Mothers’ feelings about infants’ negative emotions and mother-infant interactions among the Gamo of Southern Ethiopia
In this study, the link between Gamo mothers’ expressions of stress about their infants’ negative emotional displays (N = 29 mothers and infants) and mother-infant interactions was investigated. Mothers who expressed stress in response to their infants’ negative emotions demonstrated fewer interactions overall with their infants compared to mothers who did not express stress. Regression analyses showed that mothers who did not express stress had infants that fussed and cried more in their presence than infants of mothers who did not express stress, albeit insignificant. These results are dis...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - December 4, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Reliability and generalizability of an acted-out false belief task in 3-year-olds
Publication date: February 2019Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 54Author(s): Sebastian Dörrenberg, Lisa Wenzel, Marina Proft, Hannes Rakoczy, Ulf LiszkowskiAbstractThe current study tested the reliability and generalizability of a narrative act-out false belief task held to reveal Theory of Mind (ToM) competence at 3 years of age, before children pass verbal standard false belief tasks (the “Duplo task”; Rubio-Fernández & Geurts, 2013, Psychological Science). We conducted the task across two labs with methodologically improved matched control conditions. Further, we administered a...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - December 2, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Using automatic face analysis to score infant behaviour from video collected online
Publication date: February 2019Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 54Author(s): Brea Chouinard, Kimberly Scott, Rhodri CusackAbstractOnline testing of infants by recording video with a webcam has the potential to improve the replicability of developmental studies by facilitating larger sample sizes and by allowing methods (including recruitment) to be specified in code. However, the recorded video still needs to be manually scored. This labour-intensive process puts downward pressure on sample sizes and requires subjective judgements that may not be reproducible in a different laboratory. Here we present the fi...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - December 1, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Should I test more babies? Solutions for transparent data peeking
Publication date: Available online 22 November 2018Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Esther Schott, Mijke Rhemtulla, Krista Byers-HeinleinAbstractResearch with infants is often slow and time-consuming, so infant researchers face great pressure to use the available participants in an efficient way. One strategy that researchers sometimes use to optimize efficiency is data peeking (or “optional stopping”), that is, doing a preliminary analysis (whether a formal significance test or informal eyeballing) of collected data. Data peeking helps researchers decide whether to abandon or tweak a study, de...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - November 23, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: November 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 53Author(s): (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - November 17, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Associations of paternal postpartum depressive symptoms and infant development in a Chinese longitudinal study
This study examined paternal postpartum depression and its adverse impact on infants, and the possible mediating role of father-infant attachment in the link between fathers’ depressive symptoms and infants’ outcomes. Pregnant women and their partners were recruited from the antenatal clinics of two public hospitals in Hong Kong. Information about paternal and maternal depression, paternal-infant attachment, and infant development were collected at antenatal period, 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum. Linear regression was employed to examine risk factors for paternal depression symptoms, and mediation analysis wa...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - November 8, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

The relationship between temperament style and understanding of human goal-directed action in infants
Publication date: November 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 53Author(s): Jennifer LaBounty, Margaret Oliver, Kaitlyn True, Hannah Cooper, Sheena Friesen, Gabrielle CastroAbstractThe purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between temperament style and understanding of goal-directed action in 10–11-month-old infants. Infant social understanding was assessed using a looking-time measure similar to Woodward (1998). This method yielded two measures of infant social understanding; ‘decrement of attention’ (a measure of infant attention during habituation) and ‘nove...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - November 1, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

A comparison of low-intensity physical activity, growth, and sleep behavior in 6-month old infants
This study examined low-intensity physical activity (PA), sleep behavior (24-hour accelerometry), and growth in 22 6-month old infants. Relationships were assessed using bivariate correlations. Infants accumulating less ‘total’ sleep spent more time in low-intensity PA (r = −.524, p = .012). Those with less ‘nighttime’ sleep had greater nap frequency (r = −.460, p = .031), nap duration (r =  −.529, p = .011) and weight-for-length z-scores (r = −.481, p = .024), but ...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - November 1, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Publication standards in infancy research: Three ways to make Violation-of-Expectation studies more reliable
Publication date: Available online 26 October 2018Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Paula Rubio-FernándezAbstractThe Violation-of-Expectation paradigm is a widespread paradigm in infancy research that relies on looking time as an index of surprise. This methodological review aims to increase the reliability of future VoE studies by proposing to standardize reporting practices in this literature. I review 15 VoE studies on false-belief reasoning, which used a variety of experimental parameters. An analysis of the distribution of p-values across experiments suggests an absence of p-hacking. However, th...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - October 27, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

33-month-old children succeed in a false belief task with reduced processing demands: A replication of Setoh et al. (2016)
Publication date: Available online 26 October 2018Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Stella S. Grosso, Tobias Schuwerk, Larissa J. Kaltefleiter, Beate SodianAbstractA recent low-inhibition false belief task showed a high success rate with 33-month-old children when response-generation demands were reduced [Setoh, Scott, & Baillargeon (2016). Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 113(47), 13360–13365]. We found correct responding in 74% of N = 58 33-month-old children, replicating the original findings. Within the same sample, we compared this performance with performance in...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - October 27, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Typologies of dyadic mother-infant emotion regulation following immunization
Publication date: November 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 53Author(s): Penina M. Backer, Kelsey M. Quigley, Cynthia A. StifterAbstractMother-infant dyadic emotion regulation – the joint modulation of affective rhythms as interactive partners dynamically respond to each other across time – has been shown to promote social-emotional wellbeing both during and beyond infancy. Although contributions of dyadic regulation to self-regulatory development may particularly apparent during infant distress, studies have traditionally examined dyadic regulation in low-stress contexts. The present study a...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - October 21, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Reproducibility and a unifying explanation: Lessons from the shape bias
Publication date: Available online 19 October 2018Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Sarah C. Kucker, Larissa K. Samuelson, Lynn K. Perry, Hanako Yoshida, Eliana Colunga, Megan G. Lorenz, Linda B. SmithAbstractThe goal of science is to advance our understanding of particular phenomena. However, in the field of development, the phenomena of interest are complex, multifaceted, and change over time. Here, we use three decades of research on the shape bias to argue that while replication is clearly an important part of the scientific process, integration across the findings of many studies that include variation...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - October 20, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Different patterns of sensitivity differentially affect infant attention span
Publication date: November 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 53Author(s): Jennifer L. Miller, Ellen Hurdish, Julie Gros-LouisAbstractWe exposed infants to different types of sensitive behavior to examine effects on infants’ attention. Results revealed infants changed their patterns of visual attention; infants had longer durations of sustained attention to toys, shorter durations to the social partner, and fewer attention shifts when interacting with a nonvocal social partner than when interacting with a vocal social partner. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - October 16, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Prenatal neural responses to infant faces predict postpartum reflective functioning
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2018Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Helena J.V. Rutherford, Michael J. Crowley, Lucy Gao, Brianna Francis, Alysse Schultheis, Linda C MayesAbstractPregnancy is shaped by unfolding psychological and biological changes in preparation for parenthood. A growing literature has examined the postpartum maternal brain. However, few studies examine the maternal brain during pregnancy, and whether brain function in pregnancy may have implications for postpartum caregiving. Using event-related potentials, we examined the late positive potential (LPP) elicited by infant di...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - October 9, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

The roles of item repetition and position in infants’ abstract rule learning
We examined 11- and 14- month-old infants’ learning and generalization of abstract repetition rules (“repetition anywhere,” Experiment 1 or “medial repetition,” Experiment 2) and ordering of specific items (edge positions, Experiment 3) in 4-item sequences. Infants were habituated to sequences containing repetition- and/or position-based structure and then tested with “familiar” vs. “novel” (random) sequences composed of new items. Eleven-month-olds (N = 40) failed to learn abstract repetition rules, but 14-month-olds (N = 40) learned rules u...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - October 4, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Action effects foster 11-month-olds’ prediction of action goals for a non-human agent
In this study, 11-month-olds showed equally fast predictive gaze shifts to a claw’s action goal when the grasping action was presented either with three agency cues (self-propelled movement, equifinality of goal achievement and a salient action effect) or with only a salient action effect, but infants showed tracking gaze when the claw showed only self-propelled movement and equifinality of goal achievement. The results suggest that action effects, compared to purely kinematic cues, seem to be especially important for infants' online processing of goal-directed actions. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - October 4, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Two-year-olds’ executive functioning: The influence of task-specific vocabulary knowledge
This study investigated how the vocabulary used in explaining an EF task affects 2-year-olds’ performance. Experiment 1 used the standard instructions for the Reverse Categorization Task, in which children are asked to sort different-sized blocks into different-sized buckets according to one rule and then switch to a new rule. In Experiment 2, the task remained the same, but different instructions requiring less knowledge of size words were used. Children’s productive vocabulary was assessed in both experiments but was only correlated with task performance in Experiment 1. These results suggest that task-specif...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - October 4, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Early life experiences: Meaningful differences within and between families
Publication date: Available online 10 September 2018Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Sophie von Stumm, Rachel M. LathamAbstractPrevious research has focused on differences in early life experiences that occur between families and their impact on children's development. However, less is known about the variations in early life experiences that occur within families. Here, 53 British mothers (mean age = 34.46 years; SD = 4.35) of newborn infants (mean age = 1.68 months, SD = 0.96) used a smartphone application (app) to repeatedly rate their wellbeing an...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - September 12, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Associations of paternal postpartum depressive symptoms with infant development in a Chinese longitudinal study
This study examined paternal postpartum depression and its adverse impact on infants, and the possible mediating role of father-infant attachment in the link between fathers’ depressive symptoms and infants’ outcomes. Pregnant women and their partners were recruited from the antenatal clinics of two public hospitals in Hong Kong. Information about paternal and maternal depression, paternal-infant attachment, and infant development were collected at antenatal period, 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum. Linear regression was employed to examine risk factors for paternal depression symptoms, and mediation analysis wa...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - September 12, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - August 24, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Exploring the morphological and emotional correlates of infant cuteness
Publication date: Available online 20 August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Mayra L. Almanza-Sepúlveda, Aya Dudin, Kathleen E. Wonch, Meir Steiner, David R. Feinberg, Alison S. Fleming, Geoffrey B. HallAbstractEthologists have observed that “baby schema” or infant cuteness is an adaptive protective mechanism ensuring the young’s survival. Past efforts to quantify cuteness have been restricted to line measurement techniques. We developed a novel data-driven approach to quantify infant cuteness into a single metric. Using the Psychomorph program, we delineated facial elements o...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - August 21, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Parental negative emotions are related to behavioral and pupillary correlates of infants’ attention to facial expressions of emotion
This study investigated the associations between infants’ attention to emotional faces and infants’ and parents’ negative emotions in a community sample. Infants’ (N = 57, Mage = 14.26 months) fixations and pupil responses to fearful, sad, angry versus happy and neutral faces were measured with an eye-tracker. Mothers’ and fathers’ negative emotions (negative affect, depression, and anxiety), and infants’ negative temperament were measured with questionnaires. Infants looked longer at fearful than happy or neutral faces, while they showed less pupil dilation to fearful than to happ...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - August 20, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Infants perceive two-dimensional shape from horizontal disparity
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Stephanie Braun, Michael KavšekAbstractPrevious studies observed that responsiveness to horizontal disparity as such emerges at approximately 2 months of age. Moreover, 3- to 4-month-old infants utilize stereoscopic information to perceive object variations in depth. The present study investigated infants’ ability to respond to crossed horizontal disparity information that defines two-dimensional shape. Infants 4 and 5 months of age were habituated to either a cross or the outline of a square. During the posthabituation p...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - August 9, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Infants’ sensitivity to rhyme in songs
In this study, we investigated whether infants can already recognize this phonological pattern in songs. Earlier studies using lists of spoken words were equivocal on infants’ spontaneous processing of rhymes (Hayes et al., 2000; Jusczyk et al., 1999). Songs, however, constitute an ecologically valid rhyming stimulus, which could allow for spontaneous processing of this phonological pattern in infants. Novel children’s songs with rhyming and non-rhyming lyrics using pseudo-words were presented to 35 9-month-old Dutch infants using the Headturn Preference Procedure. Infants on average listened longer to the non-...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - August 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Sixteen-month-old infants are sensitive to competence in third-party observational learning
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Vivian Lee, M.D. RutherfordAbstractObservational learning is important to development, but not all adult models are equally informative and accurate. Selectivity is important in observational learning. Past research studies have not always differentiated competence and confidence, so the current study investigated infants’ selective imitation after observing third-party interactions, when confidence and competence were varied independently. Forty-eight 16-month-olds watched a model demonstrate the function of tools while display...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Watch and listen – A cross-cultural study of audio-visual-matching behavior in 4.5-month-old infants in German and Swedish talking faces
This study confirms a remarkably early emerging ability of infants to match auditory and visual information. The fact that the types of information were matched despite sequential presentation demonstrates that the information is retained in short term memory, and thus goes beyond purely perceptual – here-and-now processing. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Testosterone reactivity to infant crying and caregiving in women: The role of oral contraceptives and basal cortisol
We examined T reactivity to a crying infant simulator in 160 women. Use of oral contraceptives (OC), basal cortisol (CORT) levels and childhood experiences of maternal love withdrawal were taken into account. T levels were consistently significantly higher in women not using OC. In women not using OC, high basal CORT was related to higher initial T levels and larger decreases of T during caregiving. No effect of basal CORT was found in women with OC use. Childhood experiences of maternal love withdrawal did not affect T levels. This is the first study to show support for a decrease of T in women while taking care of a cryi...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Affective reactivity to cry sounds predicts young women’s reactivity and behavior in a simulated caregiving task
Publication date: Available online 13 September 2017Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Gwen E. Gustafson, Jennifer B. Bisson, Jillian M. MacDonald, James A. GreenAbstractDifferent populations of adults (experienced vs. inexperienced caregivers, men vs. women, abusive vs. nonabusive parents, etc.) have been reported to differ in their affective reactions to the sounds of infant crying. These differences are thought to impact caregiving behavior and, in some instances, to affect long-term outcomes for infants. There can be great intra-group variation, however, even when group differences are significant; model...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

When soothing succeeds: Simulating a risk for repeated shaking in abusive head trauma in infants
ConclusionsThat caregivers were more likely to repeat a successful soothing technique converges with perpetrator confessions that crying cessation after shaking may be a reason why shaking is used repeatedly in response to crying. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Young adult couples’ behavioral and physiological responses to the infant simulator: A preliminary illustration of coparenting
Publication date: Available online 1 May 2018Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Hannah F. Rasmussen, Geoffrey W. Corner, Gayla MargolinAbstractThis exploratory application of the infant simulator with two couples is designed to illustrate individual reactivity and coparenting behaviors in young couples in serious relationships who do not yet have children. A 35-min protocol with standardized onsets and offsets of inconsolable baby cries was used to capture partner’s individual behavioral and physiological responses as well as the couple’s joint efforts to soothe the crying baby. Task feasibility ...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Motor affordance at home for infants living in poverty: A feasibility study
ConclusionAmplifying motor affordance at home may be considered appropriate for future clinical trials. It may be an efficient/low-cost early intervention strategy for infants at environmental risk. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Differential effects of others’ emotional cues on 18-month-olds’ preferential reproduction of observed actions
This study explored infants’ understanding of the referential specificity of others’ emotional cues when being confronted with two actions that are accompanied by different emotional displays. Selective action reproduction was measured after 18-month-olds (N = 42) had observed two actions directed at the same object, one of which was modeled with a positive emotional expression and the other with a negative emotional expression. Across four trials with different objects, infants’ first actions matched the positively-emoted actions more often than the negatively-emoted actions. In comparison with basel...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: May 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 51Author(s): (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Evaluation of upper limb movements in children with Down’s syndrome: A systematic review
ConclusionA kinematic evaluation is effective for the discussion of the results, but methodological differences among the studies and inconsistent results exert a negative influence on clinical interpretations and the possibility of reproducibility. The standardization of an upper limb movement evaluation protocol using kinematic analysis is important, as it would provide the basis for comparable, reproducible results and facilitate the planning of treatment interventions. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

How are social-emotional and behavioral competences and problems at age 1 year associated with infant motor development? A general population study
In this study, we investigated associations between early competencies and problems, as measured by the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA), and the timing of achievement of the main gross and fine motor milestones usually attained during the first year of life in a general population context. The study sample consisted of 515 infants (mean age 12.9 [SD 0.9] months) and their parents (514 mothers, 434 fathers), who were recruited in child health centers in Northern Finland. The infants were divided into two groups, based on their BITSEA screen status, and motor milestone achievement ages were comp...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Is the Effect of Postpartum Depression on Mother-Infant Bonding Universal?
ConclusionThe prevalence of PPD was higher than previously reported at day 2–3 post-delivery, but lower at 10–12 weeks postpartum. Impaired mother- infant bonding was associated older mothers, history of depression, low social support and BDI-II scores above 20 which should alert practitioner to assessing these factors in post-partum mothers. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Postnatal anxiety prevalence, predictors and effects on development: A narrative review
Publication date: May 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 51Author(s): Tiffany FieldAbstractThe increasing prevalence of postnatal anxiety highlights the need for summarizing the recent research on this condition to inform screening and intervention efforts. This narrative review of the literature was derived from a search on PubMed and PsycINFO for papers published since 2010. The demographic risk factors for postnatal anxiety include being a young mother, having more education and being employed. Childbirth risk factors include being primiparous in one sample and multiparous in another, caesarean delivery...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Longitudinal relations among maternal depressive symptoms, maternal mind-mindedness, and infant attachment behavior
Publication date: May 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 51Author(s): Ann E. Bigelow, Beatrice Beebe, Michelle Power, Anna-Lee Stafford, Julie Ewing, Anna Egleson, Tammy KaminerAbstractThe relations among maternal depression risk, maternal mind-mindedness, and infants’ attachment behavior were longitudinally examined in a community sample of mother-infant dyads. Maternal self-reported depression risk was measured at the infant ages of 6 weeks, 4 months, and 12 months. Maternal mind-mindedness, assessed from mothers’ comments about infants’ mental states (e.g., infants’ thoughts, des...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

The Inconsolable Doll Task: Prenatal coparenting behavioral dynamics under stress predicting child cognitive development at 18 months
Publication date: Available online 28 May 2018Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Dana ShaiAbstractStudies have demonstrated that coparenting can be assessed prenatally through playful observational conditions, including simulated baby enactments. Regrettably, there is a lack of empirical research examining how prenatal coparenting under the emotional stress elicited by the distress of a simulated infant predicts children’s cognitive development. The current longitudinal study introduces a novel procedure—the Inconsolable Doll Task—to assess prenatal coparenting behavioral dynamics under the...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Simulation-based research to improve infant health outcomes: Using the infant simulator to prevent infant shaking
Publication date: Available online 11 June 2018Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Kirsten Bechtel, Ambika Bhatnagar, Marc AuerbachAbstractSimulation is a technique that creates a situation or environment to allow persons to experience a representation of a real event for the purpose of practice, learning, evaluation, testing, or to gain understanding of systems or human actions. We will first provide an introduction to simulation in healthcare and describe the two types of simulation-based research (SBR) in the pediatric population. We will then provide an overview of the use of SBR to improve health outcome...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

fNIRS reveals enhanced brain activation to female (versus male) infant directed speech (relative to adult directed speech) in Young Human Infants
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Simone Sulpizio, Hirokazu Doi, Marc H. Bornstein, Joy Cui, Gianluca Esposito, Kazuyuki ShinoharaAbstractWe hypothesized an association between auditory stimulus structure and activity in the brain that underlies infant auditory preference. In a within-infant design, we assessed brain activity to female and male infant directed relative to adult directed speech in 4-month-old infants using fNIRS. Results are compatible with the hypothesis that enhanced frontal brain activation, specifically in prefrontal cortex that is involved in emot...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Infants’ intermodal numerical knowledge
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Mohammad Rashbari DibavarAbstractTwo-system theory as the dominant approach in the field of infant numerical representation is characterized by three features: precise representation of small sets of objects, approximate representation of large magnitudes and failure to compare small and large sets. Comparison of single- and multimodal numerical abilities suggests that infants’ performance in multimodal conditions is consistent with these three features. Nevertheless, the influence of multimodal stimulation on infants’ num...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Bronchopulmonary dysplasia predictor scale validation in preterm newborns in two neonatal units at 2600 m above sea level
ConclusionsThe scale using the classical definition has high sensitivity, but it is not specific; adjusting the definition for altitude decreases sensitivity but increases specificity. New cutoffs points are needed on the scale or a change in the weight for the variables included in the model in order to be used in our high-altitude population. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

The development of object-based attention in infants
We presented 6- to 8-month-old infants with the visual stimuli consisting of two white vertical rectangles side by side, in which a target appearing at 1) the cued location, 2) the end opposite to the cued location, and 3) another rectangle’s end following the cue, using an established paradigm, and measured each infant’s first saccade to the target. We found that (1) infants of all ages could make the first saccade to the target appearing at the cued location, (2) only 8-month-old infants made the first saccade to the target appearing at the opposite end to the cued location more accurately than to the target ...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

We cooperated so… now what? Infants expect cooperative partners to share resources
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Ying Wang, Annette M.E. HendersonAbstractResearch has demonstrated that an understanding of and engagement in cooperative activities emerges early in life. However, little is known about the expectations infants hold about the consequences of cooperative action. We demonstrate that 14-month-old infants expect that cooperative partners will share the recently attained cooperative goal instead of keeping it for themselves. Interestingly, this prediction does not hold if infants saw the two individuals work towards individual goals. Thes...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Fragility of haptic memory in human full-term newborns
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Fleur Lejeune, Cristina Borradori Tolsa, Edouard Gentaz, Koviljka BarisnikovAbstractBackgroundNumerous studies have established that newborns can memorize tactile information about the specific features of an object with their hands and detect differences with another object. However, the robustness of haptic memory abilities has already been examined in preterm newborns and in full-term infants, but not yet in full-term newborns. This research is aimed to better understand the robustness of haptic memory abilities at birth by examini...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Preterm-infant emotion regulation during the still-face interaction
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Maya Yaari, Natalie Lisette Rotzak, David Mankuta, Ayelet Harel-Gadassi, Edwa Friedlander, Smadar Eventov-Friedman, Benjamin Bar-Oz, David Zucker, Oren Shinar, Nurit YirmiyaAbstractVery-preterm (VPT), moderately-preterm (MPT), and full-term (FT) infants’ emotion-regulation behaviors were assessed via the Still-Face procedure at a corrected age of four months. As a developmental task during the first year of life, emotion regulation is important for social and cognitive development. Although substantial evidence indicates that VP...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Beyond the pre-communicative medium: A cross-behavioral prospective study on the role of gesture in language and play development
This study prospectively explored the role of declarative and imperative gestures in the development of language and symbolic play milestones using a multi-measure micro-analytic approach. Nine infants were observed in their natural home environments once a month for a one hour session between the ages of 8–16 months by recording their spontaneous pre-lingual and lingual form usages and symbolic play acts. This framework enabled the coding of object- and human-directed vocalization, babbling, speech, declarative and imperative gestures, and four types of symbolic play acts: single-object play, single-object sequences...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Developmental patterns of change in mother and child emotional availability from infancy to the end of the preschool years: A four-wave longitudinal study
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Matte-Gagné Célia, Dale M. Stack, Lisa A. SerbinAbstractIn this four-wave longitudinal study, we examined intraindividual developmental patterns of change in mother-child emotional availability (EA) during infancy and the preschool years, the factors that promote or hinder it, and the longitudinal within-dyad association between maternal and child EA. Mother-infant dyads (N = 56) were observed at home when children were 6,12, 18 and 55-months-old. Multilevel growth modeling revealed that mother and child EA follow di...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

An educator-administered measure of language development in young children
We present such a measure here for Danish, the CDI: Educator (CDI-Edu) version, which is based on well-developed and validated parent report measures, adapted for the early childhood education setting. It requires approximately 10 min per child on the part of the educator. It includes a 70-item vocabulary checklist, as well as questions concerning the child’s use of decontextualized language with respect to objects and actions distant from the here and now. The test has been standardized on a total of 5097 children aged 18–34 months. Test-retest and internal consistency measures demonstrate reliability. Valid...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research