“I Know a Guy Who Once Heard…”: Contemporary Legends and Narratives in Healthcare
AbstractContemporary legends – also called urban legends – are common throughout our society. Distinct from mere rumors passed around social media, anecdotes of pseudoscientific discoveries, or medical misinformation, contemporary legends are important because, rather than merely transmitting false ideas or information abou t medicine, they model distinct and primarily antagonistic patterns of interaction between patients and providers via their narrative components. And, while legends that patients tell about their distrust for doctors are fairly well-studied, less attention has been paid to the kinds of legen...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - July 8, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Bearding, Balding and Infertile: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) and Nationalist Discourse in India
AbstractThis paper investigates the gendered and racialized discourse on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) in India. A complex metabolic, endocrinal and reproductive disorder, PCOS is one of the most common endocrinopathies in women of reproductive age today. Due to an unclear etiology, there is no single clinical definition for PCOS, contributing to a sense of confusion around the syndrome. India has one of the highest rates of PCOS in the world. Medical and social discourses on PCOS suggest the high rates are due to the failures of Westernized lifestyle and diet in women from developing countries. Taking the example of In...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - July 6, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Poetics and Politics of Alzheimer ’s Disease Life-Writing by Martina Zimmermann, London, UK: Palgrave McMillan, 2017
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - July 5, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Refugee
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - June 26, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Utility of a Bioethics Doctorate: Graduates ’ Perspectives
AbstractEach year, many young professionals forego advanced education in the traditional doctoral programs of medicine, law, and philosophy in favor of pursuing a PhD or professional doctorate in bioethics or healthcare ethics that is offered by several major institutes of higher education across the United States. These graduates often leverage their degrees into careers within the broader field of bioethics. As such, they represent a growing percentage of professional bioethicists in both academia and healthcare nationwide. Given the significant role that doctoral bioethics programs play in the training of future profess...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - June 18, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Strange Encounters with Dead Selves: Medical Memoir, Apostrophe, and (Re)animating Subjectivity
This article focuses on three memoirs written by physicians who are specifically reflecting on their time in medical school to propose that the authors of these memoirs write not only to the reading audience, but also to their present and past selves. By addressing these former selves through the rhetorical figure of apostrophe, the authors write a new subjectivity into being. These memoirs serve as the material evidence of the formation what I call a bioaffective attachment, or, the way an individual physician's subjectivity is affectively attached to their own sense of self and to the larger healthcare industry. (Source:...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - June 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Loop: there ’s no going back: A Graphic Novel by Adolescent Cancer Patients on the Youth Project in Milan
AbstractThe present paper describes the story of the development of a graphic novel —a story about superheroes—written by adolescent cancer patients on the Youth Project at the Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan (Italy). Nineteen patients from fifteen to twenty-five years old (fifteen receiving treatment for their cancer, four who had recently completed their treatments) parti cipated in a four month creative writing laboratory managed by a professional teacher. The output from the writing laboratory was a written text that was used as the script for a graphic novel drawn by professional cartoonists a...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - June 4, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

From Reading to Healing: Teaching Medical Professionalism through Literature edited by Susan Stagno and Michael Blackie, Ohio: The Kent State University Press, 2019
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - June 3, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Narrative-based Practice in Health and Social Care: Conversations Inviting Change by John Launer, London and New York: Routledge, 2018
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - June 3, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Thirteen Reasons Why Revisited: A Monograph for Teens, Parents, and Mental Health Professionals
AbstractJay Asher ’s novelThirteen Reasons Why and its Netflix adaptation have enjoyed widespread popularity. While they draw needed attention to issues like bullying and teen estrangement, they may have an unintended effect: they mislead about the etiology of suicide and even glamorize it to a degree. The medical literature has shown that suicide is almost always the result of psychiatric disorder, not provocative stress, in much the same way an asthmatic crisis is primarily the result of an underlying medical condition, not an allergic stimulus. Both the novel and Netflix series ignore this premise and even belittl...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 18, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Do No Harm: Exposing the Hippocratic Hoax, directed by Robyn Symon, 2018
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 17, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Voices that Accompany Me
AbstractThis essay begins with a metaphor describing who enters the field of humanities in medicine and healthcare and the types of work they do. The role ofwitness is discussed, underscoring tensions between witnessing and analyzing. The essay then turns to my own background as an example of how each professional in this field brings something distinct. I briefly describe the three basic principles of my work with narrative: the injunction to keep the stories in the foreground, the work of amplifying and connecting stories, and the need for generous interpretation. The second half of the essay tells three illness stories,...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

‘The Art of Insulin Treatment:’ Diabetes, Insulin, and the 1920s
AbstractSoon after the discovery of insulin in the early 1920s, the popular press celebrated the miraculous discovery. Although insulin had no curative effect on the chronic state of diabetes, it was frequently heralded as a “cure.” This paper examines how the discovery of insulin intersected with the rise of diabetic technology and the transfer of medical technology to the home setting. By analyzing diabetic manuals written for patients and physicians, letters exchanged between patient and physician, medical journa ls, magazines and newspapers, I trace how patients learned about insulin and more significantly ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Right to Maim: Debility, Capacity, Disability by Jasbir K. Puar, Duke University Press, 2017
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - May 10, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Reading Between the Lines: A Five-Point Narrative Approach to Online Accounts of Illness
We describe our use of the five-point framework in the close reading of 214 accounts by people with the life-threatening skin cancer melanoma. (Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - April 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

In/Fertile Monsters: The Emancipatory Significance of Representations of Women on Infertility Reality TV
This article examines the emancipatory significance of representations of women on 'infertility reality TV shows'. While the women in these shows all have 'abnormal' qualities, we consider their portrayal as figurations of monstrosity. In the literature, monstrosity is understood as a way to challenge nonemancipatory norms by offering an alternative identity. Through a content analysis of seven reality TV shows, we identified four types of in/fertile monsters: the cyborg, the freak, the abject, and the childless. We show that these monsters are predominantly non-emancipatory as they all involve mechanisms of altering, excl...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - April 6, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Golden Ages and Silver Screens: The Construction of the Physician Hero in 1930-1940 American Cinema
AbstractDuring the 1940s in America, as medicine became more research-focused, medical researcher heroes were described as devotedly pursuing miraculous medicine. At the same time, Hollywood thrived, and films were an effective means to help build the myth of the physician hero. Cinematic techniques, rather than only the narrative, of four films,Dr. Arrowsmith,The Story of Louis Pasteur,Dr. Ehrlich ’s Magic Bullet, andDr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, are discussed to understand how they helped construct the image of the physician hero, both in terms of what they were and what they were not. (Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - March 6, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Desegregation and the retreat of clinical psychoanalysis
This article examines the racial politics that reshaped psychoanalytic psychotherapy and ushered in a community mental health paradigm during the U.S. Civil Rights Era. Policymakers in the 1960s adopted the language of social justice to condemn psychoanalysis for its inability to treat psychotics and its unwillingness to treat black patients; yet the community psychiatry model of treatment that replaced it compounded the denial of the black subject ’s clinical needs. Challenging the extant historiography that appraises psychoanalysis as a victim of neoliberalism and psychopharmacology, this paper examines how and why...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 27, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Science, Technology, and Human Health: The Value of STS in Medical and Health Humanities Pedagogy
AbstractAs the number of medical and health humanities degree programs in the United States rapidly increases (Berry, Lamb and Jones 2016, 2017), it is especially timely to consider the range of specific disciplinary (and multidisciplinary) perspectives that might benefit students enrolled in these programs. This paper discusses the inclusion of one such perspective from the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS.) The author asserts that STS benefits students in the medical and health humanities in four particular ways, by: (1) challenging the “progress narrative” around the advancement of biomedicine as...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 26, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Paper Man
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 26, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

No One Who Loves Anyone
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - February 21, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Resident Self-Portraiture: A Reflective Tool to Explore the Journey of Becoming a Doctor
AbstractThis arts- based project creatively introduces residents to photography, self-portraiture and narratives to document the longitudinal journey of becoming a family physician. Visual arts and writing can foster reflection: an important skill to cultivate in developing physicians. Unfortunately, arts based programs are lacking in many residency programs. Tools and venues that nourish physician well being and resilience may be important in today ’s changing healthcare environment and epidemic of physician burnout. Residents created self-portraits with accompanying narratives throughout their three-year training. ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 23, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Beside Oneself with Rage: The Doubled Self as Metaphor in a Narrative of Brain Injury with Emotional Dysregulation
AbstractPeople narrating the experience of dysregulated anger after a brain injury call upon metaphor in patterned ways to help them make sense of their situation. Here, I analyze the use of the metaphor of the doubled self in a personal narrative of brain injury, and I situate this metaphor in its cultural history by analyzingDr Jekyll and Mr Hyde andThe Incredible Hulk as landmark moments in its development. A pattern of thought reflecting Seneca ’s philosophy on the incompatibility of anger with rational selfhood emerges. I discuss implications for the way we care for people struggling with post-brain-injury anger...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - January 9, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Correction to: Medical Students ’ Efforts to Integrate and/or Reclaim Authentic Identity: Insights from a Mask-Making Exercise
The authors would like to correct a misspelling in the name of one of the authors due to a typographical error. The name should read Atur Turakhia, not Artur Turakhia. This does not change the conclusions or interpretations presented. (Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - December 19, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Awkward Choreographies from Cancer's Margins: Incommensurabilities of Biographical and Biomedical Knowledge in Sexual and/or Gender Minority Cancer Patients ’ Treatment
AbstractCanadian and American population-based research concerning sexual and/or gender minority populations provides evidence of persistent breast and gynecologic cancer-related health disparities and knowledge divides. TheCancer's Margins research investigates the complex intersections of sexual and/or gender marginality and incommensurabilities and improvisation in engagements with biographical and biomedical cancer knowledge. The study examines how sexuality and gender are intersectionally constitutive of complex biopolitical mappings of cancer health knowledge that shape knowledge access and its mobilization in health...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - November 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Awkward Choreographies from Cancer's Margins: Incomensurabilities of Biographical and Biomedical Knowledge in Sexual and/or Gender Minority Cancer Patients ’ Treatment
AbstractCanadian and American population-based research concerning sexual and/or gender minority populations provides evidence of persistent breast and gynecologic cancer-related health disparities and knowledge divides. TheCancer's Margins research investigates the complex intersections of sexual and/or gender marginality and incommensurabilities and improvisation in engagements with biographical and biomedical cancer knowledge. The study examines how sexuality and gender are intersectionally constitutive of complex biopolitical mappings of cancer health knowledge that shape knowledge access and its mobilization in health...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - November 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Family Practice
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - November 22, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Medical Sublime
AbstractInspired by a passage from Kate Chopin ’sThe Awakening, this article considers the possibility of a “medical sublime.” It works through a history of the sublime in theory and in the arts, from ancient times to the present. It articulates therapeutic dimensions of the sublime and gives contemporary examples of its medical relevance. In addition, it develops the concept of sublime-based stress-r eduction workshops and programs. These workshops bring the sublime out of the library and the museum into the lives of the healthcare community—patients, families, clinicians, staff, concerned others&m...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 6, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Reflective Scribe: Encouraging Critical Self-Reflection and Professional Development in Pre-Health Education
AbstractMuch has been said about the formative process that occurs via the “hidden curriculum” of medical education during which many students experience a disconnect between the professional values espoused within the formal curriculum and the implicit values communicated through interactions with peers and mentors. Less attention, however, has been paid to the format ion of the future medical self that takes place during students’premedical years, a time in which many undergraduate students seek out immersive clinical experiences —such as medical scribing— before applying to medical school. ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 3, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

When I Saw the Table
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 3, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Reflective Scribe: Encouraging Critical Self-Reflection and Professional Development in Pre-Health Education
AbstractMuch has been said about the formative process that occurs via the “hidden curriculum” of medical education during which many students experience a disconnect between the professional values espoused within the formal curriculum and the implicit values communicated through interactions with peers and mentors. Less attention, however, has been paid to the format ion of the future medical self that takes place during students’premedical years, a time in which many undergraduate students seek out immersive clinical experiences —such as medical scribing— before applying to medical school. ...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 3, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

When I Saw the Table
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 3, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Madness Decolonized?: Madness as Transnational Identity in Gail Hornstein ’s Agnes’s Jacket
AbstractThe US psychologist Gail Hornstein ’s monograph,Agnes ’s Jacket: A Psychologist’s Search for the Meanings of Madness (2009), is an important intervention in the identity politics of the mad movement. Hornstein offers a resignified vision of mad identity that embroiders the central trope of an “anti-colonial” struggle to reclaim the experiential world “colonized” by psychiatry. A series of literal and figurative appeals makes recourse to the inner world and (corresponding) cultural world of the mad as well as to the ethno-symbolic cultural materials of dormant nationhood. Th...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 1, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Storytelling Approach: Insights from the Shambaa
AbstractNarrative medicine explores the stories that patients tell; this paper, conversely, looks at some of the stories that patients are told. The paper starts by examining the ‘story’ told by the Shambaa people of Tanzania to explain the bubonic plague and contrasts this with the stories told by Ghanaian communities to explain lymphatic filariasis. By harnessing insights from memory studies, these stories’ memorability is claimed to be due to their use mnemonic devi ces woven into stories. The paper suggests that stories can be unpatronising, informative, and appropriate vehicles for communicating medi...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 1, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Incompatible with Care: Examining Trisomy 18 Medical Discourse and Families ’ Counter-discourse for Recuperative Ethos
AbstractParents whose child is diagnosed with a serious disease such as trisomy 18 first rely on the medical community for an accurate description and prognosis. In the case of trisomy 18, however, many families are told the disease is “incompatible with life” even though some children with the condition live for several years. This paper considers parents’ response to current medical discourse concerning trisomy 18 by examining blogs written by the parents of those diagnosed. Using interpretive humanistic reading and foregr ounding Cathryn Molloy’s recuperative ethos theory (2015), we find that par...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 1, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritual Themes and Challenges in Global Health
AbstractAlthough the importance of spirituality is increasingly recognized in clinical medicine, spirituality is rarely mentioned in the practice, literature, or training programs of global health. To understand the role of spirituality in global health practice and identify factors that influence and limit its expression, I initiated conversations and informal interviews with more than 300 global health leaders, students, and practitioners during 2010-2014. Four spiritual themes or challenges emerged: compassion at a distance; dichotomous thinking; conspiracy of silence; and compulsion to save the world. Practitioners exp...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 1, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Managing Memories: Treating and Controlling Homesickness during the Civil War
AbstractAlthough it has disappeared as a clinical diagnosis, a Disability Studies perspective on Civil War nostalgia offers an opportunity to recover the process by which understanding around a medical event occurs. By incorporating and examining the interplay between and among participants in the conversation surrounding nostalgia as they operate within various site specific temporal and social contexts, this method of analysis offers an opportunity to arrive at an understanding not only of the factors that contribute to different perspectives on an illness, but also into how some voices become ascendant in constructing m...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 1, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Drawing Invisible Wounds: War Comics and the Treatment of Trauma
AbstractSince the Vietnam War, graphic novels about war have shifted from simply representing it to portraying avenues for survivors to establish psychological wellness in their lives following traumatic events. While modern diagnostic medicine often looks to science, technology, and medications to treat the psychosomatic damage produced by trauma, my article examines the therapeutic potential of the comics medium with close attention to war comics. Graphic novels draw trauma in a different light: because of the medium ’s particular combination of words and images in sequence, war comics represent that which is typic...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 1, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Echo and the Failure of Knowing in Judith Fox ’s Photographic Project I Still Do: Loving and Living with Alzheimer’s
AbstractIn relationships ‘I’ and ‘you’ become ‘we’; despite individual differences, couples obtain an interdependent identity due to their shared interactions. During a serious illness, biological and biographical disruptions can put any reciprocal relationship under strain. Through intermedial analysis of Judit h Fox’s photographic project,I Still Do: Loving and Living with Alzheimer ’s (2009), I will explore ways the couple make sense of illness, how illness is communicated through text and image and also to identify the limits of representation. Here the photographs, I arg...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 1, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Pedagogy and the Art of Death: Reparative Readings of Death and Dying in Margaret Edson ’s Wit
AbstractWit explores modes of reading representations of death and dying, both through the play ’s sustained engagement with Donne’sHoly Sonnets and through Vivian ’s self-reflexive approach to her illness and death. I argue that the play dramatizes reparative readings, a term coined by Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick to describe an alternative to the paranoid reading practices that have come to dominate literary criticism. By analyzing the play’s reparative reading s of death and dying (as well as its representation of the shortcomings of paranoid readings), I show howWit provides lessons about knowledge-mak...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 1, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Nation, Narration, and Health in Mohamedou Ould Slahi ’s Guantánamo Diary
This article examines Slahi ’s account of his interrogations and representations of mental health at Guantánamo and considers its role within the narrative function of the nation. At stake is the right of detainees to narrate, scholars to critique medical practices in the War on Terror, and the nation’s attempts to contro l its narration. (Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 1, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

What Pauline Doesn ’t Know: Using Guided Fiction Writing to Educate Health Professionals about Cultural Competence
AbstractResearch linking reading literary fiction to empathy supports health humanities programs in which reflective writing accompanies close readings of texts, both to explore principles of storytelling (narrative arc and concrete language) and to promote an examination of biases in care. Little attention has been paid to the possible contribution of guided fiction-writing in health humanities curricula toward enhancing cultural competence among health professionals, both clinical and community-based. Through an analysis of the short story “Pie Dance” by Molly Giles, juxtaposed with descriptions of specific w...
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 1, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Camus at Seventeen: The Arduous Road through Oran
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 1, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Stroke and the Remembered Body: You See Me Directed by Linda S. Brown, 2015
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 1, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Witnessing Death, Witnessing Truth
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 1, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Unspoken Plea
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - September 1, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

From the Editor
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - August 31, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Funeral for Billy
(Source: Journal of Medical Humanities)
Source: Journal of Medical Humanities - August 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research