Response to the article ‘Instrument cleanliness and protein misfolding disorders’
Publication date: Available online 5 February 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Michael Simmons (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - February 6, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

A tsunami of drug resistance in Iran’s hospitals, is it true?
Publication date: Available online 6 February 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Vahid Lohrasbi, Neda Shirmohammadlou (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - February 6, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Ozonized water as an alternative to alcohol-based hand disinfection
ConclusionOzonized tap water is an effective decontaminant of E. coli, and could be an alternative to traditional alcohol fluid hand disinfectants both in healthcare institutions and public places. Ozonized water may be particularly valuable for individuals with skin problems. (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - February 5, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

The contribution of whole-genome sequencing to our understanding of the epidemiology and control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Publication date: Available online 2 February 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Hilary Humphreys, David C. ColemanAbstractIn recent years, approaches to tracking the spread of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as part of outbreak management have used conventional DNA-based methods including pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and spa typing. However, when a predominant clone is present, these methods may be insufficiently discriminatory. We conducted a literature search to highlight how whole genome sequencing (WGS) has revolutionised the investigation of outbreaks of MRSA, including i...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - February 3, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Monitoring healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial use at regional level through repeated point prevalence surveys: what can be learnt?
Publication date: Available online 29 December 2018Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): L. Arnoldo, C. Smaniotto, D. Celotto, L. Brunelli, R. Cocconi, D. Tignonsini, A. Faruzzo, S. Brusaferro, R. Collazzo, M. Mansutti, F. Martellotta, M. Giacomini, G. Del Ben, C. Vigo, M. Marino, F. Farneti, G. Franca, L. Calligaris, C. Giuliani, R. PerossaSummaryBackgroundHealthcare-associated infections (HAIs) surveillance is an essential part of any infection prevention and control programme. Repeated point prevalence surveys (PPSs) according to European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) protocol have been impl...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - February 2, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Can guidelines for the control of multi-drug-resistant Gram-negative organisms be put into practice? A national survey of guideline compliance and comparison of available guidelines
Publication date: Available online 5 January 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): B.L. Lynch, K. SchafferSummaryMulti-drug-resistant Gram-negative organisms (MDRGNO) are an emerging global threat, reflected in the increasing incidence of infections in Ireland and elsewhere. The response to this threat has been the development of Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) guidelines. A survey of IPC teams in Ireland was undertaken to assess compliance with national guidelines. To place these survey results in context, IPC guidelines from the Irish Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC) are compared with gui...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - February 2, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Prospective surveillance of bacterial colonization and primary sepsis - findings of a tertiary neonatal intensive and intermediate care unit
ConclusionsSurveillance of colonization provided a comprehensive overview on species and antibiotic resistance patterns. It allowed early detection of a colonization cluster. Knowledge of colonization and surveillance of sepsis is useful for guiding infection control measures and antibiotic treatment. (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - February 2, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

The Clinical Risk Stratification and Antibiotic Management of NDM and OXA-48 carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae bloodstream infections the United Kingdom
Publication date: Available online 1 February 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Damien K. Ming, Jonathan A. Otter, Rohma Ghani, Eimear T. Brannigan, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Siddharth Mookerjee, Mark Gilchrist, Alison H. Holmes, Frances Davies (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - February 2, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “Environmental contamination by bacteria in hospital washrooms according to hand-drying method: a multi-centre study” [J Hospital Infection 100 (2018) 469–475]
Publication date: Available online 31 January 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): E. Best, P. Parnell, J. Couturier, F. Barbut, A. Le Bozec, L. Arnoldo, A. Madia, S. Brusaferro, M.H. Wilcox (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - February 1, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

60% and 70% isopropanol are effective against “isopropanol-tolerant” E. faecium
Publication date: Available online 1 February 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Jürgen Gebel, Stefanie Gemein, Günter Kampf, Sacha J. Pidot, Niccolò Buetti, Martin ExnerSummaryWe have determined the bactericidal activity of isopropanol against E. faecium ATCC 6057, ST 796 (isopropanol-tolerant strain) and E. hirae ATCC 10541 (EN 13727). 60% and 70% isopropanol were effective (≥5.38 log10-reduction) in 15s against all strains but 23% isopropanol was not (
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - February 1, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus contamination on mobile phones of medical students
Publication date: Available online 1 February 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Z.N.L. Goh, P.Y. Chung (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - February 1, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

HIV postexposure prophylaxis knowledge among healthcare workers in a Colombian hospital
Publication date: Available online 7 December 2018Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Y. Ortiz-Martínez, K. Mendoza-Borja, M.L. Beltrán-Avilez, K. Vásquez-Rada, A. Buelvas-Pérez, M.F. Ortega-Gaibao, J. Lafaurie-Rojas (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 30, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Identifying hospital-acquired infections using retrospective record review from the Irish National Adverse Events Study (INAES) and European point prevalence survey case definitions
ConclusionRetrospective record review is an accurate source of information on HAI incidence, preventability and impact that complements PPS prevalence rates. HAI adverse events result in higher costs to the healthcare system than other adverse events. (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 26, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Hospital Acquired Clostridium difficile Infection (HA-CDI): An institutional costing analysis
ConclusionsWhen calculating costs associated with HA-CDI, accounting for the time between admission, diagnosis and discharge can substantially reduce the estimated institutional costs associated with HA-CDI. (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 25, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “Development of consensus-based national antimicrobial stewardship competencies for UK undergraduate healthcare professional education” [J Hosp Infect 100 (2018) 245–256]
Publication date: Available online 25 January 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): M. Courtenay, R. Lim, E. Castro-Sanchez, R. Deslandes, K. Hodson, G. Morris, S. Reeves, M. Weiss, D. Ashiru-Oredope, H. Bain, A. Black, J. Bosanquet, A. Cockburn, C. Duggan, M. Fitzpatrick, R. Gallagher, D. Grant, J. McEwen, N. Reid, J. Sneddon (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 25, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

The Burden of Clostridium difficile Infection During Inpatient Stays in the United States between 2012 and 2016
ConclusionThis study is consistent with previous publications, which demonstrated CDI's high economic burden in healthcare settings and for health insurance systems. When recorded as a comorbidity, CDI significantly increased hospital costs and LOS. These results highlight the need for innovative therapeutic approaches in the prevention and treatment of CDI. (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 25, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Hospital Infection, Volume 101, Issue 2Author(s): (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 25, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Increased detection of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae on post-clean sampling of a burns unit's wet surfaces
We report the increased detection of blaIMP-4+ CPE in environmental samples from floor drains in burns unit shower rooms, when collected following cleaning as compared to pre-cleaning. We propose that disruption of biofilms during cleaning may account for the increased detection of multi-resistant organisms. The results highlight the role of the wet environment as an under-recognized potential source of CPE transmission. Environmental screening focusing on pre-cleaning samples alone will likely underestimate environmental contamination. (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 25, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Pre-operative asymptomatic bacteriuria: a risk factor for prosthetic joint infection?
Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Hospital Infection, Volume 101, Issue 2Author(s): R. Weale, F. El-Bakri, K. SaeedSummaryBackgroundInfection is a rare complication following implantation of prosthetic material into a joint. The impact of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) before elective operations and the subsequent risk of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) are not well understood.AimsTo assess the prevalence of ASB amongst patients undergoing total arthroplasty of the hip and knee; and to determine the rates of PJI diagnosed within two years of the arthroplasty and if ASB is an independent risk factor for dev...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 25, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

2018 Acknowledgement of reviewers
Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Hospital Infection, Volume 101, Issue 2Author(s): (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 25, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Development of case vignettes for assessment of the inter-rater variability of national validation teams for the Point Prevalence Survey of Healthcare-Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Use in European Acute Care Hospitals
ConclusionThe agreement between the expert raters was very good for antimicrobial use and good for the presence of HAI. Case vignettes can be a tool to support standardisation of surveillance, improving the validity and comparability of the data. (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 23, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Candidemia in an Irish intensive care unit (ICU) setting between 2004 and 2018 reflects increased incidence of Candida glabrata
Publication date: Available online 19 January 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Phelim Ryan, Catherine Motherway, James Powell, Ahmed Elsaka, Ambreen Ali Sheikh, Azhar Jahangir, Nuala H. O’Connell, Colum P. DunneSummaryThe cumulative incidence of candidemia in an Irish Intensive Care Unit (ICU) setting between January 2004 and August 2018 was 17/1000 ICU admissions. Candida albicans was responsible for 55% (n=41). C. glabrata (n=21: 28%) was the next most prevalent species; identified most frequently since 2012. C. glabrata was associated with a higher mortality rate (57%) than C. albicans (29%). Al...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 20, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Is it necessary to test the sterility of urine prior to outpatient cystoscopy?
Publication date: Available online 19 January 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): P. Pescheloche, J. Gallon, B. Parier, C. Ze Ondo, T. Bessede, J. Irani (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 20, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Effectiveness of early use of fidaxomicin in preventing recurrence of Clostridium difficile infection
Publication date: Available online 17 January 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): S.D. Goldenberg, N. Wigglesworth, P. Wade, N.M. Price (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 18, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Influence of bacterial resistance on mortality in intensive care units: A registry study from 2000 to 2013 (IICU Study)
This study aimed to compare the mortality of patients with nosocomial infections according to bacterial resistance profiles.Material and methodsThe prospective surveillance registry in 29 French intensive care units participating during the years 2000-2013 was retrospectively analyzed. All patients presenting with a nosocomial infection in intensive care unit were included.ResultsThe registry contained 88.000 eligible patients, including 10.001 patients with a nosocomial infection. Among them, 3092 (36.7%) were related to resistant microorganisms. Gram-negative bacilli exhibited the highest rate of resistance compared to G...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 17, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Attributable clinical and economic burden of carbapenem-non-susceptible Gram-negative infections in patients hospitalized with complicated urinary tract infections
Publication date: Available online 29 November 2018Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Y.P. Tabak, A.H. Sung, G. Ye, L. Vankeepuram, V. Gupta, E. McCannSummaryBackgroundGram-negative complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs) can have serious consequences for patients and hospitals.AimTo examine the clinical and economic burden attributable to Gram-negative carbapenem-non-susceptible (C-NS; resistant/intermediate) infections compared with carbapenem-susceptible (C-S) infections in 78 US hospitals.MethodsAll non-duplicate C-NS and C-S urine source isolates were analysed. A subset had principal diagnosis ICD-9-...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 15, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Clinical prediction models for ESBL-Enterobacteriaceae colonization or infection: A systematic review
ConclusionDue to limitations and variations in the study design, clinicians would have to take these differences into consideration when deciding on how to use these models in clinical practice. Due to lack of external validation, the generalizability of these models remains a question. Therefore, further external validation in one’s local settings is needed to confirm the usefulness of these models in supporting decision-making. (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 15, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Predictive models of surgical site infections after coronary surgery: Insights from a validation study on 7090 consecutive patients
ConclusionsIn this validation study, current predictive models for SSIs after CABG showed low accuracy of prediction despite satisfactory calibration and moderate predictive power. (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 15, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Association between excreta management and incidence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae: role of healthcare workers' knowledge and practices
ConclusionsA positive correlation was found between HCWs' practices for managing excreta and the incidence of ESBL-PE, especially in surgical units. There is an urgent need for development of public health efforts to enhance knowledge and practices of HCWs to better control the spread of multi-drug-resistant bacteria, and these should be integrated within infection control programmes. (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 12, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Vancomycin use in surrounding patients during critical illness and risk for persistent colonization with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus
Publication date: Available online 11 January 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Philip Zachariah, Daniel E. FreedbergAbstractThe optimal duration of contact precautions for vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) colonized patients is uncertain and individual patient characteristics alone may not predict risk of prolonged colonization. Using a cohort of adult patients who underwent testing for VRE at intensive care unit (ICU) admission we tested the association between local (unit-level) vancomycin use and persistent colonization with VRE. Higher unit-level vancomycin use significantly prolonged VRE colon...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 12, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

An evaluation of the electronic reporting system for the enhanced surveillance of carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria in England
ConclusionThe ERS is the only surveillance system in England with the potential to gather intelligence on important risk factors for CPGNB to inform public health measures to control their spread. Although the ERS captures more information on CPGNB than other surveillance systems, timeliness and completeness of the enhanced data require substantial improvements in order to deliver the desired health benefits. (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 12, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Letter to the Editor
Publication date: Available online 12 January 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Katie Prescott, Nikunj Mahida, Tim Boswell (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 12, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Impact of penicillin allergy records on carbapenem prescribing: an observational retrospective cohort study
This study measured the impact of penicillin allergy labels on meropenem prescribing. Rates of meropenem prescribing were compared between patients with a penicillin allergy record and patients without such a record. Potential confounders were also collected (i.e. age, sex and co-morbidities). Of the 21,272 patients with no penicillin allergy, 225 (1.06%) were prescribed meropenem, whereas of the 3443 patients with penicillin allergy, 240 (6.97%) were prescribed meropenem. Meropenem prescribing is associated with a patient's penicillin allergy record. Given that many penicillin allergy records are incorrect, addressing spu...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 11, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Effects of a disinfection device on colonization of sink-drains and patients during a prolonged outbreak with multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an ICU
Publication date: Available online 9 January 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): E. de Jonge, M.G.J. de Boer, E.H.R. van Essen, H.C.M. Dogterom-Ballering, K.E. VeldkampAbstractBackground and aimSink drains in intensive care units are frequently colonized with bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We studied the influence of installing disinfecting devices on sink drains on colonization of sinks and patients in an ICU during a prolonged outbreak of multiresistant P. aeruginosa.MethodsFrom 2010, there was a clonal outbreak of a multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa, (MDR-PA). In April 2013, in ICU subunit A, t...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 10, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Water-borne infections and warming the sterile water for washing high risk infants on neonatal intensive care units
Publication date: Available online 9 January 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): B. Cherian, E. Price (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 10, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Detection of Hepatitis C virus in an exhumed body identifies the origin of a nosocomial transmission which caused multiple fatal diseases
ConclusionsThis study highlights the value of sequence analysis as a tool for solving medico-legal conflicts. The high court of justice sentenced that a health worker's reuse of a contaminated needle resulted in the nosocomial transmission of HCV. (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 9, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Implementation of the cobas Liat influenza point-of-care test into an emergency department during a high-incidence season: a retrospective evaluation following real-world implementation
Publication date: Available online 16 December 2018Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): J. Youngs, Y. Iqbal, S. Glass, P. Riley, C. Pope, T. Planche, D. CarringtonSummaryThe cobas Liat influenza A/B and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) assay (Liat) was used in the adult emergency department of a large London hospital from 21st January 2018 to 14th April 2018. Influenza was detected in 308 of 1027 (30%) samples tested; influenza A in 157 (15.3%), influenza B in 149 (14.5%) and RSV in 28 (2.7%). When compared against Fast Track Diagnostics Respiratory Pathogens 21 multiplex polymerase chain reaction and Ceph...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 8, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Nosocomial Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission by brief casual contact identified using comparative genomics
We report a case of nosocomial transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by brief casual contact. Through routine variable-number tandem-repeat typing in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan, we found that M. tuberculosis clinical isolates from two patients showed indistinguishable genotypes. The patients had an epidemiological relationship of sharing a waiting room in a hospital on the same day. Since comparative genomics detected only two single-nucleotide variants between the isolates, we concluded that recent tuberculosis transmission occurred in the waiting room. These results indicate that the physical separation of infectiou...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 8, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Nosocomial outbreak of esbl-producing enterobacter cloacae among cardio-thoracic surgical patients: causes and consequences
Publication date: Available online 7 January 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): A. Noël, C. Vastrade, S. Dupont, M. de Barsy, T.D. Huang, T. Van Maerken, I. Leroux-Roels, B. Delaere, L. Melly, B. Rondelet, C. Dransart, A.S. Dincq, I. Michaux, P. Bogaerts, Y. GlupczynskiAbstractBackgroundEnterobacteriaceae are recognized as leading pathogens of healthcare-associated infections. This is a report describing an investigation of a nosocomial outbreak of extended-spectrum ß-lactamase producing Enterobacter cloacae affecting cardio-thoracic surgery patients in a Belgian academic hospital.MethodsCases w...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 8, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Prevention of healthcare-associated invasive aspergillosis during hospital construction/renovation works
Publication date: Available online 7 January 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Alida Fe Talento, Margaret Fitzgerald, Brendan Redington, Niamh O’Sullivan, Lynda Fenelon, Thomas R. RogersSummaryThe association between healthcare associated invasive aspergillosis and hospital construction/building works is well recognized. This infection can cause significant morbidity and mortality and imposes a substantial burden on the healthcare system. The population of patients at-risk for this opportunistic infection has expanded and multi-triazole drug resistance has emerged globally. Therefore there is a need...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 7, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

The effect of using Fidaxomicin on recurrent Clostridium difficile infection?
Publication date: Available online 4 January 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Martin Biggs, Tariq Iqbal, Elisabeth Holden, Victoria Clewer, Mark I. GarveyAbstractFidaxomicin is a macrocyclic antibiotic licensed for treating Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). In the UK, fidaxomicin is often reserved for severe CDI or recurrences. At Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, all courses of fidaxomicin during 2017/18 were reviewed. Thirty-eight patients received fidaxomicin, of which 64% patients responded to treatment when fidaxomicin was given during the first episode of a mild CDI. Conversely, all patient...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 5, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

A quality improvement initiative for improving hospital visitor hand hygiene
Publication date: Available online 4 January 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Amy T. Hummel, Karen Vleck, William B. Greenough (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 5, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Can guidelines for the control of multi-drug resistant gram negative organisms be put into practice? A national survey of guideline compliance and comparison of available guidelines
ConclusionThis survey gives an insight into the real life applicability of HPSC guidelines. Survey results are placed in context with a comparison of 5 MDRGNO IPC guidelines. Although core tenets of IPC are standard across guidelines, research into which practices are efficient in reducing MDRGNO transmission while being cost-effective would be worthwhile. (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 5, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Implementation of influenza point-of-care testing and patient cohorting during a high-incidence season: a retrospective analysis of impact on infection prevention and control and clinical outcomes
Publication date: Available online 22 November 2018Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): J. Youngs, B. Marshall, M. Farragher, L. Whitney, S. Glass, C. Pope, T. Planche, P. Riley, D. CarringtonSummaryBackgroundDuring high-incidence influenza seasons, a robust infection prevention and control policy is imperative to reduce nosocomial transmission of influenza.AimTo assess the impact of influenza point-of-care testing (POCT) in an emergency department (ED) and patient cohorting on an influenza ward on infection prevention and control and clinical outcomes.MethodsInfluenza POCT was operational in the study ED from 2...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 4, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Overall bioburden by total colony count does not predict the presence of pathogens with high clinical relevance in hospital and community environments
ConclusionTCC poorly predicted the presence of PHCR, rendering the results from environmental sampling difficult to interpret. MALDI-TOF enables the identification of large numbers of isolates from the environment at low cost. Further studies on environmental contamination should use MALDI-TOF to identify all pathogens grown. (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 3, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Are perineal swabs required as part of initial staff screening in healthcare-associated Streptococcus pyogenes outbreaks?
Publication date: Available online 5 December 2018Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): M. Meda, V. Gentry, A. Walker (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 3, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Workplace vaccination against measles in a teaching hospital of Rome
Publication date: Available online 6 December 2018Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): L. Coppeta, A. Pietroiusti, L. Morucci, A. Neri, M. Ferraro, A. Magrini (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - January 3, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Monitoring healthcare associated infections and antimicrobial use at regional level through repeated point prevalence surveys: what can we learn
Publication date: Available online 29 December 2018Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): L. Arnoldo, C. Smaniotto, D. Celotto, L. Brunelli, R. Cocconi, D. Tignonsini, A. Faruzzo, S. Brusaferro, R. Collazzo, M. Mansutti, F. Martellotta, M. Giacomini, G. Del Ben, C. Vigo, M. Marino, F. Farneti, G. Franca, L. Calligaris, C. Giuliani, R. PerossaSummaryBackgroundHealthcare associated infections (HAIs) surveillance is an essential part of any infection prevention and control programme. Repeated point prevalence surveys (PPS) according to ECDC protocol have been implemented in all Friuli Venezia Giulia (FVG) region (Ita...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - December 29, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Four Steps to Clean Hospitals: Look; Plan; Clean; and Dry
ConclusionGiven the lack of articles providing practical cleaning guidance, this review proposes a four-step protocol based on evidence if available, or justified where not. Each step is presented, discussed and risk-assessed. It is likely that a systematic cleaning process would reduce the risk of healthcare-acquired infection for everyone, including outbreaks, in addition to heightened confidence in overall quality of care. (Source: Journal of Hospital Infection)
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - December 28, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Acinetobacter - the Trojan Horse of infection Control?
ConclusionIn an outbreak where contact precautions and environmental cleaning are optimal, it is important to give careful consideration to other mechanisms of spread. If there is a failure to do this, it is likely that the true causes of transmission will not be addressed and the problem will recur. We recommend that burns theatres within a burn facility are designed to operate at negative pressure; this is the opposite of normal operating theatre ventilation. Where showers are used, both shower head and hose should be changed after a patient with a resistant organism. The role of non-contact disinfection (e.g. hydrogen p...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - December 28, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research