Randomised trials involving surgery did not routinely report considerations of learning and clustering effects
To establish current practice of the management of learning and clustering effects, by treating centre and surgeon, in the design and analysis of randomised surgical trials. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 12, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Elizabeth J. Conroy, Anna Rosala-Hallas, Jane M. Blazeby, Girvan Burnside, Jonathan A. Cook, Carrol Gamble Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

The TRIP database showed most Acute Respiratory Infections questions were already addressed by Cochrane reviews
Cochrane systematic reviews require more methodological support from Cochrane Review Groups (CRGs) than is customary in journals, CRGs must prioritise reviews to conserve resources. The TRIP database provided a dataset of questions to guide prioritization for the Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) CRG. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 12, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Justin Clark, Matt Carter, Anna Mae Scott, Jon Brassey, Chris Del Mar Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Randomized trials involving surgery did not routinely report considerations of learning and clustering effects
To establish current practice of the management of learning and clustering effects, by treating center and surgeon, in the design and analysis of randomized surgical trials. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 12, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Elizabeth J. Conroy, Anna Rosala-Hallas, Jane M. Blazeby, Girvan Burnside, Jonathan A. Cook, Carrol Gamble Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Response to letter to editor “Only ITT analysis provides information about the actual effects of a health policy”
We thank Bender et  al for their reply and will briefly provide some comments. With its firm focus on internal validity, a randomized controlled trial (RCT) is first and foremost used to estimate intervention effects. Why else use such a firm design? In our reply to the original letter, we merely argued that under th e assumption of noncompliance bias, that is first, incomplete participation, and second, differences between actual participants and nonparticipants, then a complier average causal effect (CACE) analysis will provide a less-biased estimate of the intervention effects (not the population effects) tha n an ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Lars Bruun Larsen, Trine Thilsing, Jens Sondergaard, Anne-Louise Bjerregaard Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Marginal structural models and other analyses allow multiple estimates of treatment effects in randomized clinical trials: meta-epidemiological analysis
To determine how marginal structural models (MSMs), which are increasingly used to estimate causal effects, are used in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and compare their results with those from intention-to-treat (ITT) or other analyses. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Hannah Ewald, Benjamin Speich, Aviv Ladanie, Heiner C. Bucher, John PA. Ioannidis, Lars G. Hemkens Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

“Only ITT analysis provides information about the actual effects of a health policy”
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Lars Bruun Larsen, Trine Thilsing, Jens Sondergaard, Anne-Louise Bjerregaard Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

A cross-sectional bibliometric study showed suboptimal journal endorsement rates of STROBE and its extensions
The STrengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Statement provides guidance on reporting observational studies. Many extensions have been created for specialized methods or fields. We determined endorsement prevalence and typology by journals in extension-related fields. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Melissa K. Sharp, Ru žica Tokalić, Guadalupe Gómez, Elizabeth Wager, Douglas G. Altman, Darko Hren Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Model Based Economic Evaluations of Diagnostic Point of Care Tests Were Rarely Fit for Purpose
Linked evidence models are recommended to predict health benefits and cost-effectiveness of diagnostic tests. We considered how published models accounted for changes in patient pathways that occur with point of care tests (POCTs), and their impact of on patient health and costs. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Katie Breheny, Andrew J. Sutton, Jonathan J. Deeks Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Response to letter to the editor “Only ITT analysis provides information about the actual effects of a health policy”
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Anne Mette Bender, Charlotta Pisinger, Torben J ørgensen Source Type: research

Model-based economic evaluations of diagnostic point of care tests were rarely fit for purpose
Linked evidence models are recommended to predict health benefits and cost-effectiveness of diagnostic tests. We considered how published models accounted for changes in patient pathways that occur with point of care tests (POCTs) and their impact on patient health and costs. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Katie Breheny, Andrew J. Sutton, Jonathan J. Deeks Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Only ITT analysis provides information about the  actual effects of a health policy - Author response
We thank Bruun Lassen et  al for their interest in our Inter99 study. Bruun Lassen has performed a CACE analysis, which compares mortality among actual participants of the intervention group with a hypothesized group of participants in the control group in the Inter99 study [1]. The authors suggest that there might be a be neficial effect of the Inter99 study on total mortality and argue that CACE analyses might be a more realistic approach to evaluate the effect of health checks. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 10, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Anne Mette Bender, Charlotta Pisinger, Torben J ørgensen Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Cover 2 Editorial Board
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 2, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 2, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research

Challenges in quantitative analysis need more attention, also in reporting
In systematic reviews and replication research, statistical methods used and choices made by investigators are often evaluated or reconsidered. While this work is essential for assessing the state of evidence, it is not always as straightforward as it may seem. Analytical methods, and applying them, are to a greater or lesser extent based on assumptions, and have strengths and limitations. In addition, researchers often make their analytical choices in a context of dilemmas and judgments, and may follow routines in which these choices are not explicitly stated or even considered anymore. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 2, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: J. Andr é Knottnerus, Peter Tugwell Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Acknowledgment of Reviewers
Abou-Setta Ahmed (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 2, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Tags: Thanks to All Our Reviewers Source Type: research

Reviewer Award
High quality of published research cannot be achieved without high quality peer review of submitted manuscripts. Good reviews are critical, but also provide authors with constructive comments to make their manuscripts even better. As an editorial team, we are extremely grateful to all our colleagues who have volunteered their expertise and have taken time out of their busy schedules to participate in the peer review for our journal. They helped us to make good editorial decisions and to safeguard the quality of the papers that were published in the past year. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 2, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Tags: Reviewers of the Year Source Type: research

David Sackett Young Investigator Award
In 2015, the Journal of Clinical of Epidemiology has initiated the annual David Sackett Young Investigator Award. This award is in the spirit of the late David L. Sackett, who over many decades and in numerous ways has continuously inspired and educated generations of young investigators in the fields of clinical epidemiology and evidence-based medicine. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 2, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Tags: David Sackett Young Investigator Award Source Type: research

Comparison of alternative falls data collection methods in the Prevention of Falls Injury Trial (PreFIT)
Prospective, monthly diaries are recommended for collecting falls data but are burdensome and expensive. The aim of the article was to compare characteristics of fallers and estimates of fall rates by method of data collection. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - November 2, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: James Griffin, Ranjit Lall, Julie Bruce, Emma Withers, Susanne Finnegan, Sarah E. Lamb, PreFIT Study Group Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Conceptualizing multiple drug use in patients with comorbidity and multimorbidity: proposal for standard definitions beyond the term polypharmacy
With older and aging populations, patients experience multiple chronic diseases at the same time. Individual chronic disease guidelines often recommend pharmacological therapies as a key intervention, resulting in patients being prescribed multiple regular medications for their different diseases. Although the term “polypharmacy” has been applied to the use of multiple medications, there is no consistent definition, and this term is now being used all inclusively. To improve both scientific rigor and optimal patient care, it is crucial that a standard terminology is used, which reclassifies the term “pol ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 29, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Umesh T. Kadam, Isobel Roberts, Simon White, Ruth Bednall, Kamlesh Khunti, Peter M. Nilsson, Claire A. Lawson Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Conceptualising multiple drug use in patients with comorbidity and multimorbidity: proposal for standard definitions beyond the term polypharmacy
With older and ageing populations, patients experience multiple chronic diseases at the same time. Individual chronic disease guidelines often recommend pharmacological therapies as a key intervention, resulting in patients being prescribed multiple regular medications for their different diseases. Whilst the term ‘polypharmacy’ has been applied to the use of multiple medications, there is no consistent definition and this term is now being used all inclusively. To improve both scientific rigor and optimal patient care, it is crucial that a standard terminology is used which reclassifies the term ‘polyp h...
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 29, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: U.T. Kadam, I. Roberts, S. White, R. Bednall, K. Khunti, P.M. Nilsson, C.A. Lawson Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Extremely large outlier treatment effects may be a footprint of bias in trials from less developed countries: randomized trials of gabapentinoids
Court documents have proven that a manufacturer-orchestrated strategy tried to promote gabapentin by distorting evidence in randomized trials. Given this background, we aimed to assess whether implausibly large treatment effects for gabapentin and for a similar gabapentinoid, pregabalin may have been published. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 23, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Karishma Desai, Ian Carroll, Steven Asch, Tina Hernandez-Boussard, John P.A. Ioannidis Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

The Delphi method —more research please
In this journal, Turnbull and colleagues have reported the results of a survey of Delphi panelists who had recently participated in the development of a Core Outcome Set (COS) and a Core Outcome Measurement Set (COMS) [1]. The COS and COMS define “what to measure” and “how to measure” outcomes in all clinical trials for the same condition. The purpose of their study was to help researchers navigate design decisions when conducting Delphi studies. The following commentary will situate the present study in the literature by reviewing t he Delphi method and highlighting concerns regarding poor standard...
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 20, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Susan Humphrey-Murto, Maarten de Wit Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

The Delphi Method - More Research Please
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 20, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Susan Humphrey-Murto, Maarten de Wit Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Citation bias in the literature on dietary trans fatty acids and serum cholesterol
In this study, we assess which determinants influenced the likelihood of being cited in the literature on trans fatty acids and cholesterol. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 18, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Miriam J.E. Urlings, Bram Duyx, Gerard M.H. Swaen, Lex M. Bouter, Maurice P.A. Zeegers Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

A Data-Sharing Agreement Helps to Increase Researchers ’ Willingness to Share Primary Data: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial
Sharing individual participant data (IPD) among researchers, upon request, is an ethical and responsible practice. Despite numerous calls for this practice to be standard, however, research indicates that primary study authors are often unwilling to share IPD, even for use in a meta-analysis. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 18, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Joshua R. Polanin, Mary Terzian Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Increased Risks for Random Errors are Common in Outcomes Graded as High Certainty of Evidence
To assess the risk for random errors in outcomes graded as high certainty of evidence (CoE). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 18, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Gerald Gartlehner, Barbara Nussbaumer-Streit, Gernot Wagner, Sheila Patel, Tammeka Swinson-Evans, Andreea Dobrescu, Christian Gluud Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Selective Outcome Reporting is Present in Randomized Controlled Trials in Lung Cancer Immunotherapies
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 18, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Reenika Aggarwal, Mark Oremus Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Borrowing of strength from indirect evidence in 40 network meta-analyses
Network meta-analysis (NMA) is increasingly being used to synthesize direct and indirect evidence and help decision makers simultaneously compare multiple treatments. We empirically evaluate the incremental gain in precision achieved by incorporating indirect evidence in NMAs. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 17, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Lifeng Lin, Aiwen Xing, Michael J. Kofler, Mohammad Hassan Murad Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

The Quintet Recruitment Intervention supported five randomized trials to recruit to target: a mixed-methods evaluation
To evaluate the impact of the Quintet Recruitment Intervention (QRI) on recruitment in challenging randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have applied the intervention. The QRI aims to understand recruitment difficulties, and then implements ‘QRI-actions’ to address these as recruitment proceeds. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 16, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Rooshenas L, Scott LJ, Blazeby JM, Rogers CA, Tilling KM, Husbands S, Conefrey C, Mills N, Stein RC, Metcalfe C, Carr AJ, Beard DJ, Davis T, Paramasivan S, Jepson M, Avery K, Elliott D, Wilson C, Donovan JL, By-Band-Sleeve study group, CSAW study group, H Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Reporting guidelines on how to write a complete and transparent abstract for overviews of systematic reviews of health care interventions
An overview of systematic reviews (OoSRs) is a study designed to offer a broad view of evidence from existing systematic reviews (SRs). The abstract is an important part of an OoSRs as it can determine whether reading the full text is of interest. The aim of this paper is to offer guidelines to promote transparent and sufficient reporting in abstracts of OoSRs of health care interventions. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 15, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Konstantinos I. Bougioukas, Emmanouil Bouras, Fani Apostolidou-Kiouti, Stamatia Kokkali, Malamatenia Arvanitidou, Anna-Bettina Haidich Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

In Cochrane reviews, risk of bias assessments for allocation concealment were frequently not in line with Cochrane's Handbook guidance
The aim of the article was to analyze whether the risk of bias (RoB) judgments for allocation concealment in Cochrane systematic reviews (CSRs) were in line with recommendations from the Cochrane Handbook. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 9, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Ivana Propadalo, Mia Tranfic, Ivana Vuka, Ognjen Barcot, Tina Poklepovic Pericic, Livia Puljak Tags: Review Source Type: research

In Cochrane reviews risk of bias assessments for allocation concealment were frequently not in line with Cochrane ’s Handbook guidance
To analyze whether the risk of bias (RoB) judgments for allocation concealment in Cochrane systematic reviews (CSRs) were in line with recommendations from the Cochrane Handbook. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 9, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Ivana Propadalo, Mia Tranfic, Ivana Vuka, Ognjen Barcot, Tina Poklepovic Pericic, Livia Puljak Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Few studies exist examining methods for selecting studies, abstracting data, and appraising quality in a systematic review
To identify and summarize studies assessing methodologies for study selection, data abstraction, or quality appraisal in systematic reviews. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 9, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Reid C. Robson, Ba ’ Pham, Jeremiah Hwee, Sonia M. Thomas, Patricia Rios, Matthew J. Page, Andrea C. Tricco Tags: Review Source Type: research

In Cochrane reviews risk of bias assessments for allocation concealment was frequently not in line with Cochrane ’s Handbook guidance
To analyze whether the risk of bias (RoB) judgments for allocation concealment in Cochrane systematic reviews (CSRs) were in line with recommendations from the Cochrane Handbook. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 9, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Ivana Propadalo, Mia Tranfic, Ivana Vuka, Ognjen Barcot, Tina Poklepovic Pericic, Livia Puljak Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Potentially missing data are considerably more frequent than definitely missing data: a methodological survey of 638 randomized controlled trials
Missing data for the outcomes of participants in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are a key element of risk of bias assessment. However, it is not always clear from RCT reports whether some categories of participants were followed-up or not (i.e., do or do not have missing data) nor how the RCT authors dealt with missing data in their analyses. Our objectives were to describe how RCT authors (1) report on different categories of participants that might have missing data, (2) handle these categories in the analysis, and (3) judge the risk of bias associated with missing data. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 6, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Lara A. Kahale, Batoul Diab, Assem M. Khamis, Yaping Chang, Luciane Cruz Lopes, Arnav Agarwal, Ling Li, Reem A. Mustafa, Serge Koujanian, Reem Waziry, Jason W. Busse, Abeer Dakik, Gordon Guyatt, Elie A. Akl Tags: Review Source Type: research

Potentially missing data is considerably more frequent than definitely missing data: A methodological survey of 638 randomized controlled trials
Missing data for the outcomes of participants in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are a key element of risk of bias assessment. However, it is not always clear from RCT reports whether some categories of participants were followed-up or not (i.e., do or do not have missing data) nor how the RCT authors dealt with missing data in their analyses. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 6, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Lara A. Kahale, Batoul Diab, Assem M. Khamis, Yaping Chang, Luciane Cruz Lopes, Arnav Agarwal, Ling Li, Reem Mustafa, Serge Koujanian, Reem Waziry, Jason W. Busse, Abeer Dakik, Gordon Guyatt, Elie A. Akl Tags: Review Source Type: research

Potentially missing data was considerably more frequent than definitely missing data in randomized controlled trials: A methodological survey
Missing data for the outcomes of participants in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are a key element of risk of bias assessment. However, it is not always clear from RCT reports whether some categories of participants were followed-up or not (i.e., do or do not have missing data) nor how the RCT authors dealt with missing data in their analyses. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 6, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Lara A. Kahale, Batoul Diab, Assem M. Khamis, Yaping Chang, Luciane Cruz Lopes, Arnav Agarwal, Ling Li, Reem Mustafa, Serge Koujanian, Reem Waziry, Jason W. Busse, Abeer Dakik, Gordon Guyatt, Elie A. Akl Tags: Review Source Type: research

Cover 2 Editorial Board
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 5, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 5, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research

A statistic to avoid being misled by the “winners curse”
The “winners curse”, the term applied to the finding that RCTs, that report large effect sizes [e.g. relative risks of>5] worryingly often, when replicated are shown to be substantively exaggerated. This can result in undue adoption of a drug in clinical practice and from a methods perspective when replication is attempted, using these results to estimate sample size, subsequent RCTs will be underpowered to detect the true treatment effect. [1] in the past it has only been possible to show this retrospectively; Lord et  al in this issue now propose two statistics to predict this prospectively the type S...
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - October 5, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Peter Tugwell, J. Andr é Knottnerus Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

The reporting of safety among drug systematic reviews was poor before the implementation of the PRISMA harms checklist
To examine, through a cross-sectional survey, how well safety information was reported among drug systematic reviews predating PRISMA harms checklist and explore factors associated with better reporting. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 29, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Ling Li, Chang Xu, Ke Deng, Xu Zhou, Zhibin Liu, Jason W. Busse, Yan Ren, Kang Zou, Xin Sun Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Tailored meta-analysis: an investigation of the correlation between the test positive rate and prevalence
Meta-analysis may produce estimates that are unrepresentative of a test ’s performance in practice. Tailored meta-analysis (TMA) circumvents this by deriving an applicable region for the practice and selecting the studies compatible with the region. It requires the test positive rate, r and prevalence, p being estimated for the setting but previous studies have assume d their independence. The aim is to investigate the effects a correlation between r and p has on estimating the applicable region and how this affects TMA. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 29, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Brian H. Willis, Dyuti Coomar, Mohammed Baragilly Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

The reporting of safety among drug systematic reviews was poor prior to the implementation of the PRISMA harms checklist
To examine, through a cross-sectional survey, how well safety information was reported among drug systematic reviews predating PRISMA harms checklist, and explore factors associated with better reporting. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 29, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Ling Li, Chang Xu, Ke Deng, Xu Zhou, Zhibin Liu, Jason W. Busse, Yan Ren, Kang Zou, Xin Sun Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

No differences were found between effect estimates from conventional and registry-based randomized controlled trials
The study aims to assess whether the results from registry-based randomized controlled trials (RRCTs) systematically differ from the results of conventional randomized controlled trials (CRCTs). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 23, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tim Mathes, Pauline Kla ßen, Dawid Pieper Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Automatic extraction of quantitative data from ClinicalTrials.gov to conduct meta-analyses
Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are labor-intensive and time-consuming. Automated extraction of quantitative data from primary studies can accelerate this process. ClinicalTrials.gov, launched in 2000, is the world ’s largest trial repository of results data from clinical trials; it has been used as a source instead of journal articles. We have developed a web application called EXACT that allows users without advanced programming skills to automatically extract data from ClinicalTrials.gov in analysis-ready format. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 23, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Richeek Pradhan, David C. Hoaglin, Matthew Cornell, Weisong Liu, Victoria Wang, Hong Yu Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

No difference were found between effect estimates from conventional and registry-based randomized controlled trials
The study aims to assess whether the results from registry-based randomized trials (RRCTs) systematically differ from the results of conventional randomized controlled trials (CRCTs). (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 23, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tim Mathes, Pauline Kla ßen, Dawid Pieper Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Two valid and reliable work role functioning questionnaire short versions were developed: WRFQ 5 and WRFQ 10
The study aims to develop and validate short versions of the work role functioning questionnaire v2.0 (WRFQ) that retain the measurement properties of the full-length 27-item questionnaire. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 22, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Femke Abma, Jakob Bue Bjorner, Benjamin C. Amick, Ute B ültmann Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

A novel superior medication-based chronic disease score predicted all-cause mortality in independent geriatric cohorts
On the basis of current treatment guidelines, we developed and validated a medication-based chronic disease score (medCDS) and tested its association with all-cause mortality of older outpatients. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 22, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Renate Quinzler, Michael H. Freitag, Birgitt Wiese, Martin Beyer, Hermann Brenner, Anne Dahlhaus, Angela D öring, Tobias Freund, Margit Heier, Hildtraud Knopf, Melanie Luppa, Jana Prokein, Steffi G. Riedel-Heller, Ingmar Schäfer, Christa Scheidt-Nave, M Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Cohort studies were found to be frequently biased by missing disease information due to death
In epidemiologic cohort studies with missing disease information due to death (MDID), conventional analyses right-censoring death cases at the last observation or at death may yield significant bias in relative risk and hazard ratio estimates. The aim of this study was to investigate susceptibility to this bias and assess its potential direction and magnitude. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 22, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Nadine Binder, Anette Bl ümle, James Balmford, Edith Motschall, Patrick Oeller, Martin Schumacher Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Evidence to Decision framework provides a structured “roadmap” for making GRADE guidelines recommendations
It is unclear how guidelines panelists discuss and consider factors (criteria) that are formally and not formally included in the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. To describe the use of decision criteria, we explored how panelists adhered to GRADE criteria and sought to identify any emerging non-GRADE criteria when the panelists used the Evidence to Decision (EtD) framework as part of GRADE application. (Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology)
Source: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology - September 22, 2018 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Shelly-Anne Li, Paul E. Alexander, Tea Reljic, Adam Cuker, Robby Nieuwlaat, Wojtek Wiercioch, Gordon Guyatt, Holger J. Sch ünemann, Benjamin Djulbegovic Tags: Original Article Source Type: research