamy veggie scramble, sit at a brightly lit table by the window, and flip through the local paper, which paints a neighborly picture of the townsfolk. I breathe easy. This is better than expected … (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 24, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Naomi R. Schechter Tags: Opinion Source Type: research

When Given a Lemon —Write a Book
As radiologists, we often get offended when other physicians “read” imaging studies—judging them as dilatants without the training or expertise needed for our highly skilled profession. We often do not realize that there are non-MD medical professionals who have specialized training in radiology. Perhaps the best known of these are veterinary radiologis ts, who hold their meeting in Chicago concurrent with the RSNA. At Stony Brook, we have a dental radiology residency for dentists who want to concentrate on oral imaging. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 24, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Mark E. Schweitzer Tags: Sparks of creativity Source Type: research

Author ’s Reply
We thank the authors for their interest and thoughtful comments on our updated recommendations concerning incidental pancreatic cysts. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 24, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Alec J. Megibow, Mark E. Baker, Desiree E. Morgan, Ihab R. Kamel, Dushyant V. Sahani, Elliot Newman, William R. Brugge, Lincoln L. Berland, Pari V. Pandharipande Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Virtual Palpation: The Role of MR Elastography in Quantifying and Spatially Resolving Tissue Stiffness as a Biomarker of  Disease
Over the past several decades, dramatic advances in the diagnosis and treatment of a broad spectrum of diseases and conditions have been made in no small part thanks to the development and advancement of sophisticated technologies, including rapid gene sequencing, active implanted devices, and diagnostic imaging technologies, including but not limited to MR, CT, ultrasound, PET, and single-photon emission computed tomography. However, one of the most ubiquitous, cost-effective, and widely used diagnostic tools is and continues to be physical touch (ie, palpation). (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 23, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Kiaran P. McGee Tags: The medical physics consult Source Type: research

The Percent Share of All Medicare Payments  to Physicians That Is Attributable to Noninvasive Diagnostic Imaging
To ascertain the proportion of all Medicare payments to physicians under the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (PFS) that is attributable to noninvasive diagnostic imaging (NDI). (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 23, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: David C. Levin, Laurence Parker, Vijay M. Rao Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Opioid Prescribing Behavior of Interventional Radiologists Across the  United States
To study opioid prescribing behavior of US interventional radiologists (IRs). (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 22, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Andrew B. Rosenkrantz, J. David Prologo, Wenyi Wang, Danny R. Hughes, Zachary L. Bercu, Richard Duszak Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Complex Nature of Radiation Risk in Medical Imaging
Q. Why is radiation risk in medical imaging such a controversy? (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 22, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Richard Morin, Mahadevappa Mahesh Tags: The medical physics consult Source Type: research

Effective Research Mentoring of Radiology Residents
Mentoring systems are now common in most radiology residencies. A resident may have multiple mentors for different purposes, such as research, ethical issues, and career planning. The mentoring relationship that pertains to research and publication of medical literature can be mutually advantageous to both the faculty and resident. Residents can achieve their first radiology publication or presentation, and the faculty mentors can defer the tedious data collection to their residents. Many residents, especially those without aspirations for academic radiology, will only participate in a single project to fulfill program and...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 21, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Charlotte S. Taylor, Vani Vijayakumar Tags: Residents ’ and fellows’ column Source Type: research

Facing the Guilt and Commemorating the Victims: German Radiology and Radiation Oncology During National Socialism
Whereas the scientific community is aware of atrocities committed by medical doctors like Mengele, the specifics of radiology and radiation oncology during National Socialism remain largely unknown. Starting in 2010, the German Radiology Association and the German Association of Radiation Oncology coordinated a national project looking into original archival material. A national committee convened in 2013 to discuss the project ’s findings, which were also the subject of a symposium at the University of Tuebingen in 2016 on radiology under National Socialism. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 21, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Franziska Eckert, Paul Weindling, Astrid Ley, Hans-Joachim Lang, Sascha Lang, Gabriele Moser Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Out-of-Pocket Costs for Advanced Imaging  Across the US Private Insurance Marketplace
The aim of this study was to characterize out-of-pocket patient costs for advanced imaging across the US private insurance marketplace. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 21, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Andrew B. Rosenkrantz, Gelareh Sadigh, Ruth C. Carlos, Ezequiel Silva, Richard Duszak Tags: Original article Source Type: research

The Role of Artificial Intelligence in Diagnostic Radiology: A Survey at a Single Radiology Residency Training Program
Advances in artificial intelligence applied to diagnostic radiology are predicted to have a major impact on this medical subspecialty. With the goal of establishing a baseline upon which to build educational activities on this topic, a survey was conducted among trainees and attending radiologists at a single residency program. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 21, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Fernando Collado-Mesa, Edilberto Alvarez, Kris Arheart Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Fostering Diversity and Inclusion: A  Summary of the 2017 Intersociety Summer Conference
The 39th radiology Intersociety Committee reviewed the current state of diversity among trainees and in our workplaces and addressed future strategies for fostering diversity through inclusion. The assembled participants addressed the imperatives and drivers for diversity and developed a road map to foster diversity. Themes included the need to be proactive in increasing awareness of our own biases and their potential impact on workplace decisions, overcoming blind spots, and being culturally sensitive. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 21, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Jonathan B. Kruskal, Amy K. Patel, Deborah Levine, Cheri L. Canon, Katarzyna J. Macura, Brenda J. Allen, Carolyn Meltzer Tags: Original article Source Type: research

MACRA 2018 and the Virtual Group
The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) called for the creation of a comprehensive value-based payment system founded on performance-based adjustments to  physicians’ Medicare payments [1]. In response, CMS established the Quality Payment Program (QPP), which aims to reward value and outcomes through two pathways: the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and advanced alternative payment models (APMs) [2]. The QPP, and thus the MIPS, began i n 2017. The MIPS initially included two ways to participate: as an individual and as a group. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Lauren Parks Golding, Andrew B. Rosenkrantz, Joshua A. Hirsch, Gregory N. Nicola Tags: Case studies in health services research and policy Source Type: research

The Effect of Computer-Assisted Reporting on Interreader Variability of Lumbar Spine MRI Degenerative Findings: Five Readers With 30 Disc Levels
The aim of this study was to assess differences in interreader variability among radiologists after the implementation of a computer-assisted reporting (CAR) tool for the interpretation of degenerative disc disease on lumbar spine MRI. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Benjamin Wang, Daniel I. Rosenthal, Chun Xu, Pari V. Pandharipande, H. Benjamin Harvey, Tarik K. Alkasab, Ambrose J. Huang Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Objective Evaluation of CT Time Efficiency in Acute Stroke Response
Timely diagnosis and therapy is essential in stroke response, because time-efficient CT imaging in acute stroke can significantly contribute to preserved neural circuitry and improved patient outcomes [1,2]. Streamlining of acute stroke CT procedures can play an important role in reducing door-to-needle times. In addition to rapid imaging, accessibility of imaging series to interpreting radiologists before examination completion is vital for rapid decision making and patient management. Because different series have different urgency (eg, head without contrast scans should be acquired and interpreted and results communicat...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Christina L. Brunnquell, Gregory D. Avey, Timothy P. Szczykutowicz Tags: Case studies in clinical practice management Source Type: research

Stereotactic Breast Biopsy With Benign Results Does Not Negatively Affect Future Screening Adherence
To evaluate whether false-positive stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (SVAB) affects subsequent mammographic screening adherence. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 9, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Alana A. Lewin, Yiming Gao, Leng Leng Lin Young, Marissa L. Albert, James S. Babb, Hildegard K. Toth, Linda Moy, Samantha L. Heller Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Comments on “Physician Knowledge of Radiation Exposure and Risk in Medical Imaging”
Hobbs et  al, in their article “Physician Knowledge of Radiation Exposure and Risk in Medical Imaging” [1], have analyzed the knowledge of physicians with different specialties about radiation exposure and risk in diagnostic imaging and also assessed the effectiveness of a short educational program on i mproving physicians’ knowledge. These researchers concluded that the knowledge of health care providers about radiation exposure and its associated risk was low at baseline. However, they report that after a brief educational presentation, this knowledge significantly increased. (Source: Journal ...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 4, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: S.M.J. Mortazavi Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Radiology: Opportunities, Challenges, Pitfalls, and Criteria for Success
Worldwide interest in artificial intelligence (AI) applications, including imaging, is high and growing rapidly, fueled by availability of large datasets ( “big data”), substantial advances in computing power, and new deep-learning algorithms. Apart from developing new AI methods per se, there are many opportunities and challenges for the imaging community, including the development of a common nomenclature, better ways to share image data, and sta ndards for validating AI program use across different imaging platforms and patient populations. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 4, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: James H. Thrall, Xiang Li, Quanzheng Li, Cinthia Cruz, Synho DO, Keith Dreyer, James Brink Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Re: “ACR Thyroid Imaging, Reporting and Data System (TI-RADS): White Paper of the ACR TI-RADS Committee”
We read with great interest the article by Tessler et  al [1] “ACR Thyroid Imaging, Reporting and Data System (TI-RADS): White Paper of the ACR TI-RADS Committee” in JACR. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 3, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Jing Li, Xiao Ma, Kefei Cui Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Author ’s Reply
This study asserts the following: first, physician knowledge of radiation exposure and risk in medical imaging is low at baseline; second, physician knowledge significantly improves with very modest educational efforts; and third, baseline knowledge is higher in radiologists than in the other specialists tested. None of these assertions is weakened by excellent participant performance on the postpresentation examination. Such performance supports the second assertion and has no bearing on the first or third. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 3, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Jason B. Hobbs Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Patient-Friendly Summary of the ACR Appropriateness Criteria Sinonasal Disease
Most people who have rhinosinusitis, a runny nose, or a stuffed up feeling in their sinuses don ’t need imaging tests. The patient’s symptoms are used to determine the type of rhinosinusitis. If the symptoms are acute and limited to the nose and last less than 4 weeks, no imaging is recommended. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 3, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Casey Quinlan Tags: Appropriate use criteria Source Type: research

Patient-Friendly Summary of the ACR  Appropriateness Criteria Routine Chest Radiography
Getting a chest x-ray before going into the hospital for an operation or for something routine is not needed unless a patient has heart or lung disease or symptoms of a heart or lung condition. The x-ray does not add information that would change treatment after getting information about the patient ’s medical history and symptoms and performing the physical examination. Chest x-rays should not be used routinely for the evaluation of patients with normal high blood pressure unless some type of heart disease is suspected. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 3, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Casey Quinlan Tags: Appropriate use criteria Source Type: research

Deep Learning in Radiology: Does One Size  Fit All?
Deep learning (DL) is a popular method that is used to perform many important tasks in radiology and medical imaging. Some forms of DL are able to accurately segment organs (essentially, trace the boundaries, enabling volume measurements or calculation of other properties). Other DL networks are able to predict important properties from regions of an image —for instance, whether something is malignant, molecular markers for tissue in a region, even prognostic markers. DL is easier to train than traditional machine learning methods, but requires more data and much more care in analyzing results. (Source: Journal of th...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 3, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Bradley J. Erickson, Panagiotis Korfiatis, Timothy L. Kline, Zeynettin Akkus, Kenneth Philbrick, Alexander D. Weston Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Re: ACR Thyroid Imaging, Reporting and Data System (TI-RADS): White Paper of the ACR TI-RADS Committee
In their letter regarding our ACR TI-RADS white paper [1], Li et  al write that their recalculation of data from a study by Arpaci et al [2] showed that peripheral calcifications and macrocalcifications conferred a similar likelihood of malignancy. This led them to question the different values (2 points and 1 point, respectively) awarded to these features in A CR TI-RADS. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 3, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Franklin N. Tessler, William D. Middleton, Edward G. Grant, Jenny K. Hoang Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Architect Glasses
One thing I have noticed in many institutions over the years is how the dress codes for radiologists, and especially trainees, have changed. When I have a chance, I ask residents if they have a dress code. The answers have evolved from ties and white coats 30 years ago to most current residents ’ answer of “not really.” (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 2, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Mark Schweitzer Tags: Sparks of creativity Source Type: research

Protecting Your Patients ’ Interests in the Era of Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, and Predictive Analytics
The Hippocratic oath and the Belmont report articulate foundational principles for how physicians interact with patients and research subjects. The increasing use of big data and artificial intelligence techniques demands a re-examination of these principles in light of the potential issues surrounding privacy, confidentiality, data ownership, informed consent, epistemology, and inequities. Patients have strong opinions about these issues. Radiologists have a fiduciary responsibility to protect the interest of their patients. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 2, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Patricia Balthazar, Peter Harri, Adam Prater, Nabile M. Safdar Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Prediction of Occult Invasive Disease in Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Using Deep Learning Features
The aim of this study was to determine whether deep features extracted from digital mammograms using a pretrained deep convolutional neural network are prognostic of occult invasive disease for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) on core needle biopsy. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 2, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Bibo Shi, Lars J. Grimm, Maciej A. Mazurowski, Jay A. Baker, Jeffrey R. Marks, Lorraine M. King, Carlo C. Maley, E. Shelley Hwang, Joseph Y. Lo Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Impact on Quality When Pediatric Urgent Care Centers Are Staffed With Radiology Technologists
The proliferation of pediatric urgent care centers has increased the need for diagnostic imaging support, but the impact of employing radiology technologists at these centers is not known. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiographic impact and quality at urgent care centers with and without radiology technologists. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 2, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: J. Herman Kan, Robert C. Orth, Terry A. Yen, Erica K. Schallert, Wei Zhang, Lane F. Donnelly Tags: Original article Source Type: research

The ACR Data Science Institute and AI Advisory Group: Harnessing the Power of Artificial Intelligence to Improve Patient Care
In the ubiquitous media coverage of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, radiology has emerged as the poster child for professions that will potentially be rendered obsolete by indefatigable robots who never miss an out-of-place pixel and whose hierarchy of needs includes nothing more than a regular software update and a reliable power source. Although this dystopian vision of radiology ’s future is far from accurate, a trusted advocate for our patients and our profession is needed to ensure that AI and other advanced technologies are used appropriately and that they deliver what they promise to enhance...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 2, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Geraldine B. McGinty, Bibb Allen Tags: Case studies in data science: big data, machine learning, and artificial intelligence Source Type: research

Information and Artificial Intelligence
Predictions about the impact of artificial intelligence (AI) on radiology dwell on AI ’s ability to perform the task of radiologists, including pattern recognition such as detecting fractures, finding nodules, flagging pulmonary emboli, fetching and comparing to old studies, and bringing urgent studies to the top of the reading list, among others. In such predictions, AI is an adju nct to radiologists, a rad-helper, whose primary purpose is to scale the productivity of radiologists [1]. We believe this vision, though accurate, limits imagination and shortchanges AI, the radiologist, and the patient. (Source: Journal ...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 2, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Saurabh Jha, Eric J. Topol Tags: Case studies in data science: big data, machine learning, and artificial intelligence Source Type: research

Machine Learning in Medical Imaging
Advances in both imaging and computers have synergistically led to a rapid rise in the potential use of artificial intelligence in various radiological imaging tasks, such as risk assessment, detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy response, as well as in multi-omics disease discovery. A brief overview of the field is given here, allowing the reader to recognize the terminology, the various subfields, and components of machine learning, as well as the clinical potential. Radiomics, an expansion of computer-aided diagnosis, has been defined as the conversion of images to minable data. (Source: Journal of the American C...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 2, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Maryellen L. Giger Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Why CAD Failed in Mammography
Many, skeptical that deep learning, computer vision, or, broadly speaking, artificial intelligence (AI), will change health care in general and radiology in particular, cite the failure of computer-aided diagnosis in mammography. We will review the history of CAD, analyze why CAD failed in mammography, and conjecture how future CAD platforms can succeed. To understand how AI can work, we must understand why CAD failed. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 2, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Ajay Kohli, Saurabh Jha Tags: Case studies in data science: big data, machine learning, and artificial intelligence Source Type: research

Artificial Intelligence and Radiology: Collaboration Is Key
Artificial intelligence (AI) and deep learning have been met with great interest  by both the medical and nonmedical community [1,2]. Within medicine, deep learning has demonstrated abilities comparable to those of humans for the diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy [3], malignant melanoma [4], and tuberculosis [5]. A crossroads between the tech world and medicine has emerged, wit h tech giants like Google (Menlo Park, California) and IBM (Armonk, New York, New York) working to develop health care AI programs [1]. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 2, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Paul H. Yi, Ferdinand K. Hui, Daniel S.W. Ting Tags: Opinion Source Type: research

As Clear as Mud
Last year, I appointed two outstanding patient advocates to the JACR Editorial Board. I thought that the participation of knowledgeable individuals with an interest but no special training in radiology, radiation physics, or radiation oncology would improve the  board’s strategic thinking, elicit new ideas, and generally improve the activities of the journal. All of this has come true in spades. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 1, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Bruce J. Hillman Tags: Department Source Type: research

Optimizing Recruitment Into Radiology: Some Simple Approaches to Controlling Bias
Two forms of bias —conscious bias and unconscious bias—adversely impact the recruitment of a vibrant diverse workforce into health care in general [1] and radiology in particular [2]. Conscious bias is more recognizable and more readily dealt with. Unconscious bias, on the other hand, is more elusive and much mor e challenging to manage. Unconscious bias is seen and described as natural and inherent in each of us; we must therefore apply debiasing strategies in the recruitment process and at the workplace to counteract pervasive unconscious bias. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - February 1, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: M. Elizabeth Oates Tags: Diversity matters Source Type: research

Evaluating Report Text Variation and Informativeness: Natural Language Processing of CT Chest Imaging for Pulmonary Embolism
The aim of this study was to quantify the variability of language in free text reports of pulmonary embolus (PE) studies and to gauge the informativeness of free text to predict PE diagnosis using machine learning as proxy for human understanding. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - January 23, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Marco D. Huesch, Rekha Cherian, Sam Labib, Rickhesvar Mahraj Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Performing an Informatics Consult: Methods and Challenges
Our health care system is plagued by missed opportunities, waste, and harm. Data generated in the course of care are often underutilized, scientific insight goes untranslated, and evidence is overlooked. To address these problems, we envisioned a system where aggregate patient data can be used at the bedside to provide practice-based evidence. To create that system, we directly connect practicing physicians to clinical researchers and data scientists through an informatics consult. Our team processes and classifies questions posed by clinicians, identifies the appropriate patient data to use, runs the appropriate analyses,...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - January 23, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Alejandro Schuler, Alison Callahan, Kenneth Jung, Nigam H. Shah Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Translational Radiomics: Defining the Strategy Pipeline and Considerations for Application —Part 2: From Clinical Implementation to Enterprise
Enterprise imaging has channeled various technological innovations to the field of clinical radiology, ranging from advanced imaging equipment and postacquisition iterative reconstruction tools to image analysis and computer-aided detection tools. More recently, the advancement in the field of quantitative image analysis coupled with machine learning-based data analytics, classification, and integration has ushered in the era of radiomics, a paradigm shift that holds tremendous potential in clinical decision support as well as drug discovery. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - January 21, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Faiq Shaikh, Benjamin Franc, Erastus Allen, Evis Sala, Omer Awan, Kenneth Hendrata, Safwan Halabi, Sohaib Mohiuddin, Sana Malik, Dexter Hadley, Rasu Shrestha Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Translational Radiomics: Defining the Strategy Pipeline and Considerations for Application —Part 1: From Methodology to Clinical Implementation
Enterprise imaging has channeled various technological innovations to the field of clinical radiology, ranging from advanced imaging equipment and postacquisition iterative reconstruction tools to image analysis and computer-aided detection tools. More recently, the advancements in the field of quantitative image analysis coupled with machine learning-based data analytics, classification, and integration have ushered us into the era of radiomics, which has tremendous potential in clinical decision support as well as drug discovery. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - January 21, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Faiq Shaikh, Benjamin Franc, Erastus Allen, Evis Sala, Omer Awan, Kenneth Hendrata, Safwan Halabi, Sohaib Mohiuddin, Sana Malik, Dexter Hadley, Rasu Shrestha Tags: Original article Source Type: research

The Effects of Fatigue From Overnight Shifts on Radiology Search Patterns and Diagnostic Performance
The aim of this study was to assess the effect of overnight shifts (ONS) on radiologist fatigue, visual search pattern, and diagnostic performance. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - January 21, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Tarek N. Hanna, Matthew E. Zygmont, Ryan Peterson, David Theriot, Haris Shekhani, Jamlik-Omari Johnson, Elizabeth A. Krupinski Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Artificial Intelligence and Radiology: What Will the Future Hold?
Radiology has witnessed the introduction of amazing new discoveries such as ultrasound, CT, MRI, and PET. These technologies have vastly improved the care of patients across the world. However, the “next big thing” in radiology may not be a new scanner technology but rather new discoveries in the ways we utilize imaging data that many refer to as “artificial intelligence.” (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - January 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Bernard F. King Tags: Opinion Source Type: research

Diagnostic Reference Levels for Adult Patients in the United States
A diagnostic reference level (DRL) is an investigational level used to identify unusually high radiation doses for common diagnostic medical x-ray imaging procedures. DRLs are typically set at the 75th percentile of a dose distribution from a broad, national survey using a set protocol. They are suggested action levels above which a facility should review its methods and determine if acceptable image quality can be achieved at lower doses. The International Commission on Radiological Protection emphasizes that DRLs “are not for regulatory or commercial purposes” [1,2]. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - January 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Priscilla F. Butler, Kalpana M. Kanal Tags: Radiation sensibilities Source Type: research

Breast Cancer Screening in Women at  Higher-Than-Average Risk: Recommendations From the ACR
Early detection decreases breast cancer mortality. The ACR recommends annual mammographic screening beginning at age 40 for women of average risk. Higher-risk women should start mammographic screening earlier and may benefit from supplemental screening modalities. For women with genetics-based increased risk (and their untested first-degree relatives), with a calculated lifetime risk of 20% or more or a history of chest or mantle radiation therapy at a young age, supplemental screening with contrast-enhanced breast MRI is recommended. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - January 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Debra L. Monticciolo, Mary S. Newell, Linda Moy, Bethany Niell, Barbara Monsees, Edward A. Sickles Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Peer Learning and Preserving the Physician ’s Right to Learn
In radiology, the true value of our work is often appreciated only in retrospect through the feedback of colleagues, clinicians, or patients. The same is true of our mistakes. Rather than representing a moral flaw, our mistakes represent vital opportunities to grow and improve as clinicians. Radiologist peer-to-peer feedback can be an important source of learning opportunities and quality improvement. But what is the best approach to the peer feedback process, and does the type of approach really matter? (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - January 18, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: H. Benjamin Harvey, Susan T. Sotardi Tags: Quality in practice Source Type: research

Improving Professionalism Between Radiology and Emergency Medicine
The ACGME has designated professionalism as one of the six core competencies for residency training [1]. This emphasis is deserved, because the impact of professionalism is pivotal in all aspects of medicine during training and beyond. There is a growing body of evidence documenting that a high level of professionalism, as demonstrated by positive teamwork and collegial working relationships, within and between specialties directly influences the quality of patient care  [2,3]. Conversely, a lack of empathy, respect, and understanding of one’s colleagues can lead to unprofessional behavior, which can deter ...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - January 15, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Kenny Q. Sam, Larry Laufman, Sara Andrabi, Peter N. Fata, Megan K. McNeer, Pedro Diaz-Marchan, Ellen Friedman Tags: Case studies in leadership Source Type: research

Patient-Friendly Summary of the ACR Appropriateness Criteria Headache
Identifying the type and cause of most headaches can be done with a medical history and a physical examination, without the need for imaging tests. Unnecessary imaging tests can lead to incidental findings —things that are not associated with the reason for the test. This can lead to patients’ getting unnecessary treatments and exposure to radiation. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - January 15, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Casey Quinlan Tags: Appropriate use criteria Source Type: research

Faculty Relative Value Unit Incentives and Resident Education
“You implemented a clinical revenue value unit (RVU)–based faculty incentive plan in your department 6 months ago. Since then, faculty members have become reluctant to give resident conferences and teach in the reading rooms. Resident evaluations of the training program are plummeting. The resi dency program director comes to you to discuss concerns about decreased teaching. As the department chair, what would you do?” (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - January 11, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Lori A. Deitte, Carolyn C. Meltzer, Alexander Norbash, Mary C. Mahoney, Jorge A. Soto, Priscilla J. Slanetz Tags: Civil discourse Source Type: research