(Un)bridgeable Chasms?: Doctor-Patient Interactions in Select Graphic Medical Narratives
AbstractEffective doctor patient relationships are predicated on doctors' relational engagement and affective/holistic communication with the patients. On the contrary, the contemporary healthcare and patient-clinician communication are at odds with the desirable professional goals, often resulting in dehumanization and demoralization of patients. Besides denigrating the moral agency of a patient such apathetic interactions and unprofessional approach also affect the treatment and well-being of the sufferer. Foregrounding multifaceted doctor-patient relationships, graphic pathographies are a significant cultural resource w...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - August 17, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Pedagogy and the Art of Death: Reparative Readings of Death and Dying in Margaret Edson ’s Wit
AbstractWit explores modes of reading representations of death and dying, both through the play ’s sustained engagement with Donne’sHoly Sonnets and through Vivian ’s self-reflexive approach to her illness and death. I argue that the play dramatizes reparative readings, a term coined by Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick to describe an alternative to the paranoid reading practices that have come to dominate literary criticism. By analyzing the play’s reparative reading s of death and dying (as well as its representation of the shortcomings of paranoid readings), I show howWit provides lessons about knowledge-mak...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - August 10, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Critical Healing: Queering Diagnosis and Public Health through the Health Humanities
AbstractThis introduction provides an overview to a special issue on Critical Healing, which draws on queer theory, disability studies, postcolonial theory, and literary studies to theorize productive engagements between the clinical and cultural aspects of biomedical knowledge and practice. The essays in this issue historicize and theorize diagnosis, particularly diagnosis that impacts trans health and sexuality, homosexuality, and HIV/AIDS transmission. The essays also address racialization, disability, and colonialism through discussions of fiction, film, theoretical memoir, and comics, as well as biomedical discourse a...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - August 9, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Medical Students ’ Efforts to Integrate and/or Reclaim Authentic Identity: Insights from a Mask-Making Exercise
AbstractMedical students ’ mask-making can provide valuable insights into personal and professional identity formation and wellness. A subset of first- and second-year medical students attending a medical school wellness retreat participated in a mask-making workshop. Faculty-student teams examined student masks and expla natory narratives using visual and textual analysis techniques. A quantitative survey assessed student perceptions of the experience. We identified an overarching theme: “Reconciliation/reclamation of authentic identity.” The combination of nonverbal mask-making and narrative offers rich...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - August 8, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Cutting Deep: The Transformative Power of Art in the Anatomy Lab
AbstractOn Tuesday evenings at New York University School of Medicine (NYUSoM), the anatomy lab is transformed into an art studio. Medical students gather with a spirit of creative enterprise and a unique goal: to turn anatomy into art. They are participants in Art& Anatomy, an innovative drawing course within the Master Scholars Program in Humanistic Medicine (MSPHM) —a component of NYUSoM, which offers elective courses across a range of interdisciplinary topics in medical humanities. Art& Anatomy has had approximately four hundred fifty participants since its inception in 2009. The educational intention of ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - August 8, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Longitudinal Service Learning in Medical Education: An Ethical Analysis of the Five-Year Alternative Curriculum at Stritch School of Medicine
AbstractIn this article, the author explores a model of alternative medical education being pioneered at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. The five-year Global Health Fieldwork Fellowship (GHFF) track allows two students per year to complete an extra year of medical education while living and working in a free rural clinic in the jungle lowlands of Bolivia. This alternative curricular track is unique among other existing models in that it is (a) longitudinally immersive for at least one full additional year of medical education, (b) grounded in clinical and service learning, and (c) heavily focused upon...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - August 6, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Fanon and the New Paraphilias: Towards a Trans of Color Critique of the DSM-V
AbstractThis essay places psychiatrist and philosopher Frantz Fanon ’s anti-colonial, anti-racist message fromPeau Noire, Masques Blancs/Black Skin, White Masks (1952; 1967; 2008) in conversation with the new diagnoses of “Gender Dysphoria” and “Transvestic Disorder” in the fifth edition of theDiagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V). Specifically, the essay discusses sexologist Ray Blanchard ’s controversial theory of autogynephilia alongside Fanon’s ambivalent rendering of transgender desire and interracial trans phenomenology in a crucial but frequently over...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - August 4, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

What is the Role of the Arts in Medical Education and Patient Care? A Survey-based Qualitative Study
AbstractTo inform medical education reform efforts, we systematically collected information on the level of arts and humanities engagement in our medical school community. Attitudes regarding incorporating arts and humanities-based teaching methods into medical education and patient care were also assessed. An IRB-approved survey was electronically distributed to all faculty, residents, fellows, and students at our medical school. Questions focused on personal practice of the arts and/or humanities, as well as perceptions of, and experience with formally incorporating these into medical teaching. Of 13,512 community member...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - August 4, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Queer Theory and Biomedical Practice: The Biomedicalization of Sexuality/The Cultural Politics of Biomedicine
This article works across multiple disciplinary boundaries, especially queer theory, to examine critically the controversial, and often socially controlling, role of biomedical knowledge and interventions in the realm of human sexuality. It will attempt to situate scientific/medical discourses on sexuality historically, socially, and culturally in order to expose the ways in which “proper” sexual health in medical research and clinical practice has been conflated with prevailing social norms at particular historical junctures in the 20th and 21st centuries. How might the relationship between clinical and cultur...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - August 3, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Resources We Bring: The Cultural Assets of Diverse Medical Students
AbstractIn response to the need for a more diverse workforce, our medical school developed new policies and procedures that focus on the recruitment and selection of diverse students with a specific focus on those considered underrepresented in medicine. To understand what these students bring to the practice of medicine, researchers investigated their perception of their cultural assets and how they plan to use these assets as physicians. A cross-section of 23 ethnically, culturally, and geographically diverse medical students were interviewed and data were analyzed through phenomenographical methods. The results indicate...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - July 23, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Imposing Order to See the Disorder: Student Depression and T.S. Eliot ’s The Waste Land: A (Mis)reading/Diagnosis
AbstractSometime ago, I found myself using the diagnosis of a student ’s depression as a critical tool of interpretation, searching for signs of mental illness in her essay that explored order and disorder in T. S. Eliot’sThe Waste Land. I realised that my reading had become a creative act, combining poem, poet, student essay and author to create, in a sense, one (un)readable text. The present paper is areflection upon the processes oforder anddisorder located in a diagnosis of “madness” and the readings of writer and text this diagnosis initiated. I look to deconstruct acts of reading and diagnosis...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - July 20, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

More Things in Heaven and Earth: Spirit Possession, Mental Disorder, and Intentionality
AbstractSpirit possession is a common phenomenon around the world in which a non-corporeal agent is involved with a human host. This manifests in a range of maladies or in displacement of the host's agency and identity. Prompted by engagement with the phenomenon in  Egypt, this paper draws connections between spirit possession and the concepts of personhood and intentionality. It employs these concepts to articulate spirit possession, while also developing the intentional stance as formulated by Daniel Dennett. It argues for an understanding of spirit possess ion as thespirit stance: an intentional strategy that aims ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - July 19, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Choir Boy: Trans Vocal Performance and the De-Pathologization of Transition
AbstractThis paper will examineChoir Boy (2005), a trans coming-of-age novel by Charlie Anders, to disrupt historically rooted medical narratives of gender transition. Through a disability studies lens, this paper locates vocal performance as a means of speaking back to gatekeeping practices held in place by medical authorities since the inception of transsexuality as a classificatory category. Offering imaginative alternatives to “wrong body” diagnostics, this analysis places cultural texts in conversation with disability theory to reframe the trans self as a singing body that cannot be reduced to normalizing ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - July 11, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Correction to: Speculative Fiction and the Political Economy of Healthcare: Chang-Rae Lee ’s On Such a Full Sea
Due to an editing error, this article was initially published with an incorrect title. The correct title is reflected above. The original article has been corrected. (Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Authoring Autism: On Rhetoric and Neurological Queerness
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - June 27, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Cambridge Social History of Modern Ireland
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - June 23, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Speculative Fiction and the Political Economy of Healthcare: Chang-Rae Lee ’s On Such a Full Sea
AbstractChang-Rae Lee ’s 2014 novelOn Such a Full Sea uses the genre of speculative fiction to reflect on longstanding healthcare debates in the United States that have recently crystalized around the Affordable Care Act. The novel imagines the political economy of healthcare in a future America devastated by environmental illness. What kind of care is available and to whom? Who provides it? Who pays for it? What about distribution and access? The different healthcare systems governing each of three geo-social zones in Lee's future society represent exaggerated versions of the scenarios participants in the ACA debate...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - June 2, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“May all Be Shattered into God”: Mary Barnes and Her Journey through Madness in Kingsley Hall
AbstractContributing to renewed scholarly interest in R. D. Laing and his circle, and in the radical therapeutic community of Kingsley Hall, London (1965-1970), this article offers the first article-length reading of Mary Barnes ’ and Joseph Berke’sMary Barnes: Two Accounts of a Journey through Madness. This text offers views of anti-psychiatry ‘on the ground’ that critique the 1960s utopianism of Laing’s championing of madness as a metanoic, quasi-psychedelic voyage. Barnes’ story, too, reveals tensions within the anti-psychiatric movement. Moving beyond existing criticism of the text, ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - June 2, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Environmental Illness and the Future of Healthcare: Chang-Rae Lee ’s On Such a Full Sea
AbstractChang-Rae Lee ’s 2014 novelOn Such a Full Sea uses the genre of speculative fiction to reflect on longstanding healthcare debates in the United States that have recently crystalized around the Affordable Care Act. The novel imagines the political economy of healthcare in a future America devastated by environmental illness. What kind of care is available and to whom? Who provides it? Who pays for it? What about distribution and access? The different healthcare systems governing each of three geo-social zones in Lee's future society represent exaggerated versions of the scenarios participants in the ACA debate...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - June 2, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Greetings
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 19, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Double Voicing and Personhood in Collaborative Life Writing about Autism: the Transformative Narrative of Carly ’s Voice
AbstractCollaborative memoirs by co-writers with and without autism can enable the productive interaction of the voices of the writers in ways that can empower rather than exploit the disabled subject.Carly's Voice, co-written by Arthur Fleischmann and his autistic daughter Carly, demonstrates the capacity for such life narratives to facilitate the relational interaction between writers in the negotiation of understandings of disability. Though the text begins by focusing on the limitations of life with autism, it develops into a collaboration which helps both writers move toward new ways of understanding disability and th...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 7, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Echo and the Failure of Knowing in Judith Fox ’s Photographic Project I Still Do: Loving and Living with Alzheimer’s
AbstractIn relationships ‘I’ and ‘you’ become ‘we’; despite individual differences, couples obtain an interdependent identity due to their shared interactions. During a serious illness, biological and biographical disruptions can put any reciprocal relationship under strain. Through intermedial analysis of Judit h Fox’s photographic project,I Still Do: Loving and Living with Alzheimer ’s (2009), I will explore ways the couple make sense of illness, how illness is communicated through text and image and also to identify the limits of representation. Here the photographs, I arg...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - April 26, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Tangles that Lead Nowhere
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - April 24, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Reading, Trauma and Literary Caregiving 1914-1918: Helen Mary Gaskell and the War Library
This article is about the relationship between reading, trauma and responsive literary caregiving in Britain during the First World War. Its analysis of two little-known documents describing the history of the War Library, begun by Helen Mary Gaskell in 1914, exposes a gap in the scholarship of war-time reading; generates a new narrative of"how,""when," and"why" books went to war; and foregrounds gender in its analysis of the historiography. The Library of Congress's T. W. Koch discovered Gaskell's ground-breaking work in 1917 and reported its successes to the American Library Association. The...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - March 28, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Embodiment and Entangled Subjectivity: A Study of Robin Cook ’s Coma , Priscille Sibley’s The Promise of Stardust and Alexander Beliaev’s Professor Dowell’s Head
AbstractThe essay examines Robin Cook ’s (1977)Coma and Priscille Sibley ’s (2013)The Promise of Stardust that dramatize the reified and disposable status of the brain-dead patients who are classified as nonpersons. The essay argues that the man-machine entanglement as depicted in the novels constructs adeterritorialized and entangled form of subjectivity that intervenes in the dominant biomedical understanding of personhood and agency that we notionally associate with a conscious mind. The essay concludes its arguments by discussing Alexander Beliaev ’s (1925)Professor Dowell ’s Head which depicts ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - March 22, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

An Art-based Case Study: Reflections on End of Life from a Husband, Artist and Caregiver
This study explores the reflective processes of Scottish artist, Norman Gilbert, as he created twenty-five drawings depicting his wife, Pat Gilbert, as she lay dying following an Alzheimer ’s-related stroke. Norman, ninety-one, had drawn Pat regularly over their sixty-five-year marriage. One week after Pat died, Norman was interviewed by a family friend to chronicle his reflections on the drawings. The drawings along with the interview transcript are analyzed qualitatively as a case study. Norman’sHospital Drawings of Pat transform what was initially a private experience into a shared comprehension of end of li...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - March 20, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Storytelling Approach: Insights from the Shambaa
AbstractNarrative medicine explores the stories that patients tell; this paper, conversely, looks at some of the stories that patients are told. The paper starts by examining the ‘story’ told by the Shambaa people of Tanzania to explain the bubonic plague and contrasts this with the stories told by Ghanaian communities to explain lymphatic filariasis. By harnessing insights from memory studies, these stories’ memorability is claimed to be due to their use mnemonic devi ces woven into stories. The paper suggests that stories can be unpatronising, informative, and appropriate vehicles for communicating medi...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - March 19, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

What Is Narrative Therapy and How Can It Help Health Humanities?
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - March 12, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Identity, Bipolar Disorder, and the Problem of Self-Narration in Kay Redfield Jamison ’s An Unquiet Mind and Ellen Forney’s Marbles
AbstractThe field of narrative medicine holds that personal narratives about illness have the potential to give illness meaning and to create order out of disparate facets of experience, thereby aiding a patient ’s treatment and resisting universalizing medical discourse. Two narratives of bipolar disorder, Kay Redfield Jamison’s prose memoirAn Unquiet Mind (1995) and Ellen Forney ’s graphic memoirMarbles (2012) challenge these ideas. These writers demonstrate that one result of bipolar disorder is a rupture to their sense of identity, making straightforward and verbal forms of narrative impossible. Durin...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - March 6, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Stroke and the Remembered Body: You See Me Directed by Linda S. Brown, 2015
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 27, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Keith Haring, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Wolfgang Tillmans, and the AIDS Epidemic: The Use of Visual Art in a Health Humanities Course
AbstractContemporary art can be a powerful pedagogical tool in the health humanities. Students in an undergraduate course in the health humanities explore the subjective experience of illness and develop their empathy by studying three artists in the context of the AIDS epidemic: Keith Haring, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Wolfgang Tillmans. Using assignments based in narrative pedagogy, students expand their empathic response to pain and suffering. The role of visual art in health humanities pedagogy is discussed. (Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 23, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Witnessing Death, Witnessing Truth
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 12, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Unspoken Plea
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 8, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Beyond Pathologizing Harm: Understanding PTSD in the Context of War Experience
AbstractAn alternative to objectifying approaches to understanding Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) grounded in hermeneutic phenomenology is presented. Nurses who provided care for soldiers injured in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, and sixty-seven wounded male servicemen in the rehabilitation phase of their recovery were interviewed. PTSD is the one major psychiatric diagnosis where social causation is established, yet PTSD is predominantly viewed in terms of the usual neuro-physiological causal models with traumatic social events viewed as pathogens with dose related effects. Biologic models of causation are applied ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 6, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Inching in Degeneration: After Jack Gilbert ’s Dementia Diagnosis
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 6, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Culture and Context in Mental Health Diagnosing: Scrutinizing the DSM-5 Revision
This article examines the revision of theDiagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and its claim of incorporating a “greater cultural sensitivity.” The analysis reveals that the manual conveys mixed messages as it explicitly addresses the critique of being ethnocentric and having a static notion of culture yet continues in a similar fashion when culture is applied in diagnostic criteria. The analysis also rel ates to current trends in psychiatric nosology that emphasize neurobiology and decontextualize distress and points to how the DSM-5 risks serving as an ethnic dividing line in psychiatr...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 28, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Ethics of Care, edited by Alan Blum and Stuart J. Murray, London: Routledge, 2017
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 22, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Beauty in Perfect Imperfection
AbstractModern technologies sanction a new plasticity of physical form. However, the increasing global popularity of aesthetic procedures (re)produces normative beauty ideals in terms of perfection and symmetry. These conditions limit the semblance of freedom by people to control their own bodies. Cultural emancipation may come from principles in Eastern philosophy. These reveal beauty in authenticity, including imperfection.Wabi-sabi acclaims beauty in common irregularity, whilekintsugi celebrates beauty in visible signs of repair, like scars. These principles resist pressure to medicalize dissatisfaction with healthy bod...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 21, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Dancing Intercorporeality: A Health Humanities Perspective on Dance as a Healing Art
AbstractAs a contribution to the burgeoning field of health humanities, this paper seeks to explore the power of dance to mitigate human suffering and reacquaint us with what it means to be human through bringing the embodied practice of dance into dialogue with the work of the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Merleau-Ponty ’s conceptualisation of subjectivity as embodied and of intersubjectivity as intercorporeality frees us from many of the constraints of Cartesian thinking and opens up a new way of thinking about how dance functions as a healing art through its ability to ground and reconnect us with self...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 20, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Approaches to Multidimensional Health in Representations of Islamic Themes among Black Male Characters in American Film and Television
AbstractHistorically, representations of Islamic themes in media narratives of Black men have been characterized by personal transformations in the midst of surviving in crime-ridden inner city areas. These young Black men are usually at-risk due to their statuses as Black, economically disadvantaged men. Beginning with Malcolm X and Alex Haley ’sThe Autobiography of Malcolm X, the Black male Islamic redemption narrative has become a common theme in Black popular culture, as it is usually supplemented with unique methods of confronting the various dimensions of health. Throughout this study, the representations of th...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 5, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Doctor Anonymous : Creating Contexts for Homosexuality as Mental Illness
AbstractIn this essay, the author describes how he faced institutionalized homophobia during his psychiatric training, and how he later wrote a play inspired by the life of a gay psychiatrist. Despite Freud ’s supportive stance, homosexuality aroused the antipathy of American organized psychiatry and psychoanalysis and came to be listed as an illness in theDiagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM). Dr. John E. Fryer outed himself as “Dr. H Anonymous” at a 1972 meeting of the American Psychiatric Association, and the next year homosexuality was removed from the DSM. The 2014 playDoctor Anonymous offers a fic...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - November 14, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Bodies in Genres of Practice: Johann Ulrich Bilguer ’s Fight to Reduce Field Amputations
AbstractThis paper examines Johann Ulrich Bilguer ’s 1761 dissertation on the inutility of amputation practices, examining reasons for its influence despite its nonconformance to genre expectations. I argue that Bilguer’s narratives of patient suffering, his rhetorical likening of surgeons to soldiers, and his attention to the horrific experien ces of war surgeons all contribute to the dissertation’s wide impact. Ultimately, the dissertation offers an example of affective rhetorics employed during the Enlightenment, demonstrating how bodies and environments—those “ambient rhetorics” made...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - November 13, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Towards the Womb of Neonatal Intensive Care
AbstractWithin the mother ’s womb, life finds its first stirrings. The womb shelters the fetus, the growing child within. We recognize the existential traces of a wombed existence when a newborn calms in response to being held; when a newborn stills in response to his or her mother’s heartbeat; and, when a newborn startl es in the presence of bright light. Yet, how does experiential human life begin within another human being? What are the conditions and paths of becoming for the fetus within the womb? And for the child born early, what “womb” welcomes the premature child in neonatal intensive care?...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - November 13, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Medical Humanities Teaching in North American Allopathic and Osteopathic Medical Schools
This study sought to discover what medical humanities is offered in North American allopathic and osteopathic undergraduate medical schools. An 18-question, semi-structured survey was distributed to all 146 (as of June 2016) member schools of the American Association of Medical Colleg es and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine. The survey sought information on required and elective humanities content, hours of humanities instruction, types of disciplines, participation rates, and humanities administrative structure. The survey was completed by 134 schools (145 AAMC; 31 AACOM). 70.8% of schools...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - November 7, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Introduction: Imagining Contexts for Mental Illness
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - November 6, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Yard Sale
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - November 4, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Why I Like Scratchy Records
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - November 3, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Another Day
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - November 3, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

As the Twig is Bent
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - October 30, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

All Clear
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - October 26, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research