From the Editors
(Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - September 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Spontaneous, Grassroots Initiative Brings Niagara Health’s new Purpose, Vision and Values to Life
The purpose (or mission) of Niagara Health is Extraordinary Caring. Every Person. Every Time. Staff and physicians across the large, multi-site hospital organization are challenged to embrace this purpose in all of their day-to-day interactions. One Niagara Health team with no direct role in patient care (IT) spontaneously and independently created an Acts of Kindness campaign. They set a goal for the number of Acts of Kindness they would do and tracked the results. This simple response inspired 32 additional teams to launch similar initiatives, with more than 30,000 Acts of Kindness recorded and celebrated as of August 20...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - July 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

myHip&Knee: Improving Patient Engagement and Self-Management through Mobile Technology
Given the increasing volume of hip and knee replacement surgery with reduced hospital stays and resources, we explored technology to address gaps in patient care and enhance self-management. The team at the Holland Orthopaedic and Arthritic Centre of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, which performs a high volume of joint replacement surgery, partnered with patients and a health technology company to create a mobile app: myHip&Knee. The results to date demonstrate that the app improves patient experience and reduces follow-up calls to surgeons' offices, ultimately reducing demand on healthcare resources. Early enga...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - July 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Overall Quality Performance of Long-Term Care Homes in Ontario
This study (1) describes the overall quality performance of LTC homes across five years (2012–2017) and (2) determines if organizational factors impact quality performance. The results demonstrate significant, continuous sector-wide improvement in overall quality performance (as assessed by the Qindex) over time and significant differences in quality based on home size, operator size and ownership. This paper positions the Qindex, a global metric of quality, as a valuable tool for quality measurement and management in the LTC sector. (Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - July 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Commentary: Identifying the Underpinnings of “Care That Honours Seniors” in Alberta
In Alberta, the Network of Excellence in Seniors’ Health and Wellness was launched in 2013 to address the challenges and growing demands on the health system resulting from the aging population. To identify key considerations, the Network commenced a public outreach campaign using a survey to gather diverse opinions about “care that honours seniors.”  (Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - July 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Establishing Effective Resident and Family Councils: A Pilot Project to Increase Family and Resident Engagement in Alberta’s Continuing Care Sites
Resident and family councils aim to improve resident and family satisfaction, but guidelines for councils are scarce. This project developed a toolkit and tested its ability, along with networking meetings, to promote successful councils. Nine continuing care sites participated with residents, family and staff from each site who received the toolkit, completed surveys, attended meetings and participated in post-pilot interviews. Participants found that the toolkit helped improve council function and, with the networking meetings, increased participation. All sites found the toolkit and networking meetings to be valuable re...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - July 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Keeping Long-Term Care Patients Out of Hospital During Acute Medical Illness: Proposal for Common Elements of an Integrated Healthcare Delivery System for Long-Term Care
Integration of acute and palliative care services for long-term care (LTC) residents reduces the morbidity and mortality associated with avoidable hospitalizations while contributing to healthcare system sustainability. This paper explores patient, provider and system factors contributing to potentially avoidable emergency room visits from LTC homes, based on our clinical and quality improvement work in the Greater Toronto Area and Calgary, as well as reviews the existing literature. Commonalities are used to identify key elements for developing an integrated healthcare delivery system to manage acute medical changes in LT...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - July 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Informing Primary Care Changes in Alberta: Continuity and Potential Impacts on Acute Care
Health systems across Canada are embarking on initiatives to enhance access to primary care services, with the intent of improving patient outcomes and mitigating escalating healthcare costs. However, it is important that such initiatives be carefully weighed with the evidence that the changes will indeed have the desired impact. In Alberta, part of the informative process involved an analysis to examine links between continuity with primary care and utilization of acute care services. The findings provide information regarding expectations for outcomes and potentially useful (and not so useful) measures for monitoring pro...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - July 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Canada’s Evolving Medicare: Patient-Centred Care
Canada's universal healthcare program, medicare, continues to evolve. An area of care that has gained increasing attention over the past several years is the general concept and specific components of patient centricity in healthcare delivery. This paper compares key measures of patient-centred care practices recorded in the 2013 and 2016 Health Care in Canada (HCIC) surveys, with the most recent preferences of the public and health professionals obtained in the 2018 HCIC survey, including priorities for improved future care. Timely access and caring care were the public's top-supported components of patient-centred care i...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - July 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Non-Adherence to Prescribed Therapies: Pharmacare’s Existential Challenge
Pharmacare, a recently proposed addition to Canada's universal medicare program, has become a prominent topic in the public discourse, but funding and leadership have not been established. Repeated Health Care in Canada (HCIC) surveys of the adult public and a broad spectrum of health professionals reveal very strong support for a national system that is easy to access and covers all prescribed pharmaceuticals. Although the practical details of universal pharmacare remain to be established, there is strong support among the public and professionals as well as increasing federal government interest in moving forward and ult...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - July 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Medicare’s Evolution: National Pharmacare and Shared Leadership
Repeated Health Care in Canada (HCIC) surveys over the past two decades have consistently reported that the adult public and clinical and administrative health professionals consider medicare to be successful in terms of quality of care, despite a growing concern that timely access to care remains challenging. These key stakeholders have also recently signalled that major change strategies are likely necessary for continuing success. In the 2018 survey, both the public and professionals ranked highest the creation of a national comprehensive pharmacare plan, entirely funded by the federal government, or with federal fundin...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - July 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Cutting Through the Ice …
The papers that follow are part of an honest, reasonable and serious attempt to build on an existing consensus at the basis of medicare, which guarantees that all Canadians can get medical attention when sick and hospital care when very sick (or injured). Without any exception, reform proposals that run counter to these principles are doomed to failure. However, it becomes harder and harder to ensure that costly and complex healthcare services can be "readily and timely" accessed without a radical shift in approaches. To say things otherwise, to keep what we cherish, we must embrace change, in the form of...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - July 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Types of Opioid Harms in Canadian Hospitals: Comparing Canada and Australia
This report examines the characteristics of opioid-related care visits to emergency departments (EDs) or hospital admissions and groups them into five distinct harm profiles. These profiles and their respective distributions illustrate how opioid-related harms differ across care settings in Canada. Opioid dependence and accidental poisoning were the more prominent types of harm seen in EDs, with a rate of 39.2 and 38.0 visits per 100,000 population, respectively. Within the in-patient population, rates of hospital stays were comparatively higher (26.8 per 100,000) for adverse drug reactions compared to other opioid-related...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - July 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Rural and Urban Differences in the Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Subsequent Health Services Utilization in Ontario
Canada has one of the highest rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the world, with 1 in 140 Canadians currently living with the disease. IBD occurs less often among individuals living in rural households. This protective effect is particularly pronounced in young children, and early-life exposure to the rural environment greatly reduces the risk. However, individuals living in rural areas who have IBD have decreased access to specialist gastroenterology care. (Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - July 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

From the Editors
(Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - June 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Overcoming Challenges to Support Clinician-Scientist Roles in Canadian Academic Health Sciences Centres
Clinician-scientists (CSs) make significant contributions to the healthcare system, yet their roles are not fully understood, supported or recognized by healthcare leaders or policy makers. CSs are healthcare professionals with advanced research training who continue to pursue clinical work and are considered an essential component of the research infrastructure in academic health sciences centres. The current literature supports the role of CSs but is also clear that there are multiple challenges in attracting and retaining clinicians to the role. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the current status of the CS role,...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Executive Coaching for Leadership Development: Experience of Academic Physician Leaders
Conclusions: The physician leaders who underwent a series of executive coaching sessions had very similar experiences overall. The added professional development tool of executive coaching for specialist physicians may have a significant role in supporting productivity, increasing workplace engagement and transforming the culture of medical practice. (Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Integrated (Enterprise) Risk Management in Canadian Healthcare Organizations – Common Barriers and a Shared Solution for Effective and Efficient Implementation in Canada
Healthcare is a complex, high-risk industry as evidenced by frequent accounts of unintended patient and staff harm as well as other disruptions leading to financial, reputational and facility losses. Canadian healthcare organizations have struggled to adopt effective organization-wide risk management programs to reduce the likelihood and impact of these losses. This paper outlines an evidence-based initiative to spread, at scale, an effective and efficient program for integrated risk management. National results and benchmarks from the first three years of implementation are provided. (Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Impact of a Primary Care After-Hours Clinic on Avoidable Emergency Department Visits and Costs
Conclusion: Our data suggest that AHCs may decrease avoidable, low-acuity ED visits and save healthcare system costs. (Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Innovation in Ontario’s Family Health Teams: How Palliative and Coordinated Care Programs Are Filling Service Gaps and Keeping Patients at Home
Collaborative interprofessional primary care (PC) teams are widely seen as an essential attribute of high-performing PC systems (Aggarwal and Hutchinson 2012). Effective PC teams play a key role in the mobilization of healthcare resources and navigation of the health and social care system for their patients. In Ontario, the establishment of Family Health Teams has resulted in the implementation of unique programs that deliver services to palliative and elderly patients with a focus on keeping them at home and out of hospital. Case studies cited in this article highlight two innovative programs in Family Health Teams and p...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Aging at Home: A Portrait of Home-Based Primary Care across Canada
Older adults and their families often struggle in navigating an increasingly fragmented healthcare system when it becomes increasingly difficult to receive care beyond their homes in the face of advanced illness, frailty and complex care needs. The provision of integrated home-based primary care has demonstrated improved patient and caregiver experiences and reduced healthcare costs when primary care providers collaborate in delivering care as part of larger interprofessional teams. In this trans-Canada portrait of five urban home-based primary care programs, their core features are highlighted to provide a roadmap on how ...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

How Do Older Adults Decide to Visit the Emergency Department? Patient and Caregiver Perspectives
Seniors account for a high number of emergency department (ED) visits, yet little is known about how they decide to visit the ED. This paper reports on the results of surveys completed by 264 seniors who visited the ED and their caregivers and interviews with a subset (N = 51) of survey respondents, aimed at understanding how they decide to visit the ED. Although older adults rely on others to help them decide whether to visit the ED, only a small proportion consult healthcare providers in doing so. Opportunities exist for enhancing seniors' decision-making process regarding ED visits and access to community-based healthca...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Frailty and Aging: How the Danish Experience Might Inform Canada
Scandinavian countries are widely acknowledged as leaders in innovative models of care for their aging populations. To learn what might be potentially applicable to the health system in Canada, the Canadian Frailty Network (CFN) led a contingent of government, administrative, research and patient representatives to Denmark to directly observe Danish approaches for providing healthcare for older adults living with frailty. In this paper and based on what we learned from these observations, we discuss healthcare challenges faced by Canada's aging population for which Danish strategies provide clues as to where and how to imp...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Opioids in Canada
The objective of this study is to summarize recent trends of opioid-related harms and opioid prescribing across Canada. Opioid-related harms examined in this study include opioid poisonings, opioid use disorders, adverse reactions to opioids and infants born with neonatal withdrawal symptoms. Data are reported at the pan-Canadian, provincial and community levels. (Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Cataract Surgery Quality and Capacity
Cataract surgery is the most common operation performed in most developed countries, including Canada. Nuanced, evidence-driven policies are needed to ensure appropriate access to this sight-saving operation while maintaining the highest standards in quality of care. The Vision Health Services Research Program at Queen's University, in partnership with members of the Ontario Provincial Vision Task Force, has developed evidence to inform policies aimed at optimizing both access and quality across the eye care spectrum. (Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

From the Editors
(Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Embedding Psychiatric Risk Flags Within an Electronic Health Record: Initial Findings and Lessons Learned
In an effort to improve safety in psychiatric settings, health professionals need to be aware of patients at risk for aggression and violent behaviour. To do so, a risk-flagging functionality can be built into an electronic health record system to alert health professionals of potentially aggressive or violent patients. This paper describes a risk-flagging system at Canada's largest psychiatric hospital and presents initial findings and lessons learned. Risk flags embedded in an electronic health record system are one way of communicating patient risks to health professionals but should be complemented with other forms of ...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Time of Transfer of Admitted Patients from the ED: A Contributor to ED Boarding in High-Volume Community Hospitals
The twin challenges of bed boarding and "hallway medicine" have emerged in recent years as key healthcare issues. Many hospitals, challenged with increasing demand and limited resources, have tried to find efficiencies within their operations. One such strategy is that of early morning discharges and expedited bed turnaround times. We conducted a retrospective study within three high-volume hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area looking at discharge times of in-patients and transfer times of admitted, Emergency Department (ED)-boarded patients. We discovered a consistent pattern of late-in-the-day discharg...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Twenty Years Later: Do We Have an Agreed-Upon Definition of Health Quality Management?
Since the Institute of Medicine's report in the USA in 1999 and the Baker–Norton report in Canada in 2004, academics have studied quality in areas such as governance, process improvement, measurement, patient engagement, physician and staff engagement and finance. Few, however, have offered a formal definition for their area or integrated each area's underlying assumptions to offer a shared definition of quality. This paper summarizes selected literature in each area, analyzes their contributions and compares common strands between each area to build a single integrated definition of health quality management whi...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Experimenting with Governance: Alberta’s Strategic Clinical Networks
Alberta is undertaking a bold and somewhat risky step overhauling its health system governance to build higher performance in quality, safety and improved health outcomes for Albertans. On the heels of having re-established a single province-wide health authority (Alberta Health Services [AHS]), provincial health system decision makers have moved to establish province-wide Strategic Clinical Networks™ (SCNs). Sixteen SCNs have been implemented, and all are constituted as teams of healthcare professionals, researchers, government stakeholders, patients and families seeking to improve delivery of healthcare across ...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

New Voices, New Power, New Ways of Working: Bringing integrated care to the National Health Service in England
This issue of Healthcare Quarterly features the third and final instalment in a three-part series developed by Ontario's The Change Foundation featuring international perspectives on health service delivery models that improve system integration and ensure seamless services and better coordination. Part one featured Chris Ham, chief executive of the London-based King's Fund think tank, and part two featured Geoff Huggins, director for health and social care integration in Scotland. In this issue, Helen Bevan, chief transformation officer of England's National Health Service, discusses the radical shifts she'd like to see i...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

An Opportunity for Quality: The Need for Better Evaluation of Family Health Teams in Ontario
In the past decade, primary care has undergone significant changes toward system improvement, which has improved patient outcomes and reduced costs. Family health teams (FHTs) were introduced in Ontario as part of primary care renewal. FHTs address a lack of capacity and integration among providers and service inaccessibility experienced by the population. We explore, the potential for positive impact of FHTs and the lack of built-in evaluation strategies to assess performance. We provide four suggestions to better support rigorous evaluation of FHTs. This commentary considers Ontario's efforts to improve capacity, quality...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Achievement of Accreditation by Community-Based Family Practice – Workload and Cost Analysis
This study conducted a workload and cost analysis of achieving accreditation. Human resources (HR) comprised 95% of the total cost. Document preparation constituted 76% of workload and 68% of total HR costs. Centralized content experts were tasked with document write-up. Clinics focused on survey preparation: 56% of staff participated, with the workload being the heaviest on managers. In CAD (2018 $ value), per capita cost was the highest for the 2-physician clinic ($65.78) and lower for the 11-physician ($19.44) clinic. Other cost determinants included culture, organizational structure, physician/staff engagement and pre-...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Accreditation: A Quality Improvement Strategy for the Community-Based Family Practice
This study examines the impact of accreditation as a quality improvement (QI) strategy for community-based/fee-for-service family practices. Pre-/post-accreditation data received on clinic compliance with accreditation standards, provider-reported work-life and patients' self-rated health status/care show massive improvement in accreditation-rated compliance scores, which were disproportional to provider-/patient-rated changes. A Donabedian-inspired explanation states that accreditation measures predominantly structures, whereas survey-sought provider/patient perspectives focus on process and outcomes. Costs and human reso...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Access to Palliative Care in Canada
Palliative care enables a better end of life, but not all Canadians have access to it. Access to community-based palliative care has become a priority for federal, provincial and territorial governments, with an emphasis on services that can help people remain in the community even at the end of life. The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) investigated the current state of access to publicly funded palliative care across the country. The purpose of the research is to help health system planners to identify service gaps and develop strategies for improving care. Using linked administrative data, the analysis f...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Reproductive Health in Women with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in Ontario: Implications for Policy and Practice
Reproductive healthcare needs of women with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) have received little attention. Using health and social services administrative data in Ontario, Canada, we comprehensively documented the reproductive health of women with IDD, including their fertility rates, pregnancy outcomes and reproductive health after pregnancy. Our findings showed high rates of adverse health outcomes for these women and their babies, supporting the development of reproductive healthcare programs tailored to their unique needs. (Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

A Canadian Take on the International Patient Engagement Revolution
(Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Supporting Patient and Family Engagement for Healthcare Improvement: Reflections on “Engagement-Capable Environments” Pan-Canadian Learning Collaboratives
This article describes CFHI initiatives to enhance patient engagement efforts across Canada and the lessons learned in the context of “engagement-capable environments” and offers reflections for the future of patient engagement in Canada.   (Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Growing a Healthy Ecosystem for Patient and Citizen Partnerships
Patient and citizen engagement is taking root in a number of healthcare organizations. These initiatives show promising results but require a supportive environment to bring systemic and sustainable impacts. In this synthesis article, we propose an ecosystemic perspective on engagement in health, outlining key elements at the individual, organizational and systemic levels supporting reciprocal and effective relationships among all partners to provide conditions for the co-production of health and care. We argue that growing a healthy engagement ecosystem requires: (1) building local and national “hubs” ...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The Capacity for Patient Engagement: What Patient Experiences Tell Us About What’s Ahead
Although great achievements in patient engagement merit celebration, many patient collaborators recognize growing gaps are straining the promise of seamless partnership. Recruitment is failing to keep pace with demands for diversity and expertise. Attempts to sustain enthusiasm face volunteer burnout and dropout. The investment in professional capacity to partner with patients contrasts sharply with the missing equivalent for patients asked to meet ever more demanding roles. While peer-led initiatives attempt self-help, more is needed to support patients to fulfill the potential for fully diverse, competent and fulfilling ...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Evaluating Patient, Family and Public Engagement in Health Services Improvement and System Redesign
As efforts to actively involve patients, family members and the broader public in health service improvement and system redesign have grown, increasing attention has also been paid to evaluation of their engagement in the health system. We discuss key concepts and approaches related to evaluation, drawing particular attention to different and potentially competing goals, stakeholders and epistemological entry points. Evaluation itself can be supported by an increasing number of frameworks and tools, matched to the relevant purpose and approach. The patient engagement evaluation field faces several challenges, including the...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Bringing Together Research and Quality Improvement: The Saskatchewan Approach
Improving health and health services requires both better knowledge (a key function of research) and better action to adapt and use what is already known (quality improvement). However, organizational and cultural divides between academic research institutions and health system organizations too often result in missed opportunities to integrate research and improvement. The Saskatchewan Health Quality Council’s experience and relationships, from linking research, quality improvement and patient engagement in its leadership of the province’s healthcare quality improvement journey, provided core support a...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Implementation of Patient Engagement in the Netherlands: A Stimulating Environment within a Large Academic Medical Centre
Patients are the official third party of the Dutch healthcare system, apart from healthcare providers and insurers. Radboud university medical center (Radboudumc) is a regional centre for specialized secondary care in the Netherlands. Here innovation is recognized as a decisive factor when it comes to the implementation of patient engagement. Therefore, all employees are invited to innovate, experiment, fail and implement promising innovations into practice. In this paper, we demonstrate how this stimulating environment led to a rich collection of patient engagement activities in organizational (re-)design and in education...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Patient Roles in Engagement-Capable Environments: Multiple Perspectives
Engagement-capable environments have well-defined roles for patients. These roles are often described in terms of their functional aspects. In this paper, we provide a complementary way of thinking about patient roles: an interactionist perspective. For interactionists, roles evolve through social interactions and contextual demands that shape how the work is performed. Drawing from a case example at Health Standards Organization (HSO), we demonstrate the need for engagement leaders to attend to functional descriptions of patient roles and their interactive possibilities. Finally, we argue for the connection between multip...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Development of Patient-Inclusive Teams: Toward a Structured Methodology
Over the last few years, the role of patients in the health system has become essential to improving the quality of care and services. However, the literature shows that patient engagement is not always ideally applied to improve the quality and safety of care and that patient engagement can be tokenistic. Through experiences conducted in Quebec, it is possible to outline a structured process involving both professional stakeholders and patients that illustrates optimal conditions to be applied for successful teamwork involving patients. (Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The Leadership and Organizational Context Required to Support Patient Partnerships
We describe challenges in creating a culture of patient partnerships and the leadership actions and organizational context required now and in the future to support engagement-capable environments at the organizational and policy levels in Canada. Case examples illustrate the need for leaders to set clear expectations, develop the infrastructure to support patient partnerships and provide education to staff, physicians and patient partners.  (Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Supporting Patient and Family Engagement for Healthcare Improvement: Reflections on “Engagement-Capable Environments” in National Learning Collaboratives
This article describes CFHI initiatives to enhance patient engagement efforts across Canada and the lessons learned in the context of “engagement-capable environments” and offers reflections for the future of patient engagement in Canada.   (Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

From the Editors
(Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Case Study – Gaining Physician Involvement in Quality Improvement Initiatives: An Organizational Perspective
This article provides an overview of Lean initiatives from the medical perspective. It addresses the importance of involving physicians and specific tactics for the same in these continuous improvement projects as well as its impact on their practice. (Source: Healthcare Quarterly)
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - October 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research