The Unintentional Procrastination Scale
AbstractProcrastination refers to the delay or postponement of a task or decision and is often conceptualised as a failure of self-regulation. Recent research has suggested that procrastination could be delineated into two domains: intentional and unintentional. In this two-study paper, we aimed to develop a measure of unintentional procrastination (named the Unintentional Procrastination Scale or the ‘UPS’) and test whether this would be a stronger marker of psychopathology than intentional and general procrastination. In Study 1, a community sample of 139 participants completed a questionnaire that consisted ...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - August 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Practicing REBT in Italy: Cultural Aspects
Abstract This paper attempts to explore the cultural background for the adoption and practice of REBT by cognitive therapists in Italy since the 1980s. It is not an attempt to capture the history of Italian culture and philosophy from antiquity. Italian therapists tend to prefer the assessment phase of the ABC framework and not fully adopt REBT disputing interventions. They also attempt to link the ABC not only to the here and now but also to clients ’ personal development. In our experience, they have combined REBT with constructivism and metacognition. These current features parallel the historical lack of confide...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - July 20, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Added Value of CBT in the Genetic Counseling Process: Concept Development, State of the Art and New Directions
Abstract The definition published by the National Society of Genetic Counselors’ Task Force states that genetic counseling is the process of facilitating people’s understanding and adaptation to the medical, psychological, and familial collateral consequences of genetic diseases. Although the definition of genetic counseling practice goes beyond giving medical information, the great majority of studies, which tested the efficacy of a genetic counseling intervention, focused mainly on providing medical information and seemed to have given less attention to more specific psychological interventions, whic...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - July 8, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Coaching Banking Managers Through the Financial Crisis: Effects on Stress, Resilience, and Performance
Abstract We conducted a study to test the effectiveness of an executive cognitive-behavioral coaching program in enhancing managerial stress resilience and performance during the financial recession. Our sample consisted of 59 middle and top-managers from an Italian multinational banking group. Results suggest that the program was effective in helping managers to improve their performance, manage their distress and depressed mood. We found that changes in irrational beliefs and rational beliefs after the program can function as mechanisms for both managing depressed mood and boosting managers’ performance le...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - June 9, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Complicated Grief Treatment: An Evidence-Based Approach to Grief Therapy
Abstract Complicated grief is a condition that occurs when something impedes the process of adapting to a loss. The core symptoms include intense and prolonged yearning, longing and sorrow, frequent insistent thoughts of the deceased and difficulty accepting the painful reality of the death or imagining a future with purpose and meaning. Complicated grief can cause substantial distress and impairment and it is important that clinicians learn to recognize and treat this condition. Complicated grief treatment is a 16-session evidence-based psychotherapy developed to release and facilitate a bereaved person’s n...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - May 24, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Assessing the Factorial Validity of the Attitudes and Belief Scale 2-Abbreviated Version: A Call for the Development a Gold Standard Method of Measuring Rational and Irrational Beliefs
Abstract Rational emotive behaviour therapy (REBT) does not possess a measure of rational and irrational beliefs that meets internationally recognised standards for acceptable psychometric properties. Without such a measure the theory/practice of REBT cannot be rigorously evaluated, thus undermining its scientific veracity. The current study investigates the validity and reliability of a recently developed measure of rational and irrational beliefs: the Attitudes and Belief Scale 2-Abbreviated Version (ABS-2-AV). University students from three countries completed the ABS-2-AV (N = 397). An alternative mo...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - May 20, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

CBT for Grief: Clearing Cognitive Obstacles to Healing from Loss
Abstract There is tremendous variability in people’s ability to cope with, and adjust to, the death of someone close to them. One of the factors identified as significant in this regard is the constellation of beliefs that includes a mourner’s thoughts about the circumstances of the death, their feelings about the person who died, their reflections on the relationship with that person, and their assessment of their own ability to survive the loss. This paper considers the role of cognition in adaptation to loss, and demonstrates how maladaptive cognitions concerning the loss, the manner of death or the...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - May 19, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Using Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) with Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) Athletes to Reduce Irrational Beliefs and Increase Unconditional Self-Acceptance
This study used a single-case multiple-baseline across participants design to investigate the effects of REBT on irrational self-depreciation beliefs and unconditional self-acceptance (USA) with three male mixed martial arts (MMA) athletes. Visual and statistical analyses indicate a reduction in total irrationality and self-depreciation and an increase in USA, which was maintained at 6 months post-REBT for two of the three athletes. Social validation data revealed positive changes in emotion management and performance in all athletes. The mechanisms by which REBT promoted changes in self-depreciation and USA are discu...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - May 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Psychometric Properties of the Grief Cognitions Questionnaire for Children (GCQ-C)
This study investigated several psychometric properties of the GCQ-C. Both reliability and validity were investigated in this study, in which hundred fifty-one children and adolescents (aged 8–18 years) participated. Findings showed that items of the GCQ-C represented one underlying dimension. Furthermore, the internal consistency and temporal stability were found to be adequate. Third, the findings supported the concurrent validity (e.g., significant positive correlations with self-report indices of PGD, depression and posttraumatic stress disorder), convergent and divergent validity of the GCQ-C. This study pr...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - April 28, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Incorporating Jewish Texts with REBT in the Treatment of Clinical Anger
Abstract Although there are some major philosophical differences between the underpinnings of REBT and religion, REBT has still been used effectively with religious clients (DiGiuseppe et al. in A practitioner’s guide to rational-emotive behavior therapy, 3rd ed., Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2014). To date, most of the literature on using REBT with religious clients has focused on Christians and Christianity (e.g. Johnson in Cognit Behav Pract 8(1):39–47, 2002; Nielsen in Cognit Behav Pract 8(1):34–39, 2002; Ellis in Prof Psychol Res Pract 31(1):29–33, 2000; amongst others), with less ...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - April 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Teacher Beliefs and Stress
Abstract The first of two studies provided validity data on the Teacher Irrational Belief Scale that measures a set of beliefs of teachers previous research has found to be associated with teacher stress. Employing a sample of 850 primary and secondary teachers in Australia, an exploratory factor analysis resulted in four distinct factors: Self-downing, Authoritarianism, Demands for Justice, and Low Frustration Tolerance. These four sub-scales demonstrated adequate internal reliability and correlated with self-ratings of stress occasioned by different teaching stressors. In a second study, 140 teachers and 26 teac...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - April 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Influence of Efficacy Beliefs on Teacher Performance and Student Success: Implications for Student Support Services
This article provides student support services personnel with an overview of efficacy beliefs and their impact on teachers’ thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. A cognitive behavioral framework, rational emotive behavior therapy, is used to conceptualize ways efficacy beliefs may hinder teacher performance and student success. Implications for student support services and research are provided. (Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy)
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - April 1, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Procrastination and Depression from a Cognitive Perspective: An Exploration of the Associations Among Procrastinatory Automatic Thoughts, Rumination, and Mindfulness
Abstract Extensive research indicates that procrastination is associated with many maladaptive outcomes including diminished performance and greater psychological distress, but the specific factors and mechanisms associated with the vulnerability of procrastinators still need to be identified. The current study examined the associations among procrastination, ruminative brooding, mindfulness, and self-compassion. Procrastination was measured in terms of academic procrastination as well as a cognitive measure of procrastination examining the frequency of procrastination-related automatic thoughts. In addition to th...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - March 10, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Integrating Cognitive Processing, Brain Activity, Molecules and Genes to Advance Evidence-Based Psychological Treatment for Depression and Anxiety: From Cognitive Neurogenetics to CBT-Based Neurogenetics
Abstract In order to promote the improvement of evidence-based psychological treatments (EBPT) and/or the integration of EBPT and bio-medical treatments, we propose a change in direction in cognitive neurogenetics (CNG)—from cognitive neurogenic to cognitive behavioral-based neurogenetics—starting from a top-down analysis: from symptoms and clinical-relevant cognitions to their implementation (brain, protein, genes). To illustrate our proposal, we specifically focus trans-diagnostically on symptoms of depression and anxiety, and consider the next underlying/interrelated mechanisms: (1) specific cog...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - February 25, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Irrational Beliefs and Attention Bias Towards Symptoms-Related Stimuli in Maintaining Gastrointestinal Symptoms: Results from a Pilot Study
Abstract Recent etiopathogenic theories of gastrointestinal conditions state that information processing biases can be a possible major factor involved in the aetiology and maintenance of these conditions. This exploratory study investigated the role of attention biases (AB) towards symptoms-related cues in gastrointestinal patients with respect to symptom maintenance, simultaneously taking into consideration the role of irrational beliefs. We included 32 patients diagnosed with gastrointestinal conditions. Patients completed a battery of psychological tests and an experimental task aimed to measure the preferenti...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - February 23, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Defense Mechanisms in Rational Emotive Cognitive Behavior Therapy Personality Theory
Abstract It has been argued that if rational emotive cognitive behavior therapy (RECBT) is to survive and prosper in the present century, the personality theory underlying it requires further development, greater clarification, and more comprehensiveness. In this article it is argued that RECBT personality theory could be further broadened and strengthened by attempting to incorporate the classic defense mechanisms of psychoanalytic theory via stripping them away from Freud’s hypothetical dynamic unconscious and instead resting them on Ellis’s concept of the unconscious. First, to provide proper contex...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - February 18, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Albert Ellis Institute: Past, Present and Future
Abstract The Albert Ellis Institute founded in 1959 by Dr. Albert Ellis is the bedrock where Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy (REBT) was born. During these 55 years the Institute has become the neuralgic center from where REBT develops and disseminates trough the affiliated international centers all over the world. Nowadays it is chartered by the University of the State of New York and it has a professional team directed by Dr. Kristene Doyle deeply committed to promote emotional health spreading REBT, a short-term therapy with long-term results. Dr. Kristene Doyle talks about her experience in the Institu...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - January 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

A Cognitive-Behavioral Standpoint on the Perceived Consequences of a Major Seismic Event in Relation to Optimism and Pre-hazard Emotional Distress
Abstract The study examined a circumscribed class of cognitions (i.e., dispositional optimism and perceived consequences) in connection to the emotional distress experienced in anticipation of a major seismic event (i.e., pre-hazard emotional distress). Grounded on cognitive-behavioral theory, it was argued that dispositional optimism exerts distal influence on distress, while the perceived consequences of a major seismic event are proximal to distress and, therefore, interpose the optimism-distress relationship. The hypothesis was tested via a cross-sectional study on a sample of 189 volunteers located in areas o...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - December 30, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

A Brief Report on the Assessment of Distress Tolerance: Are We Measuring the Same Construct?
Abstract Distress tolerance (DT) refers to an individual’s capacity to cope with aversive internal (e.g., physical, cognitive, emotional) states. A growing body of evidence suggests that there is a relationship between DT and the development and maintenance of problematic behavioral patterns. Despite emerging evidence for such associations, a number of issues remain unresolved. The results of recent studies suggest problems with the convergent validity of the primary measures used to assess DT, despite the fact that these measures are used interchangeably in the DT literature. In order to further examine...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Role of Metacognition in Self-Critical Rumination: An Investigation in Individuals Presenting with Low Self-Esteem
Abstract No research, to date, has directly investigated the role of metacognition in self-critical rumination and low self-esteem. The aims of this study are: to investigate the presence of metacognitive beliefs about self-critical rumination; the goal of self-critical rumination and its stop signal; and the degree of detachment from intrusive self-critical thoughts. Ten individuals reporting both a self-acknowledged tendency to judge themselves critically and having low self-esteem were assessed using metacognitive profiling, a semi-structured interview. All participants endorsed both positive and negative metac...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - December 16, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Effects of Cognitive Restructuring Intervention Program of Rational-Emotive Behavior Therapy on Adverse Childhood Stress in Nigeria
This study examined the effects of cognitive restructuring intervention program of rational-emotive behavior therapy on irrational thoughts/behaviors arising from adverse childhood stress in Nigeria. The participants (n = 26) are the identified victims of adverse childhood stress who met the criteria for inclusion through self-report questionnaire. The treatment process is guided by the adverse childhood stress management manual. It consists of 12 weeks of full intervention and 2 weeks of follow-up meetings. The study used repeated measures ANOVA in order to see the improvement of each participant and a...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - December 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Developing Managerial Skills Through Coaching: Efficacy of a Cognitive-Behavioral Coaching Program
This article builds on recent research on the importance of the managerial coaching by empirically investigating the effects of a cognitive-behavioral coaching programme over mid-level managers. Due to the similarities between managerial coaching behaviors and transformational leadership behaviors, we have adopted the transformational leadership model as theoretical framework for evaluating management behaviors. The study used a pre-posttest approach to test the effects of the coaching program especially designed for 23 mid-level managers having as responsibility the supervision of production teams in a multinational organ...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - November 30, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Is Trait Rumination Associated with the Ability to Generate Effective Problem Solving Strategies? Utilizing Two Versions of the Means-Ends Problem-Solving Test
This study examined the relationship between trait rumination and the effectiveness of problem solving strategies as assessed by the Means-Ends Problem-Solving Test (MEPS) in a nonclinical population. The present study extended previous studies in terms of using two instructions in the MEPS: the second-person, actual strategy instructions, which has been utilized in previous studies on rumination, and the third-person, ideal-strategy instructions, which is considered more suitable for assessing the effectiveness of problem solving strategies. We also replicated the association between rumination and each dimension of the S...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - November 19, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

A Meta-Analysis on the Efficacy of Technology Mediated CBT for Anxious Children and Adolescents
Abstract Several meta-analyses indicate that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) via electronic/technological devices or applications (i.e., eCBT) is an effective alternative to standard therapist-delivered CBT for anxious adults. However, we know little about the efficacy of eCBT interventions for anxious children and adolescents. The present meta-analysis set out to investigate the efficacy of eCBT in comparison to standard CBT or waitlist control for anxious children and adolescents. Eight randomized controlled studies (N = 404 participants) that targeted anxiety at post-intervention and follow-up were...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - November 17, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Assumptions and Conclusions: Fundamental Distinctions Between Tibetan Buddhist and Western Approaches to Happiness
Abstract The cultivation of happiness is the stated goal of Tibetan Buddhism and of Western models of psychotherapy alike. Yet these two traditions differ sharply in their identification of the conditions that give rise to happiness. Since both traditions present themselves as empirical systems of investigation open to confirmation or refutation, it may prove useful for practitioners in each tradition to become familiar with each others’ theories and claims regarding the causes of happiness. This paper discusses the questions asked and models proposed by Western psychologists researching happiness and how th...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - September 30, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Addressing Assumptions and Clarifying Conclusions in “Assumptions and Conclusions: Fundamental Distinctions Between Tibetan Buddhist and Western Approaches to Happiness”
Conclusions: Fundamental Distinctions Between Tibetan Buddhist and Western Approaches to Happiness,” by Cutz and colleagues. The recent upsurge in the theoretical and empirical professional literature with respect to mindfulness-based interventions certainly speaks to the importance of understanding the similarities and differences between Buddhist philosophical teachings and Western psychological theory and practice, including a nuanced conceptual understanding of terms such as “happiness” and “well-being.” As the target article’s effort at discriminating between Western and Eastern con...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - September 16, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Contribution of Metacognitions and Attentional Control to Decisional Procrastination
This study tested several hypotheses: (1) that metacognitions would be positively correlated with decisional procrastination; (2) that attentional control would be negatively correlated with decisional procrastination; (3) that metacognitions would be negatively correlated with attentional control; and (4) that metacognitions and attentional control would predict decisional procrastination when controlling for negative affect. One hundred and twenty-nine participants completed the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21, the Meta-Cognitions Questionnaire 30, the Attentional Control Scale, and the Decisional Procrastination Scal...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - September 9, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

An Assessment Instrument for Anger Management in Correctional Settings: The Angry Cognitions Scale-Prison Form
Abstract As the rates of both violent crime and prison violence continue to rise, anger management programs have become a common treatment recommendation for prisoners. Several psychology treatment programs have incorporated anger management as core curricula, and many supervisory and probation officers mandate anger management as a post release requirement for probationers. Assessment tools that provide direction in treatment planning and therapeutic will surely be very helpful. The Angry Cognitions Scale (ACS) (Martin and Dahlen in J Ration Emot Cogn Behav Therapy 25:155–173, 2007) was formulated to assess...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - August 14, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Role of Catastrophizing Beliefs in Effective Chronic Pain Treatment
Abstract Chronic pain is a serious and complex health issue. Patients dealing with chronic pain demonstrate multifarious behavioral and cognitive responses to their widely varying individual experiences. How can we, as health professionals, best serve these patients? In this paper, we discuss the place of pain within the historical conceptualization of health and normalcy, and the more current biopsychosocial model. We also review contemporary theories on how cognition plays a vital role in the psychological processing of stimuli, including pain. We focus on the significant interactions between catastrophizing app...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - August 7, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Mediating Role of Symptoms of Psychopathology Between Irrational Beliefs and Internet Gaming Addiction
Abstract While Internet gaming addiction has recently been proposed as a disorder, it is still discussed whether it is to some extent an effect of other disorders. By integrating the results of the previous studies of Internet gaming addiction and the postulates of REBT theory, we set up two goals. One is to determine whether the symptoms of psychopathology are mediators between irrational and rational beliefs and Internet gaming addiction. Another goal is to compare a large number of symptoms of psychopathology and determine which of these have the greatest effect on the Internet gaming addiction. An online surve...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - July 17, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Elements of the Biopsychosocial Interview of the Chronic Pain Patient: A New Expanded Model Using Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy
This article will briefly explore the history of the biopsychosocial model, relay the major tenants of rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT), and propose an expanded biopsychosocial model (rational emotive behavior therapy-health) for the assessment and conceptualization of those suffering from chronic pain disorders. Detailed are specific interview topics and related questions important to the assessment of client functioning with emphasis REBT hypothesis formulations. Discussion of conceptualization will integrate perspectives from the biopsychosocial interview with the addition of REBT hypothesis formulations. (Sourc...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - July 2, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Contribution of REBT in Addressing the Givens of Existence
Abstract This paper will try to highlight the possible contribution of REBT in facing and accepting the givens of existence and to show that REBT “takes a step further” and significantly improves the acceptance of them. Basic existential conflict, according to Yalom is in the individual’s confrontation with the givens of existence-certain ultimate concerns as Death, Freedom and responsibility, Existential isolation and the Meaninglessness of life, one cannot accept. According to existentialists we must die, we are free and responsible, there is no universal “meaning”, no grand design ...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - May 5, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Behavioral and Cognitive–Behavioral Approaches to Treating Patients with Chronic Pain: Thinking Outside the Pill Box
Abstract Chronic pain is a prevalent and disabling problem. It is a complex, multifactorial disorder that requires a comprehensive biopsychosocial conceptualization. In this paper we provide an update on research implicating the importance of the behavioral and cognitive factors in chronic pain. In addition to the significant co-variations among self-reported symptoms, recent advancement in the imaging technology provides a better understanding of the neurophysiological basis of those psychosocial factors in chronic pain. Additionally, we discuss several variations of behavioral and cognitive–behavioral appr...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - April 28, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

A Clinician’s Perspective on Treating Patients Suffering from Insomnia and Pain
This article discusses the current state of sleep and pain therapies, looks at three clinical cases in which patients suffered from primary insomnia and chronic pain, and proposes a treatment protocol. (Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy)
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - April 23, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Preface to the Special Issue on Pain Management
Abstract The World Health Organization (2004) estimates that 60 million people suffer from chronic noncancer pain (CP). The preface to the Special Issue on Pain Management reviews the prevalence rates of chronic noncancer pain (CP) in various countries around the world and the rate of comorbid health and psychological conditions. The article lists the topics covered in the journal which focus on treatment of chronic pain conditions. Article topics cover general treatment approaches, psychological assessment instruments, the psychological interview of the CP patient, and the treatment of insomnia and sleep disturba...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - April 23, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

“To Forgive is to be Sane and Realistic”: Contributions of REBT to the Psychology of Forgiving
Abstract Over the last 20 years, literature on the psychology of forgiving has burgeoned. Despite this, forgiveness literature from the rational-emotive behavior therapy (REBT) perspective has been rare. This is unfortunate, given the elegance of the REBT model and that Ellis touched favorably upon forgiving as far back as 1961. The REBT model is dialogued with the works of Enright and Fitzgibbons (Helping clients forgive. American Psychological Association, Washington, 2000; Forgiveness therapy. American Psychological Association, Washington, 2015) with reference to others. Among recommendations are: (1) usi...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - April 21, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Pain Assessment: A Practical Guide for Researchers and Clinicians
Abstract Pain is one of the most universal experiences of humankind, affecting all populations across the globe. In the United States over 100 million individuals are reported to be suffering with chronic pain (Institute of Medicine in Relieving pain in America: a blueprint for transforming prevention, care, education and research, The National Academies Press, Washington, 2011) and approximately 80 % of all medical visits stem directly from pain complaints (Quartana et al. in Expert Rev Neurother 9:745–758, 2009). This paper discusses a recent movement toward standardization of the pain assessment...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - April 18, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Need for an Integrated Cognitive-Behavioral Model for Co-occurring Chronic Pain and Insomnia
Abstract Cognitive-behavioral models for both insomnia and pain are well established. Few studies have addressed the cognitive-behavioral aspects of these conditions occurring together with a unified model. Worry, rumination, catastrophizing, monitoring, misperceptions, dysfunctional beliefs, and safety behaviors are reviewed. Sleep hygiene among those with co-occurring pain and insomnia is also discussed. It is proposed that more concerted efforts are needed to develop an integrated cognitive-behavioral model to address insomnia and pain as a complex integrated phenomenon. (Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - April 14, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

A Case Series of Individual Six-Week Cognitive Behavioral Therapy With Individually Tailored Manual-Based Treatment Delivery for Depressed College Students With or Without Suicidal Ideation
Abstract Despite their prevalence, depression and suicidal ideation (SI) are relatively unaddressed problems in the college student population. There are limited individual treatment studies targeting this population. Nine students (M = 19.33 years of age; SD ± .87) with depressive symptoms and/or SI were enrolled in 6-weeks of individual cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with a individually tailored manual-based treatment delivery. Measures were given before and after treatment. Primary results, presented as a case series, suggested decreases in depression across students and an o...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - March 26, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Descriptive/Inferential Cognitive Processes and Evaluative Cognitive Processes: Relationships Among Each Other and with Emotional Distress
Abstract We aimed to delineate key constructs from two forms of cognitive-behavioral therapy: cognitive therapy and rational-emotive behavior therapy. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate the interrelations among each other and with emotional distress. The key constructs of the underlying theories of these therapies (i.e., descriptive/inferential beliefs, evaluative beliefs) are often treated together as distorted cognitions and included as such in various scales. We used a cross-sectional design. Seventy-four undergraduate students (mean age = 24.68) completed measures of automatic thoughts and emot...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - February 26, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Associations Between Perfectionism and Generalized Anxiety: Examining Cognitive Schemas and Gender
Abstract In the current study, we extended previous research verifying significant associations between perfectionism dimensions and psychopathological outcomes. Specifically, we examined the links between perfectionism dimensions and generalized anxiety symptoms through both the context of threat and control schemas and gender. A sample of 262 university students (131 women and 131 men) completed a series of self-report questionnaires online. Univariate correlations indicated that socially prescribed perfectionism was the only dimension related to generalized anxiety symptoms. In addition, gender-specific finding...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - February 24, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Screening for Suicide Risk in the College Population
Abstract Suicide is the third leading cause of death in college students, but there is limited consensual evidence to guide clinicians’ assessment and management of suicide. The aim of the current study was to assess the capability of a simple and practical measure, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) suicide item, to identify college students at high risk of suicide. Exploration of this research question could have important implications in this vulnerable population for identifying those at risk for suicide. Six-hundred-and-fifty-seven college students participated in a mental health screening and complete...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - January 24, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Clinical Implications and Neurophysiological Background of Useing Self-Mirroring Technique to Enhance the Identification of Emotional Experiences: An Example with Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy
Abstract Many patients have difficulty recognizing their own emotions. The aim of the ABC framework of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) is to help patients identify the emotions (the C) connected to dysfunctional thoughts (B) in critical situations and inferences (the A). Today, new audiovisual recording techniques can provide patients with a “mirror”, where they can view their own emotions and way of thinking. A videotape of a patient’s face during the session and the subsequent analysis of emotional sequences can help patients gain awareness of their emotions. In this case, they do not ...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - January 21, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Demanded Wants and Oughts: An Overlooked Distinction in REBT?
Abstract The pursuit of preferences without demands is a major pathway to mental health and happiness, according to REBT theory and research. Even when people are thwarted in the pursuit of their preferences, they will only experience healthy negative emotions, which will spur them on to construct solutions to obstacles that prevent them from reaching their goals. However, if they are thwarted when rigidly demanding their preferences, they may experience unhealthy negative emotions and act in ways that most likely will be self-defeating. We suggest that this evidence-based classic REBT framework could benefit furt...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - January 7, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Cognitive Behavioural Intervention in Prolonged Grief Reaction: Case Series
Abstract Grief, a reaction, resume from death is generally considered a universal, normal human reaction as well as a highly individual one. According to the cognitive approach, psychopathological grief takes the form of distorted thinking, where an excessive emotional reaction is related to negative cognitive evaluations (automatic thoughts) of oneself, the world, and the future. In the current case series, two females and one male were taken who were aged between 42 and 46 years of age and came for the intervention in a mental health clinic after the death of their offsprings. Cognitive behavioural appr...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - December 24, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Cognitive Distortion: Propositions and Possible Worlds
Abstract In this article the concept of cognitive distortions is explored. Recent scholarship has established that the concept of cognitive distortions is not clear. However, in order for any scientific body of literature to progress an adequate degree of conceptual clarity is a requirement. Samples concerning cognitive distortions are drawn from the cognitive theory and therapy literatures. First, a small sample is subjected to an analysis where its contents are reduced to a cross-section of propositions. Altogether, 24 propositions concerning the concept of cognitive distortion are extracted from this first ...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - December 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Examining the Effects of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) on the Irrational Beliefs of Blue-Chip Professionals
Abstract The extant literature reveals a scarcity of research applying rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) in business settings. Against the backdrop of severe market conditions and inevitable involuntary job loss, the application of psychological interventions to reduce mental and physical health issues is highly pertinent and potentially valuable. This paper reports the effects of an intensive REBT programme on the irrational beliefs of staff undergoing redundancy from a Blue-Chip organisation. A repeated-measures single-group intervention design was adopted so that changes in irrational beliefs could be as...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - November 22, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

And Yet it Moves! A Reply to “Rectifying Misconception: A Comprehensive Response to Gardner, Moore, and Marks Comments on ‘Some Concerns About the Psychological Implications of Mindfulness: A Critical Analysis’ ”
Abstract In this brief article I reply to Gardner et al. (J Ration Emot Cogn Behav Ther. doi:10.1007/s10942-014-0196-1, 2014)’s comments to my previous article titled “Some concerns about the psychological implications of mindfulness. A critical analysis” (David, in J Ration Emot Cogn Behav Ther. doi:10.1007/s10942-014-0198-z, 2014). While initially—humorously and for the sake of debate—adopting an attitude towards mindfulness based on a modified version of Galileo’s Abjuration, I then critically argued that Gardner et al.’s criticism is focused on a priori defending a con...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - October 15, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Some Concerns About the Psychological Implications of Mindfulness: A Critical Analysis
Abstract In this critical analysis, we discuss the construct of mindfulness and address a number of theoretical inconsistencies and potential practical consequences of mindfulness-based clinical practices. We argue that mindfulness practices are potentially powerful psychological interventions that should be well circumscribed (1) to assure clinical safety and access to the best available clinical practices and (2) used as part of a multi-component intervention or as a stand-alone treatment, particularly when empirically supported treatments such as cognitive–behavioral therapies have not achieved desired ou...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - October 15, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Rectifying Misconceptions: A Comprehensive Response to “Some Concerns About the Psychological Implications of Mindfulness: A Critical Analysis”
Abstract The present article attempts to address misconceptions and mischaracterizations of mindfulness-based interventions found in the article “Some Concerns about the Psychological Implications of Mindfulness: A Critical Analysis,” written by Daniel David. The paper, we contended, suffers as a result of its reductive presentation of mindfulness, the relationship of mindfulness to Buddhist thought, the empirical support for mindfulness-based interventions, and the presumed mechanisms of change and clinical utility of those interventions. Such misconceptions and mischaracterizations can unfortunately ...
Source: Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy - October 1, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research