Editorial Board
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 110Author(s): (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - November 16, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Accounting for the build-up of proactive interference across lists in a list length paradigm reveals a dominance of item-noise in recognition memory
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 110Author(s): Julian Fox, Simon Dennis, Adam F. OsthAbstractThere has been a longstanding debate concerning whether interference in recognition memory is attributable to other items on the study list (i.e., item-noise) or to prior memories (i.e., context-noise and background-noise). Recently, Osth and Dennis (2015) devised a global matching model that could estimate the magnitude of each interference contribution and they found that context-noise and background-noise were dominant in recognition. In the present investigation, data from a list len...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 26, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Epistemic trespassing and disagreement
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 110Author(s): Rachel Bristol, Federico RossanoAbstractCommunication in face-to-face human interaction entails complying with social and moral norms about knowledge possession and transfer, and violations of these norms are sanctionable offenses. Underestimating an addressee’s knowledge can be tantamount to an insult, especially in domains over which they have superior epistemic authority. This paper examines cases where parties are in explicit disagreement about both the content of an utterance and relative authority over the knowledge in t...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 23, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The role of strategy use in working memory training outcomes
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 110Author(s): Daniel Fellman, Jussi Jylkkä, Otto Waris, Anna Soveri, Liisa Ritakallio, Sarah Haga, Juha Salmi, Thomas J. Nyman, Matti LaineAbstractCognitive mechanisms underlying the limited transfer effects of working memory (WM) training remain poorly understood. We tested in detail the Strategy Mediation hypothesis, according to which WM training generates task-specific strategies that facilitate performance on the trained task and its untrained variants. This large-scale pre-registered randomized controlled trial (n = 258) used a 4-w...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 19, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The world is not enough to explain lengthening of phonological competitors
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 110Author(s): Andrés Buxó-Lugo, Cassandra L. Jacobs, Duane G. WatsonAbstractSpeakers tend to lengthen the durations of words when a phonologically overlapping word has recently been produced. Although there are multiple accounts of why lengthening occurs, all of these accounts generally assume that competition at some point in the production-comprehension process leads to lengthening. We investigated the contexts that lead to competition and consequent lengthening of target word duration. In three experiments, we manipulated the con...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 16, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

How to capitalize on a priori contrasts in linear (mixed) models: A tutorial
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 110Author(s): Daniel J. Schad, Shravan Vasishth, Sven Hohenstein, Reinhold KlieglAbstractFactorial experiments in research on memory, language, and in other areas are often analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). However, for effects with more than one numerator degrees of freedom, e.g., for experimental factors with more than two levels, the ANOVA omnibus F-test is not informative about the source of a main effect or interaction. Because researchers typically have specific hypotheses about which condition means differ from each other, a pri...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 13, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Structural alignment in dialogue and monologue (and what attention may have to do with it)
Publication date: February 2020Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 110Author(s): Iva Ivanova, William S. Horton, Benjamin Swets, Daniel Kleinman, Victor S. FerreiraAbstractIn the Interactive Alignment Theory, alignment is promoted by dialogic features on a dialogue-monologue continuum. More alignment in prototypical dialogue (a chat among friends) than in prototypical monologue (a lecture) seems plausible, but the role of other dialogic features for alignment is less clear. The current study tests the joint influence of two such features: communicative intent and a live interlocutor. Four structural priming expe...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 11, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Opacity, transparency, and morphological priming: A study of prefixed verbs in Dutch
This study examines the question of morphological relatedness using intra-modal auditory priming by Dutch prefixed verbs. The key conditions involve semantically transparent prefixed primes (e.g., aanbieden ‘offer’, with the stem bieden, also ‘offer’) and opaque primes (e.g., verbieden ‘forbid’). Results show robust facilitation for both transparent and opaque pairs; phonological (Experiment 1) and semantic (Experiment 2) controls rule out the possibility that these other types of relatedness are responsible for the observed priming effects. The finding of facilitation with opaque primes...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - September 28, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: December 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 109Author(s): (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - September 27, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Cumulative effects of syntactic experience in a between- and a within-language context: Evidence for implicit learning
Publication date: December 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 109Author(s): Heeju Hwang, Jeong-Ah ShinAbstractImplicit learning models suggest that speakers adapt syntactic knowledge in response to prior syntactic experience and such adaptation is sensitive to surface structures (word order) (e.g., Chang et al., 2006, Reitter et al., 2011). To determine the scope of syntactic processing to which an implicit learning mechanism is applicable and its sensitivity to surface structures, we investigated cumulative priming and inverse frequency effects across different constructions in a between- language context ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - September 18, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “The benefits of testing: Individual differences based on student factors” [J. Memory Lang. (2019) 104029]
Publication date: Available online 11 September 2019Source: Journal of Memory and LanguageAuthor(s): Alison Robey (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - September 13, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Communication increases category structure and alignment only when combined with cultural transmission
Publication date: December 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 109Author(s): Catriona Silvey, Simon Kirby, Kenny SmithAbstractThe semantic categories labeled by words in natural languages are used for communication with others, and learned by observing the productions of others who learned them in the same way. Do these processes of communication and cultural transmission affect the structure of category systems and their alignment across speakers? We examine novel category systems that emerge from communication, cultural transmission, and both processes combined. Communication alone leads to category system...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - September 4, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Temporal isolation effects in immediate recall
Publication date: December 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 109Author(s): Rachel Grenfell-Essam, Geoff Ward, Cathleen Cortis MackAbstractThree experiments examined temporal isolation effects (TIEs), the recall advantage for stimuli separated by increased inter-stimulus intervals. Prior research suggests that TIEs are observed in immediate free recall (IFR) using longer lists, but are weaker or absent in immediate serial recall (ISR) using shorter lists. Using digit-filled intervals to reduce rehearsal, IFR and ISR benefitted overall from longer pre-item intervals and shorter post-item intervals, using lis...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - September 1, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The domain specificity of working memory is a matter of ability
Publication date: December 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 109Author(s): Kristof Kovacs, Dylan Molenaar, Andrew R.A. ConwayAbstractThe relative importance of domain-general and domain-specific sources of variance in working memory capacity (WMC) is a matter of debate. In intelligence research, the question of domain-generality is informed by differentiation: the phenomenon that the size of across-domain correlations is inversely related to ability: the lower the ability, the more domain-general the variance. Since WMC and intelligence are related constructs, differentiation might exist in WMC, too. Diffe...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - August 27, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Wait for it…performance anticipation reduces recognition memory
Publication date: December 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 109Author(s): Noah D. Forrin, Brandon C.W. Ralph, Navi K. Dhaliwal, Daniel Smilek, Colin M. MacLeodAbstractConventional wisdom suggests that there is an encoding decrement prior to performing in front of others. We hypothesized that this pre-performance memory deficit—the next-in-line effect (Brenner, 1973)—should also occur in the context of mixed-list memory experiments where one of the conditions requires performance. As the testing ground for this prediction, we used the production effect (i.e., enhanced memory for words that are ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - August 23, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Linking repetition priming, recognition, and source memory: A single-system signal-detection account
We present new behavioral data and modeling that links priming, recognition, and source memory. In four experiments, we found that the magnitude of the priming effect, as measured with identification response time in a gradual clarification task, was (1) greater for studied items receiving correct source decisions than incorrect source decisions, and (2) increased as confidence in the source decision increased. Building on the framework for modeling recognition and priming proposed by Berry, Shanks, Speekenbrink, and Henson (2012), we developed a single-system model in which source memory decisions are driven by the same m...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - August 14, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

How many words do we read per minute? A review and meta-analysis of reading rate
Publication date: December 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 109Author(s): Marc BrysbaertAbstractBased on the analysis of 190 studies (18,573 participants), we estimate that the average silent reading rate for adults in English is 238 words per minute (wpm) for non-fiction and 260 wpm for fiction. The difference can be predicted by taking into account the length of the words, with longer words in non-fiction than in fiction. The estimates are lower than the numbers often cited in scientific and popular writings. The reasons for the overestimates are reviewed. The average oral reading rate (based on 77 st...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - August 10, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: October 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 108Author(s): (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - August 7, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Publisher's Note
Publication date: October 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 108Author(s): (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - August 7, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Asymmetric accommodation during interaction leads to the regularisation of linguistic variants
Publication date: December 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 109Author(s): Olga Fehér, Nikolaus Ritt, Kenny SmithAbstractLinguistic variation is constrained by grammatical and social context, making the occurrence of particular variants at least somewhat predictable. We explore accommodation during interaction as a potential mechanism to explain this phenomenon. Specifically, we test a hypothesis derived from historical linguistics that interaction between categorical and variable users is inherently asymmetric: while variable users accommodate to their partners, categorical users are reluctant to d...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - July 27, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Repeat after us: Syntactic alignment is not partner-specific
Publication date: October 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 108Author(s): Rachel Ostrand, Victor S. FerreiraAbstractConversational partners match each other’s speech, a process known as alignment. Such alignment can be partner-specific, when speakers match particular partners’ production distributions, or partner-independent, when speakers match aggregated linguistic statistics across their input. However, partner-specificity has only been assessed in situations where it had clear communicative utility, and non-alignment might cause communicative difficulty. Here, we investigate whether speaker...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - July 18, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

An investigation into the lexical boost with nonhead nouns
Publication date: October 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 108Author(s): Maria Nella Carminati, Roger P.G. van Gompel, Laura J. WakefordAbstractIn five structural priming experiments, we investigated lexical boost effects in the production of ditransitive sentences. Although the residual activation model of Pickering and Branigan (1998) suggests that a lexical boost should only occur with the repetition of a syntactic licensing head in ditransitive prepositional object (PO)/double object (DO) structures, Scheepers, Raffray, and Myachykov (2017) recently found that it also occurs with the repetition of nou...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - July 10, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Linear forgetting
Publication date: October 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 108Author(s): Jerry S. Fisher, Gabriel A. RadvanskyAbstractMemory retention and forgetting is typically captured by an Ebbinghaus curve in which there is a sharp initial decrease that follows a negatively accelerated function. This pattern, typically well fit by a power function and poorly fit by a linear function, has been observed across a variety of materials, tasks, and retention lengths. However, here we demonstrate, across three experiments, a set of retention patterns that are better fit by a linear function, which is not accounted for by a...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - July 10, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The glottal stop between segmental and suprasegmental processing: The case of Maltese
Publication date: October 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 108Author(s): Holger Mitterer, Sahyang Kim, Taehong ChoAbstractMany languages mark vowel-initial words with a glottal stop. We show that this occurs in Maltese, even though the glottal stop also occurs as a phoneme in Maltese. As a consequence, words with and without an underlying (phonemic) glottal stop (e.g., a glottal stop-zero minimal pair qal /Ɂɑ:l/ vs. ghal /ɑ:l/ Engl., ‘he said’-‘because’) can become homophonous in connected speech. We first tested the extent of this phonetic marking of vowel-initial words in a pr...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - July 3, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “Voices in the mental lexicon: Words carry indexical information that can affect access to their meaning” [J. Memory Lang. 107 (2019) 111–127]
Publication date: Available online 24 June 2019Source: Journal of Memory and LanguageAuthor(s): Efthymia C. Kapnoula, Arthur G. Samuel (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - June 25, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Modulation of the word frequency effect in recognition memory after an unrelated lexical decision task
Publication date: October 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 108Author(s): David A. Neville, Jeroen G.W. Raaijmakers, Leendert van MaanenAbstractThe natural language frequency of a word is known to influence the ability to perform recognition judgments based on either semantic or episodic memory, an effect commonly known as the word frequency effect (WFE). For episodic recognition specifically, the WFE presents a mirrored pattern with higher hit rates and lower false alarm rates for low frequency words compared to high frequency words. Interestingly, the use of certain study tasks such as judgements of conc...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - June 22, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

A matter of priorities: High working memory enables (slightly) superior value-directed remembering
Publication date: October 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 108Author(s): Michael L. Griffin, Aaron S. Benjamin, Lili Sahakyan, Sarah E. StanleyAbstractPeople with larger working memory capacity exhibit enhanced free recall. One explanation for this relationship is that the strategies that people bring to the task of learning and retrieving are superior in learners with high working memory. There is ample evidence that learners with high working memory do indeed bring better strategies to both encoding and retrieval, but as yet little evidence of whether higher working memory is related to greater effectiv...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - June 21, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Super-overdistribution
Publication date: October 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 108Author(s): C.J. Brainerd, K. Nakamura, M. Chang, D.M. BialerAbstractConjoint recognition studies have revealed that episodic memory is subadditive over mutually exclusive reality states (e.g., old vs. new), which is known as overdistribution. Because overdistribution violates the additive law of probability, it has stimulated the development of quantum memory models, which implement the distinction between verbatim and gist traces of experience. Recent versions of those models treat verbatim and gist memory as incompatible knowledge states that...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - June 15, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The benefits of testing: Individual differences based on student factors
Publication date: October 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 108Author(s): Alison RobeyAbstractThe testing effect, the notion that retrieval practice, compared to restudying information, leads to greater and longer retention, is a robust finding in cognitive science. However, not all learners experience a benefit from retrieval practice. Many manipulations that influence the testing effect have been explored. However, there is still much to learn about potential individual differences. As the testing effect grows in popularity, it is essential to understanding how students’ individual differences and ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - June 12, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Spatial narrative context modulates semantic (but not visual) competition during discourse processing
Publication date: October 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 108Author(s): Glenn P. Williams, Anuenue Kukona, Yuki KamideAbstractRecent research highlights the influence of (e.g., task) context on conceptual retrieval. To assess whether conceptual representations are context-dependent rather than static, we investigated the influence of spatial narrative context on accessibility for lexical-semantic information by exploring competition effects. In two visual world experiments, participants listened to narratives describing semantically related (piano-trumpet; Experiment 1) or visually similar (bat-cigarette...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - June 12, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Polarity and attitude effects in the continued-influence paradigm
Publication date: October 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 108Author(s): Andrew Gordon, Ullrich K.H. Ecker, Stephan LewandowskyAbstractMisinformation – information that is false or inaccurate – can continue to influence people’s memory and reasoning even after it has been corrected. Researchers have termed this the continued influence effect (CIE). However, to date, research has focused exclusively on examining the CIE in a single polarity, namely the ongoing effect of initially affirmed material that is later negated. No research has yet examined how reliance on outdated information may...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - June 7, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

A computational model of reading across development: Effects of literacy onset on language processing
We examined the extent to which this interaction during development could be observed in language processing. We focused on age of acquisition (AoA) effects in reading, where early-learned words tend to be processed more quickly and accurately relative to later-learned words. We implemented a computational model including representations of print, sound and meaning of words, with training based on children’s gradual exposure to language. The model produced AoA effects in reading and lexical decision, replicating the larger effects of AoA when semantic representations are involved. Further, the model predicted that Ao...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - June 2, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 30, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Individual differences in subphonemic sensitivity and phonological skills
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Monica Y.C. Li, David Braze, Anuenue Kukona, Clinton L. Johns, Whitney Tabor, Julie A. Van Dyke, W. Einar Mencl, Donald P. Shankweiler, Kenneth R. Pugh, James S. MagnusonAbstractMany studies have established a link between phonological abilities (indexed by phonological awareness and phonological memory tasks) and typical and atypical reading development. Individuals who perform poorly on phonological assessments have been mostly assumed to have underspecified (or “fuzzy”) phonological representations, with typical phonemi...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 24, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Syntactic entrainment: The repetition of syntactic structures in event descriptions
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Nicholas Gruberg, Rachel Ostrand, Shota Momma, Victor S. FerreiraAbstractSyntactic structures can convey certain (subtle) emergent properties of events. For example, the double-object dative (“the doctor is giving a patient pills”) can convey the successful transfer of possession, whereas its syntactic alternative, the prepositional dative (“the doctor is giving pills to a patient”), conveys just a transfer to a location. Four experiments explore how syntactic structures may become associated with particular se...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 24, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Language-general and language-specific phenomena in the acquisition of inflectional noun morphology: A cross-linguistic elicited-production study of Polish, Finnish and Estonian
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Sonia Granlund, Joanna Kolak, Virve Vihman, Felix Engelmann, Elena V.M. Lieven, Julian M. Pine, Anna L. Theakston, Ben AmbridgeAbstractThe aim of this large-scale, preregistered, cross-linguistic study was to mediate between theories of the acquisition of inflectional morphology, which lie along a continuum from rule-based to analogy-based. Across three morphologically rich languages (Polish, Finnish and Estonian), 120 children (mean age 48.32 months, SD = 7.0 months) completed an experimental, elicited-production study of noun ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 22, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

I don’t remember vs. I don’t know: Phenomenological states associated with retrieval failures
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Jennifer H. Coane, Sharda UmanathAbstractWhen retrieval fails, what is the phenomenology of that experience? We explored different states of experience associated with retrieval failures that vary in intensity. Specifically, we examined the difference between not knowing and not remembering and the ways in which these states are described. Naïve and expert participants defined “I don’t know” (DK) and “I don’t remember” (DR). DR was associated with lack of accessibility and forgetting, whereas D...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 19, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Seeing events vs. entities: The processing advantage of Pseudo Relatives over Relative Clauses
We present the results of three offline questionnaires (one attachment preference study and two acceptability judgments) and two eye-tracking studies in French and English, investigating the resolution of the ambiguity between pseudo relative and relative clause interpretations. This structural and interpretive ambiguity has recently been shown to play a central role in the explanation of apparent cross-linguistic asymmetries in relative clause attachment (Grillo and Costa, 2014; Grillo et al., 2015). This literature has argued that pseudo relatives are preferred to relative clauses because of their structural and interpre...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 14, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Voices in the mental lexicon: Words carry indexical information that can affect access to their meaning
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Efthymia C. Kapnoula, Arthur G. SamuelAbstractThe speech signal carries both linguistic and non-linguistic information (e.g., a talker’s voice qualities; referred to as indexical information). There is evidence that indexical information can affect some aspects of spoken word recognition, but we still do not know whether and how it can affect access to a word’s meaning. A few studies support a dual-route model, in which inferences about the talker can guide access to meaning via a route external to the mental lexicon. It r...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 13, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The role of prior knowledge in incremental associative learning: An empirical and computational approach
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Oded Bein, Maayan Trzewik, Anat MarilAbstractOur experiences are encoded in relation to existing knowledge, and learning of new information is influenced by what has already been learned. Although learning is often an incremental process spanning multiple repetitions, the influences of prior knowledge have thus far been investigated primarily in one-trial learning. Incremental learning studies have generally not taken prior knowledge influences into consideration. Aiming to fill this gap, we examined the contribution of prior knowledg...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 8, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Metacognitive expectancy effects in source monitoring: Beliefs, in-the-moment experiences, or both?
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Marie Luisa Schaper, Beatrice G. Kuhlmann, Ute J. BayenAbstractJudgments of Learning (JOLs) may result from a priori beliefs and in-the-moment experiences (cue-utilization approach, Koriat, 1997). The authors investigated the interplay and relative importance of beliefs and experiences, and their impact on JOLs and Judgments of Source (JOS). In a source-monitoring task with expected and unexpected source–item pairs (e.g., kitchen–oven vs. bathroom–refrigerator), metamemory judgments were higher for expected than unex...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 8, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Rebels without a clause: Processing reflexives in fronted wh-predicates
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Akira Omaki, Zoe Ovans, Anthony Yacovone, Brian DillonAbstractEnglish reflexives like herself tend to associate with a structurally prominent local antecedent in online processing. However, past work has primarily investigated reflexives in canonical direct object positions. The present study investigates cataphoric reflexives in fronted wh-predicates (e.g., The mechanic that James hired predicted how annoyed with himself the insurance agent would be). Here, the reflexive is encountered in advance of its grammatical antecedent. We ask...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - April 25, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

How attributes and cues made accessible through monitoring affect self-regulated learning in older and younger adults
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Renée DeCaro, Ayanna K. ThomasAbstractResearch suggests that cues available at the time of monitoring affect metamemorial control. We investigated how self-regulated learning (i.e., restudy choice) varied as a function of retrieval success and access to target-related partial information in the context of a metamemorial monitoring decision. Young and older adults studied unrelated cue–target pairs and made trial-by-trial monitoring judgments during an initial testing phase. Participants chose a subset of cue–target ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - April 23, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The effects of arousal and attention on emotional false memory formation
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Maria V. Hellenthal, Lauren M. Knott, Mark L. Howe, Samantha Wilkinson, Datin ShahAbstractPrevious research has shown that with reduced attention at encoding, false recognition of critical lures for negative arousing DRM lists were higher than positive arousing lists. The current study extends this research to examine the role of attention for both arousing and non-arousing valenced false memory formation. Further, due to contradictory findings in past research, we examined attention at encoding using both within- (Experiment 1) and b...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - April 14, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Language control and lexical access in diglossic speech production: Evidence from variety switching in speakers of Swiss German
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Constanze C. Vorwerg, Sumanghalyah Suntharam, Marie-Anne MorandAbstractDiglossic speakers of two varieties of a language switch between their language varieties as bilinguals do between their languages, instead of having the otherwise typical probabilistic distributions of variants across varieties. To investigate the mechanisms involved in diglossic language control and lexical access, we conducted two switching experiments, in which participants who were highly proficient in the two varieties, or languages, named pictures in Swiss G...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - April 13, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Value bias of verbal memory
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Sucheta Chakravarty, Esther Fujiwara, Christopher R. Madan, Sara E. Tomlinson, Isha Ober, Jeremy B. CaplanAbstractA common finding is that items associated with higher reward value are subsequently remembered better than items associated with lower value. A confounding factor is that when a higher value stimuli is presented, this typically signals to participants that it is now a particularly important time to engage in the task. When this was controlled, Madan, Fujiwara, Gerson, and Caplan (2012) still found a large value-bias of mem...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - April 5, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: June 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 106Author(s): (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 31, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Distinctions between primary and secondary scalar implicatures
Publication date: June 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 106Author(s): Anouk Dieuleveut, Emmanuel Chemla, Benjamin SpectorAbstractAn utterance of Some of the students are home usually triggers the inference that it is not the case that the speaker believes that all students are home (Primary Scalar Implicature). It may also license a stronger inference: that the speaker believes that not all students are home (Secondary Scalar Implicature). Using an experimental paradigm which allows to distinguish between these three distinct readings as such (literal reading, primary SI, secondary SI), we show that the s...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 28, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Task-unrelated thoughts and forgetting in working memory
Publication date: June 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 106Author(s): Alexander SoemerAbstractThe present article reports four experiments that investigated the effects of task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs) on forgetting in non-verbal working memory. Participants had to remember three non-verbal stimuli over unfilled retention intervals (RIs) and then judge whether or not a subsequently presented probe stimulus matched one of the to-be-remembered stimuli. Participants additionally responded to randomly appearing probes that measured different aspects of their TUT engagement during the RI of the preceding tria...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 14, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Are the effects of divided attention on memory encoding processes due to the disruption of deep-level elaborative processes? Evidence from cued- and free-recall tasks
Publication date: June 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 106Author(s): Moshe Naveh-Benjamin, Matthew S. BrubakerAbstractWhereas numerous studies have indicated that divided attention (DA) at encoding significantly disrupts later memory for the studied information, the underlying mechanisms of this effect remain unclear. Following from our recent investigation (Naveh-Benjamin, Guez, Hara, Brubaker, & Lowenschuss-Erlich, 2014) that used an item recognition task, in the current study we further assess the degree to which deep-level semantically-elaborative processes are affected under DA. We compared the ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 14, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research