Analyzing second language proficiency using wavelet-based prominence estimates
Publication date: May 2020Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 80Author(s): Heini Kallio, Antti Suni, Juraj Šimko, Martti Vainio (Source: Journal of Phonetics)
Source: Journal of Phonetics - March 26, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

An experimental study of tongue body loops in V1-V2-V1 sequences
Publication date: May 2020Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 80Author(s): Christian Thiele, Christine Mooshammer, Malte Belz, Oxana Rasskazova, Peter Birkholz (Source: Journal of Phonetics)
Source: Journal of Phonetics - March 21, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: March 2020Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 79Author(s): (Source: Journal of Phonetics)
Source: Journal of Phonetics - March 16, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The effect of input prompts on the relationship between perception and production of non-native sounds
We examined whether the relationship between perception and production of non-native sounds varies as a result of different types of input prompts (auditory vs. orthographic) for production, and whether this effect of input prompts on the perception-production relationship varies in different non-native sound contrasts, namely, English /ɹ/ vs. /l/ for native Japanese learners of English, and Japanese singleton vs. geminate consonants for native English learners of Japanese. The difference in the type of input prompt for production affected learners’ perception-production relationship to a larger extent for the Engli...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - February 23, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Pause postures: The relationship between articulation and cognitive processes during pauses
Publication date: March 2020Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 79Author(s): Jelena Krivokapić, Will Styler, Benjamin ParrellAbstractStudies examining articulatory characteristics of pauses have identified language-specific postures of the vocal tract in inter-utterance pauses and different articulatory patterns in grammatical and non-grammatical pauses. Pause postures—specific articulatory movements that occur during pauses at strong prosodic boundaries—have been identified for Greek and German. However, the cognitive function of these articulations has not been examined so far. We start addressing this ques...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - February 21, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Contributions of pitch and spectral information to cortical vowel categorization
Publication date: March 2020Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 79Author(s): Marina Frank, Beeke Muhlack, Franka Zebe, Mathias ScharingerAbstractThe perception of vowels such as [a] or [i] is based on their spectral properties, i.e. resonance frequencies (formants), and on fundamental frequency (f0). Yet, it is unclear whether early neural indices of vowel processing are predominantly driven by f0 or by formant frequencies.A candidate neural index of early acoustic processing is the N1, a negative evoked potential of the human electroencephalogram (EEG), peaking between 80 and 150 ms after stimulus onset. The N1 has ...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - January 29, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: January 2020Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 78Author(s): (Source: Journal of Phonetics)
Source: Journal of Phonetics - January 20, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Phonetic effects of grammatical category: How category-specific prosodic phrasing and lexical frequency impact the duration of nouns and verbs
Publication date: January 2020Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 78Author(s): Arne Lohmann, Erin ConwellAbstractThis paper is concerned with phonetic correlates of grammatical category, specifically the finding that nouns are pronounced with greater duration than verbs in discourse. Most previous research has attributed this difference to the sentence positions that the two grammatical categories occupy and concomitant prosodic effects. Based on previous findings, we test two further effects, namely a category-specific effect on prosodic phrasing, which leads to stronger prosodic boundaries after nouns than verbs even in...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - December 27, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Training a non-native vowel contrast with a distributional learning paradigm results in improved perception and production
Publication date: January 2020Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 78Author(s): Heather Kabakoff, Gretchen Go, Susannah V. LeviAbstractPrevious distributional learning research suggests that adults can improve perception of a non-native contrast more efficiently when exposed to a bimodal than a unimodal distribution. Studies have also suggested that perceptual learning can transfer to production. The current study tested whether the addition of visual images to reinforce the contrast and active learning with feedback would result in learning in both conditions and would transfer to gains in production. Native English-speak...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - December 27, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

An articulatory study of the alveolar versus retroflex contrast in pre- and post-stress position in Arrernte
This study presents articulometry and palatography data for Arrernte, a language of Central Australia. It examines the contrast between the apical consonants – alveolar versus retroflex – according to lexical stress. Stop, nasal and lateral consonants are treated separately. Results show that the most prototypical retroflex articulation – where the tongue tip is retracted for post-alveolar closure and eventually released at a more anterior location – occurs after a stressed vowel. By contrast, a prototypical alveolar articulation – with closure and release at the same (anterior) region along t...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - December 27, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 77Author(s): (Source: Journal of Phonetics)
Source: Journal of Phonetics - December 10, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Acknowledgements for the 2019 Volumes
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 77Author(s): (Source: Journal of Phonetics)
Source: Journal of Phonetics - December 10, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Dialectal phonology constrains the phonetics of prominence
Publication date: January 2020Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 78Author(s): Rachel Smith, Tamara RathckeAbstractAccentual prominence has well-documented effects on various phonetic properties, including timing, vowel quality, amplitude, and pitch. These cues can exist in trading relationships and can differ in magnitude in different languages. Less is understood about how phonetic cues to accentuation surface under different phonological constraints, such as those posed by segmental phonology, aspects of the prosodic hierarchy, and intonational phonology. Dialectal comparisons offer a valuable window on these issues, b...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - December 9, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Articulatory and acoustic correlates of prominence in French: Comparing L1 and L2 speakers
This study investigates how L1 and L2 speakers of French produce phonetic correlates of French prosodic structure, specifically the properties of Accentual Phrases that are evidenced in dimensions other than f0. The L2 speakers had English L1, with varying levels of proficiency in French. We also examined the same individuals’ productions of sentences in English. Differences in prosodic structure between English and French lead us to expect differences between the two groups of speakers. Our study measured jaw displacement in electromagnetic articulography, as well as acoustic duration and vowel formant values. Patte...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - November 20, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Syllable-internal corrective focus in Korean
This study investigates prominence modulation at the sub-syllable level using a corrective focus task, examining acoustic duration and pitch with particular attention to the gestural composition of Korean tense and lax consonants. The results indicate that focus effects are manifested with systematic variations depending on the gestural structures, i.e. consonants, active during the domain of a focus gesture, but that the patterns of focus modulation do not differ as a function of elicited focus positions within the syllable. The findings generally support the premise that the scope of the focus gesture is not (much) small...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - November 12, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Phonological processes across word and language boundaries: Evidence from code-switching
This study examines the application of phonological rules across word and language boundaries in cases of code-switching, exploiting cross-linguistic differences in voicing assimilation and spirantization processes in English and Spanish. Results from an oral production paradigm conducted with Spanish–English bilinguals showed an asymmetrical impact of code-switching: switched and non-switched tokens differed in Spanish, but not English. A similar pattern was found for bilinguals of different language dominance profiles. This asymmetry is discussed with respect to the different language-specific degrees of variabilit...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - November 9, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Visible amplitude: Towards quantifying prominence in sign language
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 77Author(s): Oksana Tkachman, Kathleen Currie Hall, Robert Fuhrman, Yurika AonukiAbstractWhile there has been some prior work on what characteristics can increase or decrease the phonetic prominence of a sign in a signed language, there is not yet an easily obtainable, objective measure that can be used to help quantify signal-based aspects of sign language prominence. This paper introduces a novel measure, visible amplitude, which provides a way to quantify the amount of movement contained on a frame-by-frame basis in a video, and as such, can be used as ...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - November 3, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The effect of focus prominence on phrasing
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 77Author(s): Michael Wagner, Michael McAuliffeAbstractProsody simultaneously encodes different kinds of information about an utterance, including the type of speech act (which, in English, often affects the choice of intonational tune), the syntactic constituent structure (which mainly affects prosodic phrasing), and the location of semantic focus (which mainly affects the relative prosodic prominence between words). The syntactic and semantic functional dimensions (speech act, constituency, focus) are orthogonal to each other, but to which extent their pr...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - November 1, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Predictors of bilinguals’ speaking rates
This study examined native and second-language speaking rates in a speeded sentence production task; speaking rate was expected to reflect the speed with which processes underlying speech production can be executed. Sixty Spanish-English bilingual adults participated. They differed according to AOL (2–38), years of English Experience (1–45), and percent English Use (10–100). The purpose was to determine the influence of the three just-mentioned factors and their interactions using linear mixed-effects modeling. The primary findings were: (1) a linear AOL effect such that higher AOL predicted lower English...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - October 29, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Articulatory characterization of English liquid-final rimes
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 77Author(s): Michael Proctor, Rachel Walker, Caitlin Smith, Tünde Szalay, Louis Goldstein, Shrikanth NarayananAbstractArticulation of liquid consonants in onsets and codas by four speakers of General American English was examined using real-time MRI. Midsagittal tongue posture was compared for laterals and rhotics produced in each syllable margin, adjacent to 13 different vowels and diphthongs. Vowel articulation was examined in words without liquids, before each liquid, and after each liquid, to assess the coarticulatory influence of each segment on ...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - October 23, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The relevance of auditory feedback for consonant production: The case of fricatives
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 77Author(s): Eugen Klein, Jana Brunner, Phil HooleAbstractPrevious perturbation studies of vowels show that speakers employ auditory feedback to monitor their own speech production and adjust their articulation when auditory errors occur. In contrast, although a few studies have demonstrated that acoustic changes may occur to consonants under perturbed or masked auditory feedback, it is less clear if speakers rely on auditory feedback to systematically restore acoustic parameters of their perturbed consonant production. To investigate this question, we con...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - October 19, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Plosive (de-)voicing and f0 perturbations in Tokyo Japanese: Positional variation, cue enhancement, and contrast recovery
This study addresses the two-way laryngeal contrast of plosives in Tokyo Japanese, which is commonly analyzed as a “true voicing” language. We examine how voicing-related properties of the plosive and f0 of the following vowel varied with the position in the word and in the sentence. We compare word-initial with word-medial positions for words in citation (between two pauses) and for two prosodic conditions in a carrier sentence: with vs. without a preceding pause. In word-initial position, unlike in a typical “true-voicing” language such as French, voiced plosives in Tokyo Japanese show a high devo...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - October 19, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The importance of vowel formant frequencies and proximity in vowel space to the perception of foreign accent
This study used speech resynthesis to manipulate vowel formant frequencies in natural speech stimuli to examine the influence of magnitude and direction of spectral deviation from native norms, as well as the proximity of adjacent categories, on foreign-accentedness ratings, comprehensibility ratings and vowel identification. Experiment 1 contrasted the impact of spectral deviation on peripheral and non-peripheral vowels by shifting the first and second formant center frequencies in English vowels /ɔ/, /ʌ/, /ɛ/, /ɑ/, and /æ/ toward the acoustically closest vowel, and either the next-closest vowel, or unoccupied v...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - September 28, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Third-language learning affects bilinguals’ production in both their native languages: A longitudinal study of dynamic changes in L1, L2 and L3 vowel production
This study examined the impact of a study abroad (SA) English program on English and native vowel production. Basque-Spanish bilingual adolescents were assessed on their vowel production in English, Basque and Spanish before the SA program, the day after the program was completed, and four months later. The results revealed that after the SA program, participants’ English vowels were acoustically closer to English norms, revealing the effectiveness of SA programs in improving English vowel pronunciation. Yet, four months later, these benefits had faded, showing that regular input and active language use are required ...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - September 27, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Variation of the word-initial liquid in North and South Korean dialects under contact
This study examines the phonetic variation of the word-initial liquid in two dialects of Korean, Northern Hamkyeong Korean of North Korea and Seoul Korean of South Korea. The goals of the study are two-fold: to provide a thorough description of the phonetic variation in the word-initial liquid in these two dialects and to examine the acquisition of Seoul Korean features by North Koreans residing in Seoul. The participants were prompted to produce initial liquids by reading a list of Sino-Korean words in North Korean orthography and loanwords that begin with a liquid. We found that in addition to tap, the presumed default v...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - September 24, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Exemplar-theoretic integration of phonetics and phonology: Detecting prominence categories in phonetic space
This article explores an exemplar-theoretic approach to the integration of phonetics and phonology in the prosodic domain. In an exemplar-theoretic perspective, prominence categories, here specifically, pitch-accented syllables and unaccented syllables, are assumed to correspond to accumulations of similar exemplars in an appropriate perceptual space. It should then be possible, as suggested for instance by Pierrehumbert (2003), to infer the (phonological) prominence categories by clustering speech data in this (phonetic) space, thus modeling acquisition of prominence categories according to an exemplar-theoretic account. ...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - September 24, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: September 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 76Author(s): (Source: Journal of Phonetics)
Source: Journal of Phonetics - September 21, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Publisher Note
Publication date: September 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 76Author(s): (Source: Journal of Phonetics)
Source: Journal of Phonetics - September 21, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Learning a new sound pair in a second language: Italian learners and German glottal consonants
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 77Author(s): Nikola Anna Eger, Holger Mitterer, Eva ReinischAbstractThe present study investigated Italian learners’ production and perception of German /h/ and /Ɂ/ – two sounds that lack obvious linguistic counterparts in Italian. Critically, of these sounds only /h/ is explicitly known to learners from instruction and orthography. We therefore asked whether this awareness would lead to better acquisition of /h/ than /Ɂ/, and whether any differences would depend on the explicitness of the task. In production, learners of a medium proficiency...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - September 21, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Infant perception of VOT and closure duration contrasts
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 77Author(s): Muna Schönhuber, Nathalie Czeke, Anja Gampe, Janet GrijzenhoutAbstractPrevious research suggests that infant perception of phonetic contrasts undergoes a reorganisation during the first year of life with universal sound discrimination from birth that adapts to the native phoneme contrasts around 12 months of age. This paper focuses on two closely related languages that crucially differ in the realisation of stop contrasts: (Standard High) German and Swiss German. The first employs a VOT contrast for tense/lax stops, the latter uses a le...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - September 21, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Exploiting the speech-gesture link to capture fine-grained prosodic prominence impressions and listening strategies
Publication date: September 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 76Author(s): Petra Wagner, Aleksandra Ćwiek, Barbara SamlowskiAbstractIn this paper, we explore the possibility to gather perceptual impressions of prosodic prominence by exploiting the strong prosody-gesture link, i.e., by having listeners transform a perceptual impression into a motor movement, namely drumming, for two domains of prominence: word-level and syllable-level. A feasibility study reveals that such a procedure is indeed easily and speedily mastered by naïve listeners, but more difficult for word-level prominences. We furthermore examine...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - September 1, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Stress, pitch accent, and beyond: Intonation in Maltese questions
Publication date: September 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 76Author(s): Martine Grice, Alexandra Vella, Anna BruggemanAbstractMaltese question word interrogatives are shown to have an alternation in the association of postlexical tones with the question word. Tones associate with the left edge of the question word in direct questions, and with the lexically stressed syllable in indirect questions and when quoted. This alternation holds regardless of the metrical structure of the word. Maltese is thus the first language with lexical stress to be described as having a pragmatically conditioned alternation between f...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - August 30, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Prosodic encoding in Mandarin spontaneous speech: Evidence for clause-based advanced planning in language production
This study reports the cross-boundary f0 shifting of prosodic units (PU) in Mandarin conversational speech by analyzing the PU-initial and PU-final f0 heights as a function of its semantic structure. Initial and final f0 heights were defined as the f0 values extracted at the energy max of the first and the last syllable of the PU. The semantic structure of the PU was defined based on its co-extensiveness with a semantic unit in discourse (DU), i.e., a proposition, often encoded by a clause. Our analysis shows significant relationships between the cross-boundary f0 heights and the PU-DU co-extensiveness. PU-DU left alignmen...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - August 27, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Listeners maintain phonological uncertainty over time and across words: The case of vowel nasality in English
Publication date: September 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 76Author(s): Georgia Zellou, Delphine DahanAbstractWhile the fact that phonetic information is evaluated in a non-discrete, probabilistic fashion is well established, there is less consensus regarding how long such encoding is maintained. Here, we examined whether people maintain in memory the amount of vowel nasality present in a word when processing a subsequent word that holds a semantic dependency with the first one. Vowel nasality in English is an acoustic correlate of the oral vs. nasal status of an adjacent consonant, and sometimes it is the only d...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - August 17, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Does infant speech perception predict later vocabulary development in bilingual infants?
Publication date: September 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 76Author(s): Leher SinghAbstractOne of the most significant transitions reported in infant psychological development is perceptual narrowing whereby infants orient towards their native language. In monolingual infants, the progress made by infants in perceptual narrowing positively predicts later vocabulary size. The relationship between infant speech perception and later language development has not been thus far reported in bilingual populations. The present study investigated infant speech perception in relation to later vocabulary development in a pro...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - August 14, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: July 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 75Author(s): (Source: Journal of Phonetics)
Source: Journal of Phonetics - July 16, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Sound, structure and meaning: The bases of prominence ratings in English, French and Spanish
This study tests the influence of acoustic cues and non-acoustic contextual factors on listeners’ perception of prominence in three languages whose prominence systems differ in the phonological patterning of prominence and in the association of prominence with information structure—English, French and Spanish. Native speakers of each language performed an auditory rating task to mark prominent words in samples of conversational speech under two instructions: with prominence defined in terms of acoustic or meaning-related criteria. Logistic regression models tested the role of task instruction, acoustic cues and...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - June 22, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Contextual predictability and phonetic attention
Publication date: July 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 75Author(s): Jonathan MankerAbstractThe interaction of contextual, high-level linguistic knowledge and the listener’s attention to low-level phonetic details has been the subject of a large body of research in speech perception for several decades. In the current paper, I investigate this interaction by considering the specific phenomenon of word predictability and its role in modulating the listener’s attention to subphonemic details of the acoustic signal. In the first experiment, subjects are presented with a discrimination task in which target ...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - June 21, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: May 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 74Author(s): (Source: Journal of Phonetics)
Source: Journal of Phonetics - May 30, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Plasticity of native phonetic and phonological domains in the context of bilingualism
Publication date: July 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 75Author(s): Esther de Leeuw, Chiara CelataAbstractThe main point of this introduction, and therefore of the special issue, is to reveal and emphasise research findings which show that the domains of phonetics and phonology are malleable in adult native speech within the context of bilingualism. The manuscripts reveal this general finding through examination of a wide range of bilinguals using various methodologies. We believe that this finding is important for our understanding of the human capacity for language.Firstly, it is important because most humans sp...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - May 30, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Statistical distributions of consonant variants in infant-directed speech: Evidence that /t/ may be exceptional
Publication date: July 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 75Author(s): Laura Dilley, Jessica Gamache, Yuanyuan Wang, Derek M. Houston, Tonya R. BergesonAbstractStatistical distributions of phonetic variants in spoken language influence speech perception for both language learners and mature users. We theorized that patterns of phonetic variant processing of consonants demonstrated by adults might stem in part from patterns of early exposure to statistics of phonetic variants in infant-directed (ID) speech. In particular, we hypothesized that ID speech might involve greater proportions of canonical /t/ pronunciations ...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - May 25, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Spontaneous nasalization after glottal consonants in Thai
Publication date: July 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 75Author(s): Sarah E. Johnson, Marissa Barlaz, Ryan K. Shosted, Brad P. SuttonAbstractSpontaneous nasalization is the emergence of distinctive nasalization in contexts lacking an historical etymological nasal. In Thai, low and mid-low vowels nasalize after /h/ and to a lesser degree after /ʔ/. It has been reasoned that nasalization after /h/ may occur because breathiness and nasalization are acoustically similar; both introduce higher energy at low frequencies and increase spectral tilt. Glottal consonants may generally facilitate nasalization because aerodyn...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - May 25, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Influence of coda stop features on perceived vowel duration
Publication date: July 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 75Author(s): Chelsea SankerAbstractFour experiments tested what cues contribute to English speakers’ perception of vowel duration. Listeners categorized the duration of vowels as ‘long’ or ‘short’ for stimuli produced with voiced, voiceless, breathy voiced, or voiceless aspirated stop codas. Listeners demonstrated a strong ability to perceive vowel duration, though perception was continuous rather than categorical. There were several interacting factors influencing perceived vowel duration, based on expectations set by the presenc...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - May 18, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Cue-shifting between acoustic cues: Evidence for directional asymmetry
Publication date: July 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 75Author(s): Meng Yang, Megha SundaraAbstractPrevious research shows that experience with co-varying cues is neither sufficient nor necessary for listeners to integrate them perceptually. Auditory Enhancement theorists explain this by positing that listeners integrate two cues more readily if the cues enhance each other’s percept. To isolate the role of enhancement from that of experience, we forced English adult listeners to shift attention between two enhancing cues that they do not use phonemically, pitch and breathiness, by reversing the informativen...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - May 17, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Formant dynamics of Spanish vocalic sequences in related speakers: A forensic-voice-comparison investigation
This study investigates the dynamic acoustic properties of 19 vocalic sequences of Standard Peninsular Spanish, showing their potential for forensic voice comparison. Parametric curves (polynomials and discrete cosine transform) were fitted to the formant trajectories of the 19 Spanish vocalic sequences of 54 male speakers, comprising monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs, non-twin brothers and unrelated speakers. Using the curve-fitting estimated coefficients as input to a multivariate-kernel-density formula, cross-validated likelihood ratios were calculated to express the probability of obtaining the observed di...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - May 10, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Intonational structure mediates speech rate normalization in the perception of segmental categories
Publication date: May 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 74Author(s): Jeremy SteffmanAbstractThe question of if and to what extent listeners’ perceptual phonetic categories are sensitive to prosodically driven variability has been a topic of interest in the literature. The present study reports on two experiments which address this question in light of recent research. In Experiment 1, listeners categorized a VOT continuum as /p/ or /b/ in a target syllable (/pɑ/ or /bɑ/). The target was placed in a carrier phrase where the duration and f0 of the pre-target syllable were manipulated. Results suggest listeners...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - April 20, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Language change and linguistic inquiry in a world of multicompetence: Sustained phonetic drift and its implications for behavioral linguistic research
Publication date: May 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 74Author(s): Charles B. ChangAbstractLinguistic studies focusing on monolinguals have often examined individuals with considerable experience using another language. Results of a methodological review suggest that conflating ostensibly ‘multicompetent’ individuals with monolinguals is still common practice. A year-long longitudinal study of speech production demonstrates why this practice is problematic. Adult native English speakers recently arrived in Korea showed significant changes in their production of English stops and vowels (in terms of voi...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - April 13, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Alignment of f0 peak in different pitch accent types affects perception of metrical stress
Publication date: May 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 74Author(s): Katharina Zahner, Sophie Kutscheid, Bettina BraunAbstractIn intonation languages, pitch accents are associated with stressed syllables, therefore accentuation is a sufficient cue to the position of metrical stress in perception. This paper investigates how stress perception in German is affected by different pitch accent types (with different f0 alignments). Experiment 1 showed more errors in stress identification when f0 peaks and stressed syllables were not aligned – despite phonological association of pitch accent and stressed syllable. Er...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - April 7, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Acoustic correlates of word stress in Papuan Malay
Publication date: May 2019Source: Journal of Phonetics, Volume 74Author(s): Constantijn KalandAbstractThe current study investigates acoustic correlates of word stress in Papuan Malay. This language is claimed to exhibit word stress, although empirical evidence is lacking. Moreover, related languages have been shown not to have stress, counter to earlier claims. Studies on stress in Austronesian languages have furthermore struggled to separate phrase level intonation phenomena from word level stress. The current study investigates a set of twelve potential acoustic correlates of stress, covering spectral, temporal and ampl...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - March 25, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Twenty-eight years of vowels: Tracking phonetic variation through young to middle age adulthood
We describe acoustic properties of vowels produced by eleven talkers based on naturalistic speech samples spanning a period of 28 years, from ages 21 to 49. We find that the position of vowels in F1/F2 space shifts towards the periphery with increasing talker age. Based on Generalized Additive Mixed Effects models, we show that this shift is not fully attributable to changes in vowel duration or to segmental context. We discuss the implications of our results for research on aging and speech, and for research in which durational shortening and spectral characteristics of vowels are assumed to reflect a unitary process of...
Source: Journal of Phonetics - March 12, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research