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Impact of Simulation-Based Training on  Radiology Trainee Education in Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsies
The aim of this study is to determine the impact of a simulation-based ultrasound-guided (USG) breast biopsy training session on radiology trainee procedural knowledge, comfort levels, and overall procedural confidence and anxiety. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 5, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Ashley A. Roark, Lilian O. Ebuoma, Tamara Ortiz-Perez, Karla A. Sepulveda, Frederick J. Severs, Tao Wang, Ana Paula Benveniste, Emily L. Sedgwick Tags: Original article Source Type: research

What Do Patients Want to Know? Questions and Concerns Regarding Mammography Expressed Through Social Media
The purpose of this project is to identify questions and concerns patients have regarding breast cancer screening mammography to establish priorities in patient education and health care communication. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 5, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Abbas M. Charlie, Yiming Gao, Samantha L. Heller Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Supporting Imagers ’ VOICE: A National Training Program in Comparative Effectiveness Research and Big Data Analytics
Provided methodologic training, more imagers can contribute to the evidence basis on improved health outcomes and value in diagnostic imaging. The Value of Imaging Through Comparative Effectiveness Research Program was developed to provide hands-on, practical training in five core areas for comparative effectiveness and big biomedical data research: decision analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, evidence synthesis, big data principles, and applications of big data analytics. The program ’s mixed format consists of web-based modules for asynchronous learning as well as in-person sessions for practical skills and grou...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 5, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Stella K. Kang, James V. Rawson, Michael P. Recht Tags: Original article Source Type: research

The Triumph of the Machines
The topics of machine learning and artificial intelligence appear with increasing frequency in radiology professional meetings and journal articles. There is growing anxiety throughout the field that much of the work currently performed by radiologists will be carried out more quickly, accurately, and at lower cost by computers, soon completely replacing man with machine. We believe that talk of the impending triumph of machines in radiology is far more prescient than most radiologists suspect. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 5, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: I. Ray Kirk, Daniel Sassoon, Richard B. Gunderman Tags: Opinion Source Type: research

Locoregional Failure Rounds: A Meaningful Quality Improvement Project
Process review and improvement is vital for health care practitioners to  ensure delivery of high-quality care to the communities they serve [1-3]. In alignment with this philosophy, the ABR requires their diplomats to engage in quality improvement projects as part of their maintenance of certification [4]. Currently, the majority of process improvement literature in r adiation oncology focuses on error-reporting systems and platforms to refine department workflow and patient experience [5-9]. However, there is a dearth of peer-reviewed literature describing clinically focused quality improvement projects aimed t...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 5, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Stephen J. Sozio, Salma Jabbour, Rahul Parikh, Sung Kim Tags: Case studies in clinical practice management Source Type: research

Does Involvement in Global Health Reduce Perceived Radiologist Burnout?
Burnout prevention is a necessary consideration for physicians, including radiologists. The condition is characterized by emotional exhaustion, a sense of inefficacy, and cynicism [1,2]. The burnout rate for radiologists is approximately 50%, as  reported by Medscape and other surveys [3,4]. Many physicians express frustrations related to an inability to achieve change, an overload of bureaucratic tasks, and a feeling of being just a cog in the wheel of the health care system [4,5]. The issue affects radiologists at all levels of traini ng, including resident physicians [6,7]. (Source: Journal of the Am...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 5, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Aaron D. Kline, Joshua S. Harford, Melissa P. Culp Tags: A view from abroad Source Type: research

The McDonaldization of Radiology
Business is war. It ’s dog eat dog, rat eat rat. If my competitor were drowning I’d walk over and I’d put a hose right in his mouth. Can you say the same?—Ray Kroc, The Founder [1] (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 5, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Benjamin R. Gray, Richard B. Gunderman Tags: Opinion Source Type: research

Declining Interest in Pediatric Radiology Prompts a Call to Action
Diagnostic radiology training has undergone considerable evolution over the past 5 years. As the number of available jobs for new radiologists waned in the early part of this decade, the proportion of graduates who opted for fellowship rose to  95% [1]. Not all radiology subspecialties, however, have equally benefited from these increases in fellows. Although there are cyclical ebbs and flows in fellowship desirability, pediatric radiology is the only subspecialty in which resident interest incrementally decreased from 2013 through 2017 [2]. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 5, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Cory M. Pfeifer Tags: Opinion Source Type: research

The Hatfields, the McCoys, and Anthem ’s New Policy for Advanced Diagnostic Imaging
In the waning days of the Civil War, Asa Harmon McCoy was murdered by a group of confederate home guards called the Logan Wildcats on his way home from the war. William Anderson “Devil Anse” Hatfield was first suspected to have committed the murder but was later confirmed to have been sick at home. Instead, his uncle, Jim Vance, a member of the Wildcats, was widely believed to have been the murderer. According to many historians, this paved the way for a bitter feud bet ween the Hatfield family and the McCoy family that stretched for decades [1]. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 5, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: James A. Brink Tags: ACR chair ’s memo Source Type: research

A Sustainable Model for Peer Review and Utility of At-a-Glance Analysis of Dose Volume Histogram in Radiation Oncology
Peer review is an essential component of quality improvement for patient care within the practice of radiation oncology. Various national programs and regulatory agencies have recognized peer review as a critical element in the process of radiation therapy treatment planning, and prospective peer reviewing has resulted in enhanced patient outcomes when this practice is implemented [1-4]. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 4, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Rahul P. Bhandari, William N. Duggar, Chunli Yang, Madhava R. Kanakamedala, Satya Packianathan, Shankar P. Giri, Sophy H. Mangana, Robert M. Allbright, Srinivasan Vijayakumar Tags: Case studies in clinical practice management Source Type: research

Refining the Wild Wild West of Point-of-Care Ultrasound at an Academic Community Hospital
Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) describes the performance and interpretation of ultrasound by nonradiologist clinicians at a patient ’s bedside. POCUS use has grown dramatically over the past two decades, with many departments throughout the hospital adopting and adapting its use. POCUS applications include applications traditionally found within the radiology suite such as simple procedural guidance (thoracentesis, paracentes is, arthrocentesis) and diagnostic ultrasound (biliary, renal, pregnancy). (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Michael D. Zwank, Bradley D. Gordon, Susan M. Truman Tags: Clinical practice management Source Type: research

Breast Cancer Screening  Frequency and Overdiagnosis
In their interesting article, Arleo et  al [1] observe that in a series of 479 untreated breast cancers (1.4% of screening-detected cases reported by 42 experienced imaging specialists), none spontaneously disappeared or regressed. On the basis of this finding, they argue that there is no point in delaying the initiation of screening un til after 40 years of age or in providing less frequent (biennial) tests because potentially overdiagnosed cases left undetected (and consequently untreated) by a less-than-intensive screening protocol would still be detected later when the time of screening eventually comes. (Source: ...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Antonio Ponti, Alfonso Frigerio, Vincenzo Marra, Paola Armaroli, Nereo Segnan Tags: Department Source Type: research

A Difference That Makes a Difference
Diversity is the art of thinking independently together. —Malcolm Forbes (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Bruce J. Hillman Tags: Department Source Type: research

The Search for the Thyroid Nodule of Interest
The ACR Thyroid Imaging, Reporting and Data System report by Tessler et  al [1] is timely and addresses an important issue facing the ultrasound imaging community. I commend the authors for concisely and eloquently providing an exhaustive and comprehensive review of the subject. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Nagesh Ragavendra Tags: Department Source Type: research

Author ’s Reply–Re: Burnout: A Clinical and Sociological Reflection
I thank the authors for their comments. It is heartening to discover that JACR counts European occupational psychologists among its readers. What impresses me most about current discourse on burnout is not its robust nosologic foundation but the number of sincere and lively discussions it has spawned around the sources of discouragement in medical practice and the steps physicians and others can take to enhance engagement and fulfillment in work. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Richard Gunderman Tags: Department Source Type: research

Authors ’ Reply
We thank Dr Ragavendra for his letter regarding our ACR Thyroid Imaging, Reporting and Data System (TI-RADS) white paper [1] and appreciate this opportunity to respond to his comments. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Franklin N. Tessler, William D. Middleton, Edward G. Grant, Jenny K. Hoang Tags: Department Source Type: research

Less-Intensive Screening  Does Not Reduce the Frequency of Overdiagnosis
We thank Drs Ponti, Frigerio, Marra, Armaroli, and Segnan from the Breast Cancer Screening and Radiology Units in Torino, Italy, for taking the time to read and respond to our article [1]. However, we respectfully reply that we do not perceive the significance of their arguments. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Edward A. Sickles, Elizabeth Kagan Arleo, Debra Monticciolo, Barbara Monsees, Geraldine McGinty Tags: Department Source Type: research

Reducing Variability of Radiation Dose in CT: The New Frontier in Patient Safety
Although reducing radiation dose in CT examinations is an important goal, also important in the management of radiation dose is ensuring consistency of dose administered for a given type of examination. We have implemented an approach to reducing variance in CT radiation dose by standardizing protocols and implementing software that decreases variance. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - December 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Ryan K. Lee, Joel Y. Sun, Samantha Lockerby, Eric Soltycki, Terence Matalon Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Sounding the Alarm
The national mortality data are beyond startling: 142 deaths a day in the United States; more fatalities annually than gun homicides and automobile accidents combined; between 1999 and 2015, more than 560,000 dead. The cause? Drug overdoses. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 29, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Michael J. Pentecost Tags: Washington watch Source Type: research

Use of Monte Carlo Techniques in Nuclear  Medicine
Nuclear medicine has utilized simulations based on Monte Carlo techniques for over 50 years. Over that time, this has involved two main applications: estimations of internal dosimetry based on simplified patient models and investigations into the physical aspects of the instrumentation used in clinical nuclear counting and imaging. As the efficiency of the algorithms and available computing power has evolved, the sophistication of the simulations has also advanced substantially. Monte Carlo approaches are particularly useful when a closed mathematical solution is not possible or when the models become substantially sophist...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 21, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Frederic H. Fahey, Kira Grogg, Georges El Fakhri Tags: The medical physics consult Source Type: research

Good, Better, Better Still . . .
Satisfaction lies in the effort, not in the attainment. —Mahatma Gandhi (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 21, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Bruce J. Hillman Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Practicing Radiology During a Hurricane
On September 10, 2017, at 3:35 pm, Hurricane Irma made landfall on Marco Island, 15 miles southeast of Naples, Florida. Dan Singer, MD, a 65-year-old neuroradiologist, and his five practice partners had been bracing themselves for the impact for several days. Just 2 weeks earlier, Hurricane Harvey had pummeled Singer ’s daughter Lisa, a radiation oncology fellow, and millions of others in Texas. Singer and his colleagues’ experience offers important insights on disasters for all radiologists. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 21, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Richard B. Gunderman Tags: Opinion Source Type: research

Reimbursement Anxiety Disorder
I would like to introduce you to a new psychological diagnosis: reimbursement anxiety disorder (RAD). RAD is characterized by excessive worry over physician reimbursement leading to impaired decision making, irritability, and fatigue. There are two subtypes specific for this audience, R-RAD (radiology reimbursement anxiety disorder) and RAD-TECH (anxiety specific to radiology technical reimbursements). (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 21, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Kurt Schoppe Tags: Reimbursement rounds Source Type: research

Documenting Web-Based Learning Modules as Scholarly Activity for Promotion
In Boyer ’s [1] 1990 work The Scholarship of Teaching, he focused on the importance of recognizing that teaching in itself is scholarship. In 2000, Glassick [2] expanded on Boyer’s initial theories and provided a framework to view scholarship in teaching, requiring three criteria for teaching to be consi dered scholarship [2]: (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 20, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Tabassum A. Kennedy, Sarina Schrager, Elizabeth Sadowski Tags: Case studies in the educational impact of social media in radiology Source Type: research

Leveraging Twitter to Maximize the Radiology Meeting Experience
Over recent years, social media engagement has proliferated among physicians, health care systems, scientific journals, professional societies, and patients. In radiology, Twitter (Twitter Inc, San Francisco, California) has rapidly become the preferred social media engagement tool and is now an essential activity at many large radiology society meetings. Twitter offers a versatile, albeit simple, platform for anyone interested in engaging with others, regardless of title, stature, or geography. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 20, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Vivek Kalia, Daniel A. Ortiz, Amy K. Patel, Andrew K. Moriarity, Cheri L. Canon, Richard Duszak Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Machine Learning in Radiology: Applications Beyond Image Interpretation
Much attention has been given to machine learning and its perceived impact in radiology, particularly in light of recent success with image classification in international competitions. However, machine learning is likely to impact radiology outside of image interpretation long before a fully functional “machine radiologist” is implemented in practice. Here, we describe an overview of machine learning, its application to radiology and other domains, and many cases of use that do not involve image interpretation. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 17, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Paras Lakhani, Adam B. Prater, R. Kent Hutson, Kathy P. Andriole, Keith J. Dreyer, Jose Morey, Luciano M. Prevedello, Toshi J. Clark, J. Raymond Geis, Jason N. Itri, C. Matthew Hawkins Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Social Media and the 21st-Century Scholar: How You Can Harness Social Media to Amplify Your Career
To many physicians and professionals, social media seems to be a risky business. However, recent literature has shown that there is potential to enhance your scholarly brand by engaging your stakeholders online. In this article, we discuss the opportunities presented to modern scholars by social media. Using case studies, we highlight two success stories around how scientists and scholars might use social media to enhance their careers. We also outline five key steps you can follow to build and manage your scholarly presence online. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 15, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Teresa M. Chan, David Stukus, Jimmie Leppink, Lina Duque, Blair L. Bigham, Neil Mehta, Brent Thoma Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Lung Cancer Messages on Twitter: Content  Analysis and Evaluation
The aim of this project was to describe and evaluate the levels of lung cancer communication across the cancer prevention and control continuum for content posted to Twitter during a 10-day period (September 30 to October 9) in  2016. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 15, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Jeannette Sutton, Sarah C. Vos, Michele K. Olson, Chelsea Woods, Elisia Cohen, C. Ben Gibson, Nolan Edward Phillips, Jamie L. Studts, Jan M. Eberth, Carter T. Butts Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Guidelines for Screening Mammography
Kudos to the ACR Commission on Breast Imaging for its comprehensive recommendations for breast cancer screening of average-risk women [1]. Screening mammography has been, by far, the most controversial and lengthy of all United States (US) health care guidelines, and the authors appropriately emphasize the most contentious of these issues: the age at which mammography should begin and the interval between examinations. The ACR, the US Preventive Services Task Force, the American Cancer Society, and most European guidelines [2] have different recommendations regarding these practice parameters, although each was developed b...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 12, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Ferris M. Hall Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Radiologists and Social Media: Do Not Forget About Facebook
Facebook (Facebook, Inc, Menlo Park, California, USA) is the most popular social networking platform worldwide. Facebook groups are virtual communities of people who share a common interest. Breast Imaging Radiologists is a Facebook group for radiologists with an interest in breast imaging. The purpose of this study was to analyze the membership and activity of the Breast Imaging Radiologists Facebook group (BIRFG) for 2 years since its inception. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 11, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Rebecca L. Seidel, Aryan Jalilvand, Jean Kunjummen, Lea Gilliland, Richard Duszak Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Going Viral and Interacting with the Press
Social media provides a strong platform for a scholar, scientist, or advocate to deliver a message to a targeted audience. Although tweets and posts may be intended for specific audiences, like clinicians or learners, social media activity may also attract the attention of mainstream media. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 10, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Blair L. Bigham, Teresa M. Chan Tags: Case studies in the impact of social media on contemporary scholarship Source Type: research

Waiting for Radiology Test Results: Patient  Expectations and Emotional Disutility
To measure patient willingness to wait and emotional disutility of waiting for outpatient imaging test results. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 10, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Sean Woolen, Ella A. Kazerooni, Amber Wall, Kelly Parent, Shannon Cahalan, Mitchell Alameddine, Matthew S. Davenport Tags: Original article Source Type: research

The Strategic Imperative for the Use of Social Media in Health Care
Although health care lags behind many other industries in adopting social media as part of a business strategy, the Mayo Clinic recognized the importance of these applications more than a decade ago. In addition to typical media relations and marketing tactics, the Mayo Clinic has successfully used social media as part of an overall program to support the strategic imperatives of the institution. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 9, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Amy L. Kotsenas, Makala Arce, Lee Aase, Farris K. Timimi, Colleen Young, John T. Wald Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Women in Radiology: Creating a Global Mentorship Network Through Social Media
Despite efforts to attract more women into radiology, the field remains heavily male dominated. Currently, only 21% of the radiology workforce is female [1]. Additionally, current female resident numbers have remained relatively stable in recent years [2], with only 26% of radiology residents identifying as women [3]. In these circumstances, developing mentorship with other women may be challenging given the paucity of  female radiologists. Mentorship has been identified as a key element for a successful career [4], and studies have shown that mentoring is instrumental in women’s professional choices [5]. (Sourc...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 9, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Michele Retrouvey, Bernadette Keefe, Amy Kotsenas, Geraldine McGinty, Amy K. Patel Tags: Case studies in social media communities for radiologists Source Type: research

Lead Apron Inspection Using Infrared Light: A Model Validation Study
To evaluate defect detection in radiation protective apparel, typically called lead aprons, using infrared (IR) thermal imaging. The use of IR lighting eliminates the need for access to x-ray –emitting equipment and radiation dose to the inspector. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 8, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Sarah E. McKenney, Hansel J. Otero, Stanley T. Fricke Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Women in Radiology: A Retrospective Twin Study
The study sample consists of identical Twins A (the author) and B, between whom there is no statistically significant difference in age (give or take 5 minutes), gender, academic achievement, family history, or DNA. Twins A and B both attended medical school and independently chose to pursue residency training in radiology. In the spirit of full disclosure, Twin A is biologically Twin B. The author reserves the right to disregard birth order for the sake of this discussion. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 8, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Lauren Parks Golding Tags: Opinion Source Type: research

Understanding the Value of Repeat Head  CT in Elderly Trauma Patients on Anticoagulant or Antiplatelet Therapy
Noncontrast head CT is the gold standard for the acute assessment of traumatized patients in the emergency department (ED). According to the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey of 2011 Emergency Department data, 7.7% of all ED visits involved a head CT, and an estimated 10,560,000 head CT examinations were performed in US EDs in 2011 [1]. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 8, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Bennett Battle, Kevin W. Sexton, Ryan T. Fitzgerald Tags: Case studies in clinical practice management Source Type: research

The Social Media DNA of Mayo Clinic —and Health Care
Hippocrates ’ admonition and the medical community’s aversion to risk have caused many physicians and institutions to resist participation in modern social media sites such as Facebook (Facebook, Inc, Menlo Park, California, USA), Twitter (Twitter Inc, San Francisco, California, USA), and YouTube (San Mate o, California, USA). However, because Mayo Clinic’s founders were champions of analog social networking, it was among the earliest hospitals worldwide to create official accounts on these digital platforms. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 8, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Amy L. Kotsenas, Lee Aase, Makala Arce, Farris K. Timimi, Matthew Dacy, Colleen Young, John T. Wald Tags: Original article Source Type: research

#TwittIR: Understanding and Establishing a Twitter Ecosystem for Interventional Radiologists and Their Practices
This article describes several common communication pathways that can be utilized by physicians in their interventional radiology practice. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 6, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Vibhor Wadhwa, Aaron Brandis, Kumar Madassery, Peder E. Horner, Sabeen Dhand, Peter Bream, Aaron Shiloh, Mark L. Lessne, Robert K. Ryu Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Social Media Scholarship and Alternative Metrics for Academic Promotion and  Tenure
Traditionally, scholars focused their efforts in the domains of clinical care, research, and education; however, the last decade has witnessed the rise of novel areas of development such as innovation, quality improvement, informatics, and recently, digital scholarship. Academic institutions adapted and began considering these fields for academic promotion and tenure. Social media has become a critical space for the dissemination of knowledge and outreach to community and policy makers and also for the creation of communities of practice. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 6, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Daniel Cabrera, Durga Roy, Margaret S. Chisolm Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Facebook Live: A Free Real-Time Interactive Information Platform
Social media has expedited delivery of medical information through newsfeeds with the ability to respond immediately to a post and engage in a “conversation” with the post editor or other followers [1-3]. However, the ideal online educational platform would allow real-time interactive presentations, which have traditionally been expensive for educators to develop and disseminate and required user subscriptions to cover these costs. In 2016, Facebook (Menlo Park, California, USA) launched an online live broadcast platform. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 6, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Pamela T. Johnson, Rachel Black Thomas, Elliot K. Fishman Tags: Case studies: The educational impact of social media in radiology Source Type: research

Social Media, Health Policy, and Knowledge Translation
Social media has been cited as a methodology for reducing the knowledge translation gap, creating communities of practice, and reducing traditional hierarchical divisions. Social movements have also embraced social media as a means of spreading their aims and reaching wide audiences. However, its impact on health policy is seldom considered. The author examines the complexity of clinicians ’ use of social media to influence policy and how policy and government groups may use social media to help their own objectives. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 6, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Damian Roland Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Mayo Clinic Care Network: A Collaborative Health Care Model
By leveraging its experience and expertise as a consultative clinical partner, the Mayo Clinic developed an innovative, scalable care model to accomplish several strategic goals: (1) create and sustain high-value relationships that benefit patients and providers, (2) foster relationships with like-minded partners to act as a strategy against the development of narrow health care networks, and (3) increase national and international brand awareness of Mayo Clinic. The result was the Mayo Clinic Care Network. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 6, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: John T. Wald, Sherri Lowery-Schrandt, David L. Hayes, Amy L. Kotsenas Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Impact of a Physician-Led Social Media Sharing Program on a Medical Journal ’s Web Traffic
The use of social media by health professionals and medical journals is increasing. The aim of this study was to compare online views of articles in press (AIPs) released by Annals of Emergency Medicine before and after a nine-person social media team started actively posting links to AIPs using their personal Twitter accounts. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 6, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: N. Seth Trueger, Andrew V. Bokarius, Stephen Carroll, Michael D. April, Brent Thoma Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Medical Journals in the Age of Ubiquitous Social Media
Medical journals increasingly use social media to engage their audiences in a variety of ways, from simply broadcasting content via blogs, microblogs, and podcasts to more interactive methods such as Twitter chats and online journal clubs. Online discussion may increase readership and help improve peer review, for example, by providing postpublication peer review. Challenges remain, including the loss of nuance and context of shared work. Furthermore, uncertainty remains regarding how to assess the impact of journal social media outreach, abundant but unclear metrics, and the magnitude of benefit (if any), particularly giv...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 6, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: N. Seth Trueger Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Exploring Social Media in Health Care: Beyond Its Pervasiveness
Social media is everywhere. Throughout health care, social media profiles are rapidly proliferating for both organizations and individual providers. The number of platforms that host social media profiles seems to be multiplying at a similar rate. Accordingly, an increasing number of scholars have written about the overall increased adoption of social media among health care professionals, patients, and patient advocacy groups. Yet despite its growing pervasiveness, few scholarly analyses have investigated the ways in which social media may ultimately influence how we actually function as physicians on a day-to-day basis. ...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 6, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: C. Matthew Hawkins, Ruth C. Carlos Tags: Introduction to the special issue Source Type: research

Development and Utilization of a  Simulation PACS in Undergraduate Medical Education
Medical education in the United States is undergoing a paradigm shift, with the focus moving away from passive learning and toward interactive teaching methods that are competency based [1]. Simulation is a key component of this new educational model and has been called an “ethical imperative” to preserve the apprenticeship model of medical education, as it enables learners to err without violating the principle of nonmaleficence [2]. However, use of simulation in medical education lags significantly behind other professions with similar high risk profiles, such a s the aviation industry [2]. (Source: Journal o...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 3, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Nicole Restauri, Tami J. Bang, Ben Hall, Peter B. Sachs Tags: Case studies in training and education Source Type: research

Physician Knowledge of Radiation Exposure and Risk in Medical Imaging
This study had two aims: (1) analyze physicians ’ knowledge of radiation exposure and risk in diagnostic imaging across multiple specialties and levels of training, and (2) assess the effectiveness of a brief educational presentation on improving physicians’ knowledge. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Jason B. Hobbs, Noah Goldstein, Kimberly E. Lind, Deirdre Elder, Gerald D. Dodd, James P. Borgstede Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Use of Social Media in Radiology Education
Social media has become the dominant method of mass digital communication over the past decade. Public figures and corporations have learned how to use this new approach to deliver their messages directly to their followers. Recently, medical educators have begun to use social media as a means to deliver educational content directly to learners. The purpose of this article is to describe the benefits of using social media for medical education. Because each social media platform has different platform-specific constraints, several different popular social media networks are discussed. (Source: Journal of the American Colle...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Saad Ranginwala, Alexander J. Towbin Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Citation Impact of Collaboration in  Radiology Research
Team science involving multidisciplinary and multi-institutional collaboration is increasingly recognized as a means of strengthening the quality of scientific research. The aim of this study was to assess associations between various forms of collaboration and the citation impact of published radiology research. (Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR)
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - November 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Andrew B. Rosenkrantz, Ujas Parikh, Richard Duszak Tags: Original article Source Type: research