Considering Professional Misconduct and Best Interests of a Child (Palliative Orders)
(Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - January 6, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Debates about Conflict of Interest in Medicine: Deconstructing a Divided Discourse
AbstractThe pharmaceutical industry plays an increasingly dominant role in healthcare, raising concerns about “conflicts of interest” (COI) on the part of the medical professionals who interact with the industry. However, there is considerable disagreement over the extent to which COI is a problem and how it should be managed. Participants in debates about COI have become entrenched in their views, whic h is both unproductive and deeply confusing for the majority of medical professionals trying to work in an increasingly commercialized environment. We used a modified meta-narrative review method to analyse deba...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - January 3, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Value of Vagueness in the Politics of Authorship
(Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - December 30, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Investigating Trust, Expertise, and Epistemic Injustice in Chronic Pain
AbstractTrust is central to the therapeutic relationship, but the epistemic asymmetries between the expert healthcare provider and the patient make the patient, the trustor, vulnerable to the provider, the trustee. The narratives of pain sufferers provide helpful insights into the experience of pain at the juncture of trust, expert knowledge, and the therapeutic relationship. While stories of pain sufferers having their testimonies dismissed are well documented, pain sufferers continue to experience their testimonies as being epistemically downgraded. This kind of epistemic injustice has received limited treatment in bioet...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - December 22, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Gestational Diabetes Testing, Narrative, and Medical Distrust
AbstractIn this article, we investigate the role of scientific and patient narratives on perceptions of the medical debate around gestational diabetes (GDM) testing. Among medical scientists, we show that the narrative surrounding GDM testing affirms that future research and data will lead to medical consensus. We call this narrative trajectory the “deferred quest.” For patients, however, diagnosis and their subsequent discovery that biomedicine does not speak in one voice ruptures their trust in medical authority. This new distrust creates space for patients to develop a Frankian quest narrative where they bec...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - December 22, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Biopolitics of Lifestyle: Foucault, Ethics and Healthy Choices
AbstractUnlike many recent studies on the notion of lifestyle, Christopher Mayes ’The Biopolitics of Lifestyle balances theoretical rigour with empirical investigation to problematize the use of lifestyle in public health strategies. Not only does Mayes ’ book expose the unjustified emphasis on individual autonomy undergirding neoliberal strategies of governance and contemporary ethical theory, it also marks a significant step forward in enhancing our understanding of one of Foucault’s most underappreciated concepts, thedispositif. In clearly framing the import of Foucaultian analysis and placing it again...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - December 22, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Bipolar 1 As Graphic Memoir
(Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - December 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“Harvesting” and Use of Human (Embryonic) Stem Cells: An Islamic Evaluation
This study discusses the different sources of human adult and embryonic stem cells and their use from an Islamic perspective, while questioning some directions the Islamic bioethical discourse has taken. The paper invites interested parties to deliberate the use of some of the legal means resorted to in the ongoing Islamic bioethical discourse. (Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - December 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

How Should We Respond to Non-Dominant Healing Practices, the Example of Homeopathy
AbstractThe debate around the ethics of homeopathy in recent issues of the journal has been approached as a binary question; is homeopathy ethical or not? This paper suggests that this is an unhelpful question and instead discusses a framework to establish the extent to which the dominant (medical) culture should tolerate non-dominant health practices such as homeopathy. This requires a sophisticated understanding of the placebo effect, a critical evaluation of what evidence is available, a consideration of the harm that the non-dominant practice might cause, and a consideration of how this might be affected by the culture...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - December 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

How Can Respectfulness in Medical Professionals Be Increased? A Complex But Important Question
This study explores two ways to conceptualize unconditional respect from medical students, defined as respect paid to people on the basis of their humanity, in order to inform strategies to increase it. Unconditional respect conceptualized as an attitude suggests that unconditional respect and conditional respect are additive, whereas unconditional respect conceptualized as a personality trait suggests that people who are high on unconditional respect afford equal respect to all humans regardless of their merits. One hundred and eighty-one medical students completed an unconditional respect measure then read a description ...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - December 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Four Reasons Why Assisted Dying Should Not Be Offered for Depression
AbstractRecently, several authors have argued that assisted dying may be ethically appropriate when requested by a person who suffers from serious depression unresponsive to treatment. We here present four arguments to the contrary. First, the arguments made by proponents of assisted dying rely on notions of “treatment-resistant depression” that are problematic. Second, an individual patient suffering from depression may not be justified in believing that chances of recovery are minimal. Third, the therapeutic significance of hope must be acknowledged; when mental healthcare opens up the door to adm itting hope...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - December 8, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Vaccine Rejecting Parents ’ Engagement With Expert Systems That Inform Vaccination Programs
This article employs a theoretical analysis of trust and distrust to explore how twenty-seven parents with a history of vaccine rejection in two Australian cities view the expert systems central to vaccination policy and practice. Our data show how perceptions of the profit motive generate distrust in the expert systems pertaining to vaccination. Our participants perceived that pharmaceutical companies had a pernicious influence over the systems driving vaccination: research, health professionals, and government. Accordingly, they saw vaccine recommendations in conflict with the interests of their child and “the syst...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - December 1, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Disability and Depression
AbstractHere, Ann Cvetkovich, interviewed by Abby Wilkerson, brings Cvetkovich ’s influential cultural studies analysis of depression explicitly into conversation with disability studies. Cvetkovich understands “feeling bad” (a term she prefers to “depression”) as a defining affective state under neoliberalism. Drawing on a distinctive historical/cultural archive, sh e challenges the atomism of the neoliberal medical model that frames depression and affective distress more generally as the result of faulty brain chemistry—individual organisms gone awry. Instead, she traces these common e...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - November 2, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Which Lane Should We Be In?
(Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - October 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Saving Deaf Children? Screening for Hearing loss as a Public-interest Case
This article uses a critical lens to study the archive of the g overnment child healthcare organization in Flanders in order to uncover underlying constructions of childhood, deafness, and preventive health. We focus on two interrelated themes. The first is the notion of exclusion of the human factor through the mediation of technology. The second is the idea of deafness as endangering a healthy development, an impairment that can nevertheless be treated if detected early enough. It is argued that, since deafness cannot be viewed as a life-threatening condition, the public interest which is implicitly defended is not the r...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - October 19, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Grateful
(Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - October 19, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

from The Hindrances of a Householder
(Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - October 19, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Composing Disability: Diagnosis, Interrupted
AbstractWriting is central both to the medical diagnostic codification of disability and to disabled people ’s efforts to interrupt, complicate, or disrupt dominant medical narratives. This Symposium, like the George Washington University conference from which it takes its name, creates space for diverse modes and genres of claiming authority regarding diagnosis and its cultural and material effects. “ Queer” and “crip” interrogations of diagnosis illuminate its status as a cultural phenomenon, embracing culturally disavowed embodiments and embodied experiences as tools for diagnosing inegalit...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - October 5, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Participation of Children in Medical Decision-Making: Challenges and Potential Solutions
AbstractParticipation in healthcare decision-making is considered to be an important right of minors, and is highlighted in both international legislation and public policies. However, despite the legal recognition of children ’s rights to participation, and also the benefits that children experience by their involvement, there is evidence that legislation is not always translated into healthcare practice. There are a number of factors that may impact on the ability of the child to be involved in decisions regarding the ir medical care. Some of these factors relate to the child, including their capacity to be activel...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Regulating “Quack” Medicine and Decision-Making For Children Re-visited
(Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - September 8, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Symptom and Surface: Disruptive Deafness and Medieval Medical Authority
AbstractThis essay examines constructions of deafness in medieval culture, exploring how deaf experience disrupts authoritative discourses in three textual genres: medical treatise, literary fiction, and autobiographical writing. Medical manuals often present deafness as a physical defect, yet they also suggest how social conditions for deaf people can be transformed in lieu of treatment protocols. Fictional narratives tend to associate deafness with sin or social stigma, but they can also imagine deaf experience with a remarkable degree of sympathy and nuance. Autobiographical writing by deaf authors most vividly challeng...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - August 26, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Dialogic Consensus In Clinical Decision-Making
AbstractThis paper is predicated on the understanding that clinical encounters between clinicians and patients should be seen primarily as inter-relations among persons and, as such, are necessarily moral encounters. It aims to relocate the discussion to be had in challenging medical decision-making situations, including, for example, as the end of life comes into view, onto a more robust moral philosophical footing than is currently commonplace. In our contemporary era, those making moral decisions must be cognizant of the existence of perspectives other than their own, and be attuned to the demands of inter-subjectivity....
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - August 17, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Erratum to: Hard to Believe : Produced by Ken Stone and Irene Silber, 2015, Swoop Films and Stone Soup Productions (New York, 56  minutes, unrated)
(Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - August 9, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Transition and Dialectic: A Farewell, A Big Thank You, Some Medical Ethics and Some Reproduction
(Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - August 4, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Documentation of Capacity Assessment and Subsequent Consent in Patients Identified With Delirium
ConclusionsWhile impaired decision-making was indicated, the review was unable to indicate what patient characteristics flag the need for capacity assessment. Documentation relating to consent processes (whether patient or substitute) appeared deficient for this cohort. (Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - July 28, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

De-Privatizing Self-Harm: Remembering the Social Self in How to Forget
This article reads Malu De Martino ’s 2010 filmComo Esque çer (How to Forget) as a case study in self-harm as a mode of expression and self-inquiry. Drawing on disability and queer theory, psychoanalysis, and sociology of medicine, the author argues thatHow to Forget charts a “crip” epistemology of self-harm and theorizes a “social self.” That is to say, the film models an orientation towards self-harm that offers a coalitional and social therapeutic understanding. Based on this reading, the author suggests the application of practices of knowing-with, or knowing -in-relation as “...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - July 28, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Matter of Disability
Abstract By ruling out questions of impairment from the social critique of disability, Disability Studies (DS) analyses establish a limit point in the field. Of course the setting of “limits” enables possibilities in multiple directions as well as fortifies boundaries of refusal. For instance, impairment (the biological conditions of an organism’s inefficient attachment to the world) becomes in DS simultaneously a productive refusal to interpret disabled bodies as inferior to non-disabled bodies (i.e. pathologized) and a bar to thinking through more active engagements with disability as materiality. Disa...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - July 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Association Between Financial Conflicts of Interests and Supportive Opinions for Erectile Dysfunction Treatment
Abstract A conflict of interest (COI) is a situation in which a person has competing loyalties or interests that make it difficult to fulfil his or her duties impartially. Conflict of interest is not categorically improper in itself but requires proper management. A SCOPUS literature search was performed for publications on the efficacy/safety of Phospho-Di-Esterase Inhibitors (PDEIs) for treating erectile dysfunction. A categorization tool (CoOpCaT) was used to review and classify the publications as supportive/not-supportive for the discussed active ingredient and reporting or not reporting a COI for that specif...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - July 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Ethics of Deprescribing in Older Adults
This article presents a discussion of how the Four Principles of biomedical ethics (beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy, and justice) that may guide medical practitioners’ prescribing practices apply to deprescribing medications in older adults. The view of deprescribing as an act creates stronger moral duties than if viewed as an omission. This may explain the fear of negative outcomes which has been reported by prescribers as a barrier to deprescribing. Respecting the autonomy of older adults is complex as they may not wish to be active in the decision-making process; they may also have reduced cognitive functio...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - July 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Should Children Be Given Priority in Kidney Allocation?
Abstract Kidneys for transplantation are scarce, and many countries give priority to children in allocating them. This paper explains and criticizes the paediatric priority. We set out the relevant ethical principles of allocation, such as utility and severity, and the relevant facts to do with such matters as sensitization and child development. We argue that the facts and principles do not support and sometimes conflict with the priority given to children. We next consider various views on how age or the status of children should affect allocation. Again, these views do not support priority to children in its cu...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - July 8, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Inhospitable Healthcare Spaces: Why Diversity Training on LGBTQIA Issues Is Not Enough
Abstract In an effort to address healthcare disparities in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) populations, many hospitals and clinics institute diversity training meant to increase providers’ awareness of and sensitivity to this patient population. Despite these efforts, many healthcare spaces remain inhospitable to LGBTQ patients and their loved ones. Even in the absence of overt forms of discrimination, LGBTQ patients report feeling anxious, unwelcome, ashamed, and distrustful in healthcare encounters. We argue that these negative experiences are produced by a variety of subtle, ostensi...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - July 7, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Virus of Vagueness in Authorship
(Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - July 5, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Scholars ’ Attitudes and Views on Ethical Issues Pertaining to Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) in Malaysia
Abstract Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) represents the first fusion of genomics and assisted reproduction and the first reproductive technology that allows prospective parents to screen and select the genetic characteristics of their potential offspring. However, for some, the idea that we can intervene in the mechanisms of human existence at such a fundamental level can be, at a minimum, worrying and, at most, repugnant. Religious doctrines particularly are likely to collide with the rapidly advancing capability for science to make such interventions. This paper focuses on opinions and arguments of selected rel...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - June 30, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Determining a Child ’s Best Interests when Parents Refuse Medical Treatment— CAHS v Kiszko & amp; Anor [2016] FCWA 19
(Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - June 30, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Relational Capacity: Broadening the Notion of Decision-Making Capacity in Paediatric Healthcare
Abstract Problems arise when applying the current procedural conceptualization of decision-making capacity to paediatric healthcare: Its emphasis on content-neutrality and rational cognition as well as its implicit assumption that capacity is an ability that resides within a person jeopardizes children’s position in decision-making. The purpose of the paper is to challenge this dominant account of capacity and provide an alternative for how capacity should be understood in paediatric care. First, the influence of developmental psychologist Jean Piaget upon the notion of capacity is discussed, followed by an ...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - June 30, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Scholars’ Attitudes and Views on Ethical Issues Pertaining to Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) in Malaysia
Abstract Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) represents the first fusion of genomics and assisted reproduction and the first reproductive technology that allows prospective parents to screen and select the genetic characteristics of their potential offspring. However, for some, the idea that we can intervene in the mechanisms of human existence at such a fundamental level can be, at a minimum, worrying and, at most, repugnant. Religious doctrines particularly are likely to collide with the rapidly advancing capability for science to make such interventions. This paper focuses on opinions and arguments of sele...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - June 30, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Open-Identity Sperm Donation: How Does Offering Donor-Identifying Information Relate to Donor-Conceived Offspring’s Wishes and Needs?
(Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - June 30, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Determining a Child’s Best Interests when Parents Refuse Medical Treatment— CAHS v Kiszko & Anor [2016] FCWA 19
(Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - June 30, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Relative Values: Perspectives on a Neuroimaging Technology From Above and Within the Ethical Landscape
Abstract In this paper we contribute to “sociology in bioethics” and help clarify the range of ways sociological work can contribute to ethics scholarship. We do this using a case study of an innovative neurotechnology, functional magnetic resonance imaging, and its use to attempt to diagnose and communicate with severely brain-injured patients. We compare empirical data from interviews with relatives of patients who have a severe brain injury with perspectives from mainstream bioethics scholars. We use the notion of an “ethical landscape” as an analogy for the different ethical positions s...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - June 22, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Getting the Balance Right: Conceptual Considerations Concerning Legal Capacity and Supported Decision-Making
Abstract The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities urges and requires changes to how signatories discharge their duties to people with intellectual disabilities, in the direction of their greater recognition as legal persons with expanded decision-making rights. Australian jurisdictions are currently undertaking inquiries and pilot projects that explore how these imperatives should be implemented. One of the important changes advocated is to move from guardianship models to supported or assisted models of decision-making. A driving force behind these developments is a strong allegian...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - June 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Ethics of Medical Practitioner Migration From Low-Resourced Countries to the Developed World: A Call for Action by Health Systems and Individual Doctors
Abstract Medical migration appears to be an increasing global phenomenon, with complex contributing factors. Although it is acknowledged that such movements are inevitable, given the current globalized economy, the movement of health professionals from their country of training raises questions about equity of access and quality of care. Concerns arise if migration occurs from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) to high-income countries (HICs). The actions of HICs receiving medical practitioners from LMICs are examined through the global justice theories of John Rawls and Immanuel Kant. These theories were in...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - June 16, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Why Did U.S. Healthcare Professionals Become Involved in Torture During the War on Terror?
This article examines why U.S. healthcare professionals became involved in “enhanced interrogation,” or torture, during the War on Terror. A number of factors are identified including a desire on the part of these professionals to defend their country and fellow citizens from future attack; having their activities approved and authorized by legitimate command structures; financial incentives; and wanting to prevent serious harm from occurring to prisoners/detainees. The factors outlined here suggest that psychosocial factors can influence health professionals’ ethical decision-making. (Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - June 16, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Intra-Family Gamete Donation: A Solution to Concerns Regarding Gamete Donation in China?
Abstract Gamete donation from third parties is controversial in China as it severs blood ties, which are considered of utmost importance in Confucian tradition. In recent years, infertile couples are increasingly demonstrating a preference for the use of gametes donated by family members to conceive children—known as “intra-family gamete donation.” The main advantage of intra-family gamete donation is that it maintains blood ties between children and both parents. To date there is no practice of intra-family gamete donation in China. In this paper, we investigate intra-family adoption in China in...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - June 15, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Afterthoughts and Foresight: Digging Through Boxes of Bygone Beliefs and Brooding About the Burgeoning of Bioethics
(Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - June 7, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Socio-Genomics and Structural Competency
Abstract Adverse developmental exposures and pathologies of the social environment make vastly greater contributions to the leading health burdens in society than currently known genotypic information. Yet, while patients now commonly bring information on single alleles to the attention of their healthcare team, the former conditions are only rarely considered with respect to future health outcomes. This manuscript aims to integrate social environmental influences in genetic predictive models of disease risk. Healthcare providers must be educated to better understand genetic risks for complex diseases and the spec...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - June 1, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Structural Competency in the U.S. Healthcare Crisis: Putting Social and Policy Interventions Into Clinical Practice
Abstract This symposium of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry illustrates structural competency: how clinical practitioners can intervene on social and institutional determinants of health. It will require training clinicians to see and act on structural barriers to health, to adapt imaginative structural approaches from fields outside of medicine, and to collaborate with disciplines and institutions outside of medicine. Case studies of effective work on all of these levels are presented in this volume. The contributors exemplify structural competency from many angles, from the implications of epigenetics for envir...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - May 13, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Erratum to: AIDS Panic in the Twenty-First Century: The Tenuous Legal Status of HIV-Positive Persons in America
(Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - April 28, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Donor Conception Disclosure: Directive or Non-Directive Counselling?
Abstract It is widely agreed among health professionals that couples using donor insemination should be offered counselling on the topic of donor conception disclosure. However, it is clear from the literature that there has long been a lack of agreement about which counselling approach should be used in this case: a directive or a non-directive approach. In this paper we investigate which approach is ethically justifiable by balancing the two underlying principles of autonomy (non-directive approach) and beneficence (directive approach). To overrule one principle in favour of another, six conditions should be ful...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - April 26, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Treating Addictions: Harm Reduction in Clinical Care and Prevention
Abstract This paper examines the role of clinical practitioners and clinical researchers internationally in establishing the utility of harm-reduction approaches to substance use. It thus illustrates the potential for clinicians to play a pivotal role in health promoting structural interventions based on harm-reduction goals and public health models. Popular media images of drug use as uniformly damaging, and abstinence as the only acceptable goal of treatment, threaten to distort clinical care away from a basis in evidence, which shows that some ways of using drugs are far more harmful than others and that puniti...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - April 26, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Erratum to: AIDS Panic in the Twenty-First Century: The Tenuous Legal Status of HIV-Positive Persons in America
(Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry)
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - April 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research