Seeing events vs. entities: The processing advantage of Pseudo Relatives over Relative Clauses
We present the results of three offline questionnaires (one attachment preference study and two acceptability judgments) and two eye-tracking studies in French and English, investigating the resolution of the ambiguity between pseudo relative and relative clause interpretations. This structural and interpretive ambiguity has recently been shown to play a central role in the explanation of apparent cross-linguistic asymmetries in relative clause attachment (Grillo and Costa, 2014; Grillo et al., 2015). This literature has argued that pseudo relatives are preferred to relative clauses because of their structural and interpre...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 14, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Voices in the mental lexicon: Words carry indexical information that can affect access to their meaning
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Efthymia C. Kapnoula, Arthur G. SamuelAbstractThe speech signal carries both linguistic and non-linguistic information (e.g., a talker’s voice qualities; referred to as indexical information). There is evidence that indexical information can affect some aspects of spoken word recognition, but we still do not know whether and how it can affect access to a word’s meaning. A few studies support a dual-route model, in which inferences about the talker can guide access to meaning via a route external to the mental lexicon. It r...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 13, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The role of prior knowledge in incremental associative learning: An empirical and computational approach
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Oded Bein, Maayan Trzewik, Anat MarilAbstractOur experiences are encoded in relation to existing knowledge, and learning of new information is influenced by what has already been learned. Although learning is often an incremental process spanning multiple repetitions, the influences of prior knowledge have thus far been investigated primarily in one-trial learning. Incremental learning studies have generally not taken prior knowledge influences into consideration. Aiming to fill this gap, we examined the contribution of prior knowledg...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 8, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Metacognitive expectancy effects in source monitoring: Beliefs, in-the-moment experiences, or both?
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Marie Luisa Schaper, Beatrice G. Kuhlmann, Ute J. BayenAbstractJudgments of Learning (JOLs) may result from a priori beliefs and in-the-moment experiences (cue-utilization approach, Koriat, 1997). The authors investigated the interplay and relative importance of beliefs and experiences, and their impact on JOLs and Judgments of Source (JOS). In a source-monitoring task with expected and unexpected source–item pairs (e.g., kitchen–oven vs. bathroom–refrigerator), metamemory judgments were higher for expected than unex...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - May 8, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Rebels without a clause: Processing reflexives in fronted wh-predicates
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Akira Omaki, Zoe Ovans, Anthony Yacovone, Brian DillonAbstractEnglish reflexives like herself tend to associate with a structurally prominent local antecedent in online processing. However, past work has primarily investigated reflexives in canonical direct object positions. The present study investigates cataphoric reflexives in fronted wh-predicates (e.g., The mechanic that James hired predicted how annoyed with himself the insurance agent would be). Here, the reflexive is encountered in advance of its grammatical antecedent. We ask...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - April 25, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

How attributes and cues made accessible through monitoring affect self-regulated learning in older and younger adults
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Renée DeCaro, Ayanna K. ThomasAbstractResearch suggests that cues available at the time of monitoring affect metamemorial control. We investigated how self-regulated learning (i.e., restudy choice) varied as a function of retrieval success and access to target-related partial information in the context of a metamemorial monitoring decision. Young and older adults studied unrelated cue–target pairs and made trial-by-trial monitoring judgments during an initial testing phase. Participants chose a subset of cue–target ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - April 23, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The effects of arousal and attention on emotional false memory formation
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Maria V. Hellenthal, Lauren M. Knott, Mark L. Howe, Samantha Wilkinson, Datin ShahAbstractPrevious research has shown that with reduced attention at encoding, false recognition of critical lures for negative arousing DRM lists were higher than positive arousing lists. The current study extends this research to examine the role of attention for both arousing and non-arousing valenced false memory formation. Further, due to contradictory findings in past research, we examined attention at encoding using both within- (Experiment 1) and b...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - April 14, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Language control and lexical access in diglossic speech production: Evidence from variety switching in speakers of Swiss German
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Constanze C. Vorwerg, Sumanghalyah Suntharam, Marie-Anne MorandAbstractDiglossic speakers of two varieties of a language switch between their language varieties as bilinguals do between their languages, instead of having the otherwise typical probabilistic distributions of variants across varieties. To investigate the mechanisms involved in diglossic language control and lexical access, we conducted two switching experiments, in which participants who were highly proficient in the two varieties, or languages, named pictures in Swiss G...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - April 13, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Value bias of verbal memory
Publication date: August 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 107Author(s): Sucheta Chakravarty, Esther Fujiwara, Christopher R. Madan, Sara E. Tomlinson, Isha Ober, Jeremy B. CaplanAbstractA common finding is that items associated with higher reward value are subsequently remembered better than items associated with lower value. A confounding factor is that when a higher value stimuli is presented, this typically signals to participants that it is now a particularly important time to engage in the task. When this was controlled, Madan, Fujiwara, Gerson, and Caplan (2012) still found a large value-bias of mem...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - April 5, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: June 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 106Author(s): (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 31, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Distinctions between primary and secondary scalar implicatures
Publication date: June 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 106Author(s): Anouk Dieuleveut, Emmanuel Chemla, Benjamin SpectorAbstractAn utterance of Some of the students are home usually triggers the inference that it is not the case that the speaker believes that all students are home (Primary Scalar Implicature). It may also license a stronger inference: that the speaker believes that not all students are home (Secondary Scalar Implicature). Using an experimental paradigm which allows to distinguish between these three distinct readings as such (literal reading, primary SI, secondary SI), we show that the s...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 28, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Task-unrelated thoughts and forgetting in working memory
Publication date: June 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 106Author(s): Alexander SoemerAbstractThe present article reports four experiments that investigated the effects of task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs) on forgetting in non-verbal working memory. Participants had to remember three non-verbal stimuli over unfilled retention intervals (RIs) and then judge whether or not a subsequently presented probe stimulus matched one of the to-be-remembered stimuli. Participants additionally responded to randomly appearing probes that measured different aspects of their TUT engagement during the RI of the preceding tria...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 14, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Are the effects of divided attention on memory encoding processes due to the disruption of deep-level elaborative processes? Evidence from cued- and free-recall tasks
Publication date: June 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 106Author(s): Moshe Naveh-Benjamin, Matthew S. BrubakerAbstractWhereas numerous studies have indicated that divided attention (DA) at encoding significantly disrupts later memory for the studied information, the underlying mechanisms of this effect remain unclear. Following from our recent investigation (Naveh-Benjamin, Guez, Hara, Brubaker, & Lowenschuss-Erlich, 2014) that used an item recognition task, in the current study we further assess the degree to which deep-level semantically-elaborative processes are affected under DA. We compared the ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 14, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Reversal shift in phonotactic learning during language production: Evidence for incremental learning
Publication date: June 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 106Author(s): Nathaniel D. Anderson, Eric W. Holmes, Gary S. Dell, Erica L. MiddletonAbstractSpeakers implicitly learn novel phonotactic patterns while producing strings of syllables. The learning is revealed in their speech errors. For example, if /f/ is artificially restricted to the syllable onset position and /s/ is restricted to the coda position, speakers’ slips will respect these constraints, demonstrating learning. The mechanism behind this learning was investigated by reversal shift. In two experiments, speakers produced syllable seque...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 14, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Distinguishing reality from fantasy in adults with autism spectrum disorder: Evidence from eye movements and reading
We examined how adults with and without ASD make sense of reality-violating fantasy narratives by testing real-time understanding of counterfactuals. Participants were eye-tracked as they read narratives that depicted novel counterfactual scenarios that violate reality (e.g. “If margarine contained detergent, Mum could use margarine in her washing/baking”, Experiment 1), or counterfactual versions of known fictional worlds (e.g. “If Harry Potter had lost all his magic powers, he would use his broom to sweep/fly”, Experiment 2). Results revealed anomaly detection effects in the early moments of proce...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 13, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Resource allocation in phonological working memory: Same or different principles from vision?
Publication date: Available online 11 March 2019Source: Journal of Memory and LanguageAuthor(s): Christopher R. Hepner, Nazbanou NozariAbstractThe nature of working memory resources—in particular, their quantization (discrete vs. continuous)—has been studied extensively in the visual domain, with evidence supporting models with flexibly and continuously divisible resources. It remains unclear, however, whether similar mechanisms mediate the division of resources in phonological working memory. In three experiments, we show that, despite representational differences between visual and auditory domains, the princ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 12, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Counting ‘uhm’s: How tracking the distribution of native and non-native disfluencies influences online language comprehension
Publication date: Available online 6 March 2019Source: Journal of Memory and LanguageAuthor(s): Hans Rutger Bosker, Marjolein van Os, Rik Does, Geertje van BergenAbstractDisfluencies, like uh, have been shown to help listeners anticipate reference to low-frequency words. The associative account of this ‘disfluency bias’ proposes that listeners learn to associate disfluency with low-frequency referents based on prior exposure to non-arbitrary disfluency distributions (i.e., greater probability of low-frequency words after disfluencies). However, there is limited evidence for listeners actually tracking disfluenc...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 8, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The immediate benefits and long-term consequences of briefly presented masked primes on episodic recollection
Publication date: June 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 106Author(s): Geoffrey B. Maddox, David A. Balota, Abhilasha A. Kumar, Peter R. Millar, Luke ChurchillAbstractWithin-trial priming paradigms have been widely used to measure lexical retrieval and familiarity-based processes in speeded pronunciation, perceptual identification, lexical decision, lexical retrieval, and episodic recognition tasks. Here, we introduce a novel within-trial priming paradigm to examine cued recall, which is considered a more recollection-based task. In each experiment, participants initially studied a list of paired-associate...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 5, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Forget me not: Encoding processes in value-directed remembering
Publication date: June 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 106Author(s): Joseph P. Hennessee, Tara K. Patterson, Alan D. Castel, Barbara J. KnowltonAbstractValuable items are often remembered better than less valuable items, but research on the mechanisms supporting this value effect is limited. In the current study, we sought to determine how items might be differentially encoded based on their value. In Experiment 1, participants studied words associated with point-values which were followed by a cue to either “Remember” the word for a later test or “Forget” the word. While to-be-fo...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 4, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

It depends: Optionality in the production of filler-gap dependencies
This study investigates the language production mechanisms underlying the creation of filler-gap dependencies (e.g., relative clauses: This is the boy that the girl from Norway saw_ yesterday), which require speakers to establish an argument-predicate relationship between a phrase, the ‘filler’, (the boy) and a further embedded predicate (saw). We show that filler-gap dependency production involves the retention of a representation of the filler until the relevant embedded position. We then report three elicitation experiments examining how English and Hebrew speakers manage and moderate filler retention demand...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - March 4, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

List-method directed forgetting after prolonged retention interval: Further challenges to contemporary accounts
Publication date: June 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 106Author(s): Magdalena Abel, Karl-Heinz T. BäumlAbstractNumerous studies on list-method directed forgetting (LMDF) have shown that people can voluntarily forget information when cued to do so. But the cognitive mechanism(s) behind this form of forgetting are still subject to debate. The present study focused on two explanations of LMDF: selective rehearsal and mental context change. Experiment 1 addressed the context-change account by comparing the persistence of LMDF with that of context-dependent forgetting. Results showed that LMDF, but not ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - February 20, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Corrigendum to ‘Working memory training involves learning new skills’. [J. Memory Language 105 (2019) 19–42]
Publication date: Available online 18 February 2019Source: Journal of Memory and LanguageAuthor(s): Susan E. Gathercole, Darren L. Dunning, Joni Holmes, Dennis Norris (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - February 18, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: April 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 105Author(s): (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - February 2, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Implicit versus explicit mechanisms of vocabulary learning and consolidation
Publication date: June 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 106Author(s): Justyna M. Sobczak, M. Gareth GaskellAbstractPrevious research has suggested that integration of novel words into lexical competition benefits from a consolidation delay containing a period of sleep (Dumay & Gaskell, 2007). However, a recent study argued that learning novel words via a relatively implicit Hebb repetition task leads to later lexical integration independently of sleep (Szmalec, Page, & Duyck, 2012). It is not clear whether this different time course of lexical integration is a consequence of the learning method ch...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - January 25, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Why is free recall practice more effective than recognition practice for enhancing memory? Evaluating the relational processing hypothesis
Publication date: April 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 105Author(s): Katherine A. Rawson, Amanda ZamaryAbstractWhy are testing effects on memory stronger when practice tests involve free recall versus recognition? Three experiments tested the hypothesis that relational processing is evoked to a greater extent during free recall practice than during recognition practice. Students studied a list of words from taxonomic categories and then either restudied the word list several times or alternated between practice testing (either free recall or recognition) and restudy. Two days later, all groups completed...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - January 24, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Mapping non-native pitch contours to meaning: Perceptual and experiential factors
Publication date: April 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 105Author(s): Jessica F. Hay, Ryan A. Cannistraci, Qian ZhaoAbstractInfants show interesting patterns of flexibility and constraint early in word learning. Here, we explore perceptual and experiential factors that drive associative learning of labels that differ in pitch contour. Contrary to the salience hypothesis proposed in Experiment 1, English-learning 14-month-olds failed to map acoustically distinctive level and dipping labels to novel referents, even though they discriminated the labels when no potential referents were present. Conversely, i...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - January 16, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Distance-dependent memory for pictures and words
Publication date: April 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 105Author(s): Elinor Amit, SoYon Rim, Georg Halbeisen, Uriel Cohen Priva, Elena Stephan, Yaacov TropeAbstractThree experiments explored the effect of medium of presentation (pictures, words) and psychological distance (proximal, distal) on episodic memory. In particular, we predicted that memory would be better for congruent combinations of medium and distance (i.e., pictures of psychologically proximal entities and verbal labels of psychologically distal entities) than incongruent combinations (i.e., pictures of psychologically distal entities and ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - January 12, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Metaphor comprehension: An individual-differences approach
Publication date: April 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 105Author(s): Dušan Stamenković, Nicholas Ichien, Keith J. HolyoakAbstractThe nature of the mental processes involved in metaphor comprehension has been the focus of debate, with controversy focusing on the relative role of general analogical reasoning versus language-specific conceptual combination. In the present set of studies, we take an individual-differences approach to examine the comprehension of a variety of metaphors, some taken from literary sources, using several types of comprehension tests. In a series of metaphor-comprehension...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - December 29, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Scales and scalarity: Processing scalar inferences
Publication date: April 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 105Author(s): Bob van Tiel, Elizabeth Pankratz, Chao SunAbstractThe scalar word ‘some’ may be interpreted with an upper bound, i.e., as excluding ‘all’. Several studies have found that the computation of this scalar inference may be associated with a processing cost (e.g., Bott & Noveck, 2004; De Neys & Schaeken, 2007), which seems to argue in favour of theories according to which pragmatic inferencing is cognitively demanding (e.g., Sperber & Wilson, 1986). This argument holds on the premise that findings for &ls...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - December 15, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

On the encapsulation of bilingual language control
Publication date: April 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 105Author(s): Kenneth R. Paap, Regina Anders-Jefferson, Roman Mikulinsky, Shigeaki Masuda, Lauren MasonAbstractOne purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that prevalent patterns of bilingual language control lead to greater enhancement of the ability to resolve Stimulus-Stimulus conflict compared to Stimulus-Response conflict. To that end 104 bilinguals and 62 monolinguals completed four commonly used nonverbal interference tasks with varied S-S and S-R incompatibilities. No bilingual advantages were observed in any of the tasks. A second ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - December 11, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Subjecthood and linear order in linguistic encoding: Evidence from the real-time production of wh-questions in English and Mandarin Chinese
Publication date: April 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 105Author(s): Monica L. Do, Elsi KaiserAbstractWe use visual world eye-tracking to provide a first look into the real-time production of an under-researched but communicatively crucial construction – wh-questions. We investigate whether the transition from abstract message to highly-structured utterances (linguistic encoding) is driven by linear order (positional processing) or subjecthood assignment (functional processing). Experiment 1 decouples positional and functional processes by comparing production of English declaratives versus object...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - December 8, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Temporal aspects of self-monitoring for speech errors
We report two four-word tongue twister experiments eliciting consonantal errors and their repairs, in word initial and medial positions, testing some predictions relating to temporal aspects of self-monitoring. Main findings: (1) After internal error detection interrupting the speaking process takes more time than speech initiation of the error form. This implies that “covert repairs” are rare. (2) Word onset-to-cutoff times are longer for medial than for initial errors. This implies that scanning internal word forms for errors takes time. (3) Cutoff-to-repair times of 0 ms are overrepresented. This shows tha...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - December 5, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Working memory training involves learning new skills
We present a new framework characterizing training-induced changes in WM as the acquisition of novel cognitive routines akin to learning a new skill. Predictions were tested in three studies analyzing the transfer between WM tasks following WM training. Study 1 reports a meta-analysis establishing substantial transfer when trained and untrained tasks shared either a serial recall, complex span or backward span paradigm. Transfer was weaker for serial recall of verbal than visuo-spatial material, suggesting that this paradigm is served by an existing verbal STM system and does not require a new routine. Re-analysis of publi...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - December 2, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Revisiting the attentional demands of rehearsal in working-memory tasks
Publication date: April 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 105Author(s): Mirko Thalmann, Alessandra S. Souza, Klaus OberauerAbstractThere is a recent surge of interest in maintenance processes in working memory, such as articulatory rehearsal, elaboration, and attentional refreshing. Yet, we know little about the central attentional demand of these processes. It has been assumed that articulatory rehearsal does not require central attention at all (Vergauwe, Camos, & Barrouillet, 2014), being in essence a cost-free strategy. In contrast, elaboration and attentional refreshing are assumed to incur large ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - November 29, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 104Author(s): (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - November 21, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

New initiatives to promote open science at the Journal of Memory and Language
Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 104Author(s): Richard Gerrig, Kathleen Rastle (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - November 16, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Making sense of sequential lineups: An experimental and theoretical analysis of position effects
Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 104Author(s): Brent M. Wilson, Kristin Donnelly, Nicholas Christenfeld, John T. WixtedAbstractAs part of a criminal investigation, the police often administer a recognition memory task known as a photo lineup. A typical 6-person photo lineup consists of one suspect (who may or may not be guilty) and five physically similar foils (all known to be innocent). The photos can be shown simultaneously (i.e., all at once) or sequentially (i.e., one at a time). Approximately 30% of U.S. police departments have moved to using the sequential lineup procedur...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - November 14, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Exploring the shape of signal-detection distributions in individual recognition ROC data
Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 104Author(s): Simone Malejka, Arndt BröderAbstractThe question of whether recognition performance should be analyzed assuming continuous memory strength or discrete memory states has been bothering researchers for decades. Continuous-strength models (signal-detection theory) assume that memory strength varies according to Gaussian distributions, leading to graded memory-strength values. In contrast, discrete-state models (threshold theory) are formally equivalent to continuous-strength models with rectangular distributions, giving rise to de...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 24, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Learning from failure: Errorful generation improves memory for items, not associations
Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 104Author(s): Tina Seabrooke, Timothy J. Hollins, Christopher Kent, Andy J. Wills, Chris J. MitchellAbstractPotts and Shanks (2014) recently reported that making mistakes improved the encoding of novel information compared with simply studying. This benefit of generating errors is counterintuitive, since it resulted in less study time and more opportunity for proactive interference. Five experiments examined the effect of generating errors versus studying on item recognition, cued recall, associative recognition, two-alternative forced choice and...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 21, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Information packaging in speech shapes information packaging in gesture: The role of speech planning units in the coordination of speech-gesture production
Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 104Author(s): Isabella Fritz, Sotaro Kita, Jeannette Littlemore, Andrea KrottAbstractLinguistic encoding influences the gestural manner and path depiction of motion events. Gestures depict manner and path of motion events differently across languages, either conflating or separating manner and path, depending on whether manner and path are linguistically encoded within one clause (e.g., “rolling down”) or multiple clauses (e.g., “descends as it rolls”) respectively. However, it is unclear whether such gestural differences ...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 13, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “The statistical significance filter leads to overoptimistic expectations of replicability” [J. Mem. Lang. 103 (2018) 151–175]
Publication date: Available online 22 September 2018Source: Journal of Memory and LanguageAuthor(s): Shravan Vasishth, Daniela Mertzen, Lena A. Jäger, Andrew Gelman (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 5, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Individual differences in working memory capacity and long-term memory: The influence of intensity of attention to items at encoding as measured by pupil dilation
Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 104Author(s): Ashley L. Miller, Marina P. Gross, Nash UnsworthAbstractThe present study used pupil dilation as an index of the intensity of attention to determine if variation in attention at encoding partially accounts for the relation between working memory capacity (WMC) and long-term memory (LTM). In Experiment 1, participants completed a delayed free recall task while pupil dilation was simultaneously recorded. Results revealed high WMC individuals displayed an increase in pupil dilation across serial positions, whereas low WMC individuals e...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 5, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Exploring the intrinsic-extrinsic distinction in prospective metamemory
Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 104Author(s): Jonathan A. Susser, Neil W. MulliganAbstractThe overwhelming majority of research on metamemory examines retrospective memory – memory for past events. The metamemory of prospective memory – remembering to carry out intentions in the future – is little studied. The cue utilization account is a prominent framework for analyzing retrospective metamemory, here applied to prospective metamemory. This framework predicts that intrinsic cues (e.g., characteristics of the to-be-remembered information) readily impact metame...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - October 5, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Social and configural effects on the cognitive dynamics of perspective-taking
Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 104Author(s): Alexia Galati, Rick Dale, Nicholas D. DuranAbstractHow do environmental cues and social perspectives influence perspective selection? Listeners responded to instructions (e.g., “Give me the folder on the right”) from a simulated partner, selecting from two objects consistently aligned with themselves (ego-aligned; Experiment 1a) or the speaker (other-aligned; Experiment1b). In Experiment 2, listeners selected from triangular 3-object configurations whose orientation varied (ego-, other-, or neither-aligned). When the con...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - September 15, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 103Author(s): (Source: Journal of Memory and Language)
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - September 12, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Linguistic expectation management in online discourse processing: An investigation of Dutch inderdaad 'indeed' and eigenlijk 'actually'
Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 103Author(s): Geertje van Bergen, Hans Rutger BoskerAbstractInterpersonal discourse particles (DPs), such as Dutch inderdaad (≈‘indeed’) and eigenlijk (≈‘actually’) are highly frequent in everyday conversational interaction. Despite extensive theoretical descriptions of their polyfunctionality, little is known about how they are used by language comprehenders. In two visual world eye-tracking experiments involving an online dialogue completion task, we asked to what extent inderdaad, confirming an inferred expe...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - September 6, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Topic situations: Coherence by inclusion
Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 103Author(s): Lyn Frazier, Charles CliftonAbstractTopic situations have been studied in the linguistic literature but for the most part have not been studied psycholinguistically. Five experiments tested predictions of the hypothesis that a sentence-initial prepositional phrase (PP) in English introduces a Topic Situation, which by default restricts the interpretation of the following discourse. Participants in judgment experiments interpreted later discourse events as being more likely to take place in the location specified by a PP when that PP...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - August 31, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

The statistical significance filter leads to overoptimistic expectations of replicability
Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 103Author(s): Shravan Vasishth, Daniela Mertzen, Lena A. Jäger, Andrew GelmanAbstractIt is well-known in statistics (e.g., Gelman & Carlin, 2014) that treating a result as publishable just because the p-value is less than 0.05 leads to overoptimistic expectations of replicability. These effects get published, leading to an overconfident belief in replicability. We demonstrate the adverse consequences of this statistical significance filter by conducting seven direct replication attempts (268 participants in total) of a recent paper (Levy...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - August 30, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Where does the congruity effect come from in memorial comparative judgments? A serial-position-based distinctiveness account
Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 103Author(s): Jerwen Jou, Eric E. Escamilla, Andy U. Torres, Alejandro Ortiz, Paola SalazarAbstractA congruity effect (CE) refers to choosing the larger of two large things (smaller of two small things) faster than vice versa. The source of the CE in comparative judgments has been debated for decades without a definitive answer. Major extant models, e.g., the semantic-coding, the expectancy, and the evidence accrual models attribute the effect to matching or mismatching between the instruction (“choose larger” or “choose smaller...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - August 29, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Semantic diversity, frequency and the development of lexical quality in children’s word reading
Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Memory and Language, Volume 103Author(s): Yaling Hsiao, Kate NationAbstractFrequency exerts a powerful influence on lexical processing but it is possible that at least part of its effect is caused by high frequency words being experienced in more diverse contexts over an individual’s language experience. To capture this variability, we applied Latent Semantic Analysis on a 35-million-word corpus of texts written for children, deriving a measure of semantic diversity that quantifies the similarity of all the contexts a word appears in. Across three experiments with 6&n...
Source: Journal of Memory and Language - August 25, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research