Specialist palliative care service for children with life-threatening conditions: A nationwide survey of availability and utilization
According to the International Observatory on End of Life Care, the level of pediatric palliative care in Japan is Level 2 (capacity building) and the current status of palliative care for children in Japan has not been clarified. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - June 14, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Nobuyuki Yotani, Yoshiyuki Kizawa Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Resource use during the last 6 months of life among COPD patients: a population level study
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients often have several comorbidities, such as cardiovascular diseases (CVD) or lung cancer (LC), which might influence resource use in the final months of life. However, no previous studies documented resource use in end-of-life COPD patients at a population level, thereby differentiating whether COPD patients die of their COPD, CVD or LC. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - June 11, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Kristof Faes, Joachim Cohen, Lieven Annemans Source Type: research

Inter-rater agreement of intensivists evaluating the goal-concordance of preference-sensitive ICU interventions
Goal-concordant care has been identified as an important outcome of advance care planning and shared decision-making initiatives. However validated methods for measuring goal-concordance are needed. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - June 11, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Alison E. Turnbull, Sarina K. Sahetya, Elizabeth Colantuoni, Josephine Kweku, Roozbeh Nikooie, J. Randall Curtis Source Type: research

PC-FACS June 4, 2018
Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - June 11, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Andie Bernard Source Type: research

Prior trauma exposure and serious illness at end of life: A national study of children in the US foster care system from 2005 to 2015
Children in foster care suffer with serious illness at end of life. However, the relationship between prior trauma exposure and serious illness has received little empirical attention. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - June 8, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Lisa C. Lindley, Elspeth M. Slayter Source Type: research

The views of homeless people and healthcare professionals on palliative care and the desirability of setting up a consultation service: a focus group study
Palliative care for homeless people is often given late, if at all. Professionals in both palliative care and shelter care are often insufficiently equipped to provide this complex care. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - June 7, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Hanna T. Klop, Sophie I. van Dongen, Anneke L. Francke, Anke J.E. de Veer, Judith A.C. Rietjens, Jaap R.G. Gootjes, Bregje D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Characteristics and Outcomes of Psychology Referrals in Palliative Care Department
Psychologists can provide unique contributions to interdisciplinary palliative care. Despite research indicating high distress in palliative care cancer patients, little has been reported regarding the feasibility and practice of psychology in this setting. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - June 6, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Sujin Ann-Yi, Eduardo Bruera, Jimin Wu, Diane D. Liu, Monica Agosta, Janet L. Williams, Vishidha Reddy Balankari, Cindy L. Carmack Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

An Examination of State Level Personality Variation and Physician Aid in Dying Legislation
Physician aid in dying is a controversial topic in the United States, and legislation exists in some states. Personality traits are associated with preferences for end of life care, and also tend to cluster systematically across states and other geographic regions. Such clustering of personality traits could relate to legislation including physician aid in dying. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - June 6, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: James Gerhart, Elaine Chen, Sean O ’Mahony, John Burns, Michael Hoerger Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Trends of earlier palliative care consultation in advanced cancer patients receiving palliative radiation therapy
The American Society of Clinical Oncology recommends that all patients with metastatic disease receive dedicated palliative care (PC) services early in their illness, ideally via interdisciplinary care teams. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - June 6, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Sanders Chang, Keith Sigel, Nathan E. Goldstein, Juan Wisnivesky, Kavita V. Dharmarajan Source Type: research

Validity, reliability and responsiveness of the Thai Palliative Care Outcome Scale staff and patient versions among cancer patients
Palliative care is now part of Universal Health Coverage goals. Measurement of person-centred outcomes is central to determining quality and effectiveness. Guidance in psychometrics requires tools applied in new settings to have their properties tested. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - June 6, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Panate Pukrittayakamee, Ladarat Sapinum, Panadda Suwan, Richard Harding Source Type: research

Denosumab
is a human monoclonal antibody that binds Receptor Activator of Nuclear factor Kappa β Ligand (RANKL), a cytokine and member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. This prevents interaction between RANKL and the RANK receptor on osteoclasts, inhibiting their maturation, function and survival. Consequentially, bone resorption is inhibited. Bisphosphonates also inhibit osteoclast function (via a different mechanism) and thereby have similar effects. Although denosumab and bisphosphonates share indications and undesirable effects, the latter drugs are significantly less expensive. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - June 1, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Andrew Wilcock, Sarah Charlesworth, Claire Stark Toller, Rahul Girish, Mary Mihalyo, Paul Howard Source Type: research

The Spiritual Event of Serious Illness
Thought leaders in palliative care have long recognized the spiritual implications of illness, including Dame Cicely Saunders ’ groundbreaking concept of suffering as comprised of physical, emotional, social, and spiritual sources of pain. However despite such recognition, spirituality remains an oft-neglected component of the bio-psychosocial spiritual model of caregiving in serious illness. We aim in this manuscript to highlight, through an in depth account of patients’ experiences and attitudes, the concept of illness as a “spiritual event.” (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 29, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Tracy A. Balboni, Michael J. Balboni Source Type: research

Risk Factors Associated With Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea in the Week Prior to the Next Cycle and Impact of Nausea on Quality of Life Outcomes
Despite current advances in antiemetic treatments, between 19% to 58% of oncology patients experience chemotherapy-induced nausea (CIN). (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 29, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Komal P. Singh, Kord M. Kober, Anand A. Dhruva, Elena Flowers, Steve M. Paul, Marilyn J. Hammer, Frances Cartwright, Fay Wright, Yvette P. Conley, Jon D. Levine, Christine Miaskowski Source Type: research

Spirituality and Quality of Life in Black Patients with Cancer Pain
The objective of this study was to examine the associations between spirituality and overall quality of life (QOL) and individual QOL domains in Black patients with cancer pain. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 29, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Jinbing Bai, Andrea Brubaker, Salimah H. Meghani, Deborah W. Bruner, Katherine A. Yeager Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Overview of Systematic Reviews of Advance Care Planning: Summary of Evidence and Global Lessons
Advance care planning (ACP) involves important decision-making about future medical needs. The high volume and disparate nature of ACP research make it difficult to grasp the evidence and derive clear policy lessons for policymakers and clinicians. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 25, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Geronimo Jimenez, Woan Shin Tan, Amrit K. Virk, Chan Kee Low, Josip Car, Andy Hau Yan Ho Source Type: research

Comparison of EORTC QLQ-C30 and PRO-CTCAETM questionnaires on six symptom items
Clinical studies have over the past decade paid increasing attention to health-related quality of life(HRQOL) data. Multiple questionnaires are often administered resulting in overlapping questions increasing patient burden. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 25, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Gry Assam Taarnh øj, Fiona Kennedy, Kate Absolom, Christina Bæksted, Ivan Vogelius, Christoffer Johansen, Galina Velikova, Helle Pappot Source Type: research

Language used by health care professionals to describe dying at an acute care hospital
To understand the language used to describe the deterioration and death of patients in an acute academic tertiary care centre, and to identify whether patient diagnoses or palliative care(PC) involvement was associated with clearer descriptions of this process. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 22, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Kirsten Wentlandt, Philippe Toupin, Natalia Novosedlik, Lisa W. Le, Camilla Zimmermann, Ebru Kaya Source Type: research

Authors' Response
To the Editor: (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 21, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Akhila Reddy, Yvonne Heung, Eduardo Bruera Tags: Letter Source Type: research

Caution, Vigilance, and Personalization: A Must for Any Opioid Conversion
It is with great enthusiasm that we read the letter written by Foxwell and Uritsky in response to our study “The Conversion Ratio from Intravenous Hydromorphone to Oral Opioids in Cancer Patients”.1 Our study concluded after retrospectively reviewing the charts of 394 cancer patients that 1mg of intravenous (IV) hydromorphone is equivalent to 2.5 mg of oral hydromorphone and 11.46 mg of morphine equiv alent daily dose (MEDD). A ratio of 1:2 from IV to oral hydromorphone was recommended in patients receiving high doses of IV hydromorphone. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 21, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Akhila Reddy, Yvonne Heung, Eduardo Bruera Source Type: research

Hydromorphone Conversion Dilemma: A Millennial Problem
We read with great interest the recent study by Reddy et al. (2017) which recommended a new opioid conversion ratio of 1 mg intravenous (IV) hydromorphone to 2.5 mg oral (PO) hydromorphone and 11.46 mg of oral morphine equivalent daily dose (MEDD).1 The authors have adapted this ratio at their institution and conclude that utilizing these new ratios may allow for more rapid opioid titrations, improved pain management, and may ultimately decrease hospital length of stay.1 (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 21, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Anessa M. Foxwell, Tanya J. Uritsky Source Type: research

Immune checkpoint inhibitor toxicity review for the palliative care clinician
Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) have opened an exciting chapter in the treatment of patients with advanced cancer. For the palliative care clinician, however, ICI present several new challenges, including new ways to define treatment success, as well as treatment-related toxicities which differ in nature and timing from traditional chemotherapy. In this article, we review the mechanism of action of immune checkpoint inhibitors, as well as selected published data supporting the efficacy of ICI in patients with advanced cancer. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 21, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Eric D. Hansen, Xiao Wang, Amy A. Case, Igor Puzanov, Tom Smith Source Type: research

‘The thing that really gets me is the future’: Symptomatology in Older Homeless Adults in the HOPE HOME Study
The homeless population is aging. Older homeless adults experience premature development of age-related conditions and an elevated symptom burden. Little is known about symptom experience among older homeless adults. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 18, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Adam Bazari, Maria Patanwala, Lauren M. Kaplan, Colette L. Auerswald, Margot B. Kushel Source Type: research

PC-FACS May 1, 2018
Background: Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is implicated in bone metastasis and cancer progression.1 Can IL-6 blockade reduce bone fractures and improve quality of life for patients with skeletal metastases? (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 15, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Andie Bernard Source Type: research

Exploring Canadian Physicians ’ Experiences Providing Medical Assistance in Dying: A Qualitative Study
MAiD allows a practitioner to administer or prescribe medication for the purpose of ending a patient ’s life. In 2016, Canada was the latest country, following several European countries and American states, to legalize physician-assisted death. Although some studies report on physician attitudes towards MAiD or describe patient characteristics, there are few that explore the professional challen ges faced by physicians who provide MAiD. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 15, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Narges Khoshnood, Marie-Clare Hopwood, Bhadra Lokuge, Allison Kurahashi, Anastasia Tobin, Sarina Isenberg, Amna Husain Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Advance care planning in a multi-cultural family-centric community: A qualitative study of healthcare professionals ’, patients’ and caregivers’ perspectives
Advance care planning has been shown to improve end-of-life care but it was developed in the USA and most research has been conducted in western communities. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 15, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Sumytra Menon, Marijke Kars, Chetna Malhotra, Alastair V. Campbell, J.J.M. van Delden Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Pain in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients: a multicenter study
Pain is a common complaint in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients, yet is often inadequately assessed and undertreated. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 15, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Tatiana Talya Fleishman, Jacob Dreiher, Pesach Shvartman Source Type: research

Comparison of coping, psychological distress, and level of functioning in patients with gastric and colorectal cancer prior to adjuvant chemotherapy
Patients with gastrointestinal cancers are at high risk for functional problems that are generally accompanied by a decline in their overall status and intense psychological distress. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 15, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Caterina Calder ón, Paula Jimenez-Fonseca, Carlos Jara, Raquel Hernández, Eva Martínez de Castro, Sonal Varma, Ismael Ghanem, Alberto Carmona-Bayonas Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Talking About Palliative Sedation With the Family: Informed Consent vs. Assent and a Better Framework for Explaining Potential Risks
Several studies and international guidelines on palliative sedation have been published during the last 2  decades.1 Clinical guidelines include a recommended decision-making process that focuses on patient consent for palliative sedation.1 However, clinicians face difficulties when the patient cannot communicate because of disease progression, and empirical studies have demonstrated that about half of all the patients have lost this capacity at initiation of palliative sedation.2 Families are an important proxy, but quantitative research shows that about one-third of family members develop high levels of distress bec...
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 14, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Jun Hamano, Tatsuya Morita, Masanori Mori, Yosuke Uchitomi Tags: Letter Source Type: research

Talking about palliative sedation with the family: informed consent versus assent and a better framework for explaining potential risks
Several studies and international guidelines on palliative sedation have been published over the last two decades1. Clinical guidelines include a recommended decision-making process that focuses on patient consent for palliative sedation1. However, clinicians face difficulties when the patient cannot communicate due to disease progression, and empirical studies have demonstrated that about half of all patients have lost this capacity at initiation of palliative sedation2. Families are an important proxy, but quantitative research shows that about one-third of family members develop high levels of distress due to the burden...
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 14, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Jun Hamano, Tatsuya Morita, Masanori Mori, Yosuke Uchitomi Source Type: research

An Analysis of Palliative Care Development in Africa: A Ranking based on Region-Specific Macro-Indicators
To date, there is no study comparing palliative care (PC) development among African countries. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 14, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: John Y. Rhee, Eduardo Garralda, Eve Namisango, Emmanuel Luyirika, Liliana de Lima, Richard A. Powell, Jes ús López-Fidalgo, Carlos Centeno Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Geriatric Oncology, Spirituality, and Palliative Care
Cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality for older individuals. Palliative care is essential to improve the outcome of cancer treatment in terms of quality of life and treatment satisfaction. This review examines the influence of spirituality on aging in general and on the management of older cancer patients.A spiritual perspective has been associated with successful aging, and with better tolerance of physical and emotional stress, including the ability to cope with serious diseases and with isolation. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 14, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Lodovico Balducci Source Type: research

Author Index
(Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 11, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 11, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 11, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Source Type: research

It Is Not What You Think: Associations Between Perceived Cognitive and Physical Status and Prognostic Understanding in Patients With Advanced Cancer
Patients with advanced cancer often overestimate their time left to live. Those who have heightened awareness of their cognitive and physical deficits at the end of life may have a better prognostic understanding. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 9, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Keiko Kurita, Eugenia L. Siegler, M. Cary Reid, Renee C. Maciejewski, Holly G. Prigerson Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Validation of the Amharic Version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-Am) for Assessment of Cancer Related Fatigue in Ethiopian Cancer Patients
Even though cancer related fatigue (CRF) is a highly prevalent and distressing symptom associated with cancer and its treatment; it is mostly under-screened, under-assessed and under-treated. The Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) is a reliable and valid instrument to assess CRF. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 9, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Girma Tekle Gebremariam, Abel Tesfaye Anshabo, Wondemagegnhu Tigeneh, Ephrem Engidawork Tags: Brief Methodological Report Source Type: research

It ’s not what you think: Associations between perceived cognitive and physical status and prognostic understanding in patients with advanced cancer
Patients with advanced cancer often overestimate their time left to live. Those who have heightened awareness of their cognitive and physical deficits at the end of life may have a better prognostic understanding. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 9, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Keiko Kurita, Eugenia L. Siegler, M. Cary Reid, Renee C. Maciejewski, Holly G. Prigerson Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Quality of Life, Symptoms, and Self-Management Strategies After Gastroesophageal Cancer Surgery
The most common and effective treatment strategy for gastroesophageal cancer is surgery. Surgical procedures (esophagectomy, gastrectomy) are invasive and complex, and risk for postoperative complications is high (up to 40%).1 Postoperative recovery is slow, with impairments in quality of life (QOL) that can persist ten years after surgery.2 Nutritional symptoms are common (nausea, vomiting, early satiety, diarrhea, pain), and often result in severe malnutrition.3 These symptoms and associated eating problems are often a major source of anxiety for patients postoperatively. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 9, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Oliver S. Eng, Jae Y. Kim, Nora Ruel, Dan J. Raz, Loretta Erhunmwunsee, Laleh G. Melstrom, Joseph Chao, Yanghee Woo, Joseph Kim, Virginia Sun Source Type: research

Validation of the Dyspnea Exertion Scale of Breathlessness in people with life-limiting illness
Although chronic breathlessness is common in life-limiting illnesses, validated, feasible instruments to measure functional impact of the symptom in this population are scarce. We aimed to validate the Dyspnea Exertion Scale (DES) compared with the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) breathlessness scale for test-retest reliability, concurrent validity and responsiveness in people with life-limiting illness. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 9, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Jacob Sandberg, Miriam J. Johnson, David C. Currow B.MED., Magnus Ekstr öm Tags: Brief Methodological Report Source Type: research

The paradox of hospice for caregivers of cancer patients
There is a plethora of research noting the challenges of caring for a loved one at the end of life, but is less is known about the timeline of caregivers ’ quality of life once a family enrolls in hospice care. Our prior work has shown that hospice caregivers can be successful involved in the care planning process, and do benefit from problem solving intervention.1,2 Numerous studies have tried to define and measure QoL, and most have found it to b e less than desirable for family caregivers.3-5 The purpose of this study was to examine the trajectory of the QoL of family caregivers of hospice patients. (Source: Journ...
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 3, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Audrey S. Wallace, Debra Parker Oliver, George Demiris, Karla Washington, Jamie Smith Source Type: research

Secondary Traumatization and Proneness to Dissociation Among Palliative Care Workers: A Cross-Sectional Study
Exposure to dying patients can contribute to secondary traumatic stress (STS) among palliative care workers. Peritraumatic dissociation (PETD), an individual's personal proneness to dissociation during exposure to a stressful event, is the strongest predictor of post-traumatic stress, but existing research on its relationship to STS is limited. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 2, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Tali Samson, Pesach Shvartzman Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Validation of the IPOS-Renal Symptom Survey in advanced kidney disease: a cross-sectional study
The significant symptom burden in advanced renal disease is often poorly recognized by clinicians. Recently, the Integrated Palliative Outcome Score (IPOS) – Renal survey was developed from pre-existing tools to capture these symptoms and other common concerns. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 2, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Rajesh Raj, Kiran Ahuja, Mai Frandsen, Fliss E.M. Murtagh, Matthew Jose Source Type: research

A Randomized Trial of Acceptability and Effects of Values-Based Advance Care Planning in Outpatient Oncology: Person-Centered Oncologic Care and Choices (P-COCC)
No standard advance care planning (ACP) process exists in oncology. We previously developed and validated the values questions for Person-Centered Oncologic Care and Choices (P-COCC), a novel ACP intervention combining a patient values interview with an informational care goals video. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 2, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Andrew S. Epstein, Eileen M. O ’Reilly, Elyse Shuk, Danielle Romano, Yuelin Li, William Breitbart, Angelo E. Volandes Source Type: research

Gabapentin to Prevent Acute Phantom-Limb Pain in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Amputation
We read with great interest the article of Wang et al. in a recent issue of the journal.1 The authors performed a prospective double-blind randomized controlled trial on pediatric patients undergoing amputation to treat bone malignancy an concluded that gabapentin prevented postsurgical neuropathic pain and reduced postoperative pain intensity after amputation. The authors should be congratulated for performing a well-designed study in an important topic (e.g. persistent postsurgical pain) in patients undergoing surgery. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 2, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Mark C. Kendall, Lucas J. Castro-Alves Source Type: research

Secondary traumatization and proneness to dissociation among palliative care workers: A cross sectional study
Exposure to dying patients can contribute to secondary traumatic stress among palliative care workers. Peritraumatic dissociation, an individual ’s personal proneness to dissociation during exposure to a stressful event, is the strongest predictor of post-traumatic stress, but existing research on its relationship to secondary traumatic stress is limited. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 2, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Tali Samson, Pesach Shvartzman Source Type: research

Feeling Heard & Understood in the Hospital Environment: Benchmarking Communication Quality Among Patients with Advanced Cancer Before and After Palliative Care Consultation
Maximizing value in palliative care requires continued development and standardization of communication quality indicators. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - May 2, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Luke T. Ingersoll, Fahad Saeed, Susan Ladwig, Sally A. Norton, Wendy Anderson, Stewart C. Alexander, Robert Gramling Source Type: research

Using Social Network Analysis to Investigate Positive EOL Communication
End of life (EOL) communication is a complex process involving the whole family and multiple care providers. Applications of analysis techniques that account for communication beyond the patient and patient/provider, will improve clinical understanding of EOL communication. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - April 30, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Jiayun Xu, Rumei Yang, Andrew Wilson, Maija Reblin, Margaret F. Clayton, Lee Ellington Tags: Brief Methodological Report Source Type: research

Good Death
“You hang ‘round here long enough, you hear things.” Don’s words pass cracked and flat. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - April 27, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Paul Rousseau Source Type: research

Nurse Ratings of Dignity Deserve Dignity
The letter by Allard et al. discusses concerns regarding the multiple interpretations of dignity as a concept, and how multiple interpretations of dignity may influence our study conclusions. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - April 27, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Amanda Su, Lindsay Lief, Holly G. Prigerson, Severity of Suffering (SoS) in the ICU Study Team Source Type: research

Dignity or dignities? When a concept has multiple meanings
This letter is intended to offer a reflection on the article by Su& al.1 which investigates nurses ’ perceptions of suffering and dignity in patients who die in the intensive care unit (ICU). More specifically, I would like to draw your attention to the lack of an explicit definition of the concept of dignity in this paper. This letter is meant to help the readers understand the multiple meanin gs of the word dignity, as well as highlight the importance of explicitly defining a concept before discussing the findings of a research project. (Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management)
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - April 27, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Authors: Emilie Allard, Alain Legault, Christine Genest Source Type: research