Role of thymus in health and disease
Int Rev Immunol. 2022 May 20:1-17. doi: 10.1080/08830185.2022.2064461. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThe thymus is a primary lymphoid organ, essential for the development of T-cells that will protect from invading pathogens, immune disorders, and cancer. The thymus decreases in size and cellularity with age referred to as thymus involution or atrophy. This involution causes decreased T-cell development and decreased naive T-cell emigration to the periphery, increased proportion of memory T cells, and a restricted, altered T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire. The changes in composition and function of the circulating T cell po...
Source: International Reviews of Immunology - May 20, 2022 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Surendra Gulla Madhava C Reddy Vajra C Reddy Sriram Chitta Manjula Bhanoori Dakshayani Lomada Source Type: research

The role of γδ T cells in the interaction between commensal and pathogenic bacteria in the intestinal mucosa
Int Rev Immunol. 2022 May 18:1-14. doi: 10.1080/08830185.2022.2076846. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThe intestinal mucosa is an important structure involved in resistance to pathogen infection. It is mainly composed of four barriers, which have different but interrelated functions. Pathogenic bacteria can damage these intestinal mucosal barriers. Here, we mainly review the mechanisms of pathogen damage to biological barriers. Most γδ T cells are located on the surface of the intestinal mucosa, with the ability to migrate and engage in crosstalk with microorganisms. Commensal bacteria are involved in the activation and m...
Source: International Reviews of Immunology - May 18, 2022 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Xiaoxiao Wu Bing Gu Huan Yang Source Type: research

Pathophysiological functions of self-derived DNA
Int Rev Immunol. 2022 May 2:1-13. doi: 10.1080/08830185.2022.2070616. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTInflammation plays indispensable roles in building the immune responses such as acquired immunity against harmful pathogens. Furthermore, it is essential for maintaining biological homeostasis in ever-changing conditions. Pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) reside in cell membranes, endosomes or cytoplasm, and function as triggers for inflammatory responses. Binding of pathogen- or self-derived components, such as DNA, to PRRs activates downstream signaling cascades, resulting in the production of a series of pro-inflammato...
Source: International Reviews of Immunology - May 2, 2022 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Daisuke Ori Taro Kawai Source Type: research