Requiring the Healer ’s Art Curriculum to Promote Professional Identity Formation Among Medical Students
AbstractThe Healer's Art curriculum (HART) is one of the best-known educational strategies to support medical student professional identity formation. HART has been widely used as an elective curriculum. We evaluated students ’ experience with HART when the curriculum was required. All one hundred eleven members of the class of 2019 University of New Mexico School of Medicine students were required to enroll in HART. We surveyed the students before and after the course to assess its self-reported impact on key elements of professional identity formation such as empathy towards patients and peers, commitment to servic...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - August 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Rhetorical Ethos in Health and Medicine: Patient Credibility, Stigma, and Misdiagnosis by Cathryn Molloy, New York: Routledge, 2020
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - August 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Theatres of Trauma, Transcendence and Transformation
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - July 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Artificial Intelligence and Medical Humanities
This article explains four key areas of concern relating to AI and the role that medical/health humanities research can play in addressing them: definition and regulation of “medical” versus “health” data and apps; social determinants of health; narrative medicine; and technological mediation of care. Issues include data privacy and trust, flawed datasets and algorithmic bias, racial discrimination, and the rhetoric of humanism and disability. Through a discussi on of potential humanities contributions to these emerging intersections with AI, this article will suggest future scholarly directions for...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - July 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Centering Patients, Revealing Structures: The Health Humanities Portrait Approach
AbstractThis paper introduces an innovative curricular approach —the Health Humanities Portrait Approach (Portrait Approach)—and its pedagogical tool—the Health Humanities Portrait (HHP). Both enable health professions learners to examine pressing social issues that shape, and are shaped by, experiences of health and illness. The Portrait Approach is groun ded in a set of “critical portraiture” principles that foster humanities-driven analytical skills. The HHP’s architecture is distinctively framed around a pressing social theme and utilizes a first-person narrative and scholarship to e...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - July 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Pain Studies by Lisa Olstein, New York: Bellevue Literary Press, 2021
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - July 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Corner Liquor Store: Rethinking Toxicity in the Black Metropolis
AbstractLiquor stores have been repeatedly shown to be disproportionately prevalent in Black neighborhoods and therefore constitute a disproportionate health risk. This paper examines the ways in which liquor stores jeopardize Black lives through social and material conditions that are broader than health risk. Embodying and perpetuating dysfunctional markets, liquor stores relegate Black consumers to an overabundance of inexpensive and potent alcoholic beverages sold from heavily securitized storefronts and provoke conflicted and oppositional relationships. Liquor stores exist in a state of antibiosis with Black communiti...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - July 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Narrative Humility and Parasite , directed by Bong Joon Ho, 2019
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - June 25, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Psychiatrist as the Repressor of the Extraordinary in Glass, directed by M. Night Shyamalan, 2019
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - June 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“It is Sometimes Soul-Destroying”: Doctors’ Reflections on Unemployment and Health in Thatcher’s Britain
AbstractThrough an analysis of two sets of writing in theBritish Medical Journal from the 1980s, this article explores relationships between unemployment and health. “Unemployment in My Practice,” published in 1981, was a series of nine short essays by general practitioners from across the United Kingdom. This was followed by “Occupationless Health” in 1985, made up of fourteen essays, composed by the assistant editor of the journal, Dr. Richard Smith. B oth series demonstrate how deeply frustrating it was for doctors to confront mass unemployment in light of the policy decisions of the Thatcher gov...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - June 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Reading for Pandemic: Viral Modernism by Elizabeth Outka, New York: Columbia University Press, 2020
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - June 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Bearing Witness: Religious Meanings in Bioethics by Courtney Campbell , Eugene, OR: Cascade Books, 2019
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Lacan on Trauma and Causality: A Psychoanalytic Critique of Post-Traumatic Stress/Growth
This article makes the case for the largely unacknowledged relevance of the thought of the French psychoanalyst, Jacques Lacan, for the emerging field of the medical and/or health humanities. From the 1930s all the way through to the late 1970s, Lacan was deeply concerned with the ethical and political consequences of then-dominant conceptions of the human in the ‘psy’ disciplines. His attempt to ‘humanise’ these disciplines involved an emphasis on humans assymbolic beings, inevitably entangled in the structures of speech and the ‘logic of the signifier.’ This article explores the implic...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

From Girlhood to Motherhood: Rituals of Childbirth and Obstetrical Medicine Re-Examined through John Milton
This article considers how seventeenth-century writer John Milton engages in modes of thinking that register the obstetric revolution occurring during the period. During a time when physicians were gaining entry to the birthing room, a medical rhetoric of childbirth was developing that cast childbirth in new pathological terms. Milton'sA Masque Presented at Ludlow Castle demonstrates how childbirth was influenced by emerging obstetrical language and practice, as well as the ways in which a writer might question such influence. Finally, this article also draws links between disrupted historical rituals of childbirth and mod...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Health Benefits of Autobiographical Writing: An Interdisciplinary Perspective
AbstractA large body of experimental evidence in the empirical sciences shows that writing about life experiences can be beneficial for mental and physical health. While empirical data regarding the health benefits of writing interventions have been collected in numerous studies in psychology and biomedicine, this literature has remained almost entirely disconnected from scholarship in the humanities and cognitive neuropsychology. In this paper, I review the literature from psychological and biomedical writing interventions, connect these findings to views from philosophy, cognitive neuropsychology and narratology and argu...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Voices from the Newspaper Club: Patient Life at a State Psychiatric Hospital (1988-1992)
AbstractThe authors conducted a qualitative analysis of thirty-seven issues ofThe DDU Review, a newsletter produced by residents of the Dual Diagnosis Unit, a residential unit for people who had diagnoses of developmental disability and serious mental illness in the Central State Hospital (Indiana, USA). The analysis of the newsletters produced between September 1988 and June 1992 revealed three  major themes: 1) the mundane; 2) good behavior; and 3) advocacy. Contrary to the authors’ expectations, the discourse of medicalization—such as relations with physicians, diagnoses, and medications&mdash...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Therapeutic Approach to Military Culture: A Music Therapist ’s Perspective
AbstractCulture can broadly be defined as “the values, norms, and assumptions that guide human action” (Wilson2008, 14). In contrast with the broader civilian society, the experiences and environments within the military community create a unique cultural subset. The United States armed forces are unified by their primary mission to provide external defense, security, and protection, and each branch (Army, Navy, Marine Corp, Air Force, Coast Guard and National Guard) shares a unique core set of values and norms. Because this culture is so complex and unique, it can sometimes be a challenge for many civilian pro...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Silent Voices: Exploring Narratives of Women's Experiences of Health Care Professional Responses to Domestic Violence and Abuse
AbstractThe impact of domestic violence and abuse (DVA) is far reaching not least in terms of both the immediate and longer term physical and mental wellbeing of those who have experienced abuse. DVA also exerts a considerable detrimental impact on the wider family including children. While professional perspectives of working with DVA survivors is increasingly well documented, there remains a paucity of accounts of encounters with healthcare services and/or healthcare professionals from survivors of DVA themselves. A central aim of this study was the exploration of women ’s experiences of healthcare encounters told ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Visual Representations of Physical Trauma: A Medical Pedagogy
Discussions of torture must further address the emotional and symbolic effects of clinical work with torture survivors on the caregiver. Introductory workshops using visual representations can trigger pain, fear and anger in the viewer. Images of torture, war, and genocide may also invoke ethical concerns relating to the impact of visual images, where viewing can elicit an ambiguous response, casting the viewer into the role of voyeur. At the same time, learners should recognize that indifference or inattention to the provocations mediated through images has its own liabilities, signaling defensiveness. Discussions about t...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Investigating the Meaning of Patient Ownership: An Exploratory Study of a Commonly Used Phrase within an Internal Medicine Department
AbstractLearning to assume responsibility or"ownership" for patient care is an important aspect of learning what it means to be a physician. To date, most of the research on patient ownership has focused on residents' understanding of what it means to own patients. This exploratory study explored third- and fourth-year students', residents, and attending physicians' understanding of the phrase"taking ownership of a patient." Data included participant observations and interviews that expanded over a five month period. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using psychological ownership as an analytical...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“Services Not Mausoleums”: Race, Politics, and the Concept of Community in American Medicine (1963-1970)
AbstractA romance with the concept of community has long characterized activist healthcare movements and has more recently been taken up by academic medical centers (AMCs) as a sign of virtuous civic engagement. During the late 1960s, the word community, as deployed by administrators at prestigious AMCs, became increasingly politicized, commodified and racialized. Here, we analyze how the concept of community was initially framed in the 1963 Community Mental Health Centers Act, the first legislation to establish community mental health centers in America. We then examine the Health Policy Advisory Center ’s analysis ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“Through blackening pools of blood”: Trauma and Translation in Robert Graves’s The Anger of Achilles
AbstractThe Anger of Achilles, Robert Graves ’ 1959 translation of Homer’sIliad, has been variously dismissed by classical scholars as an ‘outrageous sortie into the field of translation’ (Aldrich 1961) and a work of ‘sheer egotism’ (Rexine 1962), marred by its author’s ‘scattered yapping’ (Dimmock 1960). And yet, it can be read with greater understanding if we approach it not merely as a literary anomaly, but as a refra ction of Graves’ experience of ‘Shell Shock,’ or PTSD, following his front line service during the First World War. This paper propos...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - April 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Old Man Country. My Search for Meaning Among the Elders by Thomas R. Cole, New York: Oxford University Press, 2019
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - April 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Pharmaceutical Advertising and the Subtle Subversion of Patient Autonomy
AbstractDirect-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising (DTCPA) is pervasive in the United States. Beyond its effect on consumer behavior, DTCPA changes the relationship between individuals and physicians. The author provides a brief history of pharmaceutical advertising in the United States. The author then analyzes the current commonly used marketing techniques of pharmaceutical companies and argues that pharmaceutical companies are “irrational authorities” in Erich Fromm’s sense of the term since they seek to exploit persons. Using concepts from various philosophers from the Continental tradition, with a...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - April 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Mediating Trauma and Anxiety: Letters to Fran çoise Dolto, 1976-1978
AbstractFran çoise Dolto (1908-88) was a prominent French cultural figure thanks to her practice of dispensing psychoanalytically-informed child-rearing advice via the radio. From 1976 to 1978, on her showLorsque l ’enfant paraît, she responded to thousands of letters sent in by listeners requesting help with parenting problems and personal questions of a psychological nature. The article explores Dolto ’s cultural position as a child psychoanalyst – understood in the 1960s and 1970s as a radical profession – but from a conservative, Catholic background. It then examines a sample of the...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - April 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Introduction: Trauma and Textualities
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - April 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“The Hardest Part is What to Leave Behind…”: Trauma, Medicine, and the Common Goals of Winnie the Pooh and The Story of Dr. Dolittle Abstract
AbstractOn an initial read, neither A.A. Milne'sWinnie the Pooh Adventures or Hugh Lofting'sThe Story of Dr. Dolittle come across as literature written about trauma, and yet both stories derived from authors who were at the front lines of World War I and who put their war experiences into their stories. Evoking nostalgia and drawing on simple lore, both of these works continue to touch the human psyche. Both writers reinvented the way we see trauma and pain, whilst advocating for broader access to holistic healthcare. This, in turn, has impacted our relationship with trauma texts and healthcare forever. (Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - April 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Before 1999
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - April 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Who ’s Your Enemy?: Incorporating Stories of Trauma into a Medical Humanities Course
This article discusses the theoretical and practical experiment of creating, promoting and co-teaching a medical humanities course: Medicine, War and the Arts at a School of Medicine in the United States from the viewpoint of the students who took the class. Specifically, it analyses how three themes emerged in students ’ responses to the oral, literary and visual stories of war and trauma in the course and how they revealed the subjective and ambivalent nature of all medical encounters with patients. The conclusion is that actively encouraging students to view the role of the physician through the lens of histor ica...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - April 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Great Big World
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - March 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Momentary Backlash of Mimesis in an Intensive Care Unit: Ân ( The Moment ), written/directed by Özen Yula, 2016
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Re-thinking the Narrative in Narrative Medicine: The Example of Post-War French Literature
AbstractMedicine and the humanities have been exploring new ways to improve the quality of healthcare. One such collaboration is the practice of narrative medicine which uses literature to teach physicians to better meet their patients ’ needs. Narrative medicine, however, draws primarily from Anglophone literature, yet post-war French literature, philosophy and criticism have much to add to the theoretical and practical underpinnings of narrative medicine. As well, such scholarship provokes a number of questions that expose cer tain weaknesses in narrative medicine as it is practiced currently. As this paper demonst...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

How Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Does the Body, or Why Epistemology Alone Cannot Explain this Controversial Breast Cancer Treatment
AbstractSince the late 1990s, the use of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) to treat unilateral breast cancer has been on the rise. Over the past two decades, dozens of studies have been conducted in order to understand this trend, which has puzzled and frustrated physicians who find it at odds with efforts to curb the surgical overtreatment of breast cancer, as well as with evidence-based medicine, which has established that the procedure has little oncologic benefit for most patients. Based on the work of Annemarie Mol and John Law, this paper argues that these efforts to understand increased CPM use are limited...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Slicing through Thin Layers of Humanity: Narratives of the Abject
AbstractThis essay examines narratives about cadaver dissection through the lens of psychoanalytic theory in order to better understand the nature of medical students ’ socialization into medicine and its implications for physician-patient communication. The theoretical framework provided by Julia Kristeva focuses attention on the nature of subject-formation in relation to abjection – that which reveals the contingent nature of the speaking self. Analysis of memoirs and other narratives by medical students demonstrates that students encounter the abject in the process of dissecting a corpse, but are rigorously ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Ins and Outs of ‘Schizophrenia’: Considering Diagnostic Terms as Ordinary Linguistic Expressions
AbstractDiagnostic terms in psychiatry like ‘schizophrenia’ and ‘bipolar disorder’ are deeply contested in the professional community, by mental health activists and the public. In this paper, we provide a theoretical framework for considering diagnostic terms as ordinary linguistic expressions and illustrate this approach by a corpus linguistic analysis of ‘schizophrenia.’ Our aim is to show how a focus on language itself can inform current and future debates about psychiatric terminology and provide new insights on relevant processes concerning their actual usage and change over time. ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 31, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Ailing Hearts and Troubled Minds: An Historical and Narratological Study on Illness Narratives by Physicians with Cardiac Disease
This article explores the experience of illness among physicians by applying an historical, narratological approach to three doctor ’s narratives about personal cases of cardiac disease: Max Pinner’s from the 1940s, Robert Seaver’s from the 1980s, and John Mulligan’s from 2015. Drawing on Erving Goffman’s principles of social interaction, I argue that part of the challenge in the analysed narratives is because when doc tors seek medical attention for themselves, the ensuing medical ‘drama’ suffers. I compare the three narratives to argue that the experience of becoming a patient wh...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Thin Man is His Clothing: Dressing Masculine to be Masculine
AbstractBody image research focuses almost exclusively on women or overweight and obesity or both. Yet, body image concerns among thin men are common and can result, at least in part, from mixed messages in society around how menqua men should dress and behave in order to look good and feel good. Stand-alone interventions to meet these different messages tend to provide men with little therapeutic relief. This conceptual paper draws on literature from the medical humanities; gender and body image studies; the social psychology of clothing; and the author ’s own lived experience to address this contemporary problem. T...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Responding to Racism in the Clinical Setting: A Novel Use of Forum Theatre in Social Medicine Education
AbstractIssues of race have traditionally been addressed in medical school curricula in a didactic manner. However, medical school curricula often lack adequate opportunity for the application of learning material relating to race and culture. When confronted with acts of racism in clinical settings, students are left unprepared to respond appropriately and effectively. Forum Theatre offers a dynamic platform by which participants are empowered to actively engage with and become part of the performance. When used in an educational context, Forum Theatre can be a powerful tool for students to interact with a wide variety of...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Tragic Affirmation: Disability Beyond Optimism and Pessimism
AbstractTragedy is a founding theme in disability studies. Critical disability studies have, since their inception, argued that understandings of disability as tragedy obscure the political dimensions of disability and are a barrier facing disabled persons in society. In this paper, we propose an affirmative understanding of tragedy, employing the philosophical works of Nietzsche, Spinoza and Hasana Sharp. Tragedy is not, we argue, something to be opposed by disability politics; we can affirm life within it. To make our case, we look to an ongoing ethnography of two Canadian children ’s rehabilitation clinics. Lookin...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Patient Co-Participation in Narrative Medicine Curricula as a Means of Engaging Patients as Partners in Healthcare: A Pilot Study Involving Medical Students and Patients Living with HIV
AbstractThis paper describes a pilot study of a new model for narrative medicine training, “community-based participatory narrative medicine” (CBPNM), which centers on shared narrative work between healthcare trainees and patients. Nine medical students and eight patients participated in one of two, five-week-long pilot workshop series. A case study of participants’ experiences of t he workshop series identified three major themes: (1) the reciprocal and collaborative nature of participants’ relationships; (2) the interplay between self-reflection and receiving feedback from others; and (3) the clin...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Living Dis/Artfully with and in Illness
This article experiments with multimedia storytelling to re-vision difference outside biomedical and humanistic frames by generating new understandings of living dis/artfully with illness. We present and analyze seven short videos created by women and trans people living with illness as part of an arts-based research project that aimed to speak back to hegemonic concepts of disability that create barriers to healthcare.1 We call for a welcoming in of disability studies ’ disruptive and re-imaginative orientations to bodily difference to unsettle medicine’s humanistic accounts. In turn, we advance medical post-h...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Cultural Politics of ‘Implementation Science’
AbstractDespite the growing profile of ‘implementation science’, its status as a field of study remains ambiguous. Implementation science originates in the evidence-based movement and attempts to broaden the scope of evidence-based medicine to improve ‘clinical effectiveness’ and close the ‘implementation gap’. To achieve thi s agenda, implementation science draws on methodologies from the social sciences to emphasise coherence between qualitative and quantitative approaches. In so doing, we ask if this is at the expense of ignoring the dominating tendencies of the evidence-based movemen...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Nick in Time
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Traces of the Invisible: How an Alternative Reading of The Sleeping Beauty Fashioned a Bookwork Heightening Awareness of the Role of the Anesthetist
This article discusses a Leverhulme residency undertaken by the author Julie Brixey-Williams in 2003 –4 at the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland. Notions of medical visibility were explored through practice-led investigations under the umbrella title,Traces of the Invisible, that concentrated on making concrete, visible responses to the hidden or intangible elements of the anesthetist ’s working life in areas such as sleep, breath, pain and genetic markers.Rosebud is a unique nine-foot concertina bookwork created after reading the entire story ofThe Sleeping Beauty into an anesthetic mac...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Prayer to a Parasite
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Self-Injury in Japanese Manga : A Content Analysis
This study explored representations of self-injury in Japanesemanga (graphic novels). A content analysis of fifteen slice-of-lifemanga published between 2000-2017 was conducted, focusing on forty scenes that depict eighteen characters engaging in self-injury. Most depictions of self-injury reflect a stereotypical perception of “self-injurer,” a young girl cutting herself to cope with negative emotion. Characters receive informal support from friends and partners, while parents are portrayed as unsupportive and even triggering. An emergent trend was observed amongmanga targeting male readers to label self-injuri...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Dirty Bread, Forced Feeding, and Tea Parties: the Uses and Abuses of Food in Nineteenth-Century Insane Asylums
AbstractNineteenth-century psychiatrists ascribed to a model of health that was predicated on the existence of objective and strictly defined laws of nature. The allegedly “natural” rules governing the production of consumption of food, however, were structured by a set of distinctively bourgeois moral values that demonized over-indulgence and intemperance, encouraged self-discipline and productivity, and treated gentility as an index of social worth. Accordingly, the asylum acted not only as a therapeutic instrument but also as a moral machine that was designed to remake lazy, indolent transgressors into usefu...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Unruly Voices: Artists ’ Books and Humanities Archives in Health Professions Education
AbstractMartha A. Hall ’s artists’ books documenting her experience of living with breast cancer offer future health professionals a unique opportunity to sit in the patient’s position of vulnerability and fear. Hall’s books have become a cornerstone of our medical humanities pedagogy at the Maine Women Writers Co llection because of their emotional directness and their impact on readers. This essay examines the ways that Hall’s call for conversation with healthcare providers is enacted at the University of New England and provides a model for how such works might be used at other educational ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Contemporary Artists ’ Books and the Intimate Aesthetics of Illness
AbstractThis essay brings together critical perspectives from the discrete traditions of artists ’ books and the medical humanities to examine artists’ books by three contemporary artists – Penny Alexander, Martha A. Hall and Amanda Watson-Will – that treat experiences of illness and wellbeing. Through its focus on a multimodal and multisensory art form that has allegiances with, but is not reduced to, narrative, the essay adds to recent calls to rethink key assumptions of illness narrative study and to challenge utilitarian approaches. In particular, it draws attention to the aesthetic and imaginat...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 27, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Saadat Hasan Manto, Partition, and Mental Illness through the Lens of Toba Tek Singh
Abstract“Toba Tek Singh,” which describes the exchange of mental asylum inmates between India and Pakistan in the wake of partition, was perhaps Saadat Hasan Manto’s most well-known short story. Manto’s work was coloured by his experience of mental illness, including alcohol addiction and possible d epressive disorder. This essay attempts to use “Toba Tek Singh” as a lens through which to shine an integrative light on the role of mental illness in Manto’s work and life, by discussing his personal experiences, themes of mental illness in the story, and the implications of his writin...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 20, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research