Effects of Early Palliative Care for Family Caregivers of Persons with Advanced Heart Failure: The ENABLE CHF-PC Randomized Controlled Trial (FR440B)
Family caregivers (CGs) provide high levels of care to persons with advanced heart failure and are at high risk for distress and poor quality of life (QoL). (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: James Dionne-Odom, Deborah Ejem, Rachel Wells, Andres Azuero, Macy Stockdill, Konda Keebler, Elizabeth Sockwell, Tims Tims, Sally Engler, Elizabeth Kvale, Raegan Durant, Rodney Tucker, Kathryn Burgio, Salpy Pamboukian, Keith Swetz, Marie Bakitas Source Type: research

Palliative Care Consultation Reduces 30-Day Readmission Rates for Hospitalized Patients with End-Stage Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (FR440C)
End-stage chronic obstructive disease (COPD) has a high level of symptom burden, requirement for long-term oxygen therapy and frequent exacerbations that require hospitalization. Research to date is limited regarding the delivery and impact of palliative care services in patients with end-stage COPD. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Jacqueline Sheehan, Kam Sing Ho, Setareh Alipour, Karan Jatwani, Paaras Kohli, Jennifer Fung Source Type: research

Using Guided Imagery to Address Dyspnea and Spiritual Peace for End-Stage Heart Failure Patients: An Interdisciplinary Approach. (FR440D)
Approximately 5.7 million adults have heart failure (HF), with many reporting poorly symptom leading to poor quality of life. Medications often do not produce adequate relief of symptoms. Cognitive-behavioral strategies, such as guided imagery, are particularly appealing to patients and their informal caregivers. Guided imagery (GI) is a mind-body intervention that uses the power of imagination to bring about change for overall wellness. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Tracy Fasolino Source Type: research

The Student Navigators Project: Improving Access to Early Education in End-of-Life Care for Healthcare Professional Students (FR441A)
The need for quality education regarding end-of-life (EOL) communication is well recognized; however, many healthcare education schools do not have formal curricula on EOL communication. Students report feeling unprepared to discuss patients' decisions, fears, and wishes regarding EOL care (Dickinsson,2011; Fraser,2001). Furthermore, quality education in EOL communication for healthcare students fosters positive attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their families (Chappell, 2017). Finally, these education efforts are more effective when involving interdisciplinary learners (Ferrell,2019). (Source: Journal of Pain...
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Meghan Price, Cherith Godwin, Rachael Mahle, Aaron Tarnasky, Nicole Dalal, Jason Webb, J. Trig Brown, Lucas Wachsmuth Source Type: research

Transition to a Primary Palliative Care Model in the NICU (FR441B)
Transitioning from a specialist palliative care service (SPCS) to primary palliative care (PPC) model in the Neonatal Intensive Care (NICU) requires a systematic approach. A needs assessment identified the high-value staff place on palliative care (PC) services and the desire for the primary care team to serve as the PPC providers. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Hayley Brown, Amy Bruner, Robert Baxter Source Type: research

Using the Electronic Health Record to Identify a Cohort of Seriously Ill Patients from a Primary Care Population Across Three Academic Health Systems (FR441C)
Automated identification of a serious illness population is needed to implement palliative care and advance care planning interventions. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Anne Walling, Javier Sanz, Douglas Bell, Rebecca Sudore, Christine Ritchie, Lisa Gibbs, Maryam Rahimi, Kanan Patel, Kathy Pickell, Neil Wenger Source Type: research

Virtual Visits in Hospice: Lessons Learned and Directions for the Future (FR441D)
Healthcare is evolving at a rapid pace, and technology adaptation has changed the delivery of hospice and palliative care. Tele hospice is an on-demand provision of care, using virtual visits facilitated by electronic tablet-based communication. Hospice caregivers use Angela's Virtual Assist (AVA), an innovative technology that allows the hospice patient and caregiver to have access to face-to-face assistance from triage staff. The AVA program uses Vivify's Remote Patient Monitoring platform and Zoom's communication platform. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Patricia Cameron, Karen Gugala Source Type: research

From Half Empty to Half Full: Using A Growth Mindset to Lead Your Team and Yourself (FR450)
The field of hospice and palliative care is undergoing many changes. This can lead to predictable conflicts and tension as a team attempts to navigate uncertainty and ambiguity. A fixed mindset is a rigid one, and change can precipitate resistance and negativity. A growth mindset embraces change as rich in opportunity, encourages people to give their best effort, creates openness to feedback, leads to increased learning from others, and perpetuates a cycle of growth and development. It has been shown that a growth mindset helps us persist in the face of setbacks, learn from failures, look for new opportunities, and build c...
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Gail Gazelle, Avani Prabhakar, Kerry Oconnor, Allison E. Jordan, William L. Johnson, Paul L. DeSandre Source Type: research

Quality and Value-Based Care for the Newbie: Translation Please! (FR451)
The quality improvement and value-based care realms can initially seem daunting. Everyone seems to be speaking a foreign language. Many of the “words” turn out to be acronyms comprised of words that are often not self-explanatory, or even acronyms of acronyms. And then there's Kaizen, Muri, Mura, Muda, etc. Who came up with this communication system? The different graphs, symbols, plots, pictorials, and tables can feel like arts-and-cr afts for science geeks, until you notice each seems to come with its own detailed rules on what goes where and with which symbols. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Amy L. Davis, Rachelle E. Bernacki, Mamta Bhatnagar, Karl A. Lorenz, Kelly L. Wu Source Type: research

Yesterday a Child, Today a Grown-Up: Reflections on Family and Team Experience of an Abrupt, Non-Linear Transition from Pediatric to Adult Medicine (FR452)
For young adults living with serious illnesses, the transition from pediatrics to adult medical care can be challenging and traumatic, especially if this transition occurs alongside disease progression and complex decision making. Two pediatric palliative clinicians will share their experience preparing patients and families for this transition. For these clinicians, preparing patients is nuanced and complex, as family-centered care is a core tenant of pediatric medicine. Clinicians must establish rapport and trust-building during conversations regarding future planning and adjustment. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Danielle Jonas, April Zehm, Diane Shader Smith, Ilanit Brook Source Type: research

Palliative Care for Everyone: Insider Tips for Teaching Primary Palliative Care to RNs and APRNs (FR453)
Primary palliative care education is a widely embraced solution to the increasing demand for palliative care in the midst of a specialty clinician shortage. RNs and APRNs are in a unique position to incorporate palliative principles into the management of patients with serious illness. In fact, current guidelines from national organizations recommend the integration of palliative care into routine nursing practice across all specialties and practice settings. Yet formal training and education in palliative care is not uniformly integrated in undergraduate or graduate-level nursing curricula. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Rachel Klinedinst, Claudia M. Anderson, Kathleen Fundalinski, Angela Nooner Source Type: research

Gaming the System: Creative, Simple, and Effectives Educational Interventions to Enhance Hospice IDT Learning on Key Clinical and Regulatory Topics (FR454)
Hospice regulatory burden has increased dramatically over the past decade. Keeping physicians, nurses, social workers, chaplains, and other key team members informed and engaged on regulatory, quality, and clinical updates requires creative and innovative solutions. Three topics that have received increased emphasis as as a result of recent regulatory changes include prognostication in the last week of life, medication reconciliation, and interdisciplinary communication. Our team that created novel educational interventions on these topics consisted of two hospice chief medical officers, a leading nurse educator from NHPCO...
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Patrick H. White, Amy Jacobs, Mary G. Mihalyo, Lori Bishop, Keith R. Lagnese Source Type: research

Mapping Out Your Palliative Patients' Needs: A Triage Tool (FR455)
Pediatric palliative care (PPC) has developed significantly over the past decades. As buy-in increases and PPC is more integrated into different specialties, teams may experience overwhelming growth. While positive, substantial progress can also be a stressor in a field with already high rates of professional burnout. With often limited staffing relative to growth in patient volume, an additional challenge for a palliative care team may be developing ways to ensure patient's palliative needs are met while preserving self-care and team wellness. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Alice Bass, Steven Smith, Kelli Leith Source Type: research

Healing Moral Injury of Seriously Ill Vietnam Veterans: A Veterans Affairs (VA) and National Hospice Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO) Collaboration (FR456)
Approximately 2.7 million Americans served in the military during the Vietnam War (1961-1975). 58,000 died, and many others endured traumatic experiences in combat. Soldiers returning home after the war often faced scorn in the popular press and in their communities. As a result, many Vietnam-era Veterans have experienced prolonged post-war symptoms of medical, psychological, and spiritual distress including moral injury. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Karen Blackstone, Anca Dinescu, Briana Currie-Gill, Carol A. Ramsey-Lucas, Mona S. Wilson, Joy A. Laramie, Robert Morgan, Patricia Watson Source Type: research

Sojourn's Scholars Present: In the Expert's Studio (FR457)
Clinician/patient communication is a central skill of the HPM professional. While a variety of methods are used to teach communication skills, the opportunity to learn directly from a leader in the field is rare. Even more rare is the opportunity to hear about their personal and professional development. Participants will hear the expert comment on their strategies, thought processes, and development. Our presentation is based upon a “Master's Class” in which the audience learns from the demonstration of skill by an acknowledged expert and a discussion of their development and approach. (Source: Journal of Pain...
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Toby C. Campbell, Lynn F. Reinke, Caroline J. Hurd, Abraham A. Brody, Arif H. Kamal, Elizabeth Lindenberger Source Type: research

Not Just for Addiction: The Palliative Clinician's Guide to Using Buprenorphine for Pain (FR458)
Buprenorphine is widely used as a treatment for patients with opioid use disorders, but has also been shown to be an effective treatment for cancer and neuropathic pain, with unique pharmacologic properties that give it several advantages over traditional opioids. Buprenorphine is associated with less analgesic tolerance, and is less likely to cause respiratory depression and constipation than other opioids. Buprenorphine also does not cause immunosuppression, sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, or hypogonadism like traditional opioids. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Amy A. Case, Mellar P. Davis, Sidra Anwar, Eric Hansen, Justin Kullgren, Sandra L. Pedraza Source Type: research

Physician Assisted Death: Last Resort Option or Out of Bounds? (FR459)
Recent years have seen increasing acceptance of physician assisted death (PAD) in the United States with there now being eight states and the District of Columbia that have some form of legal PAD. This growing acceptance, however, continues to be met with resistance from a number of groups based in part on differing views on religion, morality, authority, and concerns regarding disability rights. What are the sources of conflict around PAD? Much of the disagreement is grounded in true differences of opinion, but at least some of the conflict arises from misunderstandings and lack of agreement regarding definitions of terms...
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Thomas Carroll, Timothy E. Quill Source Type: research

Impact of Voluntary Opioid Taper Program in Cancer Survivors (FR460B)
ASCO Clinical Practice Guidelines for the management of chronic pain in cancer survivors recommend reducing or discontinuing opioids when no longer warranted, although if and how this can be achieved in practice is unknown. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Marcin Chwistek, Leah Holben, Molly Collins, Kathleen Murphy, Leigh Kinczewski, Sheila Amrhein, Eric Ross Tags: Paper Sessions Source Type: research

Palliative Care Needs of Young and Middle Age Adults (20-59) with Cancer: A Pilot Study (FR460C)
The diagnosis of a potentially life-threatening cancer is a documented stress that encompasses biological, cognitive and socioemotional dimensions. Early introduction to palliative care is important in addressing stress and its outcomes. For young and middle-aged adult (20-59), this diagnosis creates unique needs of which little is known. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Mary Anne Hales Reynolds Source Type: research

Patterns of Storage, Use, and Disposal of Prescription Opioids by Parents of Children with Cancer (FR460D)
Multiple studies have demonstrated that adults do not store prescription opioids safely. Increased prescription opioid rates have led to an increased incidence of opioid poisonings in children and adolescents. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Kevin Madden, Eduardo Bruera Source Type: research

A Palliative Care Consult Trigger Tool for Trauma Patients (FR461A)
Trauma patients are at increased risk of unmet palliative care needs for many reasons. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Angelo P. Canedo, Alan Roth, R. Jonathan Robitsek, Angelo R. Canedo Source Type: research

Designing a ‘Patient Values Tab’ for the Electronic Health Record (EHR): An Investigation of the Needs and Perspectives of Key Stakeholders at a Dedicated Cancer Center (FR461B)
Patient-centered care respects a patient's personal values, including what means most in life and defines living well for that patient. The EHR provides access to myriad medical details, but rarely reveals a patient's personal values, which provide a touchstone for shared decision-making throughout illness. Our dedicated cancer center is creating a new EHR “Patient Values Tab,” which will serve as a centralized home for documentation related to patient values, goals and preferences. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Anjali Desai, Gilad Kuperman, Chelsea Michael, Rajiv Agarwal, Mary Ann Connor, Andrew Epstein, Dana Kramer, Camila Bernal, Judith Nelson Source Type: research

Popular Smartphone Apps to Improve Wellness and Reduce Stress: Science or Snake Oil? (FR461C)
In an oversaturated market of commercially available smartphone apps for psychosocial self-care, providers, patients, and consumers interested in mental health-related apps may wonder which, if any, are efficacious. Metrics available to consumers include user popularity and media buzz. When an app purports to be based in science, its “scientific backing” may not reach classical standards of clinical rigor. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Nancy Lau, Alison O'Daffer, Susannah Colt, Joyce Yi-Frazier, Tonya Palermo, Elizabeth McCauley, Abby Rosenberg Source Type: research

Stage Two in the Development of the Responding to Urgency of Need in Palliative Care (RUN-PC) Triage Tool: Results of an International Discrete Choice Experiment (FR461D)
As demand for palliative care (PC) grows, an increasingly diverse patient population must be triaged to receive finite clinical resources. There is currently no evidence-based, equitable method by which to manage waiting lists. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Beth Russell, Sara Vogrin, Vijaya Sundararajan, Anna Collins, Jodie Burchell, Brian Le, Peter Hudson, Jennifer Philip Source Type: research

Health Insurance 101: Opportunities for Palliative Care (FR471)
Palliative care providers are often unfamiliar with the complexities of the health insurance industry. Yet, health plans, vendors and other risk-bearing health institutions provide a new frontier for palliative care innovation. They offer unique opportunities for program development to meet the needs of millions of seriously ill, vulnerable, high cost-high need Americans. Palliative care leaders must cultivate new skills to engage in this unfamiliar terrain, offering pioneering partnership opportunities. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Dana Lustbader, Tara C. Friedman, Tanya L. Stewart Source Type: research

To Not Be Missing Forever...That Seems Important: Ethical, Clinical, and Practical Aspects of Reuniting Patients and Families (FR472)
Health care systems are increasingly caring for patients who are unable to participate in decision making and seem to be without involved surrogates —individuals who are socially isolated, undomiciled, or in fractured families. While the work of reuniting the “missing” with families has implications beyond medical decision making, this is often the reason palliative care clinicians are consulted. When the voice of patient is silent and sur rogates unavailable, patients are more vulnerable as a clinician's thoughts and judgments are not mediated nor enriched by a dialogue which captures the unique history,...
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Eugene Choi, Terry Altilio, Annie Schneider Source Type: research

Emotional Intelligence for the Interdisciplinary Team (FR473)
High functioning, resilient hospice and palliative care teams do not happen by chance. To build resilience, teams need to be educated, developed, and guided over time by a consistent vision and process. Defined as the ability to monitor one's own and others' feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them, and to use this information to guide one's thinking and actions, emotional intelligence is supported by a growing body of evidence as a reliable path to increased resilience. The four domains of emotional intelligence (self-awareness, self-management, social-awareness, and relationship management) readily apply to hosp...
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Denise Hess, Glen I. Komatsu Source Type: research

My Heart Will Go On: Analyzing the Heartbeat Project as a Tool in Palliative and Bereavement Care (FR474)
The heartbeat project is a specialized form of legacy building for patients and families utilizing innovative technology in which the heartbeat of a patient, adult or neonate is recorded with a Bluetooth stethoscope and blended with a song that the patient and/or family indicates is meaningful. This innovative form of integrative and complementary therapy utilizes a board-certified music therapist who guides the patient and/or family through the therapeutic process of choosing the song(s) for this project. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Mary F. Cleveland, Kim Hamrick, Jasmine Vickers, Chao-Hui S. Huang, Rodney O. Tucker Source Type: research

Reimagine End of Life —Humanities and Spirituality Help Spark a Community Movement Around Dying and Living (FR475)
Death and dying are no longer part of the natural cycle of individual, family and community life. Over 80% of us say we want to die at home surrounded by loved ones, yet fewer than 20% of us do. What's more, over 25% of the population is grieving a death at any given time. Yet, cultural norms commonly prevent us from openly discussing feelings and practical matters surrounding serious illness, caregiving, dying and grieving, often engendering a sense of isolation within individuals and families pertaining to these issues. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Brad Wolfe, Ira R. Byock, Jeannie Blaustein, Cynthia Carter Perrilliat, Kenneth E. Rosenfeld Source Type: research

Telemedicine: the Pediatric Palliative Perspective (FR476)
Telemedicine is perfectly suited to provide palliative care to children with complex chronic conditions who face many barriers in their ability to travel to clinic. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Krishelle L. Marc-Aurele, Anna Kuelker, Virginia Stevens, Kimberly A. Bower Source Type: research

‘The Worst Part Is Not the Pain; It Is the Loneliness’: Detecting and Managing the Silent Epidemic of Loneliness (FR477)
It is well known that loneliness is a significant risk factor for premature mortality and is comparable with the effects of smoking. However, little attention has been paid to the terrible impact of loneliness and social isolation experienced by seriously ill patients. On the provider side, palliative clinicians often feel profoundly isolated from the traditional curative medical culture exclusively focused on diseases. Being alone and loneliness are different but related. Social isolation is the objective physical separation from other people while loneliness is the subjective distress feeling of being alone or separated....
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: V.J. Periyakoil, Timothy E. Quill Source Type: research

Instituting a Life-Changing Emergency Response Plan: Because Life Happens to All of Us (FR478)
As palliative care professionals, we pride ourselves on advocating for and supporting our patients, their families and even other staff members during challenging times. While providing excellent care to others, however, we can overlook the needs of our own team members. Prior to our dedicated action plan, the spouse of a team member died. When our leadership team's uncoordinated response to this tragic event fell short, a member within one of our teams approached her site director. She calmly stated: “We can do better. We do this every day for our patients and families. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Joanne G. Kuntz, Tammie E. Quest, Jabeen Taj, Paul L. DeSandre, Rebecca Chester, Lynn Bunch O'Neill, Michael Schmitt, Kimberly A. Curseen Source Type: research

‘Learning the Ropes’—Preparing Palliative Care Clinicians for Outpatient Practice (FR479)
Outpatient palliative care (PC) practices are increasingly prevalent as the recognized value of concurrent palliative- and disease-directed care grows in various disease types. PC providers who practice exclusively in a consultative inpatient model, as well as learners (such as Hospice and Palliative Medicine (HPM) fellows, Advanced Practice Provider (APP) students, and clinicians transitioning from other specialties) are often unprepared for the unique clinical challenges of outpatient PC practice. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Eric R. Goodlev, Mollie A. Biewald, Esme Finlay, Kristina B. Newport, Kira A. Skavinski, Christian T. Sinclair Source Type: research

Turning Your Burning Clinical Question into a Research Project: A Primer for Developing Hospice and Palliative Research Collaborations (FR480)
Successful clinical research that advances palliative care practice necessitates close collaboration among clinicians, researchers, and study site administrators. All three partners are essential in planning and conducting a study that is practical and scientifically rigorous. There are limited guiding resources on how to build relationships and collaborate among study team members with different educational backgrounds, expertise, motivation/missions, roles and functions. A 2018 survey of AAHPM/HPNA members (N=50) revealed that 92% are interested in learning practical skills for clinical research yet report many barriers ...
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Susan Lysaght Hurley, Joan G. Carpenter, Elizabeth J. Chuang, Christine A. Fortney, Seiko Izumi, Susan DeSanto-Madeya, Veerawat Phongtankuel Source Type: research

Measuring the Impact of Pediatric Palliative Care on Hospital Utilization and Costs Among Children with Complex Chronic Conditions Approaching Death (FR481A)
The impact of inpatient pediatric palliative care consultation is unknown, particularly among children with medical complexity. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Julie Childers, Elisabeth Dellon, Kanecia Zimmerman Tags: Paper Sessions Source Type: research

Mortality of Extremely Premature Neonates with Severe Intraventricular Hemorrhage (FR481B)
Severe intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is thought to be a leading cause of death among extremely premature neonates. Because other life-threatening conditions also occur in this population, this study sought to determine whether severe IVH is truly an independent predictor of mortality. Death among extremely premature neonates with severe IVH commonly occurs following withdrawal of life-sustaining medical treatment. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Christopher Collura, Amy Weaver, Kristin Mara, Reese Clark, Elise Carey, William Carey Source Type: research

What Defines High Quality End-of-Life Care for Children with Cancer? A Stakeholder-Driven Qualitative Study (FR481C)
Among adults with cancer, measures commonly used to assess high quality end-of-life care (EOLC) include prompt hospice enrollment and avoidance of chemotherapy or hospitalizations in the last month of life. Yet, for children with cancer, no quality measures exist to evaluate EOLC or improve care delivery, and adults' quality measures may not apply. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Prasanna Ananth, Randall Li, Noora Reffat, Sophia Mun, Tannaz Sedghi, Madeline Bilodeau, Cary Gross, Xiaomei Ye, Jennifer Snaman, Joanne Wolfe Source Type: research

Self-Reported Irritability in Children with Advanced Cancer: Findings from the PediQUEST Study (FR481D)
Children with cancer experience irritability yet it is poorly understood and characterized. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Christina Ullrich, Clement Ma, Hasan Al-Sayegh, Rachel Holder, Veronica Dussel, Joanne Wolfe Source Type: research

Toward a Better Understanding of How We Are Seen: Identifying Indirect Feedback (FR482A)
Much of communication education is focused on the content of our words. To complement this, we have developed a course to teach learners to assess verbal and non-verbal reactions (indirect feedback) to what they say. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: David Harris, Kathleen Neuendorf, Rachel Taliercio, Eric Yudelevich, Jennifer L. Ramsey Source Type: research

Teaching Pain Management in the Era of the Opioid Epidemic: A Team Based Intervention (FR482B)
Guidelines for safe opioid prescribing practices have largely excluded palliative care populations and there is a general lack of evidence for appropriate risk mitigation measures in this population. In lieu of such guidelines many have recommended using a “universal precautions” approach using tools from the chronic pain arena. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Alana Sagin, Jill P. Farabelli, Tanya J. Uritsky, Sharon M. Kimberly, Kava Schafer, Daniel De Joseph, Pallavi Kumar Source Type: research

You Should Probably Write This Down: Effective Documentation in Communication Skills Training (FR482C)
Critical conversations on serious diagnoses, goals of care, and end of life planning rely on effective communication. Communication skills training programs emphasize interpersonal communication, though studies repeatedly indicate that patients retain very little of what is said in medical encounters. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Reggie T. Saldivar, Karen Knops Source Type: research

A Novel Curriculum on Writing Simulated Patient Cases for Teaching Communication Skills (FR482D)
Patient communication is a crucial skill that impacts how patients cope with illness. The most effective communication training is supervised practice with simulated patients (SPs), trained actors who portray patients based on written SP cases. Despite the importance of communication training, little guidance exists on how to write cases. Over 90% of communication educators in our national survey desired instruction on case-writing. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: April Christensen, Rene N. Claxton Source Type: research

Delirium Whodunnit?: A Mystery-Based Group Learning Activity to Facilitate Development of Clinical Problem Solving Skills (FR482E)
Gamification of classroom learning is becoming more common in health professional education and may be more effective in improving learner knowledge, skills, and satisfaction. However, there is no published use of educational games to teach palliative care. This innovative activity applies game principles to teach learners clinical problem solving skills relevant to delirium management in palliative care patients. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Jennifer Ku Source Type: research

Being Your Best Self: How to Engage Allies, Mentors, and Colleagues in the Pursuit of Excellence in Leadership (Cambia)
Participants who register for the session will be surveyed about questions they have about leadership pertaining to having allies, mentors and collegues. The moderator will select questions from the survey and encourage questions from the participants for the panel to discuss in regards to what has been learned about becoming a leader in palliative care. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Edo Banach, J. Randall Curtis, Constance Dahlin, Barbara L. Jones, Abby R. Rosenberg, Debra Lotstein, Peggy Maguire Source Type: research

The Practice of Palliative Medicine in Developing Countries —Part Three (SA500)
Please join AAHPM's International Scholars for a panel discussion. Each scholar will present for 10-15 minutes on the state of the practice of palliative care in their home country, with an emphasis on the roles of physicians, nurses, and other healthcare providers; the status of education and research in the field; and the unique challenges facing patients and providers. There will be time allotted after each presentation to field questions and dialogue from the audience. Prepare to be educated and inspired by these accomplished individuals who are leading and advancing the field of hospice and palliative medicine in thei...
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Waleed Nafae, Avetis Babakhanyan, John K. Weru, Aanchal Satija, Geraldine Ndukwu Source Type: research

Let's Think Through This Together: Helping Learners Develop Clinical Reasoning Skills and Helping Faculty Add to Their Entrustable Professional Activities and Curricular Milestone Toolboxes (SA503)
As learners acquire medical knowledge and facts, they must mentally consider, organize, and select the next logical step in a patient's diagnosis or treatment. This medical problem solving, or clinical reasoning, is skill development that requires critical thinking and organized processing. As educators, explaining one's own clinical reasoning or “showing your work” is powerful role modeling that aids learner development. Furthermore, assessing a learner's clinical reasoning is important for faculty differentiating between a learner's good guess or sound acquisition of a thoughtful problem-solving approach. (So...
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Lindy H. Landzaat, Jillian Gustin, Lori L. Olson Source Type: research

Voluntarily Stopping Eating and Drinking (VSED): A Viable, Lesser Known Palliative Option of Last Resort (SA504)
Voluntarily Stopping Eating and Drinking (VSED) has recently gotten attention as a viable “last resort” palliative option for patients who want to escape their current medical situation through a self initiated death, but might not qualify for a physician assisted death or might not want it even if they did qualify. VSED is primarily under the patients own control, and it requires a tremendous amount of discipline and persistence to successfully complete. Physicians are not direclty needed to carry out VSED, but they should be a central part of the evaluation process to ensure decision making capacity, and then...
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Timothy E. Quill, Robert Horowitz, V.J. Periyakoil Source Type: research

Balancing Democracy with Efficiency: Strategies for Leading an Interdisciplinary Palliative Care Team (SA505)
One of the most celebrated attributes of palliative care (PC) is its interdisciplinary nature. PC teams often include providers from an array of disciplines, including medicine, nursing, social work, pharmacy, and pastoral care. There is little doubt that patients and families facing serious illness benefit from a comprehensive and collaborative approach that employs a broad range of knowledge and skill sets. Yet the same diversity that renders PC so effective for patients may create challenges in maintaining healthy, integrated, and efficient PC teams. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Rachel Klinedinst, Laura Dingfield, Jill P. Farabelli, Niharika Ganta Source Type: research

Beyond the SSRI: Assessment and Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in Pediatric Palliative Care (SA506)
Depression and anxiety are prevalent in pediatric palliative care and a source of significant distress for patients and parents. Despite increasing recognition of the need to address these symptoms, many palliative care providers have limited psychiatric training and limited access to psychology services. This session includes pediatric palliative care providers trained in adult and child psychiatry and psychology to increase attendees' skills to address these symptoms in children, teenagers, and young adults cared for by pediatric palliative care teams. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Natalie Jacobowski, Linda-Maritza Radbill, Natalie Truba Source Type: research

Setting SEXpectations with Patients and Families: Fostering Sex Positive Palliative Care Among Interdisciplinary Team Members (SA507)
Palliative care clinicians are expected to be able to discuss difficult and uncomfortable topics with skill and ease. In her seminal piece On Death and Dying, Dr. K übler-Ross emphasized that healthcare professionals who are more willing to embrace the awkward by diving into discussions of death and dying are more likely to come across patients willing to do the same. This sentiment also applies for issues related to sexuality; however, healthcare professional s often neglect sexuality as an important aspect of life, especially after a serious illness diagnosis. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - January 25, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Stephanie C. Chando, Erin M. Haley, Monique Neault, Caitlyn Moore, Mindi Roeser Source Type: research