Switching direction modulates the engagement of cognitive control in bilingual reading comprehension: An ERP study
Publication date: August 2020Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 55Author(s): Evelyn Bosma, Leticia PablosAbstractWhile switching costs in production have been explained in terms of top-down cognitive control, researchers do not agree whether switching costs in comprehension should be interpreted in the same way. Within the BIA + model, it has been claimed that the comprehension of code-switches can be explained sufficiently in terms of bottom-up activation of lexical representations. In the current electrophysiological study, L1 speakers of Dutch with high proficiency in L2 English (n = 63) com...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - February 24, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Incongruence of grammatical subjects activates brain regions involved in perspective taking in a sentence-sentence verification task
Publication date: August 2020Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 55Author(s): Toshiki Iwabuchi, Masato Ohba, Kenji Ogawa, Toshio InuiAbstractVarious sentences can describe the same event from different perspectives (e.g., “John kicked Mike.” and “Mike was kicked by John.”). Humans can easily verify propositional equivalence of these sentences, but the underlying brain mechanisms are unclear. The present study examined whether the perspective taking system is involved in the verification of propositional equivalence between two sentences having different grammatical subjects, using a function...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - February 20, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Minimal overlap in language control across production and comprehension: Evidence from read-aloud versus eye-tracking tasks
Publication date: May 2020Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 54Author(s): Danbi Ahn, Matthew J. Abbott, Keith Rayner, Victor S. Ferreira, Tamar H. GollanAbstractBilinguals are remarkable at language control—switching between languages only when they want. However, language control in production can involve switch costs. That is, switching to another language takes longer than staying in the same language. Moreover, bilinguals sometimes produce language intrusion errors, mistakenly producing words in an unintended language (e.g., Spanish–English bilinguals saying “pero” instead of “but...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - February 8, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Asymmetric binarity as a cognitive universal: The rhythm of syntactic structures
Publication date: May 2020Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 54Author(s): Danielle Fahey, Dirk-Bart den OudenAbstractIn syntactic and rhythmic structure, universal rules group elements hierarchically and asymmetrically. In syntax, the operation ‘merge’ is theorized to combine elements in phrasal structures, with one element governing the other, recursively, to form sentences. In rhythm, a similar asymmetric hierarchy of beats is proposed in the Generative Theory of Tonal Music. Just like syntactic processing, assigning beats into rhythmic strings, ‘beat induction,’ is automatic and subconsc...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - February 3, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Mapping vowel sounds onto phonemic categories in two regional varieties of French: An ERP study
This study examines ERP correlates of the different processes associating two phones to one vs. two phonemic categories in two regional varieties of French. Two groups of French listeners are compared, respectively exploiting two regional varieties, with a contrast between the mid-low /ϵ/ and the mid-high /e/ for Northern French (NF) but not for Southern French (SF). It is expected that the competition between the two close categories /e/ vs. /ϵ/ in NF could induce an ERP modulation in the processing of/ϵ/compared to a phoneme/a/with no close competitor, serving as control. In contrast, there should be no difference in ...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - February 2, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Bilingualism and aging: A focused neuroscientific review
Publication date: May 2020Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 54Author(s): Haoyun Zhang, Yan Jing Wu, Guillaume ThierryAbstractResearch has suggested that using two or more languages on a daily basis helps older adults maintain a heightened functional state and improves neurocomputational efficiency. In this review, we discuss studies that have examined the effect of life-long bilingualism on age-related cognitive and neural decline, with a focus on discrepancies between different sources of evidence. We intend to outline and characterize factors which might explain inconsistencies between studies claiming that bil...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - January 30, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Supplementary motor area aphasia revisited
ConclusionRegardless of its rarity, it is evident that damage in the left SMA usually results in a clinical syndrome that clearly corresponds to aphasia. Interpreting this as an aphasia can aid in overcoming the limited idea of a “language zone” located in the perisylvian area of the left hemisphere, that was proposed over one century ago. (Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics)
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - January 18, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Individual differences in language proficiency shape the neural plasticity of language control in bilingual language production
Publication date: May 2020Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 54Author(s): Mo Chen, Fengyang Ma, Junjie Wu, Shuhua Li, Zhaoqi Zhang, Yongben Fu, Chunming Lu, Taomei GuoAbstractThe present study investigated the effect of language-switching training on the neural correlates of both reactive and proactive control in bilingual language production, as well as the modulating role of the proficiency level of the second language (L2). During the pre-test, Chinese-English bilinguals performed a picture-naming task while being scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants then took part in an 8-day...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - January 18, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The ERP correlates of thematic role assignment for passive versus active sentences
This study uses ERPs to investigate how English speakers assign thematic roles while building the structure and meaning of grammatical passive versus active sentences, in which both nouns are equally plausible agents and patients. In two separate experiments, participants exhibited a frontal positivity in response to passive versus active sentences at the point they encountered the past participle form of the lexical verb (e.g., The policeman was tackling the robber/tackled by the robber …). Such frontal positivities have previously been associated with processing grammatical sentences that involve increased syntact...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - January 11, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

An audiovisual integration deficit underlies reading failure in nontransparent writing systems: An fMRI study of Chinese children with dyslexia
This study, for the first time, illustrates the neural mechanisms of the audiovisual integration deficit in dyslexia in a nontransparent logographic writing system, extending our understanding of the neural basis of dyslexia. (Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics)
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - December 2, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 53Author(s): (Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics)
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - November 9, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Embedding (im)plausible clauses in propositional attitude contexts: Modulatory effects on the N400 and late components
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 53Author(s): Lia Călinescu, Anna Giskes, Mila Vulchanova, Giosuè BaggioAbstractHow do comprehenders track dependencies between the plausibility of embedded clauses and of the sentences in which they occur? We investigated processing of Norwegian propositional attitude sentences with plausible or implausible complement clauses (‘Magnus {knows/believes/dreams/doubts/imagines} that mosquitos live off {blood/vodka}’). Using ERPs, we tested the hypothesis that the amplitude of the N400 component is sensitive to the plausibility of the...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - November 3, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Male fashionistas and female football fans: Gender stereotypes affect neurophysiological correlates of semantic processing during speech comprehension
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 53Author(s): Angela Grant, Sarah Grey, Janet G. van HellAbstractRecent studies have shown that pre-existing contextual information, such as gender stereotypes, is incorporated online during comprehension (e.g., Van Berkum, van den Brink, Tesink, Kos, & Hagoort, 2008). Stereotypes, however, are not static entities, and social role theory suggests that they may be influenced by the behavior of members of the group (Eagly, 1987). Consequently, our study examines how gender stereotypes affect the semantic processing of statements from both a male an...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - October 20, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

A critical review of the behavioral, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological studies of co-activation of representations during word production
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 53Author(s): Nazbanou Nozari, Svetlana PinetAbstractA large body of behavioral, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological studies have investigated the consequences of co-activation of representations during word production. Despite such an amazing body of empirical data, it remains unclear how the production system handles co-activated items. In this paper, we review this evidence in a systematic way, and point out three common problems in the interpretations attached to these data. We then discuss alternative approaches which might be more fruitful i...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - October 16, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

On the interplay between motor sequencing and linguistic syntax: Electrophysiological evidence
In this study, we used a paradigm combining two different sequential motor tasks, namely linear vs. non-linear self-administration of sentences, with correctness judgment of the sentences (half of them could include a morphosyntactic violation) while recording event-related potentials, ERPs. The sentences could be of either three types: subject-relative sentences, embedded PP sentences -with a displaced prepositional phrase between the subject and the verb-, or coordinate subject sentences - with two conjoined noun phrases as subject. Overall, results revealed significant modulations in the ERP components, connected to the...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - October 13, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Grey matter reduction in the occipitotemporal cortex in Spanish children with dyslexia: A voxel-based morphometry study
In this study, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to investigate brain differences in grey matter volume associated with a transparent language in a sample of 25 native Spanish participants (13 dyslexic and 12 non-dyslexic children). Results revealed a volume reduction in the left occipitotemporal cortex and right cerebellum in dyslexics. Significantly, the reduction in occipitotemporal areas has been previously linked to reading in transparent languages. Our results support previous studies and are consistent with the idea that reading problems in languages with a shallow orthography are related to the ventral reading ...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - September 30, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Time reference in aphasia: Evidence from Greek
This study presents a review of the literature and addresses the question of dissociation between the past and the non-past in aphasia in Greek, a language which distinguishes among three past forms. A mixed group of eight individuals with aphasia and a group of 10 non-brain-damaged speakers performed the two tasks of the Greek version of the Test for Assessing Reference of Time (Bastiaanse, Jonkers, & Thompson, 2008): a sentence completion task (primed by pictures) and a sentence-picture matching task. The sentence completion task tested the present, future and three past tenses: past perfective, past imperfective and...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - September 28, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Effects of encoding modes on memory of naturalistic events
This study reports both behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data on whether memory advantage of bimodal encoding exists for retrieval of naturalistic events. In Experiment 1, participants took memory tests after learning naturalistic events via three different encoding modes: (1) text reading, (2) story listening, and (3) video watching. The results showed that, at immediate recall, participants made few errors in the text reading and video watching conditions than the story listening condition; at delayed recall, these differences disappeared. In Experiment 2, participants similarly read texts, lis...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - August 22, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 52Author(s): (Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics)
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - August 16, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Publisher's Note
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 52Author(s): (Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics)
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - August 16, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Transcranial direct current stimulation improves novel word recall in healthy adults
This study contributes important information on healthy language processing and highlights the efficacy of atDCS in improvement of language recovery in clinical domains. (Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics)
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - August 14, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Neural correlates for nouns and verbs in phrases during syntactic and semantic processing: An fMRI study
This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare the neural correlates for nouns and verbs in syntactic and semantic processing, which is a major dispute in word categorization, with combinational linguistics rules. The results showed that under both conditions, verbs involved more brain activation in the left prefrontal lobe and the superior temporal gyrus (STG) than did nouns. We found that verbs in syntactic processing elicited higher activation in the middle and inferior frontal gyri (IFG) than nouns, which is consistent with the findings in Indo-European languages. However, Chinese verbs compared with ...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - August 11, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Prepositions as a hybrid between lexical and functional category: Evidence from an ERP study on German sentence processing
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 52Author(s): Mari Chanturidze, Rebecca Carroll, Esther RuigendijkAbstractIn syntactic theories of word categorization the status of prepositions as belonging to either a lexical (e.g., nouns, verbs) or a functional category (e.g., determiners, complementizers) is under debate. It has also been suggested that prepositions are a hybrid between the two categories depending on their usage. We investigated this classification question empirically in an ERP study with twelve mono-syllabic German prepositions in lexical (e.g., locative prepositions as in o...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - August 4, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Messages must be tuned to the target language: Some implications of crosslinguistic semantic diversity for neurolinguistic research on speech production
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 52Author(s): David KemmererAbstractThere are nearly 6,500 languages in the world, and they vary greatly with regard to both lexical and grammatical semantics. Hence, an early stage of utterance planning involves "thinking for speaking"—i.e., shaping the thoughts to be expressed so they fit the idiosyncratic meanings of the symbolic units that happen to be available in the target language. This paper has three main sections that cover three distinct types of crosslinguistic semantic diversity. Each type is initially elaborated with ex...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - August 3, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Lesion-aphasia discordance in acute stroke among Bengali-speaking patients: Frequency, pattern, and effect on aphasia recovery
ConclusionLesion-aphasia discordance following acute stroke is not uncommon among Bengali-speaking subjects. In the discordant group, preponderance towards non-fluent aphasia was observed. Discordance occurred more frequently after hemorrhagic stroke. Subjects with lesion-discordant aphasia presented better recovery during early post-stroke phase. (Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics)
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - July 29, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Atypical N170 lateralization of face and word recognition in Chinese children with autism spectrum disorder
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 52Author(s): Yuzhu Ji, Jing Liu, Xiao-Qian Zhu, Jingjing Zhao, Jiuju Wang, Ying-Chun Du, Hong-Yan BiAbstractAtypical brain lateralization patterns in processing both human faces (reduced right lateralization) and alphabetic languages (reduced left lateralization) have been found in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Yet, whether Chinese children with ASD show similar atypical brain lateralization patterns in processing faces and language is largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to examine this issue with N170, an event-related potential (ER...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - July 27, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Is Theory of Mind the basis for exhaustivity in wh-questions? Evidence from TOM impairment after right hemisphere damage
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 52Author(s): Noga Balaban, Petra Schulz, Naama FriedmannAbstractHow do we know when to provide an exhaustive answer to a wh-question, which mentions all the items that satisfy the property being asked about? We explored the nature of this exhaustivity requirement by investigating whether it is grammatical or based on assessing the information needs of the person asking the question. In Experiment 1 we tested 14 individuals after right hemisphere damage who had Theory of Mind (TOM) impairment (aTOMia), which compromised their ability to assess the in...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - July 19, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Updating emotional information in daily language comprehension: The influence of topic shifts
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 52Author(s): Xiuping Zhang, Xiaohong Yang, Yufang YangAbstractTracking and updating emotional information in daily language use is essential for successful comprehension and communication. Using an event-related potential technique, we investigated how the updating of emotional information was influenced by changes in topic with two-pair conversational discourses. The first pair established a topic and a kind of emotional information. The second pair either maintained or changed the topic of the first pair. The description of the topic within the se...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - July 18, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Prosodically controlled derivations in the mental lexicon
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 52Author(s): Hatice Zora, Tomas Riad, Sari YlinenAbstractSwedish morphemes are classified as prosodically specified or prosodically unspecified, depending on lexical or phonological stress, respectively. Here, we investigate the allomorphy of the suffix -(i)sk, which indicates the distinction between lexical and phonological stress; if attached to a lexically stressed morpheme, it takes a non-syllabic form (-sk), whereas if attached to a phonologically stressed morpheme, an epenthetic vowel is inserted (-isk). Using mismatch negativity (MMN), we exp...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - July 15, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The role of valence and origin of emotions in emotional categorization task for words
This article presents the results of an investigation focused on the role of valence and emotional origin of word connotations for moderately arousing verbal stimuli for performance in emotional categorization task. The task for participants was to assess whether a given word has for them an emotional meaning. Behavioral results showed a higher proportion of words indicated as emotional for both negative and positive in comparison to neutral stimuli as well as for stimuli inducing automatic originated emotion, as compared to other groups. ERP amplitude differences, localized in specific regions were, observed for valence a...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - July 12, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Semantic unification modulates N400 and BOLD signal change in the brain: A simultaneous EEG-fMRI study
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 52Author(s): Zude Zhu, Marcel Bastiaansen, Jonathan G. Hakun, Karl Magnus Petersson, Suiping Wang, Peter HagoortAbstractSemantic unification during sentence comprehension has been associated with amplitude change of the N400 in event-related potential (ERP) studies, and activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. However, the specificity of this activation to semantic unification remains unknown. To more closely examine the brain processes involved in semantic unification, we employed ...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - July 3, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Everyday conversation after right hemisphere damage: A methodological demonstration and some preliminary findings
This study explores how a man with conversational problems following right hemisphere stroke formulated responses to communicative acts addressed to him in everyday conversation. It focuses on communicative acts that were “response mobilising”, i.e., set out clear expectations about who should speak, and how they should respond. This study employed an empirical descriptive case study design to examine 43 min of triadic conversation between the man with right hemisphere damage, his spouse, and a family friend. 61 communicative acts addressed to the man with right hemisphere damage were analysed using conversat...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - June 27, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

An elephant needs a head but a horse does not: An ERP study of classifier-noun agreement in Mandarin
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 52Author(s): Shiao-hui ChanAbstractClassifiers are essential elements between numerals and nouns in Mandarin (e.g. “one-touCL-elephant”), but whether they serve a semantic or functional/morphosyntactic role in relation to the accompanying noun has been heatedly debated in linguistics. Previous ERP research consistently supported the semantic view with findings of N400; however, the apparent meaning clash in mismatched classifier-noun pairing in these studies might render morphosyntactic processing undetected. We created two violation con...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - June 27, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Processing of non-contrastive subphonemic features in French homophonous utterances: An MMN study
Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 52Author(s): Noelia Do Carmo-Blanco, Michel Hoen, Stéphane Pota, Elsa Spinelli, Fanny MeunierAbstractNative listeners process and understand homophones, such as la locution ‘the phrase’ vs. l'allocution ‘the speech’, both [lalɔkysjɔ̃], without much semantical ambiguity in connected speech. Yet, behavioral experiments show that disambiguation is partial under intra-speaker variability without semantical context. To investigate electrophysiological correlates of perception of non-contrastive subphonemic features in Fr...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - June 25, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 51Author(s): (Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics)
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - May 24, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Semantic processing of metaphor: A case-study of deep dyslexia
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 51Author(s): Hamad Al-Azary, Tara McAuley, Lori Buchanan, Albert N. KatzAbstractDeep dyslexia is characterized by the production of semantic errors (e.g., reading the word weird aloud as odd) during oral reading and greater difficulty reading aloud abstract words than concrete words. In this paper, we examine whether deep dyslexia affects higher-order semantic processing; namely, metaphor comprehension. To that end, we asked GL, a participant with deep dylexia, to rate novel metaphors (e.g., language is a bridge) for comprehensibility. The topics of t...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - May 11, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The involvement of subcortical grey matter in verbal semantic comprehension: A systematic review and meta-analysis of fMRI and PET studies
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 51Author(s): E.M. Cocquyt, C. Coffé, P. van Mierlo, W. Duyck, P. Mariën, A. Szmalec, P. Santens, M. De LetterAbstractSemantic processing is a fundamental aspect in human communication. The cortical organization of semantic processing has been exhaustively described, in contrast to inconsistent results on the function of subcortical grey matter structures. Hence, this manuscript reports a systematic review and meta-analysis on the subcortical involvement in verbal semantic comprehension in healthy individuals. The 50 included studies indica...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - May 8, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Asymmetry of affect in verbal irony understanding: What about the N400 and P600 components?
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 51Author(s): Stéphanie Caillies, Pamela Gobin, Alexandre Obert, Sarah Terrien, Alexandre Coutté, Galina Iakimova, Chrystel Besche-RichardAbstractWe investigated the neurocognitive processes behind the asymmetry of affect observed in irony understanding, where ironic criticism is more easily understood than ironic praise. We recorded the ERPs of participants while they listened to positive (e.g., “These children are always smiling”) or negative (e.g., “His son is very unfortunate”) remarks pronounced with a sincere...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - May 1, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Speech perception in bilingual contexts: Neuropsychological impact of mixing languages at the inter-sentential level
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 51Author(s): Alejandro Pérez, Jon Andoni DuñabeitiaAbstractThe neuropsychological impact of processing naturalistic speech streams containing code switches at the inter-sentential level was studied in fluent bilinguals who frequently switch between languages. To this end, electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) and a behavioral recall test were used to address speech perception while processing pieces of information conveyed in a single- or mixed-language speech carrier. Measurements of spectral power in the continuous EEG signal accomp...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - April 19, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

When embeddedness matters: Electrophysiological evidence for the role of head noun position in Chinese relative clause processing
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 51Author(s): Yanyu Xiong, Laurent Dekydtspotter, Sharlene NewmanAbstractThis ERP study of Chinese subject- and object-modifying relative clauses (RCs) aimed at investigating how sentence context (embeddedness) temporally interacted with relativization in terms of processing load. In stead of adotping a static view of processing costs of RCs, we focused on the dynamic modulation of processing load by sentence context at two critical words–the relative marker de and head noun. Using cluster-based permutation analyses of ERPs, our study found an ea...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - April 10, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

A dissociation between syntactic and lexical processing in Parkinson's disease
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 51Author(s): Karim Johari, Matthew Walenski, Jana Reifegerste, Farzad Ashrafi, Roozbeh Behroozmand, Mostafa Daemi, Michael T. UllmanAbstractParkinson's disease (PD), which involves the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the basal ganglia, has long been associated with motor deficits. Increasing evidence suggests that language can also be impaired, including aspects of syntactic and lexical processing. However, the exact pattern of these impairments remains somewhat unclear, for several reasons. Few studies have examined and compared syntactic and...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - April 2, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Higher resting state functional connectivity between the vmPFC and rTPJ in individuals who display conversational synchrony
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 51Author(s): Rupa Gupta Gordon, Arianna Rigon, Natalie V. Covington, Michelle Voss, Melissa C. DuffAbstractThe neural mechanisms that support synchrony of conversational behaviors (e.g., word production, turn length) are not well understood. Lesion work has suggested that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is important for noncontent speech convergence, which measures if word production becomes more similar across a conversation (Gordon, Tranel, & Duff, 2014). However, the relationship between neural activity and conversational synchrony h...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - March 28, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Brain activation and functional connectivity during Chinese writing: An fMRI study
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 51Author(s): Yang Yang, Zhentao Zuo, Fred Tam, Simon J. Graham, Ran Tao, Nizhuan Wang, Hong-Yan BiAbstractHow the brain processes writing in Chinese is largely unknown. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with kinematic recording, this study examined the brain activation and functional connectivity associated with writing to dictation of Chinese characters, contrasted with drawing circles, in 33 healthy adults. It was found that writing Chinese characters recruited activation in the bilateral precentral gyrus, superior/medial frontal gy...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - March 24, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Levodopa effect on spontaneous speech in Parkinson's disease
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 51Author(s): Ece Bayram, Eda Aslanbaba, Muhittin Cenk AkbostanciAbstractParkinson's disease (PD) is associated with verb deficits detected with tasks including picture naming and verbal fluency. However, these deficits are not frequently reported by the patients themselves. Levodopa, the gold standard for motor symptoms in PD, has been previously implicated to improve these verb deficits. We evaluated the effect of levodopa by using a spontaneous speech task which is more naturalistic than the previously used tasks to detect verb deficits. Thirty PD p...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - March 16, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: May 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 50Author(s): (Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics)
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - March 15, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The fundamental phonological unit of Japanese word production: An EEG study using the picture-word interference paradigm
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 51Author(s): Rinus G. Verdonschot, Shingo Tokimoto, Yayoi MiyaokaAbstractIt has been shown that in Germanic languages (e.g. English, Dutch) phonemes are the primary (or proximate) planning units during the early stages of phonological encoding. Contrastingly, in Chinese and Japanese the phoneme does not seem to play an important role but rather the syllable (Chinese) and mora (Japanese) are essential. However, despite the lack of behavioral evidence, neurocorrelational studies in Chinese suggested that electrophysiological brain responses (i.e. preced...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - March 13, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Right hemisphere involvement for pun processing – Effects of idiom decomposition
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 51Author(s): Kremena Koleva, Mark Mon-Williams, Ekaterini KlepousniotouAbstractThe present study investigated hemispheric processing of puns involving decomposable idioms (e.g. Old skiers never die, they just go downhill) and non-decomposable ones (e.g., Old cleaners never die, they just bite the dust) using a divided visual field paradigm. In two cross-modal priming experiments, participants listened to puns and made lexical decisions for targets presented either in the left or right visual fields. To investigate hemispheric asymmetries at different ...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - February 23, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Prosodic phrase priming during listening to Chinese ambiguous phrases in different experimental tasks
In conclusion, prosodic phrase structures are formulated in the brain and modulate the processing of the immediately subsequent item during speech comprehension, and this process is influenced by the type of task being performed. (Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics)
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - February 21, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The impact of the Cognitive Pragmatic Treatment on the pragmatic and informative skills of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI)
ConclusionsThe study highlighted the efficacy of the CPT program in improving patients' informativeness, confirming previous reports of its effectiveness in the rehabilitation of communicative-pragmatic skills. (Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics)
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - February 21, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Altered hemispheric specialization for speech in adult dyslexic readers: An ERPs and dichotic listening study
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics, Volume 51Author(s): Shay MenasheAbstractThe aim of this study was to investigate the functional speech lateralization in adult dyslexic readers whose native language is Hebrew. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from 22 non-impaired readers and 18 dyslexic readers performing dichotic nonsense consonant-vowel (CV) syllables and dichotic vowels target detection tasks. Evidence of altered patterns of behavioral speech lateralization was found in the dyslexic group mainly for the CV syllables task. The latencies and amplitudes of the N1P2 ERPs complex...
Source: Journal of Neurolinguistics - February 21, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research