Uniting the Pre-Health Humanities with the Introductory Composition Course
AbstractDrawing on my experiences at a teaching-focused university, I show how locating the health humanities in first-year or introductory composition courses improves learning and offers an economical, flexible, and far-reaching approach to bringing a health humanities education to all baccalaureate-level learners, regardless of whether they aspire to careers in the health professions. In terms of improving learning, health humanities composition courses support the disciplinary aims of both fields. Accessible, relevant issues in the health humanities, such as interventions in health debates or representations of illness...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 17, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Drawing Invisible Wounds: War Comics and the Treatment of Trauma
AbstractSince the Vietnam War, graphic novels about war have shifted from simply representing it to portraying avenues for survivors to establish psychological wellness in their lives following traumatic events. While modern diagnostic medicine often looks to science, technology, and medications to treat the psychosomatic damage produced by trauma, my article examines the therapeutic potential of the comics medium with close attention to war comics. Graphic novels draw trauma in a different light: because of the medium ’s particular combination of words and images in sequence, war comics represent that which is typic...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - April 8, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Temporal Dissonance: South African Historians and the ‘Post-AIDS’ Dilemma
AbstractWhile foregrounding the historiography of HIV and AIDS in the South African context, this article analyses AIDS as simultaneously existing in three spheres: first, virtually – as the subject matter of electronically measurable research; second, academically – as a topic of research in the discipline of History; and third, actually – as a complex health concern and signifier that, via the field of Medical and Health Humanities, could allow for new collaborations be tween historians and others interested in understanding AIDS. Throughout, the central focus is the discipline of History and the global...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - April 7, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Mono-Causal and Multi-Causal Theories of Disease: How to Think Virally and Socially about the Aetiology of AIDS
AbstractIn this paper, I utilise the tools of analytic philosophy to amalgamate mono-causal and multi-causal theories of disease. My aim is to better integrate viral and socio-economic explanations of AIDS in particular, and to consider how the perceived divide between mono-causal and multi-causal theories played a role in the tragedy of AIDS denialism in South Africa in the early 2000s. Currently, there is conceptual ambiguity surrounding the relationship between mono-causal and multi-causal theories in biomedicine and epidemiology. Mono-causal theories focus on single, typically microbial, sources of illness and are most...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - April 4, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

HIV Stigma, Gay Identity, and Caste ‘Untouchability’: Metaphors of Abjection in My Brother…Nikhil , The Boyfriend , and “Gandu Bagicha”
AbstractIn this article I read textual metaphors of ‘untouchability’ in ‘post-AIDS’ representation as an erasure of structures that condition HIV stigmatization in India. Throughout, my discussion is contextualised by the political economy of HIV and AIDS, which has been productive of particular modern sexual subjects. In the filmMy Brother …Nikhil, the stigmatization of Nikhil, a gay Indian man living with HIV, is constituted through visual and verbal caste metaphors, which draw on existing subject positions that are elided as ‘traditional’, residual, and receding. This stigma is...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - March 17, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Illness Doula: Adding a New Role to Healthcare Practice
AbstractIn this article, we explore the possibility of adding a new role to the clinical encounter: an illness doula. Even though research and education in medical humanities and narrative medicine have made improvements in humanizing healthcare, progress is slow and ongoing. There needs to be an intervention in the practice of healthcare now for people currently going through the system. An illness doula, like a birth doula, would facilitate and insure that attention is paid to the personal needs and desires of the patient in the present system. We envision illness doulas having the ability and availability to accompany t...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - March 7, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

HIV and AIDS in Irish Theatre: Queer Masculinities, Punishment, and ‘Post-AIDS’ Culture
AbstractThis essay provides a critical survey of key Irish theatre productions that present queer men with HIV or AIDS as a central theme while also seeking to situate several of these productions within the controversial discourse of ‘post-AIDS’ as it plays out in Irish cultural and social discourses. Through this survey, this essay finds and critically elaborates how a discourse of AIDS as punishment is a common denominator in all of these plays; whether that be as a central metaphor in the drama or conversely as a trope th at theatre makers seek to disrupt. Throughout, this essay simultaneously attends to th...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 27, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Madness Decolonized?: Madness as Transnational Identity in Gail Hornstein ’s Agnes’s Jacket
AbstractThe US psychologist Gail Hornstein ’s monograph,Agnes ’s Jacket: A Psychologist’s Search for the Meanings of Madness (2009), is an important intervention in the identity politics of the mad movement. Hornstein offers a resignified vision of mad identity that embroiders the central trope of an “anti-colonial” struggle to reclaim the experiential world “colonized” by psychiatry. A series of literal and figurative appeals makes recourse to the inner world and (corresponding) cultural world of the mad as well as to the ethno-symbolic cultural materials of dormant nationhood. Th...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 13, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Incompatible with Care: Examining Trisomy 18 Medical Discourse and Families ’ Counter-discourse for Recuperative Ethos
AbstractParents whose child is diagnosed with a serious disease such as trisomy 18 first rely on the medical community for an accurate description and prognosis. In the case of trisomy 18, however, many families are told the disease is “incompatible with life” even though some children with the condition live for several years. This paper considers parents’ response to current medical discourse concerning trisomy 18 by examining blogs written by the parents of those diagnosed. Using interpretive humanistic reading and foregr ounding Cathryn Molloy’s recuperative ethos theory (2015), we find that par...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 10, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Production of Space in Richard Selzer ’s Wartime Story “The Whistlers’ Room”
AbstractThis essay applies Henri Lefebvre ’s notion of the production of space, particularly his conceptualization of the tension formed by the perceived-conceived-lived triad to analyze how space is produced in wartime hospitals as demonstrated in Richard Selzer’s “The Whistlers’ Room.” Wounded soldiers participate in producing t he triad of the social space of military hospitals through their multilayered performances as fighting soldiers serving the nation and as living human beings longing for human connections. Contradictory performances demonstrate the strategic positioning of wounded so...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 2, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Problematising the Discourse of ‘Post-AIDS’
AbstractThis paper reflects on the meanings of ‘post-AIDS’ in the Global North and South. I bring together contemporary arguments to suggest that the notion of ‘post-AIDS’ is, at best, misplaced, not least because its starting point remains a biotechnical one. Drawing on aspects of the sub-Saharan African experience, this essay suggests that, despite significant shifts in access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV continues to be fundamentally shaped by economic determinants and social and cultural practices. In this essay, I question the certainty of the discourse of (Western biomedical) ‘po...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 1, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Miracle: Two Poems
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 27, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Authenticity in Anatomy Art
AbstractThe aim of this paper is to observe the evolution and evaluate the 'realness' and authenticity in Anatomy Art, an art form I define as one which incorporates accurate anatomical representations of the human body with artistic expression. I examine the art of 17th century wax anatomical models, the preservations of Frederik Ruysch, and Gunther von Hagens'Body Worlds plastinates, giving consideration to authenticity of both body and art. I give extra consideration to the works ofBody Worlds since the exhibit creator believes he has created anatomical specimens with more educational value and bodily authenticity than ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 12, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

What Pauline Doesn ’t Know: Using Guided Fiction Writing to Educate Health Professionals about Cultural Competence
AbstractResearch linking reading literary fiction to empathy supports health humanities programs in which reflective writing accompanies close readings of texts, both to explore principles of storytelling (narrative arc and concrete language) and to promote an examination of biases in care. Little attention has been paid to the possible contribution of guided fiction-writing in health humanities curricula toward enhancing cultural competence among health professionals, both clinical and community-based. Through an analysis of the short story “Pie Dance” by Molly Giles, juxtaposed with descriptions of specific w...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 7, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Arrival
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 7, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

What Money Cannot Buy and What Money Ought Not Buy: Dignity, Motives, and Markets in Human Organ Procurement Debates
This article examines how advocates of both the altruistic status quo and market challengers reason and weigh the central normative concept of dignity, meant as inherent worth and/or rank. Key rhetorical strategies, including motivations and broader social visions, of the two positions are analyzed and evaluated, and the separation of morally normative understandings of dignity from market encroachment is defended. (Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 6, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

From Disabled Students to Disabled Brains: The Medicalizing Power of Rhetorical Images in the Israeli Learning Disabilities Field
AbstractThe neurocentric worldview that identifies the essence of the human being with the material brain has become a central paradigm in current academic discourse. Israeli researchers also seek to understand educational principles and processes via neuroscientific models. On this background, the article uncovers the central role that visual brain images play in the learning-disabilities field in Israel. It examines the place brain images have in the professional imagination of didactic-diagnosticians as well as their influence on the diagnosticians' clinical attitudes. It relies on two theoretical fields: sociology and ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 29, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The 1925 Diphtheria Antitoxin Run to Nome - Alaska: A Public Health Illustration of Human-Animal Collaboration
AbstractDiphtheria is an acute toxin-mediated superficial infection of the respiratory tract or skin caused by the aerobic gram-positive bacillus Corynebacterium diphtheriae. The epidemiology of infection and clinical manifestations of the disease vary in different parts of the world. Historical accounts of diphtheria epidemics have been described in many parts of the world since antiquity. Developed in the late 19th century, the diphtheria antitoxin (DAT) played a pivotal role in the history of public health and vaccinology prior to the advent of the diphtheria-tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine. One o...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 29, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

‘Gushing Out Blood’: Defloration and Menstruation in Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure
This article maps narrative events on to contemporary medical depictions of first intercourse to show the ways that the theories and ideas presented in medical and pseudo-medical texts transferred into erotic fiction and demonstrates how in some ins tances the bloody defloration scenes can be read as being sex during menstruation, an act which was culturally forbidden at this time. (Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 26, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Introduction: Caregiving, Kinship, and the Making of Stories
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 26, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Role of the Curator in Modern Hospitals: A Transcontinental Perspective
AbstractThis paper explores the role of the curator in hospitals. The arts play a significant role in every society; however, recent studies indicate a neglect of the aesthetic environment of healthcare. This international study explores the complex role of the curator in modern hospitals. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten arts specialists in hospitals across five countries and three continents for a qualitative, phenomenological study. Five themes arose from the data: (1) Patient involvement and influence on the arts programme in hospital (2) Understanding the role of the curator in hospital (3) Influence...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 13, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Domesticating Deathcare: The Women of the U.S. Natural Deathcare Movement
This article examines the women-led natural deathcare movment in the early 21st century U.S., focusing upon the movement ’s non-coincidental epistemological and gender-political similarities to the natural childbirth movement. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach and drawing upon the author’s intensive interviews with pioneers and leaders of the U.S. natural deathcare movement, as well as from the author’s own participation in the movement, this article argues that the political similarities between the countercultural natural childbirth and natural deathcare movements reveal a common cultural provocati...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 8, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Disability Life Writing and the Problem of Dependency in The Autobiography of Gaby Brimmer
AbstractIndependence was a core value of the movement for disability rights. People with disabilities did not have to be dependent, advocates claimed; they were robbed of autonomy by poverty, social prejudice, and architectural barriers. Recently, critics have noted that the emphasis on independence equates personhood with autonomy, reason, and self-awareness, thereby excluding those who are incapable of self-determination. The stigma of dependency is communicated to caregivers whose work is devalued and undercompensated. These values are echoed in the life writing of people with disabilities, which tends to present a sing...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 7, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Legacy 1
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 3, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Disability, Depression, Diagnosis, and Harm: Reflections on Two Personal Scenarios
AbstractIn this article I draw on two scenarios from my personal life —the diagnosis of my newborn grandnephew with CHARGE syndrome and the diagnosis of my father with depression—to reflect on whether and when diagnosis may be harmful to patients (and their families). Despite the great differences between the two scenarios, I argue that in both cases the tendency of diagnosis to generalize, categorize, and stigmatize can lead to insidious and counterproductive effects. The perspective of disability studies can help physicians to anticipate, minimize or avoid these negative ramifications. I also reflect on the m...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 1, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Nation, Narration, and Health in Mohamedou Ould Slahi ’s Guantánamo Diary
This article examines Slahi ’s account of his interrogations and representations of mental health at Guantánamo and considers its role within the narrative function of the nation. At stake is the right of detainees to narrate, scholars to critique medical practices in the War on Terror, and the nation’s attempts to contro l its narration. (Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 1, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Listening to Quackery: Reading John Wesley ’s Primitive Physic in an Age of Health Care Reform
This article uses a reading of John Wesley'sPrimitive Physic, or An Easy and Natural Method of Curing Most Diseases (1747) to resist the common rejection —often as"quackery" —of Wesley's treatments for common maladies. We engage Wesley not because he was right but because his approach offers useful moments of pause in light of contemporary medical epistemology. Wesley's recommendations were primarily oriented towards the categories of personal responsibility and capab ility, but he also sought to empower individuals—especially the poor—with the knowledge to safely and affordably treat mala...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - November 25, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“Say Your Favorite Poet in the World is Lying There”: Eileen Myles, James Schuyler, and the Queer Intimacies of Care
This article closely reads “Chelsea Girls,” an autobiographical short story by Eileen Myles that depicts her experience caring for the diabetic, bipolar poet James Schuyler when she was a young writer getting started in East Village in the late 1970s. Their dependency relationship is a form of queer kinship, an early vers ion of the caring relations between lesbians and gay men that HIV/AIDS would demand over the next two decades as chosen families emerged to nurture gay men and lesbians rejected by their families of origin. The representation of queer kinship offers an alternative to more traditional portrayal...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - November 25, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Gentleman Vanishes: Dementia, Caretaking and the Life of the Mind
AbstractThis essay recounts the author ’s journey with her father during his prolonged decline due to dementia. The experience pushed her to break out of the confines of conventional scholarly research in her academic field of architectural history to a multi-disciplinary consideration of nineteenth-century environmental, sensory and h orticultural therapies for the mentally ill. During her father’s illness, she discovered the tangible therapeutic benefits of momentary engagements with his environment through his five senses and through the emotional filter of poetry. This reorientation to sensory and poetic ex...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - November 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Looking after Iris: John Bayley ’s Elegy for the Living
AbstractJohn Bayley ’sElegy for Iris, his memoir about living with Iris Murdoch after the onset of dementia, unsettles models of mind and agency that ignore human relationship, dependency, and the vulnerabilities of the cared for and the carer. Experiencing Iris as ambiguously absent and present while he attentively cares for her, Bayley frames his memoir as an elegy, a reflection on love and loss that conventionally represents two subjects —the author and the one he lost. Bayley’s acts of care and his stories about his wife, both as she was and as she has become, sustain her moral worth as a person. Writ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - November 7, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Are the Medical Humanities for Sale? Lessons from a Historical Debate
AbstractIn November of 1959, William Bean published in theArchives of Internal Medicine a scathing review of F élix Martí-Ibañez’sCentaur: Essays on the History of Medical Ideas. Mart í-Ibañez and Bean were two of the leading exponents of the importance of medical humanism during a formative period from the 1950s through the 1970s. But the two physicians differed fundamentally in their views of the ideal relationships among the pharmaceutical industry, the medical profession, a nd the medical humanities. We situate Bean’s review within its historical context, shedding light on...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - October 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“In the NICU” and “Another Hospital Poem”
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - October 24, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Moonglow, 1945
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - October 22, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Bad Mothers and Monstrous Sons: Autistic Adults, Lifelong Dependency, and Sensationalized Narratives of Care
AbstractSensationalized representations of autistic families in film and other media frequently feature violent encounters between mothers and sons. This essay analyzes two media stories and three films that suggest how limited —and therefore misleading—popular representations of the autism family are. Except for one of the films, these representations blame the problem of adult autistic dependency on either monstrous autism or bad mothering. Doing so elides collective social responsibility for autism care and denies t he reality that autistic adults continue to have complex dependency needs that families canno...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - October 20, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Whose Values? Whose Risk? Exploring Decision Making About Trial of Labor After Cesarean
AbstractIn this article, we discuss decision making during labor and delivery, specifically focusing on decision making around offering women a trial of labor after cesarean section (TOLAC). Many have discussed how humans are notoriously bad at assessing risks and how we often distort the nature of various risks surrounding childbirth. We will build on this discussion by showing that physicians make decisions around TOLAC not only based on distortions of risk, but also based on personal values (i.e. what level of risk are you comfortable with or what types of risks are you willing to take) rather than medical data (or at l...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - October 20, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Genetic Counseling, Professional Values, and Habitus: An Analysis of Disability Narratives in Textbooks
This article analyzes narrative illustrations in genetic counseling textbooks as a way of understanding professional habitus--the dispositions that motivate professional behavior. In particular, this analysis shows that there are significant differences in how the textbooks' expository and narrative portions represent Down syndrome, genetic counseling practice, and patient behaviors. While the narrative portions of the text position the genetic counseling profession as working in service to the values of genetic medicine, the expository portions represent genetic counselors as neutral parties. Ultimately, this article argu...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - October 19, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Downstairs My Father is Dying
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - October 7, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

My mother, my story
AbstractThis piece returns to the writer ’s memoir essays about her mother’s chronic lung disease to examine the relationship between the act of caregiving and the act of writing. In arguing for important differences between the clinical, healing imperatives of narrative medicine and the primacy for the writer of self-reflection, perso nal need and career, the essay demonstrates how writing remains in many ways at odds with the obligations and the hopes of caregiving. At the same time, the essay argues that writing her mother’s stories of illness holds the potential for both honor and mutuality—and ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - October 5, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Caretaking through Art: A Sibling Story
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - October 1, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Pas de Deux
AbstractIn this personal essay, Mark Osteen uses the metaphor of apas de deux to dramatize how caring for his autistic son has enriched his scholarship and teaching. In his early years as the father of an autistic child, Osteen ’s parental and professional roles clashed, but gradually he learns to use what his son teaches him—particularly about nonverbal communication and multiple forms of intelligence—to develop a theory of empathetic scholarship and to enhance his pedagogy. (Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 30, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Burying Ground
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 20, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Totentanz
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 20, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Lilacs
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 16, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

They Buried Him in California
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 16, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

From the Editor
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 15, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Evidence-Based Medicine: A Genealogy of the Dominant Science of Medical Education
AbstractDebates about how knowledge is made and valued in evidence-based medicine (EBM) have yet to understand what discursive, social, and historical conditions allowed the EBM approach to stabilize and proliferate across western medical education. This paper uses a genealogical approach to examine the epistemological tensions that emerged as a result of various problematizations of uncertainty in medical practice. I explain how the problematization of uncertainty in the literature and the contingency of specific social, political, economic, and historical relations allowed the EBM approach to become a programmatic and pe...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 8, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Creativity in Medical Education: The Value of Having Medical Students Make Stuff
AbstractWhat is the value of having medical students engage in creative production as part of their learning? Creating something new requires medical students to take risks and even to fail--something they tend to be neither accustomed to nor comfortable with doing. “Making stuff” can help students prepare for such failures in a controlled environment that doesn’t threaten their professional identities. Furthermore, doing so can facilitate students becoming resilient and creative problem-solvers who strive to find new ways to address vexing questions. Tho ugh creating something new can be fun, this is not...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 7, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Managing Memories: Treating and Controlling Homesickness during the Civil War
AbstractAlthough it has disappeared as a clinical diagnosis, a Disability Studies perspective on Civil War nostalgia offers an opportunity to recover the process by which understanding around a medical event occurs. By incorporating and examining the interplay between and among participants in the conversation surrounding nostalgia as they operate within various site specific temporal and social contexts, this method of analysis offers an opportunity to arrive at an understanding not only of the factors that contribute to different perspectives on an illness, but also into how some voices become ascendant in constructing m...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - August 15, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

2 Poems: Pre-Rounds and Night Float
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - August 15, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Dis/Assembling Schizophrenia on YouTube: Theorizing an Analog Body in a Virtual Sphere
Abstract As visual technologies become increasingly networked online, websites like YouTube provide a space to share vlogs (video blogs) online, suggest related content for viewers, and help in/form virtual communities, including those of mental illness. Within this space, vlogs of schizophrenia and comments generated about them by other users can represent transitional, dialogical states of illness that speak back to the analog body and affect a body ’s way of being in the world. Moreover, as vlogs create resistance against static definitions of schizophrenia, they may foster a creativity, experimentation, and inve...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - July 29, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research