Sixteen-month-old infants are sensitive to competence in third-party observational learning
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Vivian Lee, M.D. RutherfordAbstractObservational learning is important to development, but not all adult models are equally informative and accurate. Selectivity is important in observational learning. Past research studies have not always differentiated competence and confidence, so the current study investigated infants’ selective imitation after observing third-party interactions, when confidence and competence were varied independently. Forty-eight 16-month-olds watched a model demonstrate the function of tools while display...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Watch and listen – A cross-cultural study of audio-visual-matching behavior in 4.5-month-old infants in German and Swedish talking faces
This study confirms a remarkably early emerging ability of infants to match auditory and visual information. The fact that the types of information were matched despite sequential presentation demonstrates that the information is retained in short term memory, and thus goes beyond purely perceptual – here-and-now processing. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Testosterone reactivity to infant crying and caregiving in women: The role of oral contraceptives and basal cortisol
We examined T reactivity to a crying infant simulator in 160 women. Use of oral contraceptives (OC), basal cortisol (CORT) levels and childhood experiences of maternal love withdrawal were taken into account. T levels were consistently significantly higher in women not using OC. In women not using OC, high basal CORT was related to higher initial T levels and larger decreases of T during caregiving. No effect of basal CORT was found in women with OC use. Childhood experiences of maternal love withdrawal did not affect T levels. This is the first study to show support for a decrease of T in women while taking care of a cryi...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Affective reactivity to cry sounds predicts young women’s reactivity and behavior in a simulated caregiving task
Publication date: Available online 13 September 2017Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Gwen E. Gustafson, Jennifer B. Bisson, Jillian M. MacDonald, James A. GreenAbstractDifferent populations of adults (experienced vs. inexperienced caregivers, men vs. women, abusive vs. nonabusive parents, etc.) have been reported to differ in their affective reactions to the sounds of infant crying. These differences are thought to impact caregiving behavior and, in some instances, to affect long-term outcomes for infants. There can be great intra-group variation, however, even when group differences are significant; model...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

When soothing succeeds: Simulating a risk for repeated shaking in abusive head trauma in infants
ConclusionsThat caregivers were more likely to repeat a successful soothing technique converges with perpetrator confessions that crying cessation after shaking may be a reason why shaking is used repeatedly in response to crying. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Young adult couples’ behavioral and physiological responses to the infant simulator: A preliminary illustration of coparenting
Publication date: Available online 1 May 2018Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Hannah F. Rasmussen, Geoffrey W. Corner, Gayla MargolinAbstractThis exploratory application of the infant simulator with two couples is designed to illustrate individual reactivity and coparenting behaviors in young couples in serious relationships who do not yet have children. A 35-min protocol with standardized onsets and offsets of inconsolable baby cries was used to capture partner’s individual behavioral and physiological responses as well as the couple’s joint efforts to soothe the crying baby. Task feasibility ...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Motor affordance at home for infants living in poverty: A feasibility study
ConclusionAmplifying motor affordance at home may be considered appropriate for future clinical trials. It may be an efficient/low-cost early intervention strategy for infants at environmental risk. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Differential effects of others’ emotional cues on 18-month-olds’ preferential reproduction of observed actions
This study explored infants’ understanding of the referential specificity of others’ emotional cues when being confronted with two actions that are accompanied by different emotional displays. Selective action reproduction was measured after 18-month-olds (N = 42) had observed two actions directed at the same object, one of which was modeled with a positive emotional expression and the other with a negative emotional expression. Across four trials with different objects, infants’ first actions matched the positively-emoted actions more often than the negatively-emoted actions. In comparison with basel...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: May 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 51Author(s): (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Evaluation of upper limb movements in children with Down’s syndrome: A systematic review
ConclusionA kinematic evaluation is effective for the discussion of the results, but methodological differences among the studies and inconsistent results exert a negative influence on clinical interpretations and the possibility of reproducibility. The standardization of an upper limb movement evaluation protocol using kinematic analysis is important, as it would provide the basis for comparable, reproducible results and facilitate the planning of treatment interventions. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

How are social-emotional and behavioral competences and problems at age 1 year associated with infant motor development? A general population study
In this study, we investigated associations between early competencies and problems, as measured by the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA), and the timing of achievement of the main gross and fine motor milestones usually attained during the first year of life in a general population context. The study sample consisted of 515 infants (mean age 12.9 [SD 0.9] months) and their parents (514 mothers, 434 fathers), who were recruited in child health centers in Northern Finland. The infants were divided into two groups, based on their BITSEA screen status, and motor milestone achievement ages were comp...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Is the Effect of Postpartum Depression on Mother-Infant Bonding Universal?
ConclusionThe prevalence of PPD was higher than previously reported at day 2–3 post-delivery, but lower at 10–12 weeks postpartum. Impaired mother- infant bonding was associated older mothers, history of depression, low social support and BDI-II scores above 20 which should alert practitioner to assessing these factors in post-partum mothers. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Postnatal anxiety prevalence, predictors and effects on development: A narrative review
Publication date: May 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 51Author(s): Tiffany FieldAbstractThe increasing prevalence of postnatal anxiety highlights the need for summarizing the recent research on this condition to inform screening and intervention efforts. This narrative review of the literature was derived from a search on PubMed and PsycINFO for papers published since 2010. The demographic risk factors for postnatal anxiety include being a young mother, having more education and being employed. Childbirth risk factors include being primiparous in one sample and multiparous in another, caesarean delivery...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Longitudinal relations among maternal depressive symptoms, maternal mind-mindedness, and infant attachment behavior
Publication date: May 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 51Author(s): Ann E. Bigelow, Beatrice Beebe, Michelle Power, Anna-Lee Stafford, Julie Ewing, Anna Egleson, Tammy KaminerAbstractThe relations among maternal depression risk, maternal mind-mindedness, and infants’ attachment behavior were longitudinally examined in a community sample of mother-infant dyads. Maternal self-reported depression risk was measured at the infant ages of 6 weeks, 4 months, and 12 months. Maternal mind-mindedness, assessed from mothers’ comments about infants’ mental states (e.g., infants’ thoughts, des...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

The Inconsolable Doll Task: Prenatal coparenting behavioral dynamics under stress predicting child cognitive development at 18 months
Publication date: Available online 28 May 2018Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Dana ShaiAbstractStudies have demonstrated that coparenting can be assessed prenatally through playful observational conditions, including simulated baby enactments. Regrettably, there is a lack of empirical research examining how prenatal coparenting under the emotional stress elicited by the distress of a simulated infant predicts children’s cognitive development. The current longitudinal study introduces a novel procedure—the Inconsolable Doll Task—to assess prenatal coparenting behavioral dynamics under the...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Simulation-based research to improve infant health outcomes: Using the infant simulator to prevent infant shaking
Publication date: Available online 11 June 2018Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Kirsten Bechtel, Ambika Bhatnagar, Marc AuerbachAbstractSimulation is a technique that creates a situation or environment to allow persons to experience a representation of a real event for the purpose of practice, learning, evaluation, testing, or to gain understanding of systems or human actions. We will first provide an introduction to simulation in healthcare and describe the two types of simulation-based research (SBR) in the pediatric population. We will then provide an overview of the use of SBR to improve health outcome...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

fNIRS reveals enhanced brain activation to female (versus male) infant directed speech (relative to adult directed speech) in Young Human Infants
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Simone Sulpizio, Hirokazu Doi, Marc H. Bornstein, Joy Cui, Gianluca Esposito, Kazuyuki ShinoharaAbstractWe hypothesized an association between auditory stimulus structure and activity in the brain that underlies infant auditory preference. In a within-infant design, we assessed brain activity to female and male infant directed relative to adult directed speech in 4-month-old infants using fNIRS. Results are compatible with the hypothesis that enhanced frontal brain activation, specifically in prefrontal cortex that is involved in emot...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Infants’ intermodal numerical knowledge
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Mohammad Rashbari DibavarAbstractTwo-system theory as the dominant approach in the field of infant numerical representation is characterized by three features: precise representation of small sets of objects, approximate representation of large magnitudes and failure to compare small and large sets. Comparison of single- and multimodal numerical abilities suggests that infants’ performance in multimodal conditions is consistent with these three features. Nevertheless, the influence of multimodal stimulation on infants’ num...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Bronchopulmonary dysplasia predictor scale validation in preterm newborns in two neonatal units at 2600 m above sea level
ConclusionsThe scale using the classical definition has high sensitivity, but it is not specific; adjusting the definition for altitude decreases sensitivity but increases specificity. New cutoffs points are needed on the scale or a change in the weight for the variables included in the model in order to be used in our high-altitude population. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

The development of object-based attention in infants
We presented 6- to 8-month-old infants with the visual stimuli consisting of two white vertical rectangles side by side, in which a target appearing at 1) the cued location, 2) the end opposite to the cued location, and 3) another rectangle’s end following the cue, using an established paradigm, and measured each infant’s first saccade to the target. We found that (1) infants of all ages could make the first saccade to the target appearing at the cued location, (2) only 8-month-old infants made the first saccade to the target appearing at the opposite end to the cued location more accurately than to the target ...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

We cooperated so… now what? Infants expect cooperative partners to share resources
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Ying Wang, Annette M.E. HendersonAbstractResearch has demonstrated that an understanding of and engagement in cooperative activities emerges early in life. However, little is known about the expectations infants hold about the consequences of cooperative action. We demonstrate that 14-month-old infants expect that cooperative partners will share the recently attained cooperative goal instead of keeping it for themselves. Interestingly, this prediction does not hold if infants saw the two individuals work towards individual goals. Thes...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Fragility of haptic memory in human full-term newborns
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Fleur Lejeune, Cristina Borradori Tolsa, Edouard Gentaz, Koviljka BarisnikovAbstractBackgroundNumerous studies have established that newborns can memorize tactile information about the specific features of an object with their hands and detect differences with another object. However, the robustness of haptic memory abilities has already been examined in preterm newborns and in full-term infants, but not yet in full-term newborns. This research is aimed to better understand the robustness of haptic memory abilities at birth by examini...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Preterm-infant emotion regulation during the still-face interaction
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Maya Yaari, Natalie Lisette Rotzak, David Mankuta, Ayelet Harel-Gadassi, Edwa Friedlander, Smadar Eventov-Friedman, Benjamin Bar-Oz, David Zucker, Oren Shinar, Nurit YirmiyaAbstractVery-preterm (VPT), moderately-preterm (MPT), and full-term (FT) infants’ emotion-regulation behaviors were assessed via the Still-Face procedure at a corrected age of four months. As a developmental task during the first year of life, emotion regulation is important for social and cognitive development. Although substantial evidence indicates that VP...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Beyond the pre-communicative medium: A cross-behavioral prospective study on the role of gesture in language and play development
This study prospectively explored the role of declarative and imperative gestures in the development of language and symbolic play milestones using a multi-measure micro-analytic approach. Nine infants were observed in their natural home environments once a month for a one hour session between the ages of 8–16 months by recording their spontaneous pre-lingual and lingual form usages and symbolic play acts. This framework enabled the coding of object- and human-directed vocalization, babbling, speech, declarative and imperative gestures, and four types of symbolic play acts: single-object play, single-object sequences...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Developmental patterns of change in mother and child emotional availability from infancy to the end of the preschool years: A four-wave longitudinal study
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Matte-Gagné Célia, Dale M. Stack, Lisa A. SerbinAbstractIn this four-wave longitudinal study, we examined intraindividual developmental patterns of change in mother-child emotional availability (EA) during infancy and the preschool years, the factors that promote or hinder it, and the longitudinal within-dyad association between maternal and child EA. Mother-infant dyads (N = 56) were observed at home when children were 6,12, 18 and 55-months-old. Multilevel growth modeling revealed that mother and child EA follow di...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

An educator-administered measure of language development in young children
We present such a measure here for Danish, the CDI: Educator (CDI-Edu) version, which is based on well-developed and validated parent report measures, adapted for the early childhood education setting. It requires approximately 10 min per child on the part of the educator. It includes a 70-item vocabulary checklist, as well as questions concerning the child’s use of decontextualized language with respect to objects and actions distant from the here and now. The test has been standardized on a total of 5097 children aged 18–34 months. Test-retest and internal consistency measures demonstrate reliability. Valid...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Synchronization of mother-infant feeding behavior
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Marijn van Dijk, Brenda van Voorthuizen, Ralf F.A. CoxAbstractIn the weaning period, infants are introduced to solid food after being fed solely on milk, which involves a deliberate reorganization of the infant-caregiver feeding interaction. This multiple case study, involving 5 dyads with 10 repeated observations, analyzed its dynamical structure using Cross-Recurrence Quantification Analysis. The results showed that an optimal interaction occurs when the caregiver is leading by roughly 1–2 seconds. During the weaning period, a...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Desire understanding in 2-year-old children: An eye-tracking study
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Amrisha Vaish, Robert Hepach, Tobias GrossmannAbstract‘Much research has investigated children’s understanding of others’ mental states in terms of beliefs, but far less is known about their understanding of others’ desires. To fill this gap, we used an eye-tracking paradigm to test 2-year-old children’s desire understanding by measuring their anticipatory looking behavior as well as changes in their internal arousal (i.e., changes in pupil dilation). Children showed increased pupil dilation when an adult...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 11, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

An educator-administered measure of language development in young children
We present such a measure here for Danish, the CDI: Educator (CDI-Edu) version, which is based on well-developed and validated parent report measures, adapted for the early childhood education setting. It requires approximately 10 min per child on the part of the educator. It includes a 70-item vocabulary checklist, as well as questions concerning the child’s use of decontextualized language with respect to objects and actions distant from the here and now. The test has been standardized on a total of 5097 children aged 18–34 months. Test-retest and internal consistency measures demonstrate reliability. Valid...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 7, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Synchronization of mother-infant feeding behavior
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Marijn van Dijk, Brenda van Voorthuizen, Ralf F.A. CoxAbstractIn the weaning period, infants are introduced to solid food after being fed solely on milk, which involves a deliberate reorganization of the infant-caregiver feeding interaction. This multiple case study, involving 5 dyads with 10 repeated observations, analyzed its dynamical structure using Cross-Recurrence Quantification Analysis. The results showed that an optimal interaction occurs when the caregiver is leading by roughly 1–2 seconds. During the weaning period, a...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 7, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Testosterone reactivity to infant crying and caregiving in women: The role of oral contraceptives and basal cortisol
We examined T reactivity to a crying infant simulator in 160 women. Use of oral contraceptives (OC), basal cortisol (CORT) levels and childhood experiences of maternal love withdrawal were taken into account. T levels were consistently significantly higher in women not using OC. In women not using OC, high basal CORT was related to higher initial T levels and larger decreases of T during caregiving. No effect of basal CORT was found in women with OC use. Childhood experiences of maternal love withdrawal did not affect T levels. This is the first study to show support for a decrease of T in women while taking care of a cryi...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Affective reactivity to cry sounds predicts young women’s reactivity and behavior in a simulated caregiving task
Publication date: Available online 13 September 2017Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Gwen E. Gustafson, Jennifer B. Bisson, Jillian M. MacDonald, James A. GreenAbstractDifferent populations of adults (experienced vs. inexperienced caregivers, men vs. women, abusive vs. nonabusive parents, etc.) have been reported to differ in their affective reactions to the sounds of infant crying. These differences are thought to impact caregiving behavior and, in some instances, to affect long-term outcomes for infants. There can be great intra-group variation, however, even when group differences are significant; model...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

When soothing succeeds: Simulating a risk for repeated shaking in abusive head trauma in infants
ConclusionsThat caregivers were more likely to repeat a successful soothing technique converges with perpetrator confessions that crying cessation after shaking may be a reason why shaking is used repeatedly in response to crying. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Young adult couples’ behavioral and physiological responses to the infant simulator: A preliminary illustration of coparenting
Publication date: Available online 1 May 2018Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Hannah F. Rasmussen, Geoffrey W. Corner, Gayla MargolinAbstractThis exploratory application of the infant simulator with two couples is designed to illustrate individual reactivity and coparenting behaviors in young couples in serious relationships who do not yet have children. A 35-min protocol with standardized onsets and offsets of inconsolable baby cries was used to capture partner’s individual behavioral and physiological responses as well as the couple’s joint efforts to soothe the crying baby. Task feasibility ...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Motor affordance at home for infants living in poverty: A feasibility study
ConclusionAmplifying motor affordance at home may be considered appropriate for future clinical trials. It may be an efficient/low-cost early intervention strategy for infants at environmental risk. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Differential effects of others’ emotional cues on 18-month-olds’ preferential reproduction of observed actions
This study explored infants’ understanding of the referential specificity of others’ emotional cues when being confronted with two actions that are accompanied by different emotional displays. Selective action reproduction was measured after 18-month-olds (N = 42) had observed two actions directed at the same object, one of which was modeled with a positive emotional expression and the other with a negative emotional expression. Across four trials with different objects, infants’ first actions matched the positively-emoted actions more often than the negatively-emoted actions. In comparison with basel...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: May 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 51Author(s): (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Evaluation of upper limb movements in children with Down’s syndrome: A systematic review
ConclusionA kinematic evaluation is effective for the discussion of the results, but methodological differences among the studies and inconsistent results exert a negative influence on clinical interpretations and the possibility of reproducibility. The standardization of an upper limb movement evaluation protocol using kinematic analysis is important, as it would provide the basis for comparable, reproducible results and facilitate the planning of treatment interventions. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

How are social-emotional and behavioral competences and problems at age 1 year associated with infant motor development? A general population study
In this study, we investigated associations between early competencies and problems, as measured by the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA), and the timing of achievement of the main gross and fine motor milestones usually attained during the first year of life in a general population context. The study sample consisted of 515 infants (mean age 12.9 [SD 0.9] months) and their parents (514 mothers, 434 fathers), who were recruited in child health centers in Northern Finland. The infants were divided into two groups, based on their BITSEA screen status, and motor milestone achievement ages were comp...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Is the Effect of Postpartum Depression on Mother-Infant Bonding Universal?
ConclusionThe prevalence of PPD was higher than previously reported at day 2–3 post-delivery, but lower at 10–12 weeks postpartum. Impaired mother- infant bonding was associated older mothers, history of depression, low social support and BDI-II scores above 20 which should alert practitioner to assessing these factors in post-partum mothers. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Postnatal anxiety prevalence, predictors and effects on development: A narrative review
Publication date: May 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 51Author(s): Tiffany FieldAbstractThe increasing prevalence of postnatal anxiety highlights the need for summarizing the recent research on this condition to inform screening and intervention efforts. This narrative review of the literature was derived from a search on PubMed and PsycINFO for papers published since 2010. The demographic risk factors for postnatal anxiety include being a young mother, having more education and being employed. Childbirth risk factors include being primiparous in one sample and multiparous in another, caesarean delivery...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Longitudinal relations among maternal depressive symptoms, maternal mind-mindedness, and infant attachment behavior
Publication date: May 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 51Author(s): Ann E. Bigelow, Beatrice Beebe, Michelle Power, Anna-Lee Stafford, Julie Ewing, Anna Egleson, Tammy KaminerAbstractThe relations among maternal depression risk, maternal mind-mindedness, and infants’ attachment behavior were longitudinally examined in a community sample of mother-infant dyads. Maternal self-reported depression risk was measured at the infant ages of 6 weeks, 4 months, and 12 months. Maternal mind-mindedness, assessed from mothers’ comments about infants’ mental states (e.g., infants’ thoughts, des...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

The Inconsolable Doll Task: Prenatal coparenting behavioral dynamics under stress predicting child cognitive development at 18 months
Publication date: Available online 28 May 2018Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Dana ShaiAbstractStudies have demonstrated that coparenting can be assessed prenatally through playful observational conditions, including simulated baby enactments. Regrettably, there is a lack of empirical research examining how prenatal coparenting under the emotional stress elicited by the distress of a simulated infant predicts children’s cognitive development. The current longitudinal study introduces a novel procedure—the Inconsolable Doll Task—to assess prenatal coparenting behavioral dynamics under the...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Simulation-based research to improve infant health outcomes: Using the infant simulator to prevent infant shaking
Publication date: Available online 11 June 2018Source: Infant Behavior and DevelopmentAuthor(s): Kirsten Bechtel, Ambika Bhatnagar, Marc AuerbachAbstractSimulation is a technique that creates a situation or environment to allow persons to experience a representation of a real event for the purpose of practice, learning, evaluation, testing, or to gain understanding of systems or human actions. We will first provide an introduction to simulation in healthcare and describe the two types of simulation-based research (SBR) in the pediatric population. We will then provide an overview of the use of SBR to improve health outcome...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

We cooperated so… now what? Infants expect cooperative partners to share resources
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Ying Wang, Annette M.E. HendersonAbstractResearch has demonstrated that an understanding of and engagement in cooperative activities emerges early in life. However, little is known about the expectations infants hold about the consequences of cooperative action. We demonstrate that 14-month-old infants expect that cooperative partners will share the recently attained cooperative goal instead of keeping it for themselves. Interestingly, this prediction does not hold if infants saw the two individuals work towards individual goals. Thes...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Infants’ intermodal numerical knowledge
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Mohammad Rashbari DibavarAbstractTwo-system theory as the dominant approach in the field of infant numerical representation is characterized by three features: precise representation of small sets of objects, approximate representation of large magnitudes and failure to compare small and large sets. Comparison of single- and multimodal numerical abilities suggests that infants’ performance in multimodal conditions is consistent with these three features. Nevertheless, the influence of multimodal stimulation on infants’ num...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Bronchopulmonary dysplasia predictor scale validation in preterm newborns in two neonatal units at 2600 m above sea level
ConclusionsThe scale using the classical definition has high sensitivity, but it is not specific; adjusting the definition for altitude decreases sensitivity but increases specificity. New cutoffs points are needed on the scale or a change in the weight for the variables included in the model in order to be used in our high-altitude population. (Source: Infant Behavior and Development)
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Developmental patterns of change in mother and child emotional availability from infancy to the end of the preschool years: A four-wave longitudinal study
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Matte-Gagné Célia, Dale M. Stack, Lisa A. SerbinAbstractIn this four-wave longitudinal study, we examined intraindividual developmental patterns of change in mother-child emotional availability (EA) during infancy and the preschool years, the factors that promote or hinder it, and the longitudinal within-dyad association between maternal and child EA. Mother-infant dyads (N = 56) were observed at home when children were 6,12, 18 and 55-months-old. Multilevel growth modeling revealed that mother and child EA follow di...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Desire understanding in 2-year-old children: An eye-tracking study
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Amrisha Vaish, Robert Hepach, Tobias GrossmannAbstract‘Much research has investigated children’s understanding of others’ mental states in terms of beliefs, but far less is known about their understanding of others’ desires. To fill this gap, we used an eye-tracking paradigm to test 2-year-old children’s desire understanding by measuring their anticipatory looking behavior as well as changes in their internal arousal (i.e., changes in pupil dilation). Children showed increased pupil dilation when an adult...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research

Fragility of haptic memory in human full-term newborns
Publication date: August 2018Source: Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 52Author(s): Fleur Lejeune, Cristina Borradori Tolsa, Edouard Gentaz, Koviljka BarisnikovAbstractBackgroundNumerous studies have established that newborns can memorize tactile information about the specific features of an object with their hands and detect differences with another object. However, the robustness of haptic memory abilities has already been examined in preterm newborns and in full-term infants, but not yet in full-term newborns. This research is aimed to better understand the robustness of haptic memory abilities at birth by examini...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - July 5, 2018 Category: Child Development Source Type: research