Drug-drug interaction trials incompletely described drug interventions in ClinicalTrials.gov and published articles: an observational study
To evaluate the completeness of intervention description in ClinicalTrials.gov and corresponding journal articles for registered and published drug-drug interaction (DDI) trials, because complete and transparent description of interventions is particularly important for DDI. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 22, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Diana Juri ć, Adriana Bolić, Shelly Pranić, Ana Marušić Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

No consistent evidence of data availability bias existed in recent individual participant data meta-analyses: A meta-epidemiological study
To assess trial-level factors associated with the contribution of individual participant data (IPD) to IPD meta-analyses, and to quantify the data availability bias, namely the difference between the effect estimates of trials contributing IPD and those not contributing IPD in the same systematic reviews (SRs). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 22, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Yasushi Tsujimoto, Tomoko Fujii, Akira Onishi, Kenji Omae, Yan Luo, Hissei Imai, Sei Takahashi, Takahiro Itaya, Claire Pinson, Sarah J. Nevitt, Toshi A. Furukawa Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Thresholds for clinical importance were established to improve interpretation of the EORTC QLQ-C30 in clinical practice and research
To establish thresholds for clinical importance (TCIs) for the five functioning and nine symptom scales of the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 19, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Johannes M. Giesinger, Fanny L.C. Loth, Neil K. Aaronson, Juan I. Arraras, Giovanni Caocci, Fabio Efficace, Mogens Groenvold, Marieke van Leeuwen, Morten Aa Petersen, John Ramage, Krzysztof A. Tomaszewski, Teresa Young, Bernhard Holzner, EORTC Quality of Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Reasons for “awaiting classification” studies are often inadequate and underreported: a cross-sectional analysis of cochrane reviews
Whenever systematic review authors find a poorly reported study, the decision on whether to include it or not may be inaccurate as enough information does not exist for endorsing its conformity with the eligibility criteria. As the study may contribute to the analysis when the missing information become available, the authors may choose to code it as an “awaiting classification study” (ACS). Therefore, ACS is a study that has been retrieved but cannot be assessed for inclusion until additional information is obtained [1]. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 14, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Rafael Leite Pacheco, Carolina Oliveira Cruz Latorraca, Ana Luiza Cabrera Martimbianco, Rachel Riera Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Reasons for ‘awaiting classification’ studies are often inadequate and underreported: a cross-sectional analysis of Cochrane reviews
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 14, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Rafael Leite Pacheco, Carolina Oliveira Cruz Latorraca, Ana Luiza Cabrera Martimbianco, Rachel Riera Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Validation of five search filters for retrieval of clinical practice guidelines produced low precision
Our aim was to validate search filters for retrieval of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in MEDLINE, Embase and PubMed. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 11, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Carole Lunny, Douglas M. Salzwedel, Tracy Liu, Cynthia Ramasubbu, Savannah Gerrish, Lorri Puil, Barbara Mintzes, James M. Wright Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Overviews of reviews incompletely report methods for handling overlapping, discordant, and problematic data
The aim of the study was to assess the completeness of reporting of methods in overviews. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 10, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Carole Lunny, Sue E. Brennan, Jane Reid, Steve McDonald, Joanne E. McKenzie Tags: Review Source Type: research

Overviews of reviews incompletely report methods for handling overlapping, discordant and problematic data
To assess the completeness of reporting of methods in overviews. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 10, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Carole Lunny, Sue E. Brennan, Jane Reid, Steve McDonald, Joanne E. McKenzie Tags: Review Source Type: research

Letter in response to: Cooper et  al. Established search filters may miss studies when identifying randomized controlled trials [J Clin Epidemiol. 2019 Apr 13;112:12-19. doi: 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2019.04.002]
We read “Established search filters may miss studies when identifying randomized controlled trials” [1] with interest. The authors highlight an important shortcoming in the two search filters used in their case study; however, we question whether the study would have benefited from considering additiona l search filters which are more frequently utilized in systematic reviews. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 9, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Juliette C. Thompson, David A. Scott Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Validation of clinical prediction models: what does the “calibration slope” really measure?
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 9, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Richard J. Stevens, Katrina K. Poppe Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Cooper et al. Established search filters may miss studies when identifying randomized controlled trials. J Clin Epidemiol. 2019 Apr 13;112:12-19. doi: 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2019.04.002
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 9, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Juliette C. Thompson, David A. Scott Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Thresholds for clinical importance were defined for the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Computer Adaptive Testing Core —an adaptive measure of core quality of life domains in oncology clinical practice and research
The aim of this article was to establish thresholds for clinical importance (TCIs) for the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Computer Adaptive Testing (CAT) Core measure, the new adaptive version of the EORTC QLQ-C30. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 5, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Johannes M. Giesinger, Fanny L.C. Loth, Neil K. Aaronson, Juan I. Arraras, Giovanni Caocci, Fabio Efficace, Mogens Groenvold, Marieke van Leeuwen, Morten Aa Petersen, John Ramage, Krzysztof A. Tomaszewski, Teresa Young, Bernhard Holzner, EORTC Quality of Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

The conduct and reporting of mediation analysis in recently published randomized controlled trials: results from a methodological systematic review
(i) to describe the methodological characteristics of mediation analyses (MAs) reported in recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and (ii) to propose recommendations on the planning, conduct and reporting of MAs in practice. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 5, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tat-Thang Vo, Cecilia Superchi, Isabelle Boutron, Stijn Vansteelandt Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Thresholds for clinical importance were defined for the EORTC CAT Core – an adaptive measure of core quality of life domains in oncology clinical practice and research
To establish thresholds for clinical importance (TCIs) for the EORTC Computer Adaptive Testing (CAT) Core measure, the new adaptive version of the EORTC QLQ-C30. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 5, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Johannes M. Giesinger, Fanny L.C. Loth, Neil K. Aaronson, Juan I. Arraras, Giovanni Caocci, Fabio Efficace, Mogens Groenvold, Marieke van Leeuwen, Morten Aa Petersen, John Ramage, Krzysztof A. Tomaszewski, Teresa Young, Bernhard Holzner, EORTC Quality of Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

More comprehensive reporting of methods in studies using respondent driven sampling is required: a systematic review of the uptake of the STROBE-RDS guidelines
Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is an increasingly popular method of recruiting participants from hard-to-reach populations and has traditionally been used to estimate the prevalence of HIV among marginalized people. The STROBE-RDS guidelines were published in 2015 to improve the reporting of these studies. We aim to determine the current applications of RDS and the quality of reporting of these studies. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 4, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Lisa Avery, Michael Rotondi Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Multiple uses of forest plots in presenting analysis results in health research: A Tutorial
Forest plots are an important graphical method in meta-analyses used to show results from individual studies and pooled analyses. Forest plots are easy and straightforward to understand because they provide tabular and graphical information about estimates of comparisons or associations, corresponding precision, and statistical significance. This visual representation also makes it easier to see variations between individual study results. Forest plots are widely used in not only systematic reviews and meta-analyses but also observational studies and clinical trials. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 4, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Guowei Li, Jie Zeng, Junzhang Tian, Mitchell A.H. Levine, Lehana Thabane Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

More systematic reviews were registered in PROSPERO each year, but few records' status was up-to-date
To determine the proportion of systematic reviews (SRs) registered in PROSPERO and explore differences between publication years, review focus, and country. Secondary objectives were (1) to compare the characteristics of registered and nonregistered SRs and (2) to assess the up-to-dateness of the PROSPERO records' status. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 4, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tanja Rombey, Katharina Doni, Falk Hoffmann, Dawid Pieper, Katharina Allers Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

A systematic review showed more consideration is needed when conducting nonrandomized studies of interventions
The objective of this study was to evaluate the methodological conduct, reporting, and risk of bias of nonrandomized studies of interventions (NRSIs) funded by UK National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centres (NIHR-BRCs). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 4, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Paula Dhiman, Hopin Lee, Shona Kirtley, Gary S. Collins Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Uses and Reporting of Respondent-Driven Sampling Studies: A Systematic Review of the uptake of the STROBE-RDS Guidelines
Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is an increasingly popular method of recruiting participants from hard to reach populations and has traditionally been used to estimate the prevalence of HIV among marginalized populations. The STROBE-RDS guidelines were published in 2015 to improve the reporting of these studies. We aim to determine the current applications of RDS and the quality of reporting of these studies (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 4, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Lisa Avery, Michael Rotondi Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Calculation of absolute risk for important outcomes in patients with and without a prognostic factor of interest.
Primary studies and systematic reviews of prognostic factors commonly analyze and report relative measures of association between the factor(s) and outcome(s) of interest. For decision making, however, guideline panelists, systematic reviewers, and health care professionals at the point of care will ultimately need the absolute risk of the outcome(s) in those with and without the prognostic factor(s) of interest. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 4, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Farid Foroutan, Alfonso Iorio, Lehana Thabane, Gordon Guyatt Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Multiple uses of forest plots in presenting analysis results in health research
Forest plots are an important graphical method in meta-analyses used to show results from individual studies and pooled analyses. Forest plots are easy and straightforward to understand because they provide tabular and graphical information about estimates of comparisons or associations, corresponding precision and statistical significance. This visual representation also makes it easier to see variations between individual study results. Forest plots are not only widely used in systematic reviews and meta-analyses, but also in observational studies and clinical trials. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 4, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Guowei Li, Jie Zeng, Junzhang Tian, Mitchell AH. Levine, Lehana Thabane Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

More systematic reviews were registered in PROSPERO each year, but few records ’ status was up-to-date
To determine the proportion of systematic reviews (SRs) registered in PROSPERO and explore differences between publication years, review focus and country. Secondary objectives were a) to compare the characteristics of registered and non-registered SRs, and b) to assess the up-to-dateness of the PROSPERO records ’ status. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 4, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tanja Rombey, Katharina Doni, Falk Hoffmann, Dawid Pieper, Katharina Allers Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

More consideration was needed when conducting non-randomised studies of interventions
Evaluate the methodological conduct, reporting, and risk of bias of non-randomised studies of interventions (NRSIs) published by UK National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centres (NIHR-BRCs). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 4, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Paula Dhiman, Hopin Lee, Shona Kirtley, Gary S Collins Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Reporting of randomized factorial trials was frequently inadequate
Factorial designs can allow efficient evaluation of multiple treatments within a single trial. We evaluated the design, analysis, and reporting in a sample of factorial trials. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 1, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Brennan C. Kahan, Michael Tsui, Vipul Jairath, Anna Mae Scott, Douglas G. Altman, Elaine Beller, Diana Elbourne Tags: Review Source Type: research

Reporting of randomised factorial trials was frequently inadequate
Factorial designs can allow efficient evaluation of multiple treatments within a single trial. We evaluated the design, analysis, and reporting in a sample of factorial trials. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 1, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Brennan C. Kahan, Michael Tsui, Vipul Jairath, Anna Mae Scott, Douglas G. Altman, Elaine Beller, Diana Elbourne Tags: Review Source Type: research

Confounding obscures our view, effect modification is part of reality
In 1983, one of us (AK) attended a course given by one of the world's most prominent scholars in epidemiological methodology, Olli Miettinen [1], and heard him say that in the face of the Lord there is no confounding, but there is effect modification. This may well be the clearest available definition of the difference between two concepts which are still too often confused and not appropriately distinguished, theoretically, and in data-analytic practice dealing with ‘covariables.’ (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 28, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: J. Andr é Knottnerus, Peter Tugwell Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Cover 2 Editorial Board
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 28, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 28, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research

An analysis reveals differences between pragmatic and explanatory diagnostic accuracy studies
– To clarify a difference between two approaches while evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of medical tests, labeled here as “pragmatic” versus “explanatory” studies. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 24, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Patrick M. Bossuyt, Maria Olsen, Chris Hyde, J érémie F. Cohen Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

EQUATOR reporting guidelines should also be used by clinicians
For many years, the Enhancing the Quality and Transparency of Health Research (EQUATOR) Network has been endorsing several guidelines for the reporting of medical research [1]. These guidelines aim to help researchers in reporting research findings in a transparent and unbiased way. As a reviewer of some scientific journals, I often use these guidelines to help me during the review process. In fact, the EQUATOR Network provides a toolkit for peer reviewing health research [2]. The order and organization of the guidelines, in the form of checklist items, facilitate the identification of the pivotal aspects of different manu...
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 21, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Clovis Mariano Faggion Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Letter: EQUATOR reporting guidelines should also be used by clinicians
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 21, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Clovis Mariano Faggion Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Twenty percent of secondary publications of randomized controlled trials of drugs did not provide new results relative to the primary publication
To estimate the proportion of secondary publications of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that provide new results relative to the primary publication. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 20, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Cindy Lai, Emilie Sbidian, Bruno Giraudeau, Laurence Le Cleach Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Reporting the details of consent procedures in clinical trials
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 19, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Rafael Dal −Ré, Berge Solberg, Uwe Fuhr, Stefan Eriksson Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Submitting the original participant information letter as supplementary material of a trial report is useful and can be easily implemented
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 19, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Daniel Kotz, Wolfgang Viechtbauer, Mark Spigt, Rik Crutzen Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Comparison of bias adjustment methods in meta-analysis suggests that quality effects modeling may have less limitations than other approaches
The quality of primary research is commonly assessed before inclusion in meta-analyses. Findings are discussed in the context of the quality appraisal by categorizing studies according to risk of bias. The impact of appraised risk of bias on study outcomes is typically judged by the reader; however, several methods have been developed to quantify this risk of bias assessment and incorporate it into the pooled results of meta-analysis, a process known as bias adjustment. The advantages, potential limitations, and applicability of these methods are not well defined. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 18, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Jennifer C. Stone, Kathryn Glass, Zachary Munn, Peter Tugwell, Suhail A.R. Doi Tags: Review Source Type: research

Comparison of bias adjustment methods in meta-analysis suggests that quality effects modelling may have less limitations than other approaches
The quality of primary research is commonly assessed prior to inclusion in meta-analyses. Findings are discussed in the context of the quality appraisal by categorising studies according to risk of bias. The impact of appraised risk of bias on study outcomes are typically judged by the reader, however several methods have been developed to quantify this risk of bias assessment and incorporate it into the pooled results of meta-analysis; a process known as bias-adjustment. We discuss the advantages and limitations of methods for bias-adjustment in meta-analysis to inform those using and synthesising research evidence in cli...
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 18, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Jennifer Stone, Kathryn Glass, Zachary Munn, Peter Tugwell, Suhail A.R. Doi Tags: Review Source Type: research

Data extraction methods: an analysis of internal reporting discrepancies in single manuscripts and practical advice
Data extraction from reports about experimental or observational studies is a crucial methodological step informing evidence syntheses, such as systematic reviews (SRs) and overviews of SRs. These discrepancies were defined as pairs of statements that could not both be true. Authors of SRs and overviews of SRs can encounter reporting discrepancies among multiple sources when extracting data – a manuscript and a conference abstract, a manuscript and a clinical trial registry. However, these discrepancies can also be found within a single manuscript published in a scientific journal. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 18, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Livia Puljak, Nicoletta Riva, Elena Parmelli, Marien Gonz ález-Lorenzo, Lorenzo Moja, Dawid Pieper Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Randomized controlled trials reflected clinical practice when comparing the course of low back pain symptoms in similar populations
This study compares participants in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) (the Minimal Invasive Treatment [MinT] trials) to participants in a related observational study with regard to their low back pain (LBP) symptom course. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 16, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Esther T. Maas, Johanna M. van Dongen, Johan N.S. Juch, J. George Groeneweg, Jan-Willem Kallewaard, Michiel R. de Boer, Bart Koes, Arianne P. Verhagen, Frank J.P.M. Huygen, Maurits W. van Tulder, Raymond W.J.G. Ostelo Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Randomised controlled trials reflected clinical practice when comparing the course of low back pain symptoms in similar populations
This study compares participants in RCTs (the MinT-trials) to participants in a related observational study with regards to their low back pain (LBP) symptom course. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 16, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Esther T. Maas, Johanna M. van Dongen, Johan NS. Juch, J George Groeneweg, Jan-Willem Kallewaard, Michiel R. de Boer, Bart Koes, Arianne P. Verhagen, Frank JPM. Huygen, Maurits W. van Tulder, Raymond WJG. Ostelo Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

A scoping review shows that several nonvalidated budget planning tools for randomized trials are available
We aimed to provide a systematic overview of freely available tools which may help plan or monitor costs for randomized clinical trials (RCTs). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 15, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Benjamin Speich, Viktoria Gloy, Nadine Schur, Hannah Ewald, Lars G. Hemkens, Matthias Schwenkglenks, Matthias Briel, MAking Randomized Trials Affordable (MARTA) Group Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

A scoping review shows that several non-validated budget planning tools fo randomised trials are available
We aimed to provide a systematic overview of freely available tools which may help to plan or monitor costs for randomised clinical trials (RCTs). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 15, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Benjamin Speich, Viktoria Gloy, Nadine Schur, Hannah Ewald, Lars G. Hemkens, Matthias Schwenkglenks, Matthias Briel, for the MAking Randomized Trials Affordable (MARTA) Group Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Conference abstracts describing systematic reviews on pain were selectively published, not reliable, and poorly reported
To determine the reporting quality of systematic review (SR) abstracts presented at World Congresses on Pain (WCPs) and to quantify agreement in results presented in those abstracts with their corresponding full-length publications. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 15, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Lenko Saric, Svjetlana Dosenovic, Ian J. Saldanha, Antonia Jelicic Kadic, Livia Puljak Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Letter in response to Thompson and Scott Authors ’ letter reestablished search filters may miss studies when identifying randomized controlled trials. Language for trial phase necessary when searching for RCT
Thompson and Scott suggest including “additional search filters which are more frequently utilized in systematic reviews” in our case study [1]; we question if it is possible to determine which of the many search filters available for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the most frequently used in systematic reviews. It is not mandatory to reference search filters, so we cannot use citation count as an imperfect proxy, and we are not aware of any evidence which ranks search filters according to use. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 12, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Chris Cooper, David Kaunelis, Jo Varley Campbell, Patrice Carter Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Rapid reviews of medical tests used many similar methods to systematic reviews but key items were rarely reported: a scoping review
Rapid reviews provide an efficient alternative to standard systematic reviews in response to a high priority or urgent need. Although rapid reviews of interventions have been extensively evaluated, little is known about the characteristics of rapid reviews of diagnostic evidence. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 12, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Ingrid Arevalo-Rodriguez, Paloma Moreno-Nunez, Barbara Nusbaummer-Streit, Karen Steingart, Laura del Mar Gonz ález Peña, Diana Buitrago-Garcia, David Kaunelis, José Ignacio Emparanza, Pablo Alonso-Coello, Andrea C. Tricco, Javier Zamora Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Studies registered in non-ClinicalTrials.gov accounted for an increasing proportion of protocol registrations in medical research
To compare the recent trends and characteristics of studies registered as non-ClinicalTrials.gov in the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 12, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Masahiro Banno, Yasushi Tsujimoto, Yuki Kataoka Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Authors ’ letter provides further evidence that language for trial phase would appear necessary when searching for RCT
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 12, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Chris Cooper, David Kaunelis, Jo Varley Campbell, Patrice Carter Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Frandsen et  al. provide insights to PubMed coverage across all Cochrane Review Groups, but more in-depth analyses would further help inform database choices
We congratulate Frandsen et  al. [1] on their contribution to the evidence base on PubMed coverage across systematic review topics, especially with regard to their comprehensive sample. Their study provides further evidence that PubMed coverage is generally high, but variable across topics, defined by the scope of Cochrane Re view Groups (CRGs). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 7, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Maria-Inti Metzendorf, Robin M. Featherstone Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Frandsen et  al. provide insights to PubMed coverage across all Cochrane Review Groups, but more in-depth analyses would further help inform database choices
We congratulate Frandsen et  al. [1] on their contribution to the evidence base on PubMed coverage across systematic review topics, especially with regard to their comprehensive sample. Their study provides further evidence that PubMed coverage is generally high, but variable across topics, defined by the scope of Cochrane Re view Groups (CRGs). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 7, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Maria-Inti Metzendorf, Robin M. Featherstone Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Database choice can be informed by both large-scale and in-depth analyses
Database choice is closely tied to coverage, which can be investigated using a number of different approaches: a specific topic or medical specialty as an example, coverage of a selection of journals (width and depth), coverage of different document types, and finally, a gold standard can form the basis for an examination of database coverage. The latter approach is used in a large scale of the included studies in all Cochrane reviews published from 2012 to 2016 [1]. By including all Cochrane reviews, we focus on intervention studies. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 7, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tove Faber Frandsen, Mette Brandt Eriksen, David Mortan Gr øne Hammer, Janne Buck Christensen Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Frandsen et al. provide insights to PubMed coverage across all Cochrane Review Groups, but more in-depth analyses would further help inform database choices
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 7, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Maria-Inti Metzendorf, Robin M. Featherstone Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research