A randomised trial comparing three Delphi feedback strategies found no evidence of a difference in a setting with high initial agreement
To explore the impact of different feedback strategies on 1) subsequent agreement and 2) variability in Delphi studies. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 7, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Steven MacLennan, Jamie Kirkham, Thomas B.L. Lam, Paula R. Williamson Source Type: research

Decision-making frameworks and considerations for informing coverage decisions for healthcare interventions: A critical interpretive synthesis
This study aims to review and summarize available frameworks, and generate an integrated framework, if and where applicable, highlighting particular issues faced with expensive but effective and desirable healthcare interventions. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 6, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Rebecca L. Morgan, Leah Kelley, Gordon Guyatt, Ana Johnson, John N. Lavis Source Type: research

An alternative approach identified optimal risk thresholds for treatment indication: an illustration in coronary heart disease
Treatment thresholds based on risk predictions can be optimized by considering various health (economic) outcomes and performing marginal analyses, but this is rarely performed. We demonstrate a general approach to identify treatment thresholds optimizing individual health (economic) outcomes, illustrated for statin treatment based on 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk predicted by the Framingham risk score. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 3, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Anoukh van Giessen, G. Ardine de Wit, Karel G.M. Moons, Jannick A.N. Dorresteijn, Hendrik Koffijberg Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Rethinking optimization methods identified optimal risk thresholds for preventive treatment: an illustration in coronary heart disease
Treatment thresholds based on risk predictions can be optimized by considering various health (economic) outcomes and performing marginal analyses, but this is rarely performed. We demonstrate a general approach to identify treatment thresholds optimizing individual health (economic) outcomes, illustrated for statin treatment based on 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk predicted by the Framingham risk score. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 3, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: A. van Giessen, G.A. de Wit, K.G.M. Moons, J.A.N. Dorresteijn, H. Koffijberg Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 1, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 1, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research

Addressing complexity in health research, a big issue
The developing history of medicine has shown an increasingly close interaction between improvement of clinical practice and the progress of scientific knowledge. But there has always been the tension that while research must be focused on very specific questions in order to test sharply delineated hypotheses (the mosaic pieces), practice is often complex (the full mosaic of comprehensive integrated care [1]). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 1, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: J. Andr é Knottnerus, Peter Tugwell Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Registry-based randomized controlled trials merged the strength of  randomized controlled trails and observational studies and give rise to more pragmatic trials
The objective of this study was to analyze the features of registry-based randomized trials (rRCTs). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 22, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tim Mathes, Stefanie Buehn, Peggy Prengel, Dawid Pieper Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Controversy and debate on clinical genomics sequencing —paper 4: clinical genome-wide sequencing: response to Wilson, Miller, and Rousseau
We are pleased that Professors Wilson, Miller, and Rousseau agree with our conclusion that genome-wide sequencing (GWS) may benefit patients with suspected monogenic disease that has not been identified by conventional mutation testing, but we are perplexed by their assertion that each patient on whom clinical GWS is performed “is in reality an n-of-1 research subject.” They appear to be confusing “NGS” (next generation sequencing) with GWS and conventional locus-specific single-gene testing with genome-wide testing. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 22, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Shelin Adam, Jan M. Friedman Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Registry-based randomized controlled trials merged the strength of randomized controlled trials and observational studies and give rise to more pragmatic trials
To analyze the features of registry-based randomized trials (rRCT). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 22, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tim Mathes, Stefanie Buehn, Peggy Prengel, Dawid Pieper Source Type: research

Registry-based randomized controlled trials merged the strength of randomized controlled trails and observational studies and give rise to more pragmatic trials
To analyze the features of registry-based randomized trials (rRCT). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 22, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tim Mathes, Stefanie Buehn, Peggy Prengel, Dawid Pieper Source Type: research

Study design classification of registry-based studies in systematic reviews
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 22, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tim Mathes, Dawid Pieper Source Type: research

N-of-1 trials for assessing the effects of deprescribing medications on short-term clinical outcomes in older adults: a systematic review
To determine the feasibility of using the N-of-1 method for deprescribing trials in older adults. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 22, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Alexander J. Clough, Sarah N. Hilmer, Sharon L. Naismith, Luke Kardell, Danijela Gnjidic Source Type: research

Validation of a questionnaire measuring transitional patient safety climate indicated differences in transitional patient safety climate between primary and secondary care
This study describes the development and validation of the TRAnsitional patient safety Climate Evaluation (TRACE) questionnaire, measuring transitional patient safety climate from the perspective of general practitioners and hospital physicians. Patient safety climate reflects the professionals ’ perception of the organizational patient safety culture. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 22, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Marije A. van Melle, Henk F. van Stel, Judith M. Poldervaart, Niek J. de Wit, Dorien LM. Zwart Source Type: research

Controversy and Debate on Clinical Genomics Sequencing - Paper 4: Clinical Genome-Wide Sequencing: Response to Wilson, Miller and Rousseau ’s Response
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 22, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Shelin Adam, Jan M. Friedman Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Predicted burden could replace predicted risk in preventive strategies for  cardiovascular disease
The objective of this study was to explore the extent of the differences in definitions of composite end points and assess how these differences influence estimates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) burden. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 21, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Ghizelda R. Lagerweij, G. Ardine de Wit, Karel G.M. Moons, W.M. Monique Verschuren, Jolanda M.A. Boer, Hendrik Koffijberg Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Interpretation of epidemiologic studies very often lacked adequate consideration of confounding
Confounding bias is a most pervasive threat to validity of observational epidemiologic research. We assessed whether authors of observational epidemiologic studies consider confounding bias when interpreting the findings. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 21, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Lars G. Hemkens, Hannah Ewald, Florian Naudet, Aviv Ladanie, Jonathan G. Shaw, Gautam Sajeev, John P.A. Ioannidis Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Investigating heterogeneity of effects and associations using interaction  terms
Effect heterogeneity, the variability of an association or exposure across subgroups, usually warrants further investigation. The aim of this deeper analysis is to identify effect modifiers (or moderators) and quantify their relationship with the exposure. We explain why it is better to harness interaction effects within a single analytic model than to use separate models to analyze each subgroup. Using examples, we demonstrate a practical approach to modeling and interpretation with interaction terms from various measurement scales (categorical by categorical; categorical by continuous; and continuous by continuous). (Sou...
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 21, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Evangelos Kontopantelis, Matthew Sperrin, Mamas A. Mamas, Iain E. Buchan Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Interpretation of epidemiological studies very often lacked adequate consideration of confounding
Confounding bias is a most pervasive threat to validity of observational epidemiological research. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 21, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Lars G. Hemkens, Hannah Ewald, Florian Naudet, Aviv Ladanie, Jonathan G. Shaw, Gautam Sajeev, John P.A. Ioannidis Source Type: research

Investigating Heterogeneity of Effects and Associations Using Interaction Terms
Effect heterogeneity, the variability of an association or exposure across subgroups, usually warrants further investigation. The aim of this deeper analysis is to identify effect modifiers (or moderators) and quantify their relationship with the exposure. We explain why it is better to harness interaction effects within a single analytic model than to use separate models to analyse each subgroup. Using examples, we demonstrate a practical approach to modelling and interpretation with interaction terms from various measurement scales (categorical by categorical; categorical by continuous; and continuous by continuous). (So...
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 21, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Evangelos Kontopantelis, Matthew Sperrin, Mamas Mamas, Iain Buchan Source Type: research

Predicted burden could replace predicted risk in preventive strategies for cardiovascular disease
To explore the extent of the differences in definitions of composite endpoints and assess how these differences influence estimates of CVD burden. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 21, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: G.R. Lagerweij, G.A. de Wit, K.G.M. Moons, W.M.M. Verschuren, J. Boer, H. Koffijberg Source Type: research

Cumulative incidence estimates in the presence of competing risks
In the analysis of time-to-event end points, a competing risk (competing cause or competing event) may be defined as “an event whose occurrence either precludes the occurrence of another event under examination or fundamentally alters the probability of occurrence of this other event” [1]. Recent articles in the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology have shown that Kaplan–Meier (KM) estimates biased from competin g risks are commonly published in leading medical journals [2,3] and overestimated event risk by over 10% in approximately one-third of studies susceptible to competing events [3]. (Source: Journal of...
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 15, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Samantha Morais, Lu ís Antunes, Maria José Bento, Nuno Lunet Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Decision making about healthcare-related tests and diagnostic test strategies. Paper 1: a new series on testing to improve people's health
Over three decades ago, authors suggested that the use of healthcare-related tests must lead to a net health benefit beyond knowing about the presence or absence of disease [1 –3]. Achieving this net health benefit will depend on the perspective that is taken: in a clinical encounter, from the patient perspective, this net benefit is expected by the patient, whereas in a public health or health policy setting with a health system perspective, this benefit is expected at the population level, for example, through screening programs. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 15, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Holger J. Sch ünemann, Reem A. Mustafa Tags: Series: Decision Making About Healthcare-Related Tests and Diagnostic Test Strategies Source Type: research

A likelihood-based approach to P-value interpretation provided a novel, plausible, and clinically useful research study metric
This study aimed to describe a novel method of P-value interpretation that would address these limitations. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 15, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Nicholas G. Adams, Gerard O'Reilly Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Decision-making about healthcare-related tests and diagnostic strategies series. Paper 1: testing to improve people's health: a new series
Over three decades ago, authors suggested that the use of healthcare-related tests must lead to a net health benefit beyond knowing about the presence or absence of disease [1 –3]. Achieving this net health benefit will depend on the perspective that is taken: in a clinical encounter, from the patient perspective, this net benefit is expected by the patient, whereas in a public health or health policy setting with a health system perspective, this benefit is expected at the population level, for example, through screening programs. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 15, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Holger J. Sch ünemann, Reem Mustafa Tags: Invited Commentary Source Type: research

A likelihood based approach to P-value interpretation provided a novel, plausible and clinically useful research study metric
This study aimed to describe a novel method of P-value interpretation that would address these limitations. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 15, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Nicholas G. Adams, Gerard O ’Reilly Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Cumulative incidence estimates in the presence of competing risks
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 15, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Samantha Morais, Lu ís Antunes, Maria José Bento, Nuno Lunet Source Type: research

Comparative effectiveness medicines research cannot assess efficacy
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 15, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Rafael Dal-R é, Antonio J. Carcas Source Type: research

Decision-making about healthcare related tests and diagnostic strategies Series .Paper 1 : Testing to improve people's health: A new series
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 15, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Holger J. Sch ünemann, Reem Mustafa Tags: Invited Commentary Source Type: research

Decision making about healthcare-related tests and diagnostic test strategies. Paper 4: International guidelines show variability in their approaches
The objective of the study was to describe and compare current practices in developing guidelines about the use of healthcare-related tests and diagnostic strategies (HCTDS). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 13, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Reem A. Mustafa, Wojtek Wiercioch, Ingrid Arevalo-Rodriguez, Adrienne Cheung, Barbara Prediger, Liudmila Ivanova, Matthew Ventresca, Jan Brozek, Nancy Santesso, Patrick Bossuyt, Amit X. Garg, Nancy Lloyd, Monika Lelgemann, Diedrich B ühler, Holger J. Sch Tags: Series: Decision Making About Healthcare-Related Tests and Diagnostic Test Strategies Source Type: research

Decision making about healthcare-related tests and diagnostic test strategies. Paper 5: a qualitative study with experts suggests that test accuracy data alone is rarely sufficient for decision making
The objective of the study was to identify the critical factors that determine recommendations and other decisions about healthcare-related tests and diagnostic strategies (HCTDS). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 13, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Reem A. Mustafa, Wojtek Wiercioch, Matthew Ventresca, Jan Brozek, Holger J. Sch ünemann, DU-Diagnosis expert group Tags: Series: Decision Making About Healthcare-Related Tests and Diagnostic Test Strategies Source Type: research

Decision-making about healthcare related tests and diagnostic strategies: International guidelines show variability in their approaches.
To describe and compare current practices in developing guidelines about the use of health care related tests and diagnostic strategies (HCTDS) (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 13, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Reem A. Mustafa, Wojtek Wiercioch, Ingrid Arevalo-Rodriguez, Adrienne Cheung, Barbara Prediger, Liudmila Ivanova, Matthew Ventresca, Jan Brozek, Nancy Santesso, Patrick Bossuyt, Amit X. Garg, Nancy Lloyd, Monika Lelgemann, Diedrich B ühler, Holger Schün Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Decision-making about healthcare related tests and diagnostic strategies: a qualitative study with experts suggests that test accuracy data alone is rarely sufficient for decision-making
To identify the critical factors that determine recommendations and other decisions about health care related tests and diagnostic strategies (HCTDS). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 13, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Reem A. Mustafa, Wojtek Wiercioch, Matthew Ventresca, Jan Brozek, Holger J. Sch ünemann, DU-Diagnosis expert group Tags: JCE Series Source Type: research

Reply to: comparative effectiveness medicines research cannot assess efficacy
We appreciate the insightful comments from Drs. Dal-R é and Carcas in their letter to the editor [1] regarding our paper “Publication of comparative effectiveness research (CER) has not increased in high-impact medical journals, 2004–2013” [2]. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 12, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Laura L. Hester, Charles Poole, Elizabeth A. Suarez, Jane S. Der, Olivia G. Anderson, Kathryn G. Almon, Avanti V. Shirke, M. Alan Brookhart Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Decision making about healthcare-related tests and diagnostic test strategies. Paper 2: a review of methodological and practical challenges
In this first of a series of five articles, we provide an overview of how and why healthcare-related tests and diagnostic strategies are currently applied. We also describe how our findings can be integrated with existing frameworks for making decisions that guide the use of healthcare-related tests and diagnostic strategies. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 12, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Reem A. Mustafa, Wojtek Wiercioch, Adrienne Cheung, Barbara Prediger, Jan Brozek, Patrick Bossuyt, Amit X. Garg, Monika Lelgemann, Diedrich B üehler, Holger J. Schünemann Tags: Series: Decision Making About Healthcare-Related Tests and Diagnostic Test Strategies Source Type: research

Decision making about healthcare-related tests and diagnostic test strategies. Paper 3: a systematic review shows limitations in most tools designed to assess quality and develop recommendations
The objective of this study was to identify and describe critical appraisal tools designed for assessing the quality of evidence (QoE) and/or strength of recommendations (SoRs) related to health care –related tests and diagnostic strategies (HCTDSs). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 12, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Reem A. Mustafa, Wojtek Wiercioch, Maicon Falavigna, Yuan Zhang, Liudmila Ivanova, Ingrid Arevalo-Rodriguez, Adrienne Cheung, Barbara Prediger, Matthew Ventresca, Jan Brozek, Nancy Santesso, Patrick Bossuyt, Amit X. Garg, Nancy Lloyd, Monika Lelgemann, Di Tags: Series: Decision Making About Healthcare-Related Tests and Diagnostic Test Strategies Source Type: research

Evidence is needed on comparative benefits and harms of pharmacologic interventions in ideal and real-world settings
We appreciate the insightful comments from Drs. Dal-R é and Carcas in their letter to the editor [1] regarding our paper “Publication of comparative effectiveness research (CER) has not increased in high-impact medical journals, 2004–2013” [2]. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 12, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Laura L. Hester, Charles Poole, Elizabeth A. Suarez, Jane S. Der, Olivia G. Anderson, Kathryn G. Almon, Avanti V. Shirke, M. Alan Brookhart Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

A novel statistical model for analyzing data of a systematic review generates optimal cutoff values for fractional exhaled nitric oxide for asthma diagnosis
Measurement of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) might substitute bronchial provocation for diagnosing asthma. However, optimal FENO thresholds for diagnosing asthma remain unclear. We reanalyzed data collected for a systematic review investigating the diagnostic accuracy of FENO measurement to exploit all available thresholds under consideration of pretest probabilities using a newly developed statistical model. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 12, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Antonius Schneider, Klaus Linde, Johannes B. Reitsma, Susanne Steinhauser, Gerta R ücker Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Controversy and debate on clinical genomics sequencing —paper 2: clinical genome-wide sequencing: don't throw out the baby with the bathwater!
Genome-wide (exome or whole genome) sequencing with appropriate genetic counseling should be considered for any patient with a suspected Mendelian disease that has not been identified by conventional testing. Clinical genome-wide sequencing provides a powerful and effective means of identifying specific genetic causes of serious disease and improving clinical care. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 12, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Shelin Adam, Jan M. Friedman Tags: Invited Commentary Source Type: research

A novel statistical model for analyzing data of a systematic review generates optimal cut-off values for fractional exhaled nitric oxide for asthma diagnosis
Measurement of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) might substitute bronchial provocation for diagnosing asthma. However, optimal FENO thresholds for diagnosing asthma remain unclear. We re-analyzed data collected for a systematic review investigating the diagnostic accuracy of FENO measurement to exploit all available thresholds under consideration of pre-test probabilities using a newly developed statistical model. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 12, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Antonius Schneider, Klaus Linde, Johannes B. Reitsma, Susanne Steinhauser, Gerta R ücker Source Type: research

Evidence is needed on comparative benefits and harms of pharmacologic products in ideal and real-world settings
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 12, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Laura L. Hester, Charles Poole, Elizabeth A. Suarez, Jane S. Der, Olivia G. Anderson, Kathryn G. Almon, Avanti V. Shrike, M. Alan Brookhart Tags: letter to the editor Source Type: research

Controversy and Debate on Clinical Genomics Sequencing - Paper 2: Clinical Genome-Wide Sequencing: Don't Throw Out the Baby With The Bathwater!
Genome-wide (exome or whole genome) sequencing with appropriate genetic counselling should be considered for any patient with a suspected mendelian disease that has not been identified by conventional testing.Clinical genome-wide sequencing provides a powerful and effective meansof identifying specific genetic causes of serious disease and improving clinical care. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 12, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Shelin Adam, Jan M. Friedman Source Type: research

Decision-making about healthcare related tests and diagnostic strategies: A review of methodological and practical challenges
In this first of a series of five articles we provide an overview of how and why healthcare related tests and diagnostic strategies (HCTDS) are currently applied. We also describe how our findings can be integrated with existing frameworks for making decisions that guide the use of HCTDS. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 12, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Reem A. Mustafa, Wojtek Wiercioch, Adrienne Cheung, Barbara Prediger, Jan Brozek, Patrick Bossuyt, Amit X. Garg, Monika Lelgemann, Diedrich B üehler, Holger J. Schünemann Source Type: research

Decision-making about healthcare related tests and diagnostic strategies: A systematic review shows limitations in most tools designed to assess quality and develop recommendations
To identify and describe critical appraisal tools designed for assessing the quality of evidence (QoE) and/or strength of recommendations (SoR) related to healthcare related tests and diagnostic strategies (HCTDS). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 12, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Reem A. Mustafa, Wojtek Wiercioch, Maicon Falavigna, Yuan Zhang, Liudmila Ivanova, Ingrid Arevalo-Rodriguez, Adrienne Cheung, Barbara Prediger, Matthew Ventresca, Jan Brozek, Nancy Santesso, Patrick Bossuyt, Amit X. Garg, Nancy Lloyd, Monika Lelgemann, Di Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Controversy and debate on clinical genomics sequencing —paper 3: response to “clinical genome-wide sequencing: do not throw out the baby with the bathwater”
We enjoyed our colleagues' paper and see ourselves as pursuing the same goal: the application of NGS technologies to improve clinical care and promote better health outcomes, particularly where alternative approaches are often inadequate. We find we agree on some points, but on others, regrettably, we are still far apart. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 11, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Brenda J. Wilson, Fiona Alice Miller, Fran çois Rousseau Tags: Invited Commentary Source Type: research

Response to “Clinical genome-wide sequencing: don’t throw out the baby with the bathwater”
We enjoyed our colleagues' paper, and see ourselves as pursuing the same goal: the application of NGS technologies to improve clinical care and promote better health outcomes, particularly where alternative approaches are often inadequate. We find we agree on some points, but on others, regrettably, we're still far apart. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 11, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Brenda J. Wilson, Fiona Alice Miller, Fran çois Rousseau Tags: Invited Commentary Source Type: research

Not enough I say! Expand the remit of living systematic reviews to  inform future research
This issue of the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology includes a collection of four papers [1 –4] considering the idea of living systematic reviews (LSRs) and the methodology they should employ. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 10, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Alex J. Sutton Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Living systematic reviews: 2. Combining human and machine effort
New approaches to evidence synthesis, which use human effort and machine automation in mutually reinforcing ways, can enhance the feasibility and sustainability of living systematic reviews. Human effort is a scarce and valuable resource, required when automation is impossible or undesirable, and includes contributions from online communities ( “crowds”) as well as more conventional contributions from review authors and information specialists. Automation can assist with some systematic review tasks, including searching, eligibility assessment, identification and retrieval of full-text reports, extraction of da...
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 10, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: James Thomas, Anna Noel-Storr, Iain Marshall, Byron Wallace, Steven McDonald, Chris Mavergames, Paul Glasziou, Ian Shemilt, Anneliese Synnot, Tari Turner, Julian Elliott, Living Systematic Review Network Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Living systematic review: 1. Introduction —the why, what, when, and how
Systematic reviews are difficult to keep up to date, but failure to do so leads to a decay in review currency, accuracy, and utility. We are developing a novel approach to systematic review updating termed “Living systematic review” (LSR): systematic reviews that are continually updated, incorporating relevant new evidence as it becomes available. LSRs may be particularly important in fields where research evidence is emerging rapidly, current evidence is uncertain, and new research may change pol icy or practice decisions. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 10, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Julian H. Elliott, Anneliese Synnot, Tari Turner, Mark Simmonds, Elie A. Akl, Steve McDonald, Georgia Salanti, Joerg Meerpohl, Harriet MacLehose, John Hilton, David Tovey, Ian Shemilt, James Thomas, Living Systematic Review Network Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Living Systematic Reviews: 3. Statistical methods for updating meta-analyses
A Living systematic review should keep the review current as new research evidence emerges. Any meta-analyses included in the review will also need updating as new material is identified. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 10, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Mark Simmonds, Georgia Salanti, Joanne McKenzie, Living Systematic Review Network Source Type: research