Node-making processes in network meta-analysis of nonpharmacological interventions should be well planned and reported
We read with interest the article of James et  al. [1]. We agree there is lack of guidance for generating nodes for network meta-analyses (NMAs) of nonpharmacological interventions, and the proposed elements are useful. Based on our experience of conducting NMAs of wound care devices [2,3], we offer the following new considerations. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 17, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Chunhu Shi, Maggie Westby, Gill Norman, Jo C. Dumville, Nicky Cullum Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Importance of the methods used to support the node-making process in network meta-analysis
We thank Shi et  al. for their interest [1] in our article “Node-making process in network meta-analysis of non-pharmacological interventions should be well planned and reported” [2]. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 17, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Arthur James, Am élie Yavchitz, Isabelle Boutron Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Node-making processes in network meta-analysis of non-pharmacological interventions should be well planned and reported
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 17, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Chunhu Shi, Maggie Westby, Gill Norman, Jo Dumville, Nicky Cullum Source Type: research

Importance of the methods used to support the node making process in network meta-analysis
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 17, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Am élie Yavchitz Source Type: research

Node-making processes in network meta-analysis of non-pharmacological interventions should be well planned and reported
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 17, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Chunhu Shi, Maggie Westby, Gill Norman, Jo Dumville, Nicky Cullum Source Type: research

Importance of the methods used to support the node making process in network meta-analysis
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 17, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Am élie Yavchitz Source Type: research

Scoping review identifies significant number of knowledge translation theories, models, and frameworks with limited use
To conduct a scoping review of knowledge translation (KT) theories, models, and frameworks that have been used to guide dissemination or implementation of evidence-based interventions targeted to prevention and/or management of cancer or other chronic diseases. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 13, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Lisa Strifler, Roberta Cardoso, Jessie McGowan, Elise Cogo, Vera Nincic, Paul A. Khan, Alistair Scott, Marco Ghassemi, Heather MacDonald, Yonda Lai, Victoria Treister, Andrea C. Tricco, Sharon E. Straus Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Reply to letter to the editor by C. Faggion: reproducibility and reporting guidelines
Over the last 20  years, many reporting guidelines have been published to assist authors in ensuring that their articles include key information about their study methods and findings. The EQUATOR network has a database of hundreds of guidelines, although only a few core generic guidelines address major study types (http://www.equator-network.org/). We note that the EQUATOR Network does not develop guidelines, although we have published guidance for those who do [1]. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 13, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Douglas G. Altman, David Moher Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Testing for reproducibility: a missing point in  reporting
The quality of reporting is pivotal when presenting data from any type of research. Poor reporting in a scientific article can imply a limited management of these data (eg, an inaccurate evaluation of the risk of bias of the study). Readers will also lose their confidence in the accuracy of the effect estimates if an article is poorly reported. For the past decade, the Enhancing the QUAlity and Transparency Of Health Research (EQUATOR) collaboration [1] has been doing an important job by publishing several tools, in the form of checklists, to help researchers report the methods and findings of their research. (Source: Jour...
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 13, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Clovis Mariano Faggion Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Scoping review identifies significant number of knowledge translation theories, models and frameworks with limited use
To conduct a scoping review of knowledge translation (KT) theories, models and frameworks that have been used to guide dissemination or implementation of evidence-based interventions targeted to prevention and/or management of cancer or other chronic diseases. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 13, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Lisa Strifler, Roberta Cardoso, Jessie McGowan, Elise Cogo, Vera Nincic, Paul A. Khan, Alistair Scott, Marco Ghassemi, Heather MacDonald, Yonda Lai, Victoria Treister, Andrea C. Tricco, Sharon E. Straus Source Type: research

Letter: Testing for reproducibility: a missing point in reporting
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 13, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Clovis Mariano Faggion Source Type: research

Reply to: Letter to the editor by C Faggion
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 13, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Douglas G. Altman, David Moher Source Type: research

Scoping review identifies significant number of knowledge translation theories, models and frameworks with limited use
To conduct a scoping review of knowledge translation (KT) theories, models and frameworks that have been used to guide dissemination or implementation of evidence-based interventions targeted to prevention and/or management of cancer or other chronic diseases. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 13, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Lisa Strifler, Roberta Cardoso, Jessie McGowan, Elise Cogo, Vera Nincic, Paul A. Khan, Alistair Scott, Marco Ghassemi, Heather MacDonald, Yonda Lai, Victoria Treister, Andrea C. Tricco, Sharon E. Straus Source Type: research

Letter: Testing for reproducibility: a missing point in reporting
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 13, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Clovis Mariano Faggion Source Type: research

Reply to: Letter to the editor by C Faggion
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 13, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Douglas G. Altman, David Moher Source Type: research

PRISMA and AMSTAR show systematic reviews on health literacy and cancer screening are of good quality
The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reporting and methodological quality of systematic reviews (SRs) on health literacy and cancer screening and to investigate factors that may influence overall quality. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 11, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Sakshi Sharma, Mark Oremus Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Considerations when assessing heterogeneity of treatment effect in patient-centered outcomes research
When baseline risk of an outcome varies within a population, the effect of a treatment on that outcome will vary on at least one scale (e.g., additive, multiplicative). This treatment effect heterogeneity is of interest in patient-centered outcomes research. Based on a literature review and solicited expert opinion, we assert: 1) Treatment effect heterogeneity on the additive scale is most interpretable to healthcare providers and patients using effect estimates to guide treatment decision making; heterogeneity reported on the multiplicative scale may be misleading as to the magnitude or direction of a substantively import...
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 11, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Catherine R. Lesko, Nicholas C. Henderson, Ravi Varadhan Source Type: research

PRISMA and AMSTAR Show Systematic Reviews of Health Literacy and Cancer Screening are Good Quality
To evaluate the reporting and methodological quality of systematic reviews (SRs) in health literacy and cancer screening; to investigate factors that may influence overall quality. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 11, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Sakshi Sharma, Mark Oremus Source Type: research

Considerations when assessing heterogeneity of treatment effect in patient-centered outcomes research
When baseline risk of an outcome varies within a population, the effect of a treatment on that outcome will vary on at least one scale (e.g., additive, multiplicative). This treatment effect heterogeneity is of interest in patient-centered outcomes research. Based on a literature review and solicited expert opinion, we assert: 1) Treatment effect heterogeneity on the additive scale is most interpretable to healthcare providers and patients using effect estimates to guide treatment decision making; heterogeneity reported on the multiplicative scale may be misleading as to the magnitude or direction of a substantively import...
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 11, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Catherine R. Lesko, Nicholas C. Henderson, Ravi Varadhan Source Type: research

PRISMA and AMSTAR Show Systematic Reviews of Health Literacy and Cancer Screening are Good Quality
To evaluate the reporting and methodological quality of systematic reviews (SRs) in health literacy and cancer screening; to investigate factors that may influence overall quality. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 11, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Sakshi Sharma, Mark Oremus Source Type: research

A 67-item stress resilience item bank showing high content validity was  developed in a psychosomatic sample
To develop the first item bank to measure stress resilience (SR) in clinical populations. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Nina Obbarius, Felix Fischer, Alexander Obbarius, Sandra Nolte, Gregor Liegl, Matthias Rose Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

A 67-Item Stress Resilience item bank showing high content validity was developed in a psychosomatic sample
To develop the first item bank to measure Stress Resilience (SR) in clinical populations. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Nina Obbarius, Felix Fischer, Alexander Obbarius, Sandra Nolte, Gregor Liegl, Matthias Rose Source Type: research

High Agreement was Obtained Across Scores from Multiple Equated Scales for Social Anxiety Disorder using Item Response Theory
This study is the first to equate several scales for social anxiety disorder. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Matthew Sunderland, Philip Batterham, Alison Calear, Natacha Carragher, Andrew Baillie, Tim Slade Source Type: research

The M3 multimorbidity index outperformed both Charlson and Elixhauser indices when predicting adverse outcomes in people with diabetes
Multimorbidity is common among those living with diabetes. The purpose of this manuscript was to assess the performance of the recently developed M3 multimorbidity index within a large, well-defined cohort of patients with diabetes. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Jason K. Gurney, James Stanley, Diana Sarfati Source Type: research

Epidemiologic practice and conduct guidelines: a new kid on the block
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Henrique Barros Source Type: research

A 67-Item Stress Resilience item bank showing high content validity was developed in a psychosomatic sample
To develop the first item bank to measure Stress Resilience (SR) in clinical populations. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Nina Obbarius, Felix Fischer, Alexander Obbarius, Sandra Nolte, Gregor Liegl, Matthias Rose Source Type: research

High Agreement was Obtained Across Scores from Multiple Equated Scales for Social Anxiety Disorder using Item Response Theory
This study is the first to equate several scales for social anxiety disorder. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Matthew Sunderland, Philip Batterham, Alison Calear, Natacha Carragher, Andrew Baillie, Tim Slade Source Type: research

The M3 multimorbidity index outperformed both Charlson and Elixhauser indices when predicting adverse outcomes in people with diabetes
Multimorbidity is common among those living with diabetes. The purpose of this manuscript was to assess the performance of the recently developed M3 multimorbidity index within a large, well-defined cohort of patients with diabetes. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Jason K. Gurney, James Stanley, Diana Sarfati Source Type: research

Epidemiologic practice and conduct guidelines: a new kid on the block
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - April 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Henrique Barros Source Type: research

Cross-cultural adaptation of Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire needs to assess the measurement properties: a systematic review
To assess the cross-cultural adaptations of the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 26, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Min Yao, Sen Zhu, Zi-rui Tian, Yong-jia Song, Long Yang, Yong-jun Wang, Xue-jun Cui Tags: Review Source Type: research

A review of cluster randomized trials found statistical evidence of selection bias
To assess markers of selection bias risk in a sample of recently published cluster randomized controlled trials compared with individually randomized trials. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 26, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Jaime Bolzern, Nandi Mnyama, Katharine Bosanquet, David J. Torgerson Tags: Review Source Type: research

From the theoretical to the practical: how to evaluate the ethical and scientific justifications of randomized clinical trials
We commend Shamy and Fedyk for their thoughtful commentary [1] on the ethical and scientific justification for clinical trials and accompanying cross-sectional study of De Meulemeester et  al. [2]. We generally agree with the three proposed criteria for ethical justification of randomized control trials (RCTs): nonredundancy, scientific plausibility, and methodological rigor. Yet, these criteria are broad, and moreover, the end users (eg, ethical review boards [ERBs], funders, or bo th) and practical implementation of this framework in practice are not entirely clear. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 26, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Maria Olsen, Melissa K. Sharp, Patrick M. Bossuyt Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Reply to: Letter to the Editor by M. Olsen, M. K. Sharp, and P. M. Bossuyt
On behalf of our coauthors, we thank Olsen, Sharp, and Bossuyt for their insightful comments [1]. We agree that a major challenge to ensuring that proposed randomized clinical trials are ethically justified is developing a system to evaluate their ethics in practical terms. One of the great weaknesses of the concept of equipoise is that no widely accepted operationalization has been developed, despite its widespread use for 30  years. In the absence of such a system, an ethical principle may be used unethically, that is, unfairly and in a biased manner. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 26, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Michel Shamy, Mark Fedyk Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Cross-cultural Adaptation of Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire Needs to Assess the Measurement Properties: A Systematic Review
To assess the cross cultural-adaptations of the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 26, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Min Yao, Sen Zhu, Zi-rui Tian, Yong-jia Song, Long Yang, Yong-jun Wang, Xue-jun Cui Source Type: research

A review of cluster randomised trials found statistical evidence of selection bias
To assess markers of selection bias risk in a sample of recently-published cluster randomized controlled trials compared with individually randomized trials. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 26, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Jaime Bolzern, Nandi Mnyama, Katharine Bosanquet, David J. Torgerson Source Type: research

From the Theoretical to the Practical: How to Evaluate the Ethical and Scientific Justifications of Randomized Clinical Trials
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 26, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Maria Olsen, Melissa K. Sharp, Patrick M. Bossuyt Source Type: research

Reply to: Letter to editor by M. Olsen, M. K. Sharp, P. M. Bossuyt
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 26, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Michel Shamy, Mark Fedyk Source Type: research

Lack of preregistered analysis plans allows unacceptable data mining for and selective reporting of consensus in Delphi studies
To empirically demonstrate how undisclosed analytic flexibility provides substantial latitude for data mining and selective reporting of consensus in Delphi processes. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 17, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Sean Grant, Marika Booth, Dmitry Khodyakov Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Lack of pre-registered analysis plan allows unacceptable data mining for and selective reporting of consensus in Delphi studies
To empirically demonstrate how undisclosed analytic flexibility provides substantial latitude for data mining and selective reporting of consensus in Delphi processes. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 17, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Sean Grant, Marika Booth, Dmitry Khodyakov Source Type: research

Network meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy studies identifies and  ranks the optimal diagnostic tests and thresholds for health care policy and decision-making
Network meta-analyses (NMA) have extensively been used to compare the effectiveness of multiple interventions for health care policy and decision-making. However, methods for evaluating the performance of multiple diagnostic tests are less established. In a decision-making context, we are often interested in comparing and ranking the performance of multiple diagnostic tests, at varying levels of test thresholds, in one simultaneous analysis. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 13, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Rhiannon K. Owen, Nicola J. Cooper, Terence J. Quinn, Rosalind Lees, Alex J. Sutton Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Structured methodology review identified seven (RETREAT) criteria for selecting qualitative evidence synthesis approaches
To compare and contrast different methods of qualitative evidence synthesis (QES) against criteria identified from the literature and to map their attributes to inform selection of the most appropriate QES method to answer research questions addressed by qualitative research. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 13, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Andrew Booth, Jane Noyes, Kate Flemming, Ansgar Gerhardus, Philip Wahlster, Gert Jan van der Wilt, Kati Mozygemba, Pietro Refolo, Dario Sacchini, Marcia Tummers, Eva Rehfuess Tags: Review Source Type: research

Association measures of claims-based algorithms for common chronic conditions were assessed using regularly collected data in Japan
Although claims data are widely used in medical research, their ability to identify persons' health-related conditions has not been fully justified. We assessed the validity of claims-based algorithms (CBAs) for identifying people with common chronic conditions in a large population using annual health screening results as the gold standard. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 13, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Konan Hara, Jun Tomio, Thomas Svensson, Rika Ohkuma, Akiko Kishi Svensson, Tsutomu Yamazaki Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Network meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy studies identifies and ranks the optimal diagnostic tests and thresholds for healthcare policy and decision making
Network meta-analyses have extensively been used to compare the effectiveness of multiple interventions for healthcare policy and decision-making. However, methods for evaluating the performance of multiple diagnostic tests are less established. In a decision-making context, we are often interested in comparing and ranking the performance of multiple diagnostic tests, at varying levels of test thresholds, in one simultaneous analysis. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 13, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Rhiannon K. Owen, Nicola J. Cooper, Terence J. Quinn, Rosalind Lees, Alex J. Sutton Source Type: research

Structured methodology review identified seven (RETREAT) criteria for selecting qualitative evidence synthesis approaches
To compare and contrast different methods of qualitative evidence synthesis (QES) against criteria identified from the literature and to map their attributes to inform selection of the most appropriate QES method to answer research questions addressed by qualitative research. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 13, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Andrew Booth, Jane Noyes, Kate Flemming, Ansgar Gehardus, Philip Wahlster, Gert Jan van der Wilt, Kati Mozygemba, Pietro Refolo, Dario Sacchini, Marcia Tummers, Eva Rehfuess Source Type: research

Association measures of claims-based algorithms for common chronic conditions were assessed using regularly collected data in Japan
Although claims data are widely used in medical research, their ability to identify persons ’ health-related conditions has not been fully justified. We assessed the validity of claims-based algorithms (CBAs) for identifying people with common chronic conditions in a large population using annual health screening results as the gold standard. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 13, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Konan Hara, Jun Tomio, Thomas Svensson, Rika Ohkuma, Akiko Kishi Svensson, Tsutomu Yamazaki Source Type: research

Response to Dr. Livia Puljak's letter about our published article
We thank Dr. Puljak for taking interest in our study. Dr.  Puljak is correct in stating that our risk of bias judgments were guided by the Cochrane risk of bias tool, supported by training and guidance documents internal to our center. The aim of these guidance documents was to improve the inter-rater reliability between the two reviewers [1] and the cons istency of judgments for separate trials. To ensure the transparency of our methods, our internal guidance documents are available on the University of Alberta Librairies’ Dataverse network, the online data repository for our university. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 12, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Allison Gates, Ben Vandermeer, Lisa Hartling Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Response to Dr. Livia Puljak ’s Letter About Our Published Article
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 12, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Allison Gates, Ben Vandermeer, Lisa Hartling Source Type: research

Technology-assisted risk of bias assessment in  systematic reviews requires precise definitions of risk of bias
Gates et  al. [1] conducted a study about technology-assisted risk of bias assessment in systematic reviews, a prospective cross-sectional evaluation of the RobotReviewer machine learning tool. I applaud the authors for testing automation technologies for improving efficiency of conducting systematic review s. It would be beneficial for the research community if the authors could provide precise information about the grading criteria used by human reviewers for assessing risk of bias. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - March 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Livia Puljak Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research