Dissociation between the clinical course and chest imaging in severe COVID-19 pneumonia: a series of five cases
Our results suggest that in cases of clinical improvement with worsened or stable chest imaging variables, the PaO2:FiO2 ratio might be a good marker of the resolution of COVID-19-specific pulmonary vascular insult. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 29, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Damien Basille, Marie-Anne Auquier, Claire Andr éjak, Daniel Oscar Rodenstein, Yazine Mahjoub, Vincent Jounieaux, A & P Group Source Type: research

Heart and Lung Leadership message for September/October 2021
An Ounce of Protection is a Pound of Prevention (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 23, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Craig Thomas Source Type: research

Grip strength as a predictor of disease severity in hospitalized covid-19 patients
Determining the possible risk factors for disease severity - as well as for worse prognosis - among inpatients with COVID-19 is important. It is reported that increased age and comorbidities - especially hypertension, cardiovascular disease (CVD), obesity, diabetes mellitus (DM), and chronic respiratory diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchial asthma - are related with higher rates of severe disease and mortality in COVID-19.1 Likewise, a recent study investigating the predictors of in-hospital mortality among older patients with COVID-19 has shown that non-survivors were more often fra...
Source: Heart and Lung - June 11, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Özgür Kara, Murat Kara, Emre Akın, Levent Özçakar Source Type: research

OR1. Frailty, Quality of Life, and Renal Dysfunction in African Americans with Preserved Ejection Fraction Heart Failure
African Americans (AA) are at a higher risk for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and renal impairment. They are predisposed to several shared risk factors for both syndromes at a younger age. HFpEF is associated with frailty and poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Renal impairment amplifies the inflammatory state in HFpEF, worsens ventricular function, and leads to increased frailty and poorer HRQOL. In HFpEF trials, AAs are often underrepresented and patients with renal impairments are often excluded. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Fatimah Abudayah, Ulf Bronas, Eileen Collins, Anne Fink, Catherine Murks, Chang Park, Houry Puzantian, Karen Vuckovic Tags: Research Source Type: research

OR2. Exploring Experiences Associated with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Diagnosis, Treatment and Life Impact Among Middle-aged and Older Adults: An Interview Study
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder and an important cause of sudden death and heart failure. Limited studies exist that describe diagnosis, treatment, and management experiences of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The purpose of this investigation was to use qualitative data collection methodologies to characterize HCM patient experiences related to HCM diagnosis, treatment, self-management, and the life impacts of HCM. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Deena Zytnick, Ferhaan Ahmad, Sharon Cresci, Debbie Heard, Christina Shay, Anjali Tiku Owens Tags: Research Source Type: research

OR3. Practitioners' Inaccuracy in Decision-Making with Assessing NYHA Functional Class of Patients with Heart Failure
Timely evidence-based guideline directed treatment is essential to ensure optimal outcomes when managing patients with heart failure (HF). Identifying HF patient's New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class is a clinically important as it relates to treatment recommendations. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Kelly Stamp, Marilyn Prasun, Lisa Rathman, Thomas Mc Coy Tags: Research Source Type: research

P001. Gender Differences in Frailty in Heart Failure: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
The objective of this study was to quantify gender differences in the prevalence of frailty in HF. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Mary Roberts Davis, Christopher Lee, Amy Corcoran, Nandita Gupta, Izabella Uchmanowicz, Quin Denfeld Tags: Research Source Type: research

P002. Cardiovascular and Renal Outcomes with Empagliflozin in Heart Failure
Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors reduce the risk of hospitalizations for heart failure in patients with or without diabetes. More evidence is needed regarding their effects across the broad spectrum of heart failure, including those with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Butler Javed, Stefan Anker, Martina Brueckmann, Gerasimos Filippatos, Waheed Jamal, Karen Kimura, Milton Packer, Stuart Pocock, Janet Schnee, Faiez Zannad, Cordula Zeller Tags: Research Source Type: research

P003. An Evidence Based Quality Improvement Project of the Impact of a Nurse Practitioner Led Heart Failure, Self-Care Focused, Patient Education on Healthcare Related Quality of Life
Heart failure (HF) is a progressive and debilitating disease with high morbidity and mortality rates. HF affects both physical and psychosocial health with over 75% of HF patients experiencing frailty and 10-40% of HF patients having difficulty preforming activities of daily living. These limitations heavily impact healthcare related quality of life (HRQOL). Patient education has been shown to improve HF outcomes, but it remains poorly utilized. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Tal Sraboyants Tags: Research Source Type: research

P004. 30-Day Hospital Readmission Rates, Frequencies, and Heart Failure Classification for Patients with Heart Failure
Congestive heart failure (CHF) is the leading cause of mortality, morbidity, and disability worldwide among patients. Both the incidence and the prevalence of heart failure are age dependent and are relatively common in individuals 40 years of age and older. CHF is one of the leading causes of inpatient hospitalization readmission in the United States, with readmission rates remaining above the 20% goal within 30 days. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services imposes a 3% reimbursement penalty for excessive readmissions including those who are readmitted within 30 days from prior hospitalization for heart failure. (So...
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Margaret Harvey, Yolanda Brown, Twonia Goyer Tags: Research Source Type: research

P005. Patient Satisfaction with Virtual Heart Failure Care in the Bronx During the Initial COVID-19 Surge
At the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was an urgent need to limit the exposure of patients (pts) to SARS-CoV-2, including areas within outpatient medical offices. Nevertheless, high risk heart failure (HF) pts continued to require close management. To overcome this predicament, at our institution pts were asked to stay at home and engage in virtual HF visits (VHFVs) via telephone or video, in lieu of in-office visits (IOVs). (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Marie Galvao, Norma Christian, Muhammad Farooq, Jeanne Hickey, Ulrich Jorde, Snehal Patel, Kalil Salkey, Newman Seth, Sabrina Sicilia Tags: Research Source Type: research

P006. Relationship of Heart Failure Patient Caregivers Mutuality and Preparedness to Caregiving Role Strain and Burden during COVID-19
The hospitalization rates among Heart Failure (HF) patients has increased from 23% in 2000 to 29% in 2010 necessitating the efforts to improve care and reduce cost (CDC, 2014). This is causing an increase burden on the health care system, families, and the society. At discharge, patients are educated on self-care, which is a non-pharmacological approach towards patients managing their own disease state. Self-care is a difficult concept for most Heart Failure patients to master because it requires adapting to new life-style changes. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Lydia Albuquerque Tags: Research Source Type: research

P007. Genotypic and Phenotypic Differences and Similarities Among Patients With Transthyretin Amyloidosis or Other Inherited Cardiovascular Diseases: Insights From a Genetic Testing Program
Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (hATTR or ATTRv [variant]) is a progressive, and fatal disease caused by mutations in the transthyretin (TTR) gene. These mutations destabilize protein folding, resulting in amyloid deposits and causing multisystem dysfunction such as cardiomyopathy, whose etiology may be attributed to traditional causes of cardiovascular diseases. Genetic testing was recently added to the diagnostic armamentarium for ATTR with cardiomyopathy. Heart failure nurses, whether registered nurses or advanced practice nurses, can have a pivotal role in appropriately diagnosing hATTR as the underlying cause of ...
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Andrew Keller, Olakunle Akinboboye, Diego Delgado, Jill S. Dolinsky, Aaron Gabriel, Catherine Marti, Arvind Narayana, Kemi Olugemo, Keyur Shah, Ajay Vallakati Tags: Research Source Type: research

P008. Referral and Diagnosis of Hereditary Transthyretin Amyloidosis by Heart Failure Nursing Specialists in the United States: Insights From a Genetic Testing Program
Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (hATTR or ATTRv [variant]) is a progressive and fatal disease caused by mutations in the transthyretin gene (TTR) that result in the deposition of misfolded TTR protein in major organs and systems, leading to multisystem dysfunction. Patients often experience a mixed phenotype of both cardiomyopathy and polyneuropathy. Early diagnosis, which can be facilitated with genetic testing, is key to achieving optimal patient outcomes. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Christopher Bell, Jill Dolinksy, Aaron Gabriel, Arvind Narayana, Kemi Olugemo, Meghan Towne Tags: Research Source Type: research

P009. Cardiovascular Disease Burden Before Hereditary Transthyretin Amyloidosis Diagnosis
Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (hATTR or ATTRv [variant]) is a progressive and fatal disease often associated with infiltrative cardiac involvement, with cardiac symptoms sometimes occurring years before diagnosis. Because there are available treatments for hATTR, prompt recognition and early diagnosis is imperative. Nurses who work closely with patients with heart failure are positioned to recognize the symptoms and early signs that should raise clinical suspicion and uncover an underlying diagnosis of hATTR. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Montserrat Vera Llonch, Eunice Chang, Nowell M. Fine, Jose Nativi-Nicolau, Jose T. Ortiz-Perez, Michael R. Pollock, Sheila R. Reddy, Marian H. Tarbox Tags: Research Source Type: research

P010. Evaluation of the Efficacy and Safety of AKCEA-TTR-LRx (ION-682884) in Patients with Transthyretin-mediated Amyloid Cardiomyopathy: The CARDIO-TTRansform Study
Transthyretin amyloidosis cardiomyopathy (ATTR-CM) is a fatal condition, leading to heart failure (HF) and ultimately death. ATTR-CM is caused by misfolding and aggregation of transthyretin (TTR), a protein produced by the liver. Depending on the presence or absence of a destabilizing mutation in the TTR gene, the disease can be classified as hereditary ATTR-CM (hATTR-CM) or wild-type ATTR-CM (wtATTR-CM), respectively. Despite the treatment with a TTR stabilizer, tafamidis, recently approved in the United States for the treatment of ATTR-CM, disease progression still occurs. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Mathew Maurer, Merrill Benson, Brambatti Michela, Gustavo Buchele, Rodney Falk, Richard Geary, Arnt Kristen, Brett Monia, Cecilia Monteiro, Louis O'Dea, Eugene Schneider, Li Tai, Sotirios Tsimikas, Nick Viney, Qingqing Yang Tags: Research Source Type: research

P011. Impact of Patisiran on Activities of Daily Living and Functional Status in hATTR Amyloidosis
Hereditary transthyretin-mediated (hATTR) amyloidosis, a rare, multi-systemic, life-threatening disease, causes neurologic and cardiac dysfunction, leading to impaired functional status and declining ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs). (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Madeline Merkel, David Adams, Senda Ajroud-Driss, John Berk, Alejandra Gonzalez-Duarte, Cecilia Hale, Hollis Lin, Amanda Peltier, Ole Suhr, Ivailo Tournev, Taro Yamashita Tags: Research Source Type: research

P012. COVID-19 Restrictions Impact Psychosocial Health Outcomes of Adults with Cardiovascular Disease
Individuals with underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) have an increased vulnerability to COVID-19 and poorer outcomes. Little is known about the impact social distancing guidelines have had on the health behaviors of this population. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Jennifer Viveiros, Elizabeth Chin, Joohyun Chung, Mary McCurry, Kristen Sethares, Mary-Elizabeth Sosa Tags: Research Source Type: research

P013. BNP as a Predictor of Diuretic Nonadherence in 30-Day Heart Failure Readmissions
Diuretic treatment effectively treats heart failure (HF), lowers brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and can reduce hospital readmissions, yet approximately 50% of HF patients do not take medications as prescribed. Additionally, 25% of HF hospital readmissions are thought to be preventable and associated with imperfect adherence to prescribed medications. One barrier to solving this problem is the lack of an objective marker for identifying or gauging diuretic-taking habits in the HF patient. Better understanding of the impact of imperfect diuretic adherence on BNP provides insight into the significance of taking diuretics as...
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Rebecca Meraz, Katie Frank, Kathryn Osteen, Henry Viejo, Nancy Vish Tags: Research Source Type: research

P014. Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Events In Hospitalized Patients with COVID-19
Between 25%-50% of patients hospitalized with (COVID-19) suffer cardiovascular events. Limited information is available to identify those at greatest risk for cardiac complications. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Lynn Roser, Jiapeng Huang, Maiying Kong, Trevor McGuffin, Pavani Nathala, Vidyulata Salunkhe, Harideep Samanapelly, Qian Xu Tags: Research Source Type: research

OR4. Emphasis on Post-Acute Care Shows Improved Guideline Adherence in Three Metro Markets
Nearly 6.5 million Americans are living with heart failure. Heart failure remains a leading cause of hospital admission and contribution to healthcare expenditure. It is projected that by the year 2030, the total cost of heart failure will increase by 127%. Participation in a quality improvement initiative aimed at improving adherence to evidenced based guidelines can assist in reducing cost and improving patient outcomes. While hospital participation in an in-hospital quality improvement initiative, such as Get With the Guidelines ® Heart Failure (GWTG-HF), has been well-studied, few studies evaluate post-hospital dis...
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Lynn Mallas-Serdynski, Michele Bolles, Sruthi Cherkur, Robin Kiser, Kelly Macheska, Michelle Scharnott Tags: Practice Improvement Source Type: research

OR5. Supportive Heart Failure Care Program: Reducing Hospital Re-admissions at a Visiting Nurse Agency
The purpose of this quality improvement project was to decrease heart failure patient hospital readmissions during the first 30-days of care within a visiting nurse agency by implementing a Supportive Heart Failure Care Program. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Claudine Hagan Tags: Practice Improvement Source Type: research

OR6. Heart Failure Hospitalist Program: Innovation Drives Best Practice and Exceptional Outcomes
This presentation will describe a creative, integrated care-model for heart failure (HF) management. Two key areas of focus will be consistent, patient-centered care across the continuum and innovative inpatient strategies. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Kimberly Fowler, Jesus Vargas Tags: Practice Improvement Source Type: research

OR7. Health Literacy and the Inpatient Nurse: Defining Core Competencies at an Academic Medical Center
Limited health literacy is a national health crisis contributing to poor health outcomes including increased hospital readmissions, increased healthcare cost, decreased use of preventive services, and increased morbidity and mortality. Efforts to improve the health literacy of the nation hinge on healthcare provider-level interventions to address social determinants of health. However, these strategies represent an area of care which inpatient providers may not be prepared. Despite cascading poor outcomes associated with limited health literacy, staff nurses at a large urban medical center are not professionally prepared w...
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Denise Sanchez, Rose Milano Tags: Practice Improvement Source Type: research

P015. Implementing Telemedicine Practices for Mechanical Circulatory Support Patients During COVID-19 Global Pandemic
To provide safe, comprehensive, medical care to homebound MCS patients during the COVID-19 global pandemic. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Beth Dinicola Tags: Practice Improvement Source Type: research

P016. Evaluating the Efficacy of Focused Nurse Practitioner Visits on Heart Failure Outcomes Among Patients Enrolled in the Program for All-Inclusive Care of the Elderly (PACE): A Quality Improvement Project
Symptom management in heart failure (HF) is the cornerstone to improve outcomes in this complex population. Rehospitalization rates due to HF sequelae are high and symptom management remains an ongoing issue. Focused Nurse Practitioner (NP) visits with evidence-based patient education will enhance engagement and self-care management of HF. Ultimately, this will improve HF outcomes for participants in the PACE program. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Kristen Lewis Tags: Practice Improvement Source Type: research

P017. Impact of Chronic Care Management on Heart Failure Readmissions
Heart Failure (HF) currently affects 6.2 million Americans, with an expected 8.5 million by 2030. There are 134, 000 annual HF readmissions (CMS) at an estimated cost of $4.5 billion. HF readmission significantly impacts Quality of Life (QOL) and mortality. Research suggests that Chronic Care Management (CCM) programs improve patient outcomes and reduce healthcare costs. Given the significant clinical and economic burdens associated with HF, we examined the effect of Nurse Practitioner led CCM program on hospitalization rate in HF patients. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Simran Grewal Tags: Practice Improvement Source Type: research

P018. Case Study of Heart Failure Exacerbation Management via Tele-Health
• 6.5 million American adults have heart failure• Advance Practice Providers (APP) can successfully manage CHF exacerbation via Tele-HealthCase Study•HPI: 74-year-old male with a PMHx of ICM, HFrEF (EF 25-30%), HTN, HLD, obesity, OSA, hx of tobacco use and EtOH abuse. Cardiology consulted for worsening edema, weight gain, escalating SOB and DOE.• NP provided same day Tele-Health visit and diagnosed patient with CHF exacerbation. Treatment plan in alignment with Goal Direct Medical Therapy (GDMT) developed for inpatient diuresis. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Robert Malloy Tags: Practice Improvement Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Source Type: research

Board of Directors
(Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Source Type: research

COVID-19 variants in India : potential role in second wave and impact on vaccination
SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus first detected in China in December 2019, has had a far-reaching impact on global health affecting millions worldwide. As the pandemic has evolved over the past year and half, detailed insight has been gained on the multiple variants of this novel coronavirus and their possible role in the resurgence of this pandemic globally. Variants are often defined as a group of viruses that share distinctive mutations inherited over a lineage. If these multiple mutations accumulate in a lineage, these viruses may evolve and develop into newer strains. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - June 3, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Shekhar Kunal, Aditi, Kashish Gupta, Pranav Ish Source Type: research

Lung ultrasound score as a tool to monitor disease progression and detect ventilator-associated pneumonia during COVID-19-associated ARDS
During the past few months, intensive care units (ICUs) all over the world were overwhelmed with a large amount of severe pandemic coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia cases. COVID-19 pneumonia was well described in computerized tomography (CT) studies, with early ground-glass opacities originating in subpleural zones, progressive extension and consolidation 1. Pleural involvement was also underlined by rare cases of pneumothorax and pneumopericardium2,3. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - May 30, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Auguste Dargent, Emeric Chatelain, Salim Si-Mohamed, Marie Simon, Thomas Baudry, Louis Kreitmann, Jean-Pierre Quenot, Martin Cour, Laurent Argaud, the COVIDLUS study group Source Type: research

Does COVID-19 Pneumonia Signify Secondary Organizing Pneumonia?: A Narrative Review Comparing The Similarities Between These Two Distinct Entities
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) results from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection leading to the ongoing worldwide pandemic. As the wave of COVID-19 disease continues to spread across the globe, many medical publications have followed as part of scientific efforts to characterize, treat, and prevent this disease. COVID-19 can present with a wide variety of respiratory complications that range from self-limiting upper respiratory tract infection to acute respiratory failure from diffuse bilateral lung infiltrates, resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - May 29, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Woon H. Chong, Biplab K. Saha, Amit Chopra Source Type: research

Pre-Hospital Antiplatelet Medication Use on COVID-19 Disease Severity
Progressive respiratory failure in the form of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major driver of morbidity and mortality in COVID-19 patients.1 Some patients with COVID-19 respiratory failure demonstrate severe hypoxemia despite having near normal compliance, a combination atypical for ARDS.2 This disconnect between gas exchange and lung mechanics may be explained by pulmonary thrombi as endothelial injury and thromboembolic events are increasingly recognized as an essential component of COVID-19 pathophysiology. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - May 26, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Darren Pan, Ada Ip, Serena Zhan, Isaac Wasserman, Daniel J. Snyder, Alexandra Z. Agathis, Nikhil Shamapant, Jeong Yun Yang, Akila Pai, Madhu Mazumdar, Hooman Poor Source Type: research

High-flow Nasal Cannula therapy: A feasible treatment for vulnerable elderly COVID-19 patients in the wards
Approximately 80% of COVID-19 patients experience respiratory symptoms and roughly 20% of the patients develop severe symptoms requiring hospital admission.1 With the lack of effective antiviral drugs, symptomatic treatment with oxygen administration remains the cornerstone of the treatment. As an intermediate step between conventional oxygen administration and invasive mechanical ventilation, High-flow Nasal Cannula (HFNC) is widely used to treat hypoxemic respiratory failure. HFNC is a form of non-invasive ventilation and contains high flow, pre-heated and humidified air delivering high concentrations of oxygen. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - May 25, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Job van Steenkiste, Michael C. van Herwerden, Dolf Weller, Christiaan J. van den Bout, Rikje Ruiter, Jan G. den Hollander, Rachida el Moussaoui, Gert T. Verhoeven, Charlotte. van Noord, Marinus A. van den Dorpel Source Type: research

Heart and Lung Leadership message for July/August 2021
(Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - May 1, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Source Type: research

The Incidence, Clinical Characteristics, and Outcomes of Pneumothorax in Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients: A Systematic Review
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus is known to cause coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), resulting in the ongoing global pandemic1. COVID-19 presents with a wide variety of respiratory complications that range from self-limiting upper respiratory tract infection to acute respiratory failure from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pleural diseases such as pleural effusion and pneumothorax.2 Pneumothorax is a common complication of invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) in critically ill patients, with reported incidence up to 15%. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - May 1, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Woon H. Chong, Biplab K. Saha, Kurt Hu, Amit Chopra Source Type: research

American Association of Heart Failure Nurses Position Paper on the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP)
(Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - April 19, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Source Type: research

Indacaterol/glycopyrronium affects lung function and cardiovascular events in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases: A meta-analysis
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by chronic progressive aggravation of lung function, commonly results in progressive dyspnea, coughing, and expectoration,1 and is currently the third leading Disease-related death worldwide.2 Acute COPD exacerbation not only requires additional medication, but also for the patient to be further hospitalized, which accelerates decline in lung function and leads to poor prognosis as well as increased risk of death.3 Bronchodilators play a central role in managing symptoms in COPD patients, therefore form a cornerstone for its treatment. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - April 14, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Qinxia Zhang, Haifu Zhang, Jianjun Wang, Zhaoyang Ruan, Yifan Dai, Zehai Xia, Qun Lv Source Type: research

Heart & Lung Official Journal of the American Association of Heart Failure NursesAbstractsVirtual AAHFN 17th Annual Meeting, June 17-18, 2021
(Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - April 10, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Source Type: research

Symptom Status Questionnaire – Heart Failure – Brazilian Version: cross-cultural adaptation and content validation
In the US, there were 809,000 hospital discharges due to heart failure (HF) and over 80,400 HF-related deaths from 2013 to 2016.1 Brazil has similar numbers of HF-related hospitalizations and deaths, with over 880,000 hospitalizations and 98,000 deaths from the disease since 2016.2 In patients with HF, persistent symptoms even after therapeutic optimization are prevalent,3 –6 indicate poor prognosis,7 and are common causes for hospitalization.7–10 In addition, HF symptoms are associated with impaired functional capacity and limited performance of activities of daily living11 and are the most important predictor...
Source: Heart and Lung - April 7, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Gabriela Nunes dos-Santos, Ana Paula da-Concei ção, Seongkum Heo, Renata Eloah de-Lucena-Ferretti-Rebustini, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite de-Barros, Vinicius Batista Santos, Camila Takáo-Lopes Source Type: research

The effects of maintenance cardiac rehabilitation: A systematic review and Meta-analysis, with a focus on sex
Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are among the leading causes of death and disability globally.1 This occurs despite the substantive evidence regarding how to control the disease, by means of interventional procedures, pharmacological approaches, and promotion of healthy lifestyles to control risk factors.2 (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - April 7, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Mohiul Chowdhury, Fiorella A. Heald, Juan C. Sanchez-Delgado, Maureen Pakosh, Adriana M. Jacome-Hortua, Sherry L. Grace Source Type: research

COPD exacerbations are related to poor air quality in Innsbruck: A retrospective pilot study
Chronic obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a frequent yet preventable disease caused by smoking and pollutants.1 In 2016, nearly 6% of all-cause mortality in Austria was related to respiratory diseases, leading to a severe economic burden.2,3 According to the World Health Organization (WHO), COPD is now the third leading cause of death worldwide, and approximately one-quarter of the Austrian population aged over 40 is expected to suffer from COPD.4 –6 (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - April 6, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Anna Boehm, Magdalena Aichner, Thomas Sonnweber, Ivan Tancevski, Thomas Fischer, Sabina Sahanic, Michael Joannidis, Guenter Weiss, Alex Pizzini, Judith Loeffler-Ragg Source Type: research

Perceived stress and social support needs among primary family caregivers of ICU Patients in Taiwan
Having a family member hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) is a stressful event for family caregivers.1,2 The stress level could be even higher among patients unexpectedly admitted to the ICU and their family members.3 For family caregivers of ICU patients, the stressors could be derived from unexpected hospitalization, the ICU environment, the uncertainty of the disease progress, medical decision-making, insufficient care information, and their own daily lives.1,4,5 The stressors perceived by individuals are influenced by their cultural context, which further affects their strategies for coping with stress. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - April 6, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Pei-Yu Chang, Tsai-Hsiu Chang, Jung-Min Yu Source Type: research

Lower socioeconomic factors are associated with higher mortality in patients with septic shock
Sepsis is a life-threatening syndrome defined by acute organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection.1 With over 970,000 cases admitted annually in the United States, sepsis-related hospitalizations place a significant burden on hospital resources.2 Recently published data suggest that the incidence of sepsis in the United States has been increasing. The treatment of sepsis and septic shock accounts for nearly $24 billion or 6.2% of national hospital expenses. Additionally, septic shock is a contributor to nearly 50% of hospital deaths. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - April 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Daniel Colon Hidalgo, Natalie Tapaskar, Swathi Rao, Dalila Masic, Alice Su, Josue Portillo, Megan Rech Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - April 1, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Source Type: research

Board of Directors
(Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - April 1, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Source Type: research

AAHFN Leadership Address Submitted February 11, 2021
(Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - March 17, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Source Type: research

Comment on: “Pattern of anticoagulation prescription for patients with Covid-19 acute respiratory distress syndrome admitted to ICU. Does it impact outcome?”
The article by Nadeem et al. entitled “Pattern of anticoagulation prescription for patients with Covid-19 acute respiratory distress syndrome admitted to ICU. Does it impact outcome?” has been read with great interest. Although it is a very interesting article, some pertinent points merit attention. (Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - March 14, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Joshua K. Salabei Source Type: research

Who Knows What the Future Brings
(Source: Heart and Lung)
Source: Heart and Lung - March 3, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Source Type: research