Mapping human vigilance: the influence of conspecifics
Publication date: Available online 13 October 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Nuno Gomes, Gün R. SeminAbstractA considerable volume of animal research on detecting threat and foraging reveals that the co-presence of conspecifics reduces vigilance and enhances foraging. Monitoring threat is an adaptive process and is of considerable relevance to humans. It is therefore important to understand how the presence of others influences threat monitoring - namely vigilance - and consequently the capacity to detect threats. We examine this with a novel paradigm, that simulates a “foraging under threat&...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - October 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Family dynamics and age-related patterns in marriage probability
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Jenni E. Pettay, Simon N. Chapman, Mirkka Lahdenperä, Virpi LummaaAbstractIn cooperatively breeding species, extended living in natal families after maturity is often associated with limited breeding possibilities and the ability to gain indirect fitness from helping relatives, with family dynamics, such as parental presence and relatedness between family members, playing a key role in determining the timing of own reproduction. How family dynamics affect marriage and the onset of reproduction in humans is complex and less ...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - October 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Perceived goal instrumentality is associated with forgiveness: A test of the valuable relationships hypothesis
Publication date: Available online 15 September 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Adam Smith, Thomas G. McCauley, Ayano Yagi, Kazuho Yamaura, Hiroshi Shimizu, Michael E. McCullough, Yohsuke OhtsuboAbstractThree autobiographical studies tested the valuable relationships hypothesis of forgiveness. Although previous studies revealed that relationship value predicts interpersonal forgiveness, the measure of relationship value may be conflated with affective assessments of the relationship with the transgressor, which might have caused a criterion contamination problem. Therefore, we assessed the goal-related i...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - September 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

A comparative perspective on measures of cycle phase, and how they relate to cues, signals, and mating behavior: A commentary on Gangestad et al. (2019)
Publication date: Available online 13 September 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): James P. Higham (Source: Evolution and Human Behavior)
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - September 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Lassitude: The emotion of being sick
Publication date: Available online 11 September 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Joshua M. Schrock, J. Josh Snodgrass, Lawrence S. SugiyamaAbstractOur long co-evolutionary history with infectious agents likely began soon after the rise of the first single-celled organisms. This ongoing evolutionary arms race has generated complex host adaptations, many highly conserved, for resisting infection (e.g., innate and acquired immune systems, infection-sensitive developmental programs, sexual reproduction). A large body of evidence suggests that, in humans, pathogen-avoidance disgust is an emotion that motivates...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - September 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

No robust evidence for cycle shifts in preferences for men's bodies in a multiverse analysis: A response to Gangestad, Dinh, Grebe, Del Giudice, and Emery Thompson (2019)
Publication date: Available online 30 August 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Julia Stern, Ruben C. Arslan, Tanja M. Gerlach, Lars Penke (Source: Evolution and Human Behavior)
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - September 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Psychological cycle shifts redux, once again: response to stern et al., Roney, Jones et al., and Higham
Publication date: Available online 27 August 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Steven W. Gangestad, Tran Dinh, Nicholas M. Grebe, Marco Del Giudice, Melissa Emery Thompson (Source: Evolution and Human Behavior)
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - August 29, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

On the use of log transformations when testing hormonal predictors of cycle phase shifts: Commentary on Gangestad, Dinh, Grebe, Del Giudice, and Emery Thompson (2019)
Publication date: Available online 25 August 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): James R. Roney (Source: Evolution and Human Behavior)
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - August 26, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Sexual initiation among Canadian youth: A model comparison approach of evolutionary hypotheses shows greatest support for extrinsic mortality cues, intergenerational conflict, and early life psychosocial stressors
Publication date: Available online 22 August 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Kristin Snopkowski, John P. Ziker (Source: Evolution and Human Behavior)
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - August 23, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: September 2019Source: Evolution and Human Behavior, Volume 40, Issue 5Author(s): (Source: Evolution and Human Behavior)
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - August 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Publisher’s Note
Publication date: September 2019Source: Evolution and Human Behavior, Volume 40, Issue 5Author(s): (Source: Evolution and Human Behavior)
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - August 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Children's understanding of dominance and prestige in China and the UK
Publication date: Available online 16 August 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Anni Kajanus, Narges Afshordi, Felix WarnekenAbstractIndividuals can gain high social rank through dominance (based on coercion and fear) and prestige (based on merit and admiration). We conducted a cross-cultural developmental study and tested 5- to 12-year-olds, and adults in the UK and China, aiming to determine (a) the age at which children distinguish dominance and prestige, and (b) the influence of cultural values on rank-related reasoning. We specifically tested participants in China because of the value of prestigious in...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - August 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Assessing the evidentiary value of secondary data analyses: A commentary on Gangestad, Dinh, Grebe, Del Giudice, and Thompson (2019)
Publication date: Available online 16 August 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): BenedictChristopher Jones, Urszula Maria Marcinkowska, Lisa Marie DeBruine (Source: Evolution and Human Behavior)
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - August 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Singles of both sexes expedite reproduction: Shifts in sexual-timing strategies before and after the typical age of female menopause
Publication date: Available online 10 August 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Samantha E. Cohen, Peter M. Todd, John K. Kruschke, Justin R. Garcia, Helen E. FisherAbstractHow do singles' strategies for engaging in sexual activity with a new partner vary across the adult lifespan? Using three large and independent demographically representative cross-sectional samples of heterosexual single adults in the U.S., we found that females approaching the typical age of menopause became less likely to establish relationship exclusivity prior to sexual activity with a new partner. However, after the typical age of ...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - August 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Who teaches children to forage? Exploring the primacy of child-to-child teaching among Hadza and BaYaka Hunter-Gatherers of Tanzania and Congo
Publication date: Available online 5 August 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Sheina Lew-Levy, Stephen M. Kissler, Adam H. Boyette, Alyssa N. Crittenden, Ibrahim A. Mabulla, Barry S. HewlettAbstractTeaching is cross-culturally widespread but few studies have considered children as teachers as well as learners. This is surprising, since forager children spend much of their time playing and foraging in child-only groups, and thus, have access to many potential child teachers. Using the Social Relations Model, we examined the prevalence of child-to-child teaching using focal follow data from 35 Hadza and 38 B...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - August 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Sexual selection for low male voice pitch among Amazonian forager-horticulturists
Publication date: Available online 25 July 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Kevin A. Rosenfield, Agnieszka Sorokowska, Piotr Sorokowski, David A. PutsAbstractPitch is the most perceptually salient feature of the voice, yet it is approximately five standard deviations lower in men than in women, a degree of sexual dimorphism exceeding that of all extant nonhuman apes. Evidence from Western samples suggests that low-frequency vocalizations may have augmented male mating success ancestrally by intimidating competitors and/or attracting mates. However, data are lacking from traditional societies living under ...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - July 26, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Assortative mating and the evolution of desirability covariation
Publication date: Available online 27 June 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Daniel Conroy-Beam, James R. Roney, Aaron W. Lukaszewski, David M. Buss, Kelly Asao, Agnieszka Sorokowska, Piotr Sorokowski, Toivo Aavik, Grace Akello, Mohammad Madallh Alhabahba, Charlotte Alm, Naumana Amjad, Afifa Anjum, Chiemezie S. Atama, Derya Atamtürk Duyar, Richard Ayebare, Carlota Batres, Mons Bendixen, Aicha Bensafia, Anna BertoniAbstractMate choice lies close to differential reproduction, the engine of evolution. Patterns of mate choice consequently have power to direct the course of evolution. Here we provide evide...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - June 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Unleashing the BEAST: a brief measure of human social information use
Publication date: Available online 27 June 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Lucas Molleman, Ralf Kurvers, Wouter van den BosAbstractSocial information enables individuals to reduce uncertainty and increase decision accuracy across a broad range of domains. Intriguingly, individuals and populations consistently differ in social information use. Understanding the underlying causes of this variation has proven challenging due to the lack of a standardized paradigm to quantify social information use. Here we introduce the BEAST (Berlin Estimate AdjuStment Task); a brief (∼5-min), simple, and incentive-com...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - June 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Pride and shame: Key components of a culturally universal status management system
Publication date: Available online 21 June 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Patrick K. Durkee, Aaron W. Lukaszewski, David M. BussAbstractWe apply recent adaptationist theories about the emotions “pride” and “shame” to the domain of hierarchical status and test the hypothesis that pride and shame are distinct components of a culturally universal status-management system. Using an international dataset containing ratings of the status impacts of 240 personal characteristics within 14 nations (N = 2751), we found that (i) the status impacts of personal characteristics were strong...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - June 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Self sacrifice and kin psychology in war: threats to family predict decisions to volunteer for a women's paramilitary organization
Publication date: Available online 22 June 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Lynch Robert, Lummaa Virpi, Loehr JohnAbstractThe conditions that propel humans to make sacrifices for groups of unrelated, and often unknown, individuals has received considerable attention across scientific disciplines. Evolutionary explanations for this type of sacrifice have focused on how men form strategic coalitions organized around kin networks and reciprocity when faced with out-group threats. Few studies, however, have analyzed how women respond to external threats. Using data from one of the largest female paramilitary ...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - June 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Children's judgements of facial hair are influenced by biological development and experience
We presented pairs of bearded and clean-shaven faces to children (2–17 years old; N = 470) and adults (18–22 years; N = 164) and asked them to judge dominance traits (strength, age, masculinity) and mate choice traits (attractiveness, parenting quality). Young children associated beardedness with dominance traits but not mate choice traits. This pattern became more extreme during late childhood and gradually shifted toward adult-like responses during early adolescence. Responses for all traits were adult-like in late adolescence. Finally, having a bearded father was associated with positive judgment...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - June 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Evidence supporting nubility and reproductive value as the key to human female physical attractiveness
Publication date: Available online 8 May 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): William D. Lassek, Steven J.C. GaulinAbstractSelection should favor mating preferences that increase the chooser's reproductive success. Many previous studies have shown that the women men find most attractive in well-nourished populations have low body mass indices (BMIs) and small waist sizes combined with relatively large hips, resulting in low waist-hip ratios (WHRs). A frequently proposed explanation for these preferences is that such women may have enhanced health and fertility; but extensive evidence contradicts this health-a...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - June 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

A critique of life history approaches to human trait covariation
Publication date: Available online 8 June 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Brendan P. Zietsch, Morgan J. SidariAbstractCovariation of life history traits across species may be organised on a ‘fast-slow’ continuum. A burgeoning literature in psychology and social science argues that trait covariation should be similarly organised across individuals within human populations. Here we describe why extrapolating from inter-species to inter-individual trait covariation is not generally appropriate. The process that genetically tailors species to their environments (i.e. Darwinian evolution) is funda...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - June 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The attention–aversion gap: how allocation of attention relates to loss aversion
Publication date: Available online 31 May 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Tomás Lejarraga, Michael Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Thorsten Pachur, Ralph HertwigAbstractLoss aversion is often assumed to be a basic and far-reaching psychological regularity in behavior. Yet empirical evidence is accumulating to challenge the assumption of widespread loss aversion in choice. We suggest that a key reason for the apparently elusive nature of loss aversion may be that its manifestation in choice is state-dependent and distinct from a more state-independent principle of heightened attention to losses relative to ga...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - June 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The evolution of plant social learning through error minimization
Publication date: Available online 28 May 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Leonardo Oña, Linda S. Oña, Annie E. WertzAbstractPlants have developed toxic chemical and physical defenses as a consequence of their co-evolution with herbivores. Humans, like other animal species, have evolved strategies to protect themselves from such plant dangers. For example, recent studies have shown that human infants exhibit a reluctance to manually explore plants and use social learning (SL) to acquire knowledge about plants. However, SL can also be costly under certain circumstances and there is reason to ...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - May 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Psychological cycle shifts redux: Revisiting a preregistered study examining preferences for muscularity
Publication date: Available online 24 May 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Steven W. Gangestad, Tran Dinh, Nicholas M. Grebe, Marco Del Giudice, Melissa Emery ThompsonAbstractJünger et al. (2018) conducted a preregistered study examining whether women particularly prefer muscular bodies when conceptive in their cycles. Despite an impressive number of participants and within-woman observations, they found no evidence for a preference shift; rather, they claimed, conceptive women find all male bodies more attractive. We preregistered a separate study very similar to Jünger et al.'s, with specified...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - May 25, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Rhesus macaques use probabilities to predict future events
Publication date: Available online 23 May 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Francesca De Petrillo, Alexandra G. RosatiAbstractHumans can use an intuitive sense of statistics to make predictions about uncertain future events, a cognitive skill that underpins logical and mathematical reasoning. Recent research shows that some of these abilities for statistical inferences can emerge in preverbal infants and non-human primates such as apes and capuchins. An important question is therefore whether animals share the full complement of intuitive reasoning abilities demonstrated by humans, as well as what evolutio...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - May 25, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: July 2019Source: Evolution and Human Behavior, Volume 40, Issue 4Author(s): (Source: Evolution and Human Behavior)
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - May 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

You watch my back, I'll watch yours: Emergence of collective risk monitoring through tacit coordination in human social foraging
Publication date: Available online 21 May 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Kiri Kuroda, Tatsuya KamedaAbstractPredation risk is a significant concern when social animals including humans engage in foraging. When people search for resources together, individuals often find themselves in a producer–scrounger game, in which some individuals bear the cost of risk monitoring while others can free ride on those efforts. A theoretically rational strategy is to mix foraging and risk monitoring randomly with the same probability across all members, but such uncoordinated action often yields inefficiencies of...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - May 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Response to vocal music in Angelman syndrome contrasts with Prader-Willi syndrome
We report the necessary complementary pattern here: individuals with Angelman syndrome, a genomic imprinting disorder resulting from increased relative paternal genetic contribution, demonstrate a relatively reduced relaxation response to song, suggesting increased demand for parental attention. These results support the extension of genetic conflict theories to psychological resources like parental attention. (Source: Evolution and Human Behavior)
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - May 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The emotion–valuation constellation: Multiple emotions are governed by a common grammar of social valuation
Publication date: Available online 9 May 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Daniel Sznycer, Aaron W. LukaszewskiAbstractSocial emotions are hypothesized to be adaptations designed by selection to solve adaptive problems pertaining to social valuation—the disposition to attend to, associate with, and aid a target individual based on her probable contributions to the fitness of the valuer. To steer between effectiveness and economy, social emotions need to activate in precise proportion to the local evaluations of the various acts and characteristics that dictate the social value of self and others. Sup...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - May 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Evidence supporting nubility and reproducitve value as the key to human female physical attractiveness
Publication date: Available online 8 May 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): William D. Lassek, Steven J.C. GaulinAbstractSelection should favor mating preferences that increase the chooser's reproductive success. Many previous studies have shown that the women men find most attractive in well-nourished populations have low body mass indices (BMIs) and small waist sizes combined with relatively large hips, resulting in low waist-hip ratios (WHRs). A frequently proposed explanation for these preferences is that such women may have enhanced health and fertility; but extensive evidence contradicts this health-a...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - May 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “common knowledge, coordination, and the logic of self-conscious emotions” [Evolution and Human Behavior volume 39, issue 2, march 2018, pages 179–190]
Publication date: Available online 3 May 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Kyle A. Thomas, Peter DeScioli, Steven Pinker (Source: Evolution and Human Behavior)
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - May 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Corrigendum to ‘Going the distance, going for speed: Honest signaling and the benefits of exercising with an opposite-sex partner’ [Evolution and Human Behavior Volume 40, Issue 2, March 2019, Pages 167-175]
Publication date: Available online 19 April 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Michael D. Baker, Mark E. Nabell, Nicholas Thomas, Heather Nicole Sloan, Rachel L. Utter, Alexandra Hall, Nicole D. Fox, Jessica A. Beringer (Source: Evolution and Human Behavior)
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - April 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Grandmaternal childcare and kinship laterality. Is rural Greece exceptional?
Publication date: Available online 10 April 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Martin Daly, Gretchen PerryAbstractGrandmothers provide more childcare for their daughters' children than for those of their sons, almost everywhere. Exceptions occur where virilocal (patrilocal) postmarital residence makes the children of sons more accessible, but even under virilocality, preferential care of daughters' children, net of the effects of proximity, is often demonstrable. A unique counter-example has been reported by Pashos (2000, Evolution & Human Behavior, 21, 97–109) who found that rural Greek grandmoth...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - April 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The evolution of daily food sharing: A Bayesian phylogenetic analysis
Publication date: Available online 5 April 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Erik J. Ringen, Pavel Duda, Adrian V. JaeggiAbstractSome human subsistence economies are characterized by extensive daily food sharing networks, which may buffer the risk of shortfalls and facilitate cooperative production and divisions of labor among households. Comparative studies of human food sharing can assess the generalizability of this theory across time, space, and diverse lifeways. Here we test several predictions about daily sharing norms–which presumably reflect realized cooperative behavior–in a globally r...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - April 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Do post-menopausal women provide more care to their kin?: evidence of grandparental caregiving from two large-scale national surveys
Publication date: Available online 4 April 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Marlise K. Hofer, Hanne K. Collins, Gita D. Mishra, Mark SchallerAbstractDrawing on the logical principles of life-history theory, it may be hypothesized that—compared to pre-menopausal women—post-menopausal women will spend more time caring for grandchildren and other kin. This hypothesis was tested in two studies, on results obtained from two large datasets documenting altruistic behaviors of pre-menopausal and post-menopausal women in the United States (N = 7, 161) and Australia (N = 25, 066). Results from b...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - April 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The primacy of trust within romantic relationships: Evidence from conjoint analysis of HEXACO-derived personality profiles
Publication date: Available online 4 April 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Justin K. Mogilski, Jennifer Vrabel, Virginia E. Mitchell, Lisa L.M. WellingAbstractMate preference research often focuses on traits that indicate a romantic partner's personal worth (e.g., their physical attractiveness, resource potential) rather than their tendency to leverage that worth for mutual vs. zero-sum benefit (i.e., their trustworthiness). No one has assessed the contribution of trustworthiness to perceived mate value relative to other personality dimensions. Here we examined the desirability of a partner's trustworthi...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - April 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Social contact and hormonal changes predict post-conflict cooperation between friends
Publication date: Available online 29 March 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Joyce F. Benenson, Lindsay J. Hillyer, Maxwell M. White, Sera Kantor, Melissa Emery Thompson, Henry Markovits, Richard W. WranghamAbstractLong-term cooperation between individuals necessitates repairing damage arising from inevitable competing interests. How two members of a valuable relationship switch from competing to cooperating constitutes an important problem for any social species. Observations of non-human animals suggest that affiliative contact immediately following a contest facilitates continued cooperation. Behaviora...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - March 31, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: May 2019Source: Evolution and Human Behavior, Volume 40, Issue 3Author(s): (Source: Evolution and Human Behavior)
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - March 28, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Do ‘watching eyes’ influence antisocial behavior? A systematic review & meta-analysis
Publication date: Available online 25 February 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Keith Dear, Kevin Dutton, Elaine FoxAbstractEye cues have been shown to stimulate rapid, reflexive, unconscious processing and in many experimental settings to cue increased prosocial and decreased antisocial behaviour. Eye cues are being widely applied in public policy to reduce crime and antisocial behaviour. Recently, failed replication attempts and two meta-analyses examining the eye cue effect on generosity have raised doubts regarding earlier findings. Much of the wider evidence on eye cues has still not been systematica...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - February 26, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Hormonal predictors of women's sexual motivation
Publication date: Available online 18 February 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Talia N. Shirazi, Heather Self, Khytam Dawood, Kevin A. Rosenfield, Lars Penke, Justin M. Carré, Triana Ortiz, David A. PutsAbstractWomen's mating psychology may have evolved to track reproductive conditions, including conception risk, across and between ovulatory cycles. Alternatively, within-woman correlations between mating psychology and ovarian hormones may be byproducts of between-women relationships. Here, we examined associations between steroid hormones and two facets of sexual psychology with putatively differ...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - February 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Are attractive female voices really best characterized by feminine fundamental and formant frequencies?
Publication date: Available online 10 February 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Christoph Schild, David R. Feinberg, David A. Puts, Julia Jünger, Vanessa Fasolt, Iris Holzleitner, Kieran O'Shea, Rebecca Lai, Ruben Arslan, Amanda Hahn, Rodrigo A. Cárdenas, Lisa M. DeBruine, Benedict C. JonesAbstractResearch into the characteristics of attractive women's voices has focused almost exclusively on associations with fundamental or formant frequencies. A recent study of a small sample of voices used a bottom-up approach to identify acoustic characteristics associated with women's vocal attractiveness...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - February 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: March 2019Source: Evolution and Human Behavior, Volume 40, Issue 2Author(s): (Source: Evolution and Human Behavior)
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - February 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Investigating the association between mating-relevant self-concepts and mate preferences through a data-driven analysis of online personal descriptions
Publication date: Available online 23 January 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Anthony J. Lee, Benedict C. Jones, Lisa M. DeBruineAbstractResearch on mate preference have often taken a theory-driven approach; however, such an approach can constrain the range of possible predictions. As a result, the research community may inadvertently neglect traits that are potentially important for human mate choice if current theoretical models simply do not identify them. Here, we address this limitation by using a data-driven approach to investigate mating-relevant self-concepts (i.e., what individuals believe to be...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - January 24, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Alloparenting and religious fertility: A test of the religious alloparenting hypothesis
Publication date: Available online 15 January 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): John H. Shaver, Chris G. Sibley, Richard Sosis, Deane Galbraith, Joseph BulbuliaAbstractLife history theory anticipates that organisms trade offspring quantity for offspring quality. In modern human societies this tradeoff is particularly acute because of increased returns on investments in embodied capital. Religious people, however, despite having more children than their secular counterparts, do not appear to suffer lower quality offspring. To explain this apparent paradox of religious fertility, we propose a religious allop...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - January 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Utilizing simple cues to informational dependency
Publication date: Available online 8 January 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Hugo Mercier, Helena MitonAbstractStudies have shown that participants can adequately take into account several cues regarding the weight they should grant majority opinions, such as the absolute and relative size of the majority. However, participants do not seem to consistently take into account cues about whether the members of the majority have formed their opinions independently of each other. Using an evolutionary framework, we suggest that these conflicting results can be explained by distinguishing evolutionarily valid c...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - January 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

An integrative study of facultative personality calibration
Publication date: Available online 7 January 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Christoph J. von Borell, Tobias L. Kordsmeyer, Tanja M. Gerlach, Lars PenkeAbstractThe theory of facultative calibration, which explains personality differences as responses to variation in other phenotypic traits of individuals, received mixed results throughout the last years. Whereas there is strong evidence that individual differences in human behavior are correlated with the self-perception of other traits, it still needs to be questioned whether they are also adjusted to objective differences in body condition (i.e. formid...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - January 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Who punishes promiscuous women? Both women and men are prejudiced towards sexually-accessible women, but only women inflict costly punishment
Publication date: Available online 22 December 2018Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Naomi K. Muggleton, Sarah R. Tarran, Corey L. FincherAbstractAcross human societies, female sexuality is suppressed by gendered double standards, s. shaming, sexist rape laws, and honour killings. The question of what motivates societies to punish promiscuous women, however, has been contested. Although some have argued that men suppress female sexuality to increase paternity certainty, others maintain that this is an example of intrasexual competition. Here we show that both sexes are averse to overt displays of female sexual...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - January 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Helping in young children and chimpanzees shows partiality towards friends
Publication date: Available online 4 January 2019Source: Evolution and Human BehaviorAuthor(s): Jan M. Engelmann, Lou M. Haux, Esther HerrmannAbstractFriendship naturally leads to treating some people differently from the way we treat everyone else. One manifestation of such preferential treatment is in the domain of prosociality: we are more likely to extend favors towards our friends. Little is known about the developmental and evolutionary roots of such preferential prosociality. Here, we investigate whether young children and chimpanzees show partiality towards friends in helping contexts. Results show that young child...
Source: Evolution and Human Behavior - January 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research