Reading the written language environment: Learning orthographic structure from statistical regularities
Publication date: October 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 114Author(s): Teresa Marie Schubert, Trevor Cohen, Simon Fischer-Baum (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - July 18, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Delineating linguistic contexts, and the validity of context diversity as a measure of a word's contextual variability
Publication date: October 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 114Author(s): Geoff Hollis (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - July 8, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The linguistic looming effect
Publication date: October 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 114Author(s): Antonio M. Díez-Álamo, Arthur M. Glenberg, Emiliano Díez, María A. Alonso, Angel Fernandez (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - July 8, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Anticipating causes and consequences
Publication date: October 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 114Author(s): Alan Garnham, Scarlett Child, Sam Hutton (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - July 1, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Taking another perspective on overconfidence in cognitive ability: A comparison of self and other metacognitive judgments
Publication date: October 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 114Author(s): Robert Tirso, Lisa Geraci (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - June 18, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Individual differences in learning the regularities between orthography, phonology and semantics predict early reading skills
Publication date: October 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 114Author(s): Noam Siegelman, Jay G. Rueckl, Laura M. Steacy, Stephen J. Frost, Mark van den Bunt, Jason D. Zevin, Mark S. Seidenberg, Kenneth R. Pugh, Donald L. Compton, Robin D. Morris (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - June 9, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

When less is more: Enhanced statistical learning of non-adjacent dependencies after disruption of bilateral DLPFC
Publication date: October 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 114Author(s): Géza Gergely Ambrus, Teodóra Vékony, Karolina Janacsek, Anna B.C. Trimborn, Gyula Kovács, Dezso Nemeth (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - June 7, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

What did we learn from forty years of research on semantic interference? A Bayesian meta-analysis
Publication date: October 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 114Author(s): Audrey Bürki, Shereen Elbuy, Sylvain Madec, Shravan Vasishth (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - June 5, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Lexical entrainment without conceptual pacts? Revisiting the matching task
Publication date: October 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 114Author(s): Adrian Bangerter, Eric Mayor, Dominique Knutsen (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 29, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The role of retrieval during study: Evidence of reminding from overt rehearsal
Publication date: October 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 114Author(s): Geoffrey L. McKinley, Aaron S. Benjamin (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 26, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: August 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 113Author(s): (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 25, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “Accounting for the build-up of proactive interference across lists in a list length paradigm reveals a dominance of item-noise in recognition memory” [J. Memory Lang. 110 (2019) 104065]
Publication date: Available online 13 May 2020Source: Journal of Memory and LanguageAuthor(s): Julian Fox, Simon Dennis, Adam F. Osth (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 15, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

A story about statistical learning in a story: Regularities impact eye movements during book reading
Publication date: August 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 113Author(s): Joshua Snell, Jan Theeuwes (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 14, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Bilingual novel word learning in sentence contexts: Effects of semantic and language variation
Publication date: August 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 113Author(s): Justin Lauro, Ana I. Schwartz, Wendy S. Francis (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 6, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Nonlinear effects of spatial connectedness implicate hierarchically structured representations in visual working memory
Publication date: August 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 113Author(s): Błażej Skrzypulec, Adam Chuderski (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - April 23, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

How top-down processing enhances comprehension of noise-vocoded speech: Predictions about meaning are more important than predictions about form
Publication date: August 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 113Author(s): Ruth E. Corps, Hugh Rabagliati (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 28, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: June 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 112Author(s): (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 24, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Corrigendum to ‘Individual differences in subphonemic sensitivity and phonological skills’. [J. Memory Language 107 (2019) 195–215]
Publication date: Available online 7 March 2020Source: Journal of Memory and LanguageAuthor(s): Monica Y.C. Li, David Braze, Anuenue Kukona, Clinton L. Johns, Whitney Tabor, Julie A. Van Dyke, W. Einar Mencl, Donald P. Shankweiler, Kenneth R. Pugh, James S. Magnuson (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 8, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Video context-dependent effects in recognition memory
Publication date: August 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 113Author(s): Takeo Isarida, Toshiko K. Isarida, Takayuki Kubota, Saki Nakajima, Kosei Yagi, Aoi Yamamoto, Miyoko Higuma (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 7, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The origins of backward priming effects in logographic scripts for four-character words
Publication date: August 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 113Author(s): Huilan Yang, Yasushi Hino, Jingjun Chen, Masahiro Yoshihara, Mariko Nakayama, Junyi Xue, Stephen J. Lupker (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - February 29, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

To catch a Snitch: Brain potentials reveal variability in the functional organization of (fictional) world knowledge during reading
Publication date: August 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 113Author(s): Melissa Troyer, Marta Kutas (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - February 26, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Priming effects on subsequent episodic memory: Testing attentional accounts
Publication date: August 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 113Author(s): Alexander J. Kaula, Richard N. Henson (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - February 26, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

How semantic processing affects recognition memory
Publication date: August 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 113Author(s): Michael S. Humphreys, Yanqi Ryan Li, Jennifer S. Burt, Shayne LoftAbstractMemory researchers acknowledge the importance of semantic processing in recognition and recall, but there is a significant disconnect from the literature that addresses how to conceptualize words. We use the lexical literature to ask more analytic questions about the effects of semantic processing on memory. A prospective memory task requiring the initiation of a semantic search that was imposed during an ongoing task had an effect on the delayed recognition of ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - February 21, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Is buttercup a kind of cup? Hyponymy and semantic transparency in compound words
Publication date: August 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 113Author(s): Christina L. Gagné, Thomas L. Spalding, Patricia Spicer, Dixie Wong, Beatriz Rubio, Karen Perez CruzAbstractHyponymy is a semantic relation of class inclusion (e.g., a cat is an animal; a wildcat is a cat). Compound words are often, but not always, in a hyponymic relationship with the second constituent of the compound, as in wildcat and cat. This paper introduces a set of human ratings of hyponymy for over 2500 English compound words, which will facilitate research on the role of hyponymy in compound word processing and relate...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - February 21, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Language-specific prosodic acquisition: A comparison of phrase boundary perception by French- and German-learning infants
This study compares the development of prosodic processing in French- and German-learning infants. The emergence of language-specific perception of phrase boundaries was directly tested using the same stimuli across these two languages. French-learning (Experiment 1, 2) and German-learning 6- and 8-month-olds (Experiment 3) listened to the same French noun sequences with or without major prosodic boundaries ([Loulou et Manou][et Nina]; [Loulou et Manou et Nina], respectively). The boundaries were either naturally cued (Experiment 1), or cued exclusively by pitch and duration (Experiment 2, 3). French-learning 6- and 8-mont...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - February 20, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Does case marking affect agreement attraction in comprehension?
We present a theoretical proposal of how case and number information may be used differentially during agreement licensing in comprehension. More generally, this work sheds light on the nature of the retrieval cues deployed when completing morphosyntactic dependencies. (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - February 14, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Semantic transparency is not invisibility: A computational model of perceptually-grounded conceptual combination in word processing
Publication date: June 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 112Author(s): Fritz Günther, Marco Alessandro Petilli, Marco MarelliAbstractPrevious studies found that an automatic meaning-composition process affects the processing of morphologically complex words, and related this operation to conceptual combination. However, research on embodied cognition demonstrates that concepts are more than just lexical meanings, rather being also grounded in perceptual experience. Therefore, perception-based information should also be involved in mental operations on concepts, such as conceptual combination. Conseque...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - February 14, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

A computational approach to the revelation effect
Publication date: June 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 112Author(s): Martin Brandt, André Aßfalg, Ann-Kathrin Zaiser, Daniel M. BernsteinAbstractInterrupting a sequence of episodic recognition decisions by a problem-solving task will change the hit and false alarm rate for the following item in a recognition test (Watkins & Peynircioglu, 1990). The mechanisms of this revelation effect have not yet been understood completely. We offer a new explanation based on the global matching model MINERVA 2 (Hintzman, 1984, 1986, 1988). The main mechanism in our approach is that the interruptin...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - February 10, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Explaining complementarity in false memory
Publication date: June 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 112Author(s): C.J. Brainerd, K. Nakamura, Y.A. MurtazaAbstractComplementarity is a paradoxical phenomenon in which memory for incompatible reality states (e.g., old vs. new) violates basic logical constraints: Subjects remember certain groups of items as belonging to both of two incompatible states at reliable levels. The theoretical principle that predicts this phenomenon, non-compensatory gist memory, also predicts a more stringent form in which individual items are successively remembered as belonging to each of two incompatible states. In the pre...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - February 10, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Best practice guidance for linear mixed-effects models in psychological science
Publication date: June 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 112Author(s): Lotte Meteyard, Robert A.I. DaviesAbstractThe use of Linear Mixed-effects Models (LMMs) is set to dominate statistical analyses in psychological science and may become the default approach to analyzing quantitative data. The rapid growth in adoption of LMMs has been matched by a proliferation of differences in practice. Unless this diversity is recognized, and checked, the field shall reap enormous difficulties in the future when attempts are made to consolidate or synthesize research findings. Here we examine this diversity using two m...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - January 30, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Visual working memory capacity is limited by two systems that change across lifespan
Publication date: June 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 112Author(s): Anka Slana Ozimič, Grega RepovšAbstractTo better understand the sources of visual working memory limitations we explore the possibility that its capacity is limited by two systems: a representational system that enables formation of independent representations of visual objects, and an active maintenance system that enables sustained activation of the established representations in the absence of external stimuli. A total of 392 participants took part in four experiments in which they were asked to maintain orientation of items ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - January 26, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Cues to stress in English spelling
Publication date: June 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 112Author(s): Rebecca Treiman, Nicole Rosales, Lauren Cusner, Brett KesslerAbstractHow do skilled readers of English decide which syllable of a word to stress? In four behavioral studies, we examined this issue using disyllabic nonwords that varied in number of initial and final consonants. The tasks included oral reading of sentences that contained the nonwords, pronunciation of isolated nonwords, and metalinguistic judgments about stress. Contrary to the influential view within linguistics that onsets are irrelevant to stress assignment, the rate o...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - January 22, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: April 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 111Author(s): (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - January 20, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Long-lasting gradient activation of referents during spoken language processing
Publication date: June 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 112Author(s): J. Benjamin Falandays, Sarah Brown-Schmidt, Joseph C. ToscanoAbstractDuring speech processing, listeners must map a fundamentally continuous acoustic signal onto discrete symbols, such as words. A current debate concerns the time-course over which sub-phonemic (i.e., gradient) acoustic information continues to influence symbolic (i.e., linguistic) interpretation, which can provide evidence regarding the level of representation at which gradient information is maintained. In a visual-world paradigm experiment, participants indicated whet...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - January 9, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Translation equivalent and cross-language semantic priming in bilingual toddlers
Publication date: June 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 112Author(s): Caroline Floccia, Claire Delle Luche, Irina Lepadatu, Janette Chow, Paul Ratnage, Kim PlunkettAbstractIn adult bilinguals, a word in one language will activate a related word in the other language, with language dominance modulating the direction of these effects. To determine whether the early bilingual lexicon possesses similar properties to its adult counterpart, two experiments compared translation equivalent priming and cross-linguistic semantic priming in 27-month-old bilingual toddlers learning English and one other language. Pri...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - January 9, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Effects of chronological age on native and nonnative sentence processing: Evidence from subject-verb agreement in German
Publication date: April 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 111Author(s): Jana Reifegerste, Rebecca Jarvis, Claudia FelserAbstractWhile much attention has been devoted to the cognition of aging multilingual individuals, little is known about how age affects their grammatical processing. We assessed subject-verb number-agreement processing in sixty native (L1) and sixty non-native (L2) speakers of German (age: 18–84) using a binary-choice sentence-completion task, along with various individual-differences tests. Our results revealed differential effects of age on L1 and L2 speakers' accuracy and reactio...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - January 7, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Are graphemic effects real in skilled visual word recognition?
Publication date: April 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 111Author(s): Fabienne ChetailAbstractIn the last decades, repeated evidence for graphemic effects has been reported in skilled readers. For example, a letter is more easily detected in a word when it corresponds to a simple grapheme (e.g., A in PLACE) than when it is embedded in a complex one (e.g., A in BEACH). Such effects have been taken as a demonstration that graphemes are processed as perceptual units by the reading system. However, this conclusion has been recently challenged by studies using different experimental designs. In the present st...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - December 18, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Adaptive use of semantic representations and phonological representations in verbal memory maintenance
This study investigated the WLE under articulatory suppression and when following the semantic instruction in serial recall of words of high and low imageability. In addition, the study investigated whether the WLE is affected by individual differences in capacity for maintaining semantic representations that are measured by the synonym recognition task. The results demonstrated that the WLE disappeared when maintaining highly imageable words but was still observed when maintaining words of low imageability under articulatory suppression. Moreover, the semantic instruction eliminated the WLE only in individuals who could p...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - December 18, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Maze Made Easy: Better and easier measurement of incremental processing difficulty
Publication date: April 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 111Author(s): Veronica Boyce, Richard Futrell, Roger P. LevyAbstractBehavioral measures of incremental language comprehension difficulty form a crucial part of the empirical basis of psycholinguistics. The two most common methods for obtaining these measures have significant limitations: eye tracking studies are resource-intensive, and self-paced reading can yield noisy data with poor localization. These limitations are even more severe for web-based crowdsourcing studies, where eye tracking is infeasible and self-paced reading is vulnerable to inat...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - December 11, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Interference patterns in subject-verb agreement and reflexives revisited: A large-sample study
Publication date: April 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 111Author(s): Lena A. Jäger, Daniela Mertzen, Julie A. Van Dyke, Shravan VasishthAbstractCue-based retrieval theories in sentence processing predict two classes of interference effect: (i) Inhibitory interference is predicted when multiple items match a retrieval cue: cue-overloading leads to an overall slowdown in reading time; and (ii) Facilitatory interference arises when a retrieval target as well as a distractor only partially match the retrieval cues; this partial matching leads to an overall speedup in retrieval time. Inhibitory interfer...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - December 11, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Scalar bounds and expected values of comparatively modified numerals
Publication date: April 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 111Author(s): Christoph Hesse, Anton BenzAbstractSpeakers routinely employ world knowledge to draw scalar implicatures in numerals. For instance, in the context of ‘an exceptionally hot summer’, speakers will use their knowledge of average summer temperatures and record temperatures to construct a range of potential values. However, it is not clear how they do so when they do not have strong expectations or context is less informative. 1270 adult American English native speakers were shown short dialogues and stories containing numerals ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - December 5, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Global semantic similarity effects in recognition memory: Insights from BEAGLE representations and the diffusion decision model
Publication date: April 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 111Author(s): Adam F. Osth, Kevin D. Shabahang, Douglas J.K. Mewhort, Andrew HeathcoteAbstractRecognition memory models posit that false alarm rates increase as the global similarity between the probe cue and the contents of memory is increased. Global similarity predictions have been commonly tested using category length designs where it has been found that false alarm rates increase as the number of studied items from a common category is increased. In this work, we explored global similarity predictions within unstructured lists of words using re...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - November 29, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Repairing speech errors: Competition as a source of repairs
Publication date: April 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 111Author(s): Sieb G. Nooteboom, Hugo QuenéAbstractThis paper focuses on the source of self-repairs of segmental speech errors during self-monitoring. A potential source of repairs are candidate forms competing with the form under production. In the time interval between self-monitoring internal and overt speech, activation of competitors probably decreases. From this theory of repairing we derived four main predictions specific for classical SLIP experiments: (1) Error-to-cutoff times are shorter after single elicited errors than after other...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - November 28, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Psycholinguists should resist the allure of linguistic units as perceptual units
Publication date: April 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 111Author(s): Arthur G. SamuelAbstractThe current study has empirical, methodological, and theoretical components. It draws heavily on two recent papers: Bowers et al. (2016) (JML, 87, 71–83) used results from selective adaptation experiments to argue that phonemes play a critical role in speech perception. Mitterer et al. (2018) (JML, 98, 77–92) responded with their own adaptation experiments to advocate instead for allophones. These studies are part of a renewed use of the selective adaptation paradigm. Empirically, the current study r...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - November 28, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 110Author(s): (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - November 16, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Accounting for the build-up of proactive interference across lists in a list length paradigm reveals a dominance of item-noise in recognition memory
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 110Author(s): Julian Fox, Simon Dennis, Adam F. OsthAbstractThere has been a longstanding debate concerning whether interference in recognition memory is attributable to other items on the study list (i.e., item-noise) or to prior memories (i.e., context-noise and background-noise). Recently, Osth and Dennis (2015) devised a global matching model that could estimate the magnitude of each interference contribution and they found that context-noise and background-noise were dominant in recognition. In the present investigation, data from a list len...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 26, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Epistemic trespassing and disagreement
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 110Author(s): Rachel Bristol, Federico RossanoAbstractCommunication in face-to-face human interaction entails complying with social and moral norms about knowledge possession and transfer, and violations of these norms are sanctionable offenses. Underestimating an addressee’s knowledge can be tantamount to an insult, especially in domains over which they have superior epistemic authority. This paper examines cases where parties are in explicit disagreement about both the content of an utterance and relative authority over the knowledge in t...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 23, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The role of strategy use in working memory training outcomes
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 110Author(s): Daniel Fellman, Jussi Jylkkä, Otto Waris, Anna Soveri, Liisa Ritakallio, Sarah Haga, Juha Salmi, Thomas J. Nyman, Matti LaineAbstractCognitive mechanisms underlying the limited transfer effects of working memory (WM) training remain poorly understood. We tested in detail the Strategy Mediation hypothesis, according to which WM training generates task-specific strategies that facilitate performance on the trained task and its untrained variants. This large-scale pre-registered randomized controlled trial (n = 258) used a 4-w...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 19, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The world is not enough to explain lengthening of phonological competitors
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 110Author(s): Andrés Buxó-Lugo, Cassandra L. Jacobs, Duane G. WatsonAbstractSpeakers tend to lengthen the durations of words when a phonologically overlapping word has recently been produced. Although there are multiple accounts of why lengthening occurs, all of these accounts generally assume that competition at some point in the production-comprehension process leads to lengthening. We investigated the contexts that lead to competition and consequent lengthening of target word duration. In three experiments, we manipulated the con...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 16, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

How to capitalize on a priori contrasts in linear (mixed) models: A tutorial
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 110Author(s): Daniel J. Schad, Shravan Vasishth, Sven Hohenstein, Reinhold KlieglAbstractFactorial experiments in research on memory, language, and in other areas are often analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). However, for effects with more than one numerator degrees of freedom, e.g., for experimental factors with more than two levels, the ANOVA omnibus F-test is not informative about the source of a main effect or interaction. Because researchers typically have specific hypotheses about which condition means differ from each other, a pri...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 13, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research